Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Tagged (None yet)

Add Tags

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

No corrections yet

WHITTAKER WRIGHT HIS HOME AT LEA. The home of Mr Whitaker Wright is Lea Park, near Godalming. After he bought it he made very great alterations in the grounds, and some account of these is given in the "Royal Magazine." Some four 'hundred men are engaged up on the work. "Why don't you put more energy into your work, my man?" he said one day to a giant na'vy, who took things rather easily. "When I used to dig, I worked three times as hard as you do." The navvy turned slowly and looked his master in the eyes. "May be," he answered, "but you were digging for diamonds!" Mr Wright gave a laugh and passed on. THE LAKES. The hundreds of workmen, in the course of six or seven years' hard labor. utterly changed the face of Lea Park. It is estimated that Mr Whitaker Wright must have spent upon the place fully L1,250,000. The big lake, In front of the house, covering some fifty acres, was the greatest of all the works. There are three lakes in the park. There is a square lake at the top of the hill whence the water is carried by pipes to the bathing lake, entering by a cascade some thirty feet high. From the bathing-lake the water is carried to the big lake through a great dolphin's head, carved from a solid block of marble weighing eighty tons. THE SUBTERRANEAN ROOM. On the lawn, by the lake side, is to be seen a little erection sheltering the head of a spiral staircase. Descending the stairs one comes to a subway, 400 feet long, lighted by rows of electric lamps. The passage leads into a great chamber o glass thirty feet in height-a beautiful conservatory with a dondrous mosaic floor, settees and chairs, palms, and little tables. Outside the clear crystal glass is a curtain of green water, and goldfish come and press their noses against the glass. This submerged fairy-room with appendages cost fully L20,000. It was built, of course, with the utmost care for if one of the square panes of three inch glass should break, the place would be filled with water within five minutes. A woman's head is always influenced by her heart, but a man's heart is al ways influenced by his head. Nice Nephew!-Tommy: Talking of riddles, uncle, do you know the differ ence between an apple and an elephant? Uncle (benignly): No, my lad, I don't. Tommy: You'd be a smart chap to send out to buy apples, wouldn't you?.

Digitisation generously supported by
State Library of Victoria
Digitisation generously supported by

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down