Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Tagged (None yet)

Add Tags

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

No corrections yet

THE WORLD OF SPORT.

(From our Special Correspondent.)

London. October 16, 19H.

Eating of considerable ímnortince has I been taking place in England «¡ince lf*t I [

wtDte Ibu» lost week end the Kemp

ton Park authorities brought ort wh it m |

normal times is one of the most jnipor

tant race meeting« of the autumn It |

was successful this time, all tlnngc con sidered On the opening day the« Impe- rial Produce Stake» AVIS the chict event It "ivas of the grots A due of -to,(J00, and that lip'ng oo, it AVJ» «surprising to find

uni' four tunnels lins i« the tate winch "I ne Tetiarch «diould have tun fo«-, but the daj betöre he hit himself m the spot which ultimately ended hi- racing career On tin.« oct.ision the runners weie Mt. W llmnson a King Pnim, vvho ha-< Leen regarded bv m mi a«? the best two-jcarold of the sca«on, "Mi J li

Joe"'s Pommern, who had Avon vvhen la-t sn.cn out at Doncaster. "Mr L Nctitnann:

Snow "Marten, and Colonel ilall \\ alkcr s I Follow Lp King Pnim had to give S lb to Pommera, and l8 lb to SnoAv Alar ten Nevertheless he started in equal

favorite with Snow Afirten, and there Avao |

a fair demand for Pommern Hie rice, however, was dominated bv the la-stnamed

The son of Polymelus led from end to end j and Avon easdj, with King Priam beating Follow Up b> a held for third place

King Priam s jockey reported that his I

I norse ran without any ciasn, and it is pro

| bable that for some reason he was far

.from being himself. At any rate this is not his form. Pommern is entitled to full credit for his win. He bas grown hito a. fine colt, with wonderful quality and liberty. He.should make a high-class three-year-old, and the pleasure of his ow- ner is «surely added to by the fact that he bred him. Neither colt runs again this year, so that the question between them is not likely to be determined in the most favorable circumstances before next Derby day. On the second day the Duke of York Stakes, a handicap with an interest- ing histor}-, occupied a prominent place on tlie card. It only brought out seven run- ners, which is the smallest number in the history of the race. Nevertheless the event was interesting if only tie-cause it possessed an open character. Favoritism finally rooted with Lord D'Abernou's Dia. dumenos, a horse formerly trained by the Hon. George Lambton, but now in the care of the Australian trainer, E. de Mcsirc. It was quite evident that this son of Orby had given full satisfaction in a trial, and as his friends were disappoin- ted that be got no nearer than third, it is passible that be did not run up to his trial. The race provided a tremendous fin'sh between Air. George Edwardes' Nas- sau tfcnd Mr. A. Hulton'.« Green Falcon. Tlie former was greatly fancied by his trainer, P. Hartigan, and it was his good

fortune to see the horse squeeze home in the last few strides and win by a short head. The Avinner Avas bred by the Duke of Portland, and was sold out of the Kingsclere stable to Mr. Edwardes for £800. There was an idea then that the horse was gone in his wind, especially as he came from roaring stock, but he has gone the right way ever since the change of stables occurred. Mr. George Edwardes :s still a prisoner at I>ad Nauheim, Avhich means that he ia merely ''detainer!" at the German health resort, Avhere.be hap- pened to be when war broke ont. Since then his horses haA-e been in grrtit form, and have altogether Avon about £0,000 in stakes. The Newmarket Second October meeting opened on Tuesday, the feature, ot the day being the three victories credited to Sir Ernest Cassel. One doubts whe- ther this owner, Avho has spent very large sums on breeding and racing, has eA'er Avon three races before in a day. He won the Newmarket Oaks with Flying Bridge, though the public money 'was all on uis other candidate, Yokohama, Avhose tragic fate it was to be beaten by a neck bj» his stable companion. Then llapsburg, sefton«! in the Derby, and winner of the Eclijise Stakes, won him the Champion Stakes, after a pretty race with a solitary oppo- nent. Mr. "W. M. Singer's Sir Eagle. The third vrinner for Sir Ernest Cassel was Matter, «who won the Apprentice "llandi rap. Nothing sucinxids like success in racing. Once get on_ the crest of a wave and yon can be carried far, whether you arc owner, trainer, or jockey. Thus Sir Ernest Cassel had the good fortune on the second day of the meeting to Avin the Oesarewifcch, with a three-year-old named Troubadour. The fact that the start- ing price was C6 to 1 is more than- evidence that he was absolutely un fancied, and his easy victory therefore created an astonished feeling. Arda finally started favorite and finished third, but Prinaîss Dorrie, Grave Greek, and Fitz Yama ran badly. Green Falcon, to whom reference is made aboA'e, would have won with the winner out of the Avay. It Avas not by any means a popular result.

FEATURES OF FOOTBALL.

First League.

Bradford City .. 3 Aston Villa.. .. 0 Burnley. 1 Fhcffield United 3

Chelsea. 3 Liverpool. 1 Everton. 4 Bradford. 1 Manchester City 1 Newcastle United 1 Notts County .. 1 Blackburn Kovers 1 Sheffield Wednes-

day . 1 Manchester Utd. 0

Sunaerland .... 4 Bolton Wanderers 3 Tottenham Hot-

spur .3 Middlesbrough .. 3 West Bromwich

Albion. 0 Oldham Athletic 0 Played on the ground of the first-named club on Saturday, October 10.

Position of the Gubs.

Goals

P. W. D. L. For. Ag. Pta. Manchester

City.7 5 2 0 12 8 12 Sheffield Wed. .8 5 1 2 19 10 11 Oldham Athletic 7 5 1 1 l8 11 11 Everton.8 4 1 3 15 7 9 Middlesbrough . 7 :¡ 3 1 14 10 9 Newcastle Utd. 8 3 2 3 10 0 West Bromwich

Albion.8 3 2 3 12 9 S Blackburn Ro-

vers .S 3 2 3 15 13 S Bradford Citv .. 8 2 4 2 li 11 Burnlev.7 3 1 3 S 6

Sheffield United 7 2 3 2 S S 7 Bolton Wan-

derers .9 3 1 5 22 23 Aston Villa.. ..7313 9 14 Sunderland.. ..7 3 1 3 14 lo

Notts County .. 7 2 2 3 IO H 6 Liverpool .... 8 2 2 4 12 23 0 Manchester Utd. 7 2 1 4 j S li Chelsea.7 1 3 3 S 13 Tottenham Hot-

spur .8 1 3 4 11 l8

Bradford.7205 820 4

Manchester City still unbeaten; Chelsea win their first match! Those were the

first thoughts on surveying the results of ; the First League matches. But just «s it is likely that the London club, with all their expensive players so grievously disappointing on the field, will have to struggle desperately to make any sub- stantial advance, one feels that Man- chester City's occupancy of the first place in the table is only temporary. For the team are not good enough to remain there. The defence has excelled, but the for- wards have only scrambled to success with luck on their side. The rear divi- sion men averted defeat against Newcastle United, but they were a sadly overworked band of faithfuls, and could not have succeeded in their mission had the oppo- sition shot ordinarily well after taking the ball into favorable shooting posi- tions. So long as Manehi-sther CSty re- maba unbeaten at the top of the compe- tition it is not likely that the forwards will be changed, but this fact does not remove the necessity for change. The Football Association bave spent £20,000 in fostering amateur football on the Con- tinent, and at tbe moment it seems to have been a colossal piece of extravagance for the game in those couirtries in which they have ehiïwn most e-nterprise Iras been wrecked in the vortex of war. H<a-e and there, however, we find representa-

tives of these Continental nations who 1 bave benefited bv the nelp afforded them.

One is Nils Middelboe, a yerong Dane*. I who ha-5 the distinction of captaining Chelsea. Standing 6 ft. 4 in-, be is a remarkable footballer, with striking natu-

ral talents. He is playing as an ama- j

teur and did not cost Chelsea a penny, but now he is keeping Abra-ms out of

the team, and it -was Abrams for whom I £1,000 was Daid to the Heart of Midlo- thian Club last May. Chelsea showed

sligbt improveant-mt against Liverpool, I but not sufficient to cause one to think |

that all was at last well with the side.

There has been, sedóos trouble with the I Manchester United players owing to tie suspension of "Sandy" Turnbull, who has been with the chib six v«*Brs, and ia-d a benefit, which brought 'him about

.-£050. The bother began at Burnley on the occasion of a Lancashire Cup tie, Turnbull in«ulling Mr. .1". J. Bentley, the old pre--idcnt. of the Football l-icaguo and now manager of Manchester United. If ?*î«rnliiill had been, in bowsa {ind had

acted in the same way to Ins employer as

he did to Mr. Bentley he Avould have < bten dismissed on the spot. As it was he was suspended for a fortnight, which really meant u fine of £10, representing

two Avcek»' wages. The other Unit«! i players threatened to strike if Turnbulls suspension AV.IS not rcmo\-cd, but the ctub refused to be browbeaten in this wa\\ and nracticallv caid to the players. 'Well, strike'"' Meanwhile they had the reserves in readiness to travel to .Sheffield to play the Wednesday team, but the men evidently thought better of their ridiculous threat of mutiny, and all took part in the match, except, of course, Turnbull. Possibly the players think the trouble is at an end, but the authorities are not likely to take the hame view of what i¿» really a most serious matter. This is not the first time foot- ballers have attempted to dictate and assert rights that cannot be_ justified. There is one outstanding individual suc- cors on Saturday, Fox. the Bradford City inside rieht, .«coiir.g all his side's three mais against A «ton Yilla. Generally there Avas a big drop in the scoring, but there Avas an exception at Sunderland, where Bolton Wanderers accomplished the rare feat for a visiting side of obtaining three goals and still - losing. Similarly at Tottenham, owing-"to disastrous blun- ders on defence by the' Hotspur, Middles- brough scored three times and only drew. In this rase there ivas the further re- markable feat that the visitors held the l«3ad three times.

Second League.

Arsenal .2 Clapton Prient .. 1. Birmingham .. ~. 0 Stockport County 1. Blackpool .. .. .. Z Notts Forest .. 0. Bristol City - - S Glossop.1.

Bury.1 Barnshn-.2 i Derby County ... 1 Leeds City .. .. 2. i Grimsby .1 Fulham.1 Huddersfield .. -. 2 Wolrverhamnton

W.0

Lincoln City .... 0 Hull City .. ..3 Played on the ground of the first-named

clnb on Saturday. October 10.

Position of the Clubs.

Goals P. The Arsesial .. S Huddersfield .. S Preston N.E. . 8 Bristol City .. 7 Clapton Orient 8 Bttrv.7 Fulham.S Grimsbv Town S Hull City .... 7 Wolverhampton

W.:. S Derby County . 7 Stockport C. .. 7 Barnsley .. .. 7 Birmingham .. 7 Notts Forest .. 8 Leeds City.... 8 Lincoln City .. 8 Blackpool .. .. 7 Leichter Fosse S Glossop.8

The Highbnry district of London is prov- ing an El Dorado for the Arsenal. Much gold is (lowing into the club's purse. There were 30,000 spectators of their match with Clapton Orient, representing receipts of over £12,000, and not only have the Ar- senal had the best gates in London, but very few First League clubs in the country can equal their average. There is certainly no need for the Arsenal to stop paying their players full wages, but the reduction was compulsory for the general well-being of all the clubs. No better phrase than the hackneyed one «that success begets success can be used to describe their good fortune. They are prospering in a playing sense, they are at the top of the table, and no team have better prospects of gaining pro-

motion.

w.

D.

TA

For. Ag.

Pts.

a

o

1/

17

6

12 5

2

j'

15

6

12 A

*>

1

32

S

11 5

0

o

13

6

10 4

2

2

10

7

10 5

5

2

11

10 4

i

3

12

10

9 3

3

o

S

10

9 4

0

3

10

8

8 3

o

3

S

9

S

ii

T,

3

13

7

7 3

i

;>,

0

7

7

3

i

3

7

13

7

o

2

3

10

10

6 2

2

4

11

IS

0 2

í

5

9

10

5 2

1

5

11

17

5 2

0

5

10

13

4 1

6

6

13

3 0

o

5

S

10

3

There was an ecno of last season during the match with the Orient. Last season te Arsenal took a two goals lead and then lost it. dropping a point that would have ensured tbear going up to the First League 1-ast Saturday the} were also two goals in front, and then, after ha*, mg one negatived, Avère m grave danger of losing all their advantage. It was a thnlbng struggle, gran and earnest, and the fine show of the Orient igamst opponents wbo were «neasurably suoeraor lent a piquant m terest that the big crowd enjoved The

Arsenal are finding it most diffacult to [

get aw.iv from these rivals on tlie table

Huddersfield, the .'«-urpnse ' side m the j competition, are hanging on moat tena- ciously, and the only gam the London club t-m be said to ha\c made aft.-r boating toe Orient carne about through tbe unexpected set back of Bury against Barnsley Though onlv a shadow of their former greatness only Downs th<* back and Tufnell the for-

ward remain of the famous Cup team erf j a few year«} ago-the Yorkshire club re- tain that special qualification for defeat ing opponents better than themselves. Thev contrmio to play that type of foot- ball winch u, more iortefni tuan clever, md Bury were knocked off their balance Forton* bas been unkind to Fulham. Just when the outlook appeared so favor able their players -ft ere battered and rn mred in- the hurly-burly of the game with Derby County three weeks ago. Since then all sorts of ..'-qiexjments have had to he made to fill up the gaps and in the circirmstances the di aw at Grimsbv was credit<*hle One of the strangest results of all was the ftrHrxre of Birmingham on their own ground On the previous week

.it Fulham tht>\ bad given a trulv great | il-i-splav. In comparison against Stockport Goiintj last week they played like a third rate »ide. It was another illustration of

the hirtoan error creeping into a game j we would be pleased to baie mechanical.

Southern League.

The merits of Watford have won slow

recognition, bnt they continue as tiie only j unbeaten ade in the Soirüiern Leagne. j The club in past years have imltivated such

a bad habit of remaining near the bottom j of the tonmaminit that enthusiasts cannot ] bring thcnnselves to realise that the team are as good as fchey persist in proving

themselves to be. Thev achieved another j fine victory in the niiitch with Bristol Hovers bv- fcx'fbjJl th.it wa« really admir- able. The chib have no outstanding per-

former, but tie level of play, all through J.

is excellent. Watford, however, continue io rank second to Brighton, for the latter made no mistakes in their home game Avith Portsmouth, though one goal served to g"vc them the maximum pointe. One of the most striking resulte was the crushing defeat of Swindon at Gillingham. The previous week with Fleming as a makeshift centre for Avanl they scored four goals; on this occa- sion, with the (international «in his proper place at inside right, and Denyer back as leader of tht- attack, they lost four. The forwards at Gâllingham were disappointing, but the source of the trouble AVÍIS at half- back, where -fJhc experiment was made of converting AYheateroft, the old schoolmas- ter centre forward, into a centre half. But centre half is not a comfortable re- treat for a man who is beginning to slfow down and in a positiion that requires an endless store of energy AV'heatcroft soon begam to lag. The result was that not only did the forwards lack adequate support, but there 'was a weak spot in the defence that the Gillingham men playcsd "on to'' mo^t persistently. There is one quaint fact in connection with the Kent Club's nx-ord. Leslie, the bac-k. is the top scorer. This comos about by Ms being entrusted with the penalty kicks. Ile has already taken four of these an'd scored on each, ooc.x

cion. _ Crystal Palace must be beginning to despair. Now that Chelsea have broken the sequence »of their reversas they share Avith Glossop in the second league "the un-, enviable distinction of being the only club'

Avüthout a win to their credit. Tile cause of the abject failure of Crystal Palace is baffling. Supporters of the club have yet to see a goal registered by the home trdc on the ground, and it ds not surprising the attendants arc becoming smaller eaoh week. More than half the gate of ."¡,000 last Saturday was made up of naval men, of whom 3,000 are being housed in tha palace.

IN THE BING.

Matt AA"ells is one of the few amateurs to have any real success as a professional boxer. He quickly bridged OA-CT the two classes of the sport, so quickly, in fact, as to win the light-weight Aampitonship from Fred Walsh, the present champion of the world, and though he has now joined the middle-wrfghts he is still win- ning. He took part in lias first eontot since lus return from Australia this week, when lie met Young Nipper («Charlie Wood) in 15 rounds, and, bv a display of forceful hitting that was also extremely «ciever. gained a decisive victory on points. He wins every possi- ble point ho can from the first round to tlie last. Whether he is winning easily or not malees no difference.- With every blow he seems to say to 'his opponent, "If you don't like this sort of thing you had bet- ter give in.'"" These were his tactics against Young Nipper, a man as strong as himself, but lacking the speed and resource. Nip- per went down twice in the fourth round, and then the finish seemed near, but Avith great_ courage he struggled on, notwith standing heavy punishment, and stayed to the end o: tne 15 rounds. In almost every round Wells scoredthe maximum points, and his victory was most decisive. Al! that one was lent to admire was the pEuak of tlie vanquished man. This match may be said .to mark the opening of the Avinter boxing season in London. The sport be- gins at the National Sporting Club next Monday, when the AJhief contest will be between the Welshman (Percy Jonas) and Tancy Lee (the Scotsman) for the fly- weight "championship and the Lord Lons- dale 'belt. This will be the first occasion Jones has been called on to defend his title since ¡be gained it by defeating Lad bury Lost s<2ason. In the rmsantitne, how- ever, he has twice been beaten, by the Frenchman Eugene Griqui, and 'by young Symond». He was knocked out by the latter at Plymouth. But the war has knocked out the real interest of boxing in London. Glove fighting is fine exercise and grand training, but, when the real tiling is afoot, surely every fighting man who is worth his salt is following Carpcntier's ex- ample, and ?helping to battler the Germans ?back into their own corner. Not only are most of the boxers, amateur and profes- sional, away at the front, and all the army ?boxers, who have d«*ne so wdl in ¿he ring art the U.S.C. before they were called into the arena of Europe, but most of the patrons of the ring are gone too. Your true "Corinthian" is not the man to lounge at home and watch other fellows hammering each other with "'the mitts'* «while there is a Wow to strike for Eng- land, home, and duty.

NOVELTY IN BILLI A£J>S.

The billiard season opens on Monday with the start of the Burroughes anil Watts tournament, «ind the conditions have been so altered that the matcihes will 'bo «something of a novelty. Previously tue beats have been 9,000 up, extending over a week. Thw time they will be «Denly 4,000, and there wül be two games a week. There will also be only one session, with a brief interval. This means-that there will be no play at night. By these changes it is hoped to creerte fresal interest and bring awout an improvement jn the attendances. Six players malee up the competition, and the handicap has just been announced. As .vvas expected, H. W. Stevenson, George Gray, and T. rvecee haye been placed on the scratch mark. .The two young men, T. Newman and W. Smith, have «"räch been given 300 start, and E. Diggle geïts 500. lit would appear that Newman and Smith have be-cn rather itaxshly treated. A year ago, when Newman waa successful, with- out dropping a point, he receive-d '3,000 in 9,000. The start ¡he bas now been allotted is «-¡quivalcnt to 675 in 9,000, so 'he has been penalised 1,325 for his victory of a year ago. Newman was, of «-ourse, expected to be polled back, but 'hardly to thai e*ctent. If this is the correct placing of Newman, the authorities were bound to put his riva?, Smithj on the same mark, for the latter was toe only man to heart Newman last season, and he accomplis,b«?d this feat three ?times. That Diggle, wbo has so long jbeen up to the championship level, snotfid have been given so many «as 500 is snrprisng, and. if he would shake «iff the indifference which often attacks him, there is none who would liave a better chance of winning

tbe tournament. In these short games, J .jhoweyo-, it is possible for onytMng '.to, I

happen, and the player who makes the best start will lie hard to overtake. For Ste-

venson, Reece, and Gray, it can t?e _said that they are only a. good brea'k behind their opponents. * They can clear off the

whole of .their arrears in the "first hour or so of a heat. In the circumstances the winner may well come from the backmark, and at the moment George Gray, with all the endlos« possibilities of his red Dall play, is favorite._ _

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down