Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

2 corrections, most recently by diverman - Show corrections

THE ELECTIONS.

DECLARATIONS OF 'THE POLL. The result of the polling in the following

districts was officially declared on Saturday.  

EMERALD, HILL.    

The declaration of the number of votes polled

in this district took place at 12 o'clock on Satur- day morning, at the Mechanics' Institute. About 400 persons were present. Mr. Anderson's appearance was greeted with somewhat subdued cheering, and that of Mr. Service was the signal for loud cheering, mingled with groans.  

The Returning-Officer (Dr. Palk) stated the number of votes polled to be—for Mr. Ander son 868 and for Mr. Service 783, leaving a majo-   rity of 85 votes in favour of Mr. Robert Sterling Anderson, whom he declared duly elected to serve in the Legislative Assembly. (Cheers.)

Mr. Anderson said—Mr. Returning-Officer and gentleman, the noise and bustle necoi

'8orily ncc.ompanying_rjV'general election,' espe«, cial'y iu such a district as this, so prominent fo . its .public spirit and for-, the interest it -takosin all -matters affeoting the publio weal, have now terminated, and my most sincore wish .is that all feeling of strife will coaso with the stnfo itself. Thero has been--and in my opinion necessarily-a good deal of personality indulged in, and I now feel-and hopo you all feel-that this' should not be indulged in further. I will nob refer by one word to the past contest. I did my best, and my opponent did his, It was a gal- lant and a manly fight (cheers), »nd now I havo {ho pleasing duty to perform of returning thanks to you for being victorious ; but in doinç so I de- sire at the sometime to say to ovort friend whp will reoiprocoto my feelings, that I should con- sider this contest dearly won if it resulted in the alienation of my firm friend and neighbour. In doing bo, I am only expressing, the sentiments of Mr. Servico. (" Hear, hear," from Mr. Service.) He has said to mo-" At all evonts, do not let the district suffer ; but lot -us, as far as we cm, work harmoniously together for tho good of the district." I take hnn . at his word (cheers) ; and believe that, apart from this contest, our mutual desires have been for the general good, and our only difference was as to the way in which that good was to bo obtained. We eaoli thought ourself most likely to do the most good to the district. I was very pleased to find that. . let the result bo what It might, nothing would prevent the Othor candidate from doing as muoh us in him lay for the district at large. I would only remind you now that bravo men are always magnanimous, and there have been some demon- strations of victory that did not meet my con-

currence. I think it well that victors should show magnanimity, and not trample on thoso who aro 1 eaten (cheers): and after what Mr. Service saidto me last night, I think that tho men of Emerald Hill should meet tho ono who lost the conto3t ..s one worthy of perfect silence, instead of marks if disapprobation. (Cheers.) It only remains for mo to say, as your representative, that I am fully impressed with the importance of the trust reposed in me, and I shall endea- vour as far as in me lies to repre- sent the ontiro of the district, and not portions of it merely. My ambition is to aot independently j and if I know my own heart I will go into Parliament actuated by the single desire to record my voto, not for the interests of class or party, hut accoiding to my conscience for the best interests of my adopted country. (Cheers.) We hove had_ a hard contest-a gallant fight und the majority of the electors having expressed their confidence in me, it only remains for me to say how deeply grateful I am. and to hope that my gratitudo and sense of obligation to you will enablo mo to render myself worthy of you. To the best of my ability and judgment I will honestly endeavour to be so. After a few mora words of thanks, Mr. Anderson sat down amid loud cheering.

Mr. Ser.vj.oe on coming forward was greeted with loud applause. He Boid-Mr. Rcturning Officcr and gdntlemen, I shall begin by saying that I cordially reciprocate the sentiments ivhioh have fallen from Mr. Anderson. (Cheers.) I am quite sure this contest has been, con- ducted with as great propriety as any on Emerald Hill, and, as far as I know, in a manner highly oreditable to both sides. I am quite satisfied that nothing will arise from it to interfere with tho harmony liithorto existing, and I am myself convinced that those who honestly and conscientiously oppqsedtmo occupy the same place-in my esteem as they did before this con- test began, and that I shall retain the same feel- ing towards an honourable and conscientious opponent as towards a friend. The feeling of opposition will bo only for the moment, while my esteem for them after their honourable opposition will bo for a generation. It would bo of no use to say I um not disappointed, for I am so. I regret my defeat, and it would be altogether vain to say anything else. As far as I could judge, I was Îustifiedin believing that I should be successful,

lut the result proves such expectation to have been a fallacy. If any man has the daring to enter into any contest, he ought to bear in mind that the result may be contrary to his wish, and when I went into this contest I know it would ba a hard one, and that tho result would very pos- sibly bo defeat, therefore I am not cost down. (Cheers.) I simply say I regret, not altogether for my own sake, the way that things have gone. I am the last man in the world to find fault with the decision of iho district ; and I am not now here to say what the district, or I, should have done. You heard me before tho contest began, and decided between us. Mr. Anderson is in and I am out ; and I am prepared to submit-as I must do-to your decision. (Hore Councillor Chessell, who was on the platform, made somo remarks, which were eventually checked by his eui rounding friends.) One word and I have done-it is as to the cause of the contest ¡ and I shall «¡ay it in a manner which I trust will not trench in any unhappy way on the feelings of anyone in the room. I will simply repeat that from first to last the contest has not been one of 0 personal character. (Cheers.) I came forward only because I thought it my duty to do so, and I do not regret taking tho step I did. There is a general impression abroad -I do not say it to boast - that 1 might have had a good chanco to go in for one of the city districts; but oven though I thought I could do so, I should still have con- tested this election on the grounds I did. (Crioj of " Question," which wero at once overwhelmed by counter cries of " Order.") Right or wrong, my feeling is as strong as when I thought I had a chance of success. My simple ground of oppo- sition was tho question, "Is tho O'shanassy Ministry to remain in power or not ?" (Cheers and crios of " No, no.) I thought the wholo contest lay in that question, and I don't say that the constituency have put it so, or in any othor way. I am satisfied with the result of yesterday^ proceedings as a whole, and am glad to find somo of th'o gentlemen opposed to mo still my friends. 1 have now merely to thank thoso who voted for mo and worked ro energetically in my behalf, "and also thoso who so honourably opposed me.

{Loud cheers.)

The Eetornino-Ofitoer having announced the proceedings to bo terminated,

Mr. Anderson moved a vote of thanks to lum for his dignified and impartial conduct.

>Mr. Service seconded the resolution. Ho caid that, after narrowly scrutinising Dr. Palk's conduct, he believed that if any partiality had boen displayed it was on his own side. This, in the face of Dr. Palk's known partiality for Mr. Anderson, was a very favourable feature in his

conduct.

Dr. Palk briefly returned thanks to Iris friends Messrs. Andorson and Servico, for their hand- some conduct. Having the intimacy and friend- ship of both candidates, the contest had been a painful one to him. (Cnoers.)

The proceedings now terminated, and the assemblage broke up.

ST. KILDA.

The declaration of the poll took plaoo at nooa on Saturday, in front of tlio Court House, Chapel street. Including those on tho hustings, thors wero about 200 persona present. The Hon. Alex. Fraser, M.L.C., the Returning-Officer, having read tbo returns from the different polling-places {which wero precisely the samo as all those already published in The Argus), declared Messrs, Michie and Johnston duly elected.

Mr. MlOEEE then came forward, and was received with loud cheers. He said-Mr, Koturning-Officor and gentlemen, owing to some misconception as to tho time whea the official declaration of the poll would tako placo, I had gone into town, under the impression that it would not como off until Monday. It was only accidentally that I found out the mistake, into which I hod boon misled by a statement made yesterday ovening in tho committee-room. In ordor to get hero in timo, I had to avail myself of the services of ode of my constituents, who caught me up in Chapel-' street, and brought me here in his conveyance.^ I was saluted on arrival with cries of " Is that your trap ;" but although it was not my own, it was a cheaper one to mo than if it was. and waa otherwise equally satisfactory, ana I trust that this ride may bo only the first of a< series of mutual benefits to mysolf and the electors. But now for the business for whioh I am hero before you. We have all been astonished at the unexpected results of the ballot-the glorious ballot, for glorious ballot say I, erenhad'

its results proved altogether less satisfactory than, I they have clone. Thero is on ancient adago, that "misery makes us acquainted with strange bod fellows." Now, I think that the some adago might with truth apply to many of those I ant about to meet in the new Parliament. .But it nill not suffer in the long run, .Previous, to {bia election I had remarkable faith In the-goott sonsa

of the community, and,' strong as that faith was before, it is still stronger cow. What oould VS' moro triumphant, or more delightfully satisfac- tory, tlmn that four mdmduals, who but yester- day -were four unsatisfactory Munsters, aro no Ministers to-day? (Ctwers.) Although pre- viously condemned by a majority m every part of the country, and although alleging: that it I was through misrepresentation, wo discover in

their tactics at this general eleotion that they hue been pursuing an Austrian policy, for, whilst apparently making a bold face against their enemies, they have made every arrange- ment for a skilful retreat. (Laughter.) Why has such an unwarrantable delay beenaUowed to take place between some of tho elections Î The Ministry, who havo had the presidenoy of those arrangements, havetnken every precaution against the rejection of all their candidates by delaying; I tho country elections until after tho urban and

suburban ones. They have given themselves another chance, and possibly it may toke, but X do not think that they will take a benefit out of it. At present they oro damaged goods, and if hawked about again, they will go to tho oleo tors with the further obloquy of being previously beaton. The public has been informed by one of these ex-Ministers - now defunct, and there» fore I will be as tender of his memory as poa* Bible-that he ignored all the rest of bia cot* leagues, and stood on his own bottom. Ha wished the electors to believe that he had cast his skin, and in the same manner he wished them to cast their memories. But they didn't ! He is also said to have told thom -but in this I think ho must either havfl made a mistake, or he must have been misro portcd-that he considered himself as die mem- ber of a provisional Administration only.- Gentío» i men, when ho said a provisional Administration,

ho'meant to aay a provisioning ono-(roars of laughter)-an Administration that was in every [ .sense a provisioning one, as it has shown .by it3i

flagrant nepotism, and its prostitution of all* patronage-an administration, that endeavoured by ev cry nefarious means, to buttress themselves upin place, but, a» it has tumod out, without success. It was a desperate and dishonest game, heit it has soon been played out, except amongst constituents as dishonest as themselves. The game, however, ¡snow almost played up, and therefore I will say no more about it, as tas Administration will soon havo passed into the Tegions of history. I have now another duty to perform, anti that is to acknowledge my

siiiocu e ann heartfelt thanks for the open and manly treatment I havo reeefved throughout this election. I was glad rvto bo questioned, for all that I required was a patient hearing, and that I have received. I hív*> only to complain, however, of some misTC-i presentations on the other side. On one of the bills, on which was printed, in extensive charac- ters, " Voto for Chapman," was a catalogue of my misdeeds, and below them the question, " Would you vote for a man with such a refuta- tion as that V Now, without professing to bo either an Aristides or his antipodes, I would ask you n hat do you think of such a question coming from- such a quarter Î (Hear, hear.) But it ja now at an end. and let whatever bad spirit, if any existed, die with the occasion that brought it forth. I can tell those amongst you who voted against me, that I am as heartily their represen- tative as I am that of those who supported mo j and I shall always be as ready and willing to for» ward their interests as I shall those of my own friends. I believe that their opposition to me was sincere and conscientious ; indeed, I have no reason to think it could havo boen otherwiso ; and I honour thom for so doing (" Any pity Î") No, pity is # too patronising. All men grow wiser in time, and, doubtless, so will they. (Hear, hear.) To one section, however, of the electors, have I es- pecially to tender my thanks for their assiduous and successful exertions in this contest in my behalf ; I mean the members of my Committee. In concluding, I trust that I shall not show myself unworthy of the confidence you have reposed in mo, and I hope, before many months «re over- I would have said, ere the close of next week, had it not been for the littlo arrangements I hnve previously alluded to-to do something to satisfy my fellow-electors and the colony of Victoria at large. (Prolonged cheering.)

Mr. James Stewart Johnston then came forward. He said he came before them that day under different circumstances to those under

which he had made his appearance on the last occasion on the same hustings. On that occa- sion he came before them almost as a stranger. He now had the honour of appearing there as their elected representative. With regard to the present election, he could not but allude to the groundless and foolish charges that had been made against him. It had been said that he had been brought forward by the sup- porters of Mr. Michie, and even by that gentle- man himself. As for that, what complaint could be made if Mr. Michie's supporters had chosen to support him on the one common ground that they both wished to defeat the present Ministry ? As for Mr. Michie himself, he had to thank that gentleman for the generous and magnanimous manner in which ho had alluded to Kim at his I various meetings ; but he had done so, knowing

him (the speaker) better than tho majority of the electors. It had been said that he was lout of 1 harness, and therefore not fit to be sent into the Assembly; but ^though not having the sarae ôxperienco as was possessed by an old stager like Mr. Michie, ho thought they would soon find fha$ he. would improve ; and ore longthoy might toy whether, running alone or in couples, le was fit for either single or double

harness. Ho had to thank Mr. Michie for the .help ho had rendered lum in towing hint through the breakers at his start. A great deal had been said about his retiring from the con- test, and then again coming forward, hut what- ever might havo been said, it was evident frora tbo state of the poll that he was justified ia «gain coming forward. It might bo that hi» retirement v, as caused by too littlo faith in the promises of support he nod received, and when ho retired it might have boen an error ; but not to havo como forward »rain would have ¿eon a crime. (Hear, hoar.) But now let them bury all angry words in oblivion, and romombor only the advantages they had gained, Yeats ago, when a member of the old Legislative Council, and when St. Kilda was very little more than bush, with only a few houses scattered here and there, he used to imagine that possibly ono day, there might be formed there a large and po- pulous town, and he might havo the honour of being its representative. That dream had now como to pass, and they had elected him as there representative. He had not perhaps i mode the same amount of promises that other ' candidates had made, but thoy would find that what he had promised, he would act up to. It had been said that a good deal of money had Leen spent upon their election,butif suohwere the case, lie could assure them that lie knew nothing about it. Ho would pay nothing but the regular advertising and printing expenses, and the few cars that, in common with other candidatos, tliey had employed. Mr. Michie had already spoken about the conduct of the Government in putting off pome of the elections for a month, m the hope that some of them might serve as " consolation stakes ;" but he behoved, that as they had already been beaten, so they would find themselves beaten again. . ,

-Mr. J. B. Obbws then addressed the electors. He said.-Mr. Roturning-Officer and gentlemen,

' I stand hero in your presence as one of the,

beaten candidates, but I can only say that I have a duty to perform, and I should be -wanting if I neglected to come hore and perform that duty. It is to re- turn thanks to those who voted for me yester- day, and to thoso who exerted themselves in my behalf. I feel satisfied that this election has not been an election decided on principles, but that the principles I represent areBtill held hy the majority of the electors of St. Kilda, and if the elections yesterday had been decided on these principle«, I should have been placed at the head of the poll. ("Oh, oh 1" and cheers.) But by a want of tactics on the part of those who uphold these principles, and by a display of consummate tact amongst those who aro opposed to them, have boen defeated ; but, nevertheless, tho day is not far distant, I believe, when thosoprinciples will again be found triumphant in St. Kilda, I hare certainly to congratulate you, that in order to .»in thoir election, tho candidates have had to Outbid even tho principles of the Convention. What has been stated hy the successful r dictates I trust will be carried out

. them, and if so, no man will rejoice moro than I shall. I Lavo stood before you as a candidate, not for the sake of getting myself elected, but Jtmply for the purpose of securing the adoption of those views whioh I have always advocated. ("Oh, ohl") Ido not care what any of you may choose to think about that, hut I can ossuroyoutiiatpersonaUylshoukl have been a loser by willing; but I strove to win for your benefit, and for that of the colony. Believing as I do That the day is' not far distant when my | principles will ho triumphant. I rejoice ¿hat in i the district where I am best known, I was a long way at tho top of the poll. Had the outlying districts known moas my own district did, alf the claptrap that has been written and spoken

against mo- would not have led them, astray. 11 have always stated my honest convictions/ and ! havo stood by my principles, and I never would, l as Twos tempted to do, link myself i with Mr. Michie, on the assurance that I should have a

.walk -;0ver. I believe, however, that, tho day ia > coming when you will do justice to . youweívaii 1 and justice to myself. As I see no other of the defeated candidates Jbere present, I bee- M ",-""

Air. Mioma baying seconded the'motion, it -was earned unanimously, and ' '

Mr. Fbasbr replied m suitable terms. . "

w hÄ?,"1611 about dispersing, whea Mr. Miohib suddenly «ame forward, and stated ttiat he had been engaged *ih 'speaking! to-Jfr Hammil at «io latter-part of Itt^ Crews' i£

c*r<Es; hut having becn'tbld that he bad stated "that an offer hod been made <to'him,that ho

i-houid link himself with the spcakor.-and, on - that condition, would be carried in, be begged ka\e to give his most absolute and diametrical contradiction to such a statement. * '

Mr. Crews.-I have never yet made an asser- tion at a public meeting without boing prepared to prove it. Threo weeks ago, Mr. Copie, tha bookseller in Collins-street, came to me and i tnted that if I would allow him to put one lina

in my address thoy would send mo in with. Mr. Michie. (" Who aio they?") I presume when Mr. Caple said " thoy," ho meant tho members of his party. I know that Mr. Caple Was a pro« minent member of the Constitutional 'Associa- tion, and ought I not to have considered that ha was authorised to make such an offer ? And will thoy tell us that they did not maka the sama offer to Dr. Spicer? ;

Mi. Hammiix, who was received with groans; nnd cheers, stated that, as a member of Mr. Jlichio's committeo, he gave his most unqualified lonial to Mr. Crews' statement. Thoy hod novec had any doubt about the result of this electra.

Mr. Michie.-Thoy had now hoard both sides of, the question, and he could add to it, that he lind it from Mr. Caple himself, .that he Waa laughing at the riso he had taken' out of Mr Crews. As for Mr, Caple being authorised to court a coalition with Mr. Crows, or anyone else» ho was nothing of the kind. (" What about Spier ?") His remarkB equally 'applied to Dr. Spicer. With regard to a coalition, ho had been: asked if he had any objection to work with Mr. Johnston, and ho had replied that, although ha had been originally in antagonism with that gentleman, he would not be ashamed of working; with him now. Ho had dono so, and'-fio was perfectly satisfied with the result of the'1 election.

The matter then dropped, and the* meeting; dispersed. _

SANDRIDGE.

. The Retuening-Offioer (Dr. Plummer) de«

clared officially on Saturday, at noon, the result: of the poll for tho district of Sandridge. About 160 persons were present. The numbers were-« for Mr. Nicholson, 599 ; for Mr. Vines, 209V Tho former gentleman was therefore declared to be elected by a majority of 390 votes.

Mr. Nicholson, who was received with louot cheering, said, thero only remained to bim tha simple duty of returning thanks for the groat honour which they, in returning him as their re- presentative in the Assembly by so huge a irajoiity, had conferred upon him. It was jnot a, very courageous aot on tho part of any man to» triumph over his onemy; thoroforo he would pay nothing in respect to his opponent, Mr. Vines. He hod during the contest rofraiuei from alluding to that gentleman in any <nay whatever, nor would he now do so. Mr. Vines had a perfect right to contest; Sandridge if he chose, and to represent it if » majority of the electors thought fit to select him« It was his (Mr. Nicholson's) duty now to enter on, his work, and to show the electors by his services that he was worthy of the great confidence they had reposed in him. He was sorry to have to re- fer to certain charges which had been brought; against him, and which had he been hoard on tha

subject ho could havo successfully answered. 16

had been said that ho on one occasion had stated that he could got returned for Sandridge without: tho votes of the working-men. Ho begged to> state that he nevor said anything of the kind. (Hear, hear.) He knew very well that with uni- versal suffrage no candidate could bo returned ta Parliament without the support of the working« mon. (Cheers.) He begged to tell those elec- tors who had supported the rival candidate that: lie bore them no ill-will whatsoever. It was his duty to regard tho constituency as a whole, and make himself useful to it in every possible ways

.and he begged to invite thoso gentlemen, ic . he could be of servico to them, to como to him. without the slightest, reserve He hoped that when the period for which he had been eleoted had terminated he would havo shown himselC worthy of tho position in which thoy had placed 'him. (Cheeis.) Ä i *

As neither Mr. Vines nor any one in his behalf put in an appearance, Mr. Nicholson moved« and Mr. HAMMOND seconded, ayote o£ thanks to) the Beturning-Offlcer, which was duly.'reBponded to, and the proceedings closed. i

'. RICHMOND.,

The following protest against tho validity of tho proceedings of the polling at Richmond has been entered by Dr. Evans, one of the defeated can- didates :- ' r

"To the Hon. William Highett, M.L.C., R>

turning-Officor for the Electoral Distriot oE

Richmond.

" I, the undersigned George Samuel Evans, da hereby protest against the validity of the pro- ceedings on the taking of tho poll on the 26th August, 1859, for the election of two members to represent the district of Richmond, in the Legis- lative Council, and I object to jour deolaring any cf the candidates as duly elected, on the ground ' that the election was illegally and improperly

conducted, and is altogether void.

" And I protest against Mr. Alfred Woolley boing declared duly elected, on the'gr0111"* tnat liib Christian nome and surname did not appBar cn the ballot-papors as required by the Aot in

that behalf.

" And I fin thor protest against the proceed- ings, on the ground that several of the ballot papers delivored to electors wore not signed by the Returning-Officer, with his nemo on. tho book thereof, as required by law, and that votes ia my favour were rejected at tho close of the poll for want of such signature. '

"And I further protest against the-rejection of i arious voting-papers, on the alleged ground that they recorded a greater number or votes than candidates to be chosen, whereas the con- trary was the fact. Should tho eleotion not be deemed altogether void, I claim to have been duly elected, on the ground that the number of

good votes duly given or tendered on my behobt

.entitles me to bo placed second en tho poll.

" And I further protest against your openly .declaring the general Btate of tho poll, or the jiomcs of tho persons who moy have boen duly elected at such election, until the objections horcby mado havo been inquired into, and suoh a re-investigotion and scrutiny of the voting papers has been made as the justice of the case requires, and as you aie empowered to make,

" And I givo you notico that I hold you re- sponsible for oil damages I havo sustained, or may sustain, in consequence of tho irregularities .committed by you in your capacity of Returning

Officer at such election.

" Dated this 27th day of August, 1859.

" (Signed) Geo. Saul. Evans,

" One of the candidates,"

WEST BOURKE ELECTION

Districts,

1

"8

ú i

9

i

i

1

1

Baird

King

Phelan.

Riddle.

Thomson.

Wilkie.

Essendon

36

85

145

98

49

13

¡sr'

Flemington ...

123

109

130

32

17

10

sa

Keilor.

6

12

35

69

30

1

13

Footscray

48

79

92

48

5

7

59 Ballan.

11

4

15

35

l8

3

2T

Bacchus Marsh

163

34

146

60

103

_

26

Moiton

83

3

35

10

31

2

8

Diggers* Rest... Sunbury

34

20

35

62

20

2

li

10

11

12

15

4

2

12

Bulla.

5

24

29

38

43

_

41

Tullamarine . .

1

11

11

2

24

1

Braybrook . .

7

37

39

6

1

8

17

Blackwood ..

212

55

12

63

1

6

12?

Gisborne

102

71

103

65

234

4

er

Kilmore, for

Bylands ...

-

-i

_

33

1

-

7

Lancefield ...

4

32

32

11

37

->

31

Wyndham ...

0

5

5

5

3

1

5 Totals ...

1801

592

876

642

621

60

682

Close ov the Poll.

King.

Amsinck .

Phelan. Biddle. Baird .

Wilkie. Thomson .

876 801 642 621 592 582 60

[BY ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH.]

CASTLEMAINE.

Castlemaine, August 27.

At the declaration of the Castlemaine poll to-day there was much excitement. The first three were declared elected.

Mr. Ireland left for Melbourne this morning by the first coaoh.

io numbers were

Macadam

...

... 1,613

Pyke ....

...

...

... 1,539

Aspinall

**r

...

... 1,296

Ireland

...

' ...

... 1,036

Chapman

...

...    

Adamson  

...  

...

... 360

Thompson

...

... 111

Hitchcock

...

...

... 77

ARARAT.

.

Close of

the Poll,

M'Lelland

August 27 O'Hea...

...

...

... 1,374

Tyree ...

...

... 1.144

Haynes

... 137 ... 317 ... 237

Armstrong

...

...

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down