Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Tagged (None yet)

Add Tags

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

1 correction by rjholmes - Show corrections

BIOGRAPHICAL PARTICULARS

HOW SERGEANT D. ADAMS DIED.  

Corporal R. G. M. Weatherall, of the 10th Battalion, writing to his mother from Anzac Cove, Gallipoli, on October 19,   says:-"Sergeant Douglas Adams, was one of my best friends, and his death affec- ted me so much that I have not had the

heart to write to his parents. He was hit with a pellet, I understand, from a burst of shrapnel. I saw the shell burst, and it wounded two men in our Company.   He was a sergeant in A Company, and the battalion was having a day or two out

of the trenches. We were camped on

the side of a hill. After the shell burst   I heard that poor Douglas was hit, and went across to the stretcher where he was lying. The doctor informed me that there was not much hope. He lived for about an hour, and was buried near the beach. I am trying to get a photograph of the grave. I saw the wooden cross that was to be erected, and at the first chance I must take a walk to the ceme- tery and see if some wattle can be planted on the grave."

STAFF-SERGEANT P. R. MAGAREY.

Staff-Sergeant P. R. Masarcy, of Mills- wood, who was wounded at the Dardanelles, is an inmate of a London hospital.

HONORING SOLDIERS.

A number of relatives and friendĀ« awcmbled at the residence of Mrs. VVm. Bath. Scott-street, Parkside, on Saturilav nipht last to bid farewell to Private AA*. K. Bath. The gtiest was the reci- pient of many useful {rifts.

i ' .

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down