Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Tagged (None yet)

Add Tags

Comments

Show 1 comment
  • doug.butler 21 Sep 2011 at 08:58
    This school became Musaeus College, named for the woman who followed Miss Pickett as principal.

Add New Comment

2 corrections, most recently by doug.butler - Show corrections

THE BUDDHIST CONVERTS. SAD END OF A VICTORIAN YOUNG LADY. The visit of Colonel Olcott, one of the founders of the Theosophical Society, to Melbourne will be fresh in the memories of our readers. They will also recollect (says the " Herald") the appeal which he made for the education of Cingalese women and his intimation that a Victorian young lady was leaving the colony for Ceylon to fill the position of Principal of the Buddhist Girls' High School. The young lady in question was a Miss Pickett. and she duly proceeded to and arrived at Ceylon. where she entered upon her duties. News now comes to hand that she has found a sad and untimely end by suicide. A Cingalese gentleman resident in Melbourne sends us the following extract from     the " Ceylon Independent" :- Miss K. F. Pickett, of Melbourne, arrived a fortnight before the sad occurrence, and immediately after her arrival in Ceylon, and publicly em- braced the Buddhist religion by taking Paustl. It seems on Wednesday, the 24th of June, a little before she committed suicide, she was reading a book, The Perfect Way, or the Finding of Christ, by Kings- ford and Maitland. It was a high order of   spiritual book. We may add that it is not a book on Christianity, as would appear from its title, but an abstruse one on ' her- metic philosophy.' Anyhow, whether it is on Christianity or not, the title itself would mislead the reader. Miss Pickett, although she rejected Christ, no doubt was once a believer in Him, and very likely she found out her mistake, and being in distress of mind, and having no one of her own to tell her dilficulties to, committed the dreadful crlme by jumping into a well and ending her life."      

Digitisation generously supported by
State Library of Victoria
Digitisation generously supported by

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down