Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Tagged (None yet)

Add Tags

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

2 corrections, most recently by anonymous - Show corrections

HEART OF HIROSHIMA WIPED OUT

AS BY GIANT BULLDOZER

All Living Things Seared to

Death, Tokio Admits

GUAM, WEDNESDAY.-PHOTOGRAPHS SHOW CLEARLY THAT THE HEART OF HIRO- SHIMA HAS BEEN WIPED OUT AS BY A GIANT BULLDOZER AS A RESULT OF THE ATOMIC BOMB ATTACK. ONLY A FEW CONCRETE STRUCTURES, BELIEVED TO BE AIR-   RAID SHELTERS, REMAIN STANDING, BUT EVEN THEY HAVE BEEN BURNED INSIDE.

Seven streams of several man-made fire-breaks, including one three blocks wide, which were among the best seen in Japan, failed to stop the flames. The lower part of Hiroshima, with harbor and dock facilities, appeared to have been barely touched by the concussion.

An expert said that there was no comparison between a normal conflagration and the fire   caused by the atomic bomb. He recalled that when Yokohama was burned, it looked as if smoke spots were burning in all parts of the city, whereas an immense smoke and dust mush-

room plumed over Hiroshima.

Reconnaissance photographs showed that tho atomic bomb wiped out 4 1-10 square miles, or 60 per cent, of Hiroshima. Five major industrial targets were destroyed. Additional damage is shown outside the completely-de- stroyed area.

Tokio admits that the impact was so terrific that practically all living things, human and animals, were literally seared to death by the tremendous heat and pr essure engendered by the blast. All the dead and injured were burned beyond recognition.

The historic first atomic bomb was dropped at 9.15 a.m., Japanese time, on Monday. The fact that no flak was reported indicates that the city was to tally surprised. Only three men in tho bomber knew the nature of the mis- sion.

Tokio Radio said the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima literally seared to death all living things, human and animal. The authorities wcro unable to check the civilian casualties, be causo many were burned beyond recog- nition. The effect was widespread. Thoso out of doors were burned; those indoors were killed by indescribable pressure and heat.

Awe-inspiring Explosions

As the atomic bomb wns dropped squarely in the centre of Hiroshima on Monday the crew of thc Super-Fortress which carried it felt concussion like the close explosion of flak, although they were 10 miles from tho target.

Colonel Paul Tibbets, the pilot, and navy ordnance expert Capt. William Parsons, described tho explosion as tremendous and awe-inspiring.

Capt. Parsons said: "We dropped the bomb at 9.15 a.m., and turned the plane to get the best view. We then made as much distance- from the ball of fire as we could. We were at least 10 miles away, and there was a visual im- pact, even though every man wore colored glasses. We braced ourselves for the shock. It was just like a close

burst of flak.

"The crew said, 'My God!' They

could not believe what happened. Mountains of smoke mushroomed up with the stem pointing down. There was white smoke at the top, but swirling, boiling dust up to 1000 feet from tho ground. Soon

afterwards small fires-sprang up at " the edge of the town; but the town was entirely obscured. We stay- ed two or three minutes. By that

time the smoke had risen to 40,000 feet. As we watched the top of a white cloud broke off, but an- other soon formed."

Air Chief Elated

Details of the bombing wore disclos- ed at a press conference attended by General Carl Spaatz, who termed the bomb the most revolutionary develop- ment in the history of war. He was obviously highly elated. He said, "If he had had it in Europe, it would have shortened the war by six or eight

months."

Major-General Lemay said that if tho bombs had been available, thero would not have been any need for D-Day in Europe.

Colonel Tibbets, who was specially trained for the mission, was awarded

the Distinguished Service Cross by General Spaatz as he stepped from the

plane.

General Spaatz announced that more Super-Fortresses from the Marianas were ready to follow with atomic bombs. He added that a leaflet cam- paign would inform the Japanese people that-they, had been "atom-bombed," and could expect more in the future However, he believed it was unlikely that specific targets would be named,

as with incendiaries.

There are many secrets about the flight and the bombing, includ- ing the reason for the selection of a

target. It is believed probable that Hiroshima was not chosen for its great importance, but partly be- cause the weather was clear, per- mitting a close view of the ex- plosion.

A special unit was ornanised many months ago for special work.

Capt. Parsons said he was assigned by the Navy to work on tho weapon with a view to making it safe to handle.

Stupendous Power

Tho smoke cloud from the bombing was visible 160 miles at sea.

Generals Spaatz and Lemay did not leave any doubt that they believe the air forces can beat Japan into uncon- ditional surrender with the new ter- rible weapon, which General Spaatz lik- ened to 2000 Super-Portresses fully loaded with standard incendiary and demolition bombs.

Brigadier-General Thomas Far- rell, aide to Major-General Leslie Groves, who was in charge of atomic bomb development, disclosed that the date for dropping the bomb was set well over a year ago.

British and American scientists thought for a while that they were racing against time with the Ger- mans, who had begun work on a similar bomb.

Allied bombs last March destroyed a laboratory at Oranienburg in which German scientists were working on an   atomic bomb.    

When they heard about thc labora-   tory, Generals Marshall and Arnold sent a courier from Washington with oral orders to General Spaatz to destroy the building.

Brigadier-General Farrell, added that the Allies after entering Germany, learned that the Nazis were years be- hind British and American scientists.

Tokio Radio reports that Prince Rigu.   who was a lieut.-colonel in the Japanese Army, was killed in Hiroshima.

The prince's uncle, Lieut.-General Prince Rigin, is head of tho former ruling house of Korea.

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down