Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

2 corrections, most recently by anonymous - Show corrections

SITUATION IN NATAL.

LARGE FORCE ACROSS THE TUGELA.

ADVANCE ON LADYSMITH.

RAPID PROGRESS OE GENERAL

WARREN.

BULLER ADDRESSES THE TROOPS.

 

A DETERMINED MOVEMENT.

"NO TURNING BACK."

AUSTRALIANS AMBUSHED.

BETRAYED BY DUTCH FARMER

CONSPICUOUS GALLANTRY.

COLONIALS AMBUSHED.

A PATROL CAUGHT.

LONDON, January l8.

News has been received from General French's column of a mis- adventure, of which a small body of Australian troops near Rensbnrg were

the victims.

The report states that a patrol, composed of sixteen New South Wales Lancers and Australian Horse, was surprised by a party of Boers in

ambush.

Two members of the patrol only escaped. Of the others, five were killed, one was wounded, and the re- mainder were taken prisoners.

MISHAP ATTRIBUTED TO

"TREACHERY.

A VISIT TO THE- SCENE OF

ACTION".

LONDON. January 19.

Later particulars have been re- ceived of the misadventure which befel the colonial patrol near Rens burg.

The mishap is attributed to the treachery of a Dutch farmer, who, it is suspected, warned the Boers of the whereabouts of the patrol, thus en- abling it to advance and to compel its retreat upon kopjes where parties of the enemy were, by pre-arrange- ment, concealed in ambush.

The Daily Mail's correspondent states that a patrol sent on Wednes- day to the scene of action found the dead body of Trooper G. A. Griffin, of the Australian Horse, and Lancer F. Kilpatrick, of the New South Wales Lancers, badly wounded. Seven dead horses belonging to the Boers were also found, but the dead and wounded Boers had been re- moved.

Two messages have been received from Reuter's correspondent dealing

with the incident. The first of these

states that two of the patrol escaped and returned to camp. The second message states that six more had re- turned, including one who, when his horse had been shot, lay hidden until the Boers retired. The face of one body recovered was so shattered as to raise the presumption that the wound was caused by an explosive bullet.

The Times' correspondent at Rens- burg reports that six members of the patrol returned to camp, that four- teen are missing, and that the casual- ties number one killed and one dan-

gerously wounded.

The English press deeply regrets the Rensburg incident. It is pointed out, however, that such reverses are inseparable from guerilla warfare.

All the newspapers acknowledge the gallantry displayed by the Aus-

tralians.

No information regarding the affair has, so far, been received from official sources.

LATER PARTICULARS.

A GALLANT RUNNING FIGHT. HEROIC ACT OF A LANCER.

LIEUTENANT DOWLING A

PRISONER.

LONDON, January 19.

The strength of the colonial patrol that was surprised, arid which fared so badly near Rensberg, has been variously estimated. Its numbers are

stated in some of the accounts at six-

teen and in others at twenty-five.

The little force was commanded by Lieut. W. V. Dowling, of the Aus-

tralian Horse, which formed a por- tion of the first New South Wales contingent.

It appears that on Tuesday last the patrol was reconnoitring towards Norval's Pont, and that on returning in the afternoon it encountered from

sixty to one hundred Boers.

The Australians raced to a neigh- bouring kopje, which they intended to hold until relief should arrive, but, as events proved, they had run into a trap. A number of Boers were con- cealed in ambush on the kopje, and these immediately sent a well directed volley into the Australians, which brought down half of their horses.

The Colonial troops then made for a second kopje, where they encountered a similar reception.

They again made off, maintaining meanwhile a gallant running fight.

A few of Rimington's Scouts arrived near the close of the fight.

One of these, Trooper Bennett, charged with the greatest determina- tion and suceceded in rescuing a

wounded lancer.

Three mounted Australians reached

the British camp, and reported that two of the patrol were killed.

Of the fourteen captured it is feared that seven or eight are badly wounded, as the Boers were seen carrying some and helping others,

who were unable to walk.

Lieut. Dowling himself is among the prisoners.

Our Sydney correspondent telographed last night as follows :-A private cable was received here to-day, stating that. Lieut. W. V. Dowling and seven lancers had been captured during a reconnaissance. Lieut. Dowling belongs to the Australian Horse, a draft of which corps went with the first contingent. Much concern was felt in tho city to-day when it became known that some of the Lancers had beau killed. Ad- ditional information is anxiously awaited."]

CROSSING THE TUGELA.

 

SNIPING THE ENEMY.

SIR. CHARLES WARREN'S

MOVEMENTS.

ON THE WAT TO LADYSMITH.

LONDON, January 18.

A few farther brief particulars have

been received of the advance move-

ment now in progress across and north of the Tugela River.

It is stated that the small force which, under Colonel the Earl of Dundonald, occupied the hill com- manding Potgieters Drift, had to wait for two days for the arrival of General Lyttleton's Brigade, and that the troops, in the meantime, occupied themselves, from effective cover, in sniping the enemy.

Having crossed the river at Pot- gieter's Drift, partly by wading, and partly by the aid of the captured Boer ferry, which is worked by wires, General Lyttleton occupied the com- manding kopjes on the north bank.

Howitzers and naval guns were mounted on Mount Alice, near Zwartze Kop, and from these a shell fire wag poured into the enemy's

trenches.

Artillery also covered General War- ren's movements while crossing the river some five miles higher up the stream. Here the enemy for some little time indulged in a desultory fire, but ultimately fled

The passage of the river was com- pleted by the aid of a pontoon bridge, which admirably served its purpose.

According to latest advices, Sir Charles Warren's force is now advanc- ing in the direction of Spion's Kop, on the road towards Dewdrop, the

last named post being about seven   miles west of Ladysmith.

Telegraph lines are being erected in rear of and simultaneously with

the British advance.

The troops are reported to be in the best of good spirits.

GENERAL WARREN'S

MOVEMENTS.

MESSAGE FROM LORD

ROBERTS.

BULLER'S ADDRESS TO THE

TROOPS.

"TO BE NO TURNING BACK."

LONDON, January 19.

Lord Roberts, telegraphing to the War Office from Capetown, regarding the advance on Ladysmith, mentions that Sir Charles Warren is hopeful of turning the enemy, who are occupying a strongly entrenched position within five miles of his right front.

A cable message from Sir Red- vers Buller states that General Warren crossed the Tugela by the aid of a pontoon bridge 85 yards long. He hoped that Sir Charles Warren would advance five miles towards the enemy's position by Thursday even- ing. The Boers, he added, are re- ported to be busily entrenching.

A report received from another source, states that General Buller prior to the advance, made a spirited appeal to the troops. In the course of his address he declared that he was starting out with a full intention of relieving Ladysmith, and that there was to be no turning back. He also warned the troops against the Boers'  

treacherous use of the white flag.

THE SEIZURE OF POTGIETER"S

DRIFT.  

BOERS SURPRISED.

GENERAL LYTTLETON'S

BRIGADE.

CROSSES THE RIVER WITH

DIFFICULTY.

LONDON, January 19.

It is stated that Colonel the Earl of Dundonald, who succeeded in cap- turing Potgieter's Drift, found the Boers bathing and quite unprepared

for an attack.

The crossing of the river by Major-' General Lyttleton's brigade appears to have been attended by some diffi- culty. The stream was greatly swollen, and was running strongly. The troops crossed the drift waist high, and grasped one another's rifles in order to steady themselves against

the current.

The passage of the river was effected virtually without opposition.

General Lyttleton's howitzers shelled the enemy's trenches call yesterday, and made a breach in the sandbag emplacement protecting the Boer guns. The latter, however, I made no response.    

The British troops are said to be

full of confidence.

GENERAL BULLER'S

STRATEGY.

APPLAUDED BY THE PRESS.

DISPOSITION OF THE BRITISH

FORCES.

PROBABLE PLAN OF OPERA-

TIONS.

LONDON, January 19.

The English newspaper Press warmly applauds the boldness of Sir Redvers Buller's strategy and the skill with which it has so far been executed.  

The Times, referring to the general advance now in progress, estimates Sir Charles Warren's force at 12,000 infantry, 1,500 cavalry, 30 field guns, and 6 howitzers. The force which is advancing under the personal com-

mand of General Buller is estimated

by the same journal at 7,000 infantry, 18 field guns and howitzers, besides naval guns.

The Times is farther responsible for the statement that General Clery is remaining at Colenso.

It is expected that the forces under Sir Charles Warren and Sir Redvers Buller will junction near Blaauwbank, about eight miles from Ladysmith.

The British advance movement is said to threaten all the Boer lines of communication south of Ladysmith.

The Times considers that the Boers

have no continuous line of defences, and that they are mainly disposed in two comparatively isolated positions, one being in front of each British

camp.

The numbers of Boers to be reckoned with are unknown.

THE AFFAIR AT

SUNNYSIDE.

TRIAL OF REBELS.

LONDON, June 18.

The trial is proceeding at Capetown of thirty-five Douglas disloyalists who were taken prisoners at Sunny- side on New Year's Day, and who were subsequently charged with

treason.  

Yesterday Captain R. Dowse, of the Queensland contingent, gave im- portant evidence. He stated that he commanded one of the divisions of the attacking force at Sunnyside, and that he was within eighty yards of the prisoners, whom he identified. He added that Private W. McLeod, of his company, who was killed during the engagement, was twice shot by

the rebels.

The trial was adjourned.

CANADA AND THE WAR.

A PATRIOTIC MUNICIPALITY.

  LONDON, January 18.

The Municipal Council of Toronto, the second city of Canada, has under-

taken to insure the lives of the mem- bers of the second Canadian contin- gent for South. Africa.

REINFORCEMENTS.

THE EIGHTH DIVISION.

COMMANDED BY SIR HENRY

RUNDLE.

LONDON, January 19.

Major-General Sir Henry Rundle, now commanding the South-East District, will, it is announced, receive the command of the 8th Division

of Lord Roberts' army. The 8th Division is now mobilising.

SUNDAY AT LADYSMITH.

AN IMPRESSIVE THANKS-

GIVING SERVICE.

LONDON. January 19.

On the Sunday following the assault upon Ladysmith, an impres- sive thanksgiving service was held by the garrison. The congregation on the occasion sang the National

Anthem.

THE WESTERN AUSTRALIAN

CONTINGENT.

The delivery of a further consignment of saddles at the camp enabled three divi- sions of the Mounted Infantry contingent yesterday morning to drill in the saddle, whilst the other company had foot drill. Again in the afternoon there were three divisions in the saddle, whilst the fourth was engaged in musketry. The mounted and foot drills and the musketry exercises are taken in rotation by the several divisions, so that each has an equal

amount of exercise in each class of drill. The afternoon movements wore conducted under the supervision of Commandant Col. Chippindall, who relieved Major Campbell.  

On Thursday night a great batch of horses was brought into camp, bringing the number up to 100, and this morning probably there will be a final allotment of the horses to the various troopers as Boon as possible.

The following general order, dated the 8th inst., has been issued by headquarters : -Mounted Infantry : Captain H. L. Pil- kington, Reserve of Officers, to be Captain in Command ; Captain J. M. Y. Stewart, to be Captain in medical charge; Lieu- tenants R. T. McMaster, S. Harris, S. Inglis, and Second Lieutenant J. de Cas- tilla, to be Lieutenants. 20/12/99. His Excellency the Governor in Executive Council has been pleased to sanction an increase of the establishment, as published

in the Government Gazette of the 22nd

December, 1899, to one hundred and twenty-five, all ranks. Pay-Add to rates of pay : Staff Sergeants, 10s. per day:   Warrant Officers, 11s. 6d. per day.

A telegram having appeared in these columns stating that the steamer Surrey, which is to convey the West Australian contingent to South Africa, would call at Albany for coal, the Acting-Premier put himself in communication with Mr. Lyne, the Premier of Now South Wales, on the subject. Yesterday, Mr. Piesse received a reply from Mr. Lyne to the effect that ho had been informed by the agents for the steamer that the Surrey would not call at Albany, but proceed direct to Fremantle.

THE SCOTTISH MEMBERS OF THE

FORCE.

AN ENTHUSIASTIC SEND-OFF.

There was a very large and very enthu- siastic gathering of Scotchmen and their friends in Jacoby's Bohemia Hall, last night, at a smoko social, tendered as a " send-off " to the Scottish members of the Mounted Infantry contingent. The Mayor of Perth (Mr. A. Forrest, M.L.A.) occupied the chair, and about 30 members of the contingent were present, including Lieut.

McMasters 'and Lieut. De Castila. After the toasts of "The Queen" and "His Ex- cellency the Governor" had been enthusi- astically honoured,

Mr. A. BANKIN proposed the toast of " Parliament."

Mr. A. FOREST, M.L A., responded. He said that Western Australia had sent away one contingent, and, on the present occasion, was sending away nearly as many men as the other colonies. If the Imperial Government wanted more men, the colony was prepared to send them and pay for them. (Applause.) As long as they were under the British flag, they would send every man they had if they were necessary for Britain to conquer her enemies. (Ap- plause.)

Mr. J. MCKENZIE proposed tho toast of " The Second Western Australian Contin-

gent," and asked the company to drink it with cheers. The toast was honoured with great enthusiasm.

Lieut. McMASTER, in responding, said for enthusiasm and heartiness he did not

think that gathering would be equalled

either in Western Australia or South Africa.

The CHAIRMAN here announced that he had telephoned to Major Campbell, and secured permission for the members of the force to remain until 11 o'clock, instead of 10, as at first arranged.

Mr. W. J. FERGUSON, in a happy speech, proposed the toast, " Scottish Members of the Second Contingent." In conclusion, he recited an address, in verse, appropriate to the occasion, which was received with enthusiasm. The toast was drunk with musical honours, and was succeeded by prolonged shouts of cheering and applause.

Rev. STANLEY REID, who was greeted with uproarious cheers, responded. It might seem peculiar to them that a clergy- man should volunteer for active service, and he would say at once that, though he had not received the sympathy which he had expected from the members of his own denomination, ho knew in his own heart that he had the sympathy of those who

wore around him then.

Various other toasts were honoured, and an admirable programme of songs, dancing, and instrumental music was given by Messrs Sibbald, Calvin, F. Gallowav, J. M. Fowler, J. M. Lapsley, Doig, Follows, H. Little, T. Christie, D. Anderson, and Pipe-Major McKenzie.

SUNDAY CHURCH PARADE.

A special church parade, at which his Lordship the Bishop of Perth will officiate, has been arranged for Sunday afternoon at 5 o'clock. To make the service as attrac- tive as possible, tho Perth, Fremantle, and Guildford corps will attend in uni- form, and will be accompanied by the Headquarters Baud. The service will be conducted in the open air, within the camp lines, and tho public will be per- mitted to be present.

As many visitors are expected during Sunday afternoon by the members of the contingent who are unable to obtain leave, Major Campbell has arranged that tea and biscuits shall be served at 3 p.m., so that

the men may entertain their friends.

SUPPLY OF WAGGONS.

It will be remembered that at the be-

ginning of the present month tho Govern- ment in a communication to the Agent General in London requested him to approach the Imperial authorities with a view to orders for the construction of waggons for use as transports in South Africa being placed amongst the wheel- wrights of this colony. Yesterday the Government received a reply from the Secretary of State for the Colonies. In this

cable message Mr. Chamberlain thanked   the Western Australian Government for its suggestion, but explained that ample   supplies of waggons for military purposes   had been arranged for locally. Mr. Cham- berlain further stated that the delay in re-

plying to the Government's cable message   had been caused by reference of the matter  

South Africa.

NURSES FUND CONCERT.

An especially good programme has been drawn up by the committee of   management of tho concert to be given   in the Fremantle Town Hall on Wednes-   day evening next in aid of the fund to   send West Australian nurses to South   Africa. Several of the names of those   who have promised to take part have already been published ; in addition,   Messrs. M. McDonnell and F. C. Reid   will take part, while selections will be given by the Fremantle Infantry Band,  

under Bandmaster Fay. Mrs. Buntine   and Mr. C. W. Handle will play the ac- companiments. Already many of the tickets have been disposed of. The com- mittee of management are Messrs. W. T. John (chairman), J. F. Allen, H. Egan, J. Western, and Flannigan, with   Messrs. W. W. Neander and C. Glover as hon. secretaries.  

 

DR. NAPIER'S CONDITION      

IMPROVING.      

 

ADELAIDE, January 19.   There is a slight improvement in the   condition of Dr. Napier.        

NEW SOUTH WALES CONTINGENT

MESSAGE FROM MR. CHAMBERLAIN.  

SYDNEY, January 19.  

The Premier has received the following   cable from Mr. Chamberlain to-day :- "Her Majesty's Government has learned  

with great satisfaction of the despatch of the second contingent and also of the patriotic feeling in New South Wales. The   Queen commands me to express her thanks   for your renewed expression of loyalty."    

The troopship Surrey has completed her  

loading, and it is expected that she will  

clear the Heads early to-morrow morning.  

QUEENSLAND BUSHMEN'S CORPS  

EQUIPPED AS OVERLANDERS.  

BRISBANE, January 19.     At a public meeting held to-night it was decided at the suggestion of the Premier   to ask the Government to send a further   contingent, giving preference to bushman.   Probably the men will be fitted out as if for overlanding.    

AN ADMIRALTY BLUNDER.      

The "Daily Chronicle" says ''Hither-  

to we have hesitated to speak of the quality of the tinned meat supplied to   our transports, much of which has had to be thrown overboard. But we have made inquiries in quarters not likely to   be influenced by mere rumours, and we

find there suspicion that some of the meat supplied to the Government, for use on British transports was meat re-   jected by the United States during hos- tilities in Cuba, where it was piotu-     resquely known as 'embalmed beef,'   and relabelled with the mark of the   current year. Whatever blunder there   may have been, it must be laid, not at  

the door of the War Office, but at the   door of the Admiralty, which has under-   taken to feed the troops."      

HYMN FOR USE IN TIME OF WAR.  

The London Times states that the following hymn has been set to music   by Sir John Stainer, Mus. Doc.:-    

Exsurgat Deus.     1. Let God arise to lead forth those    

Who march to war;   Let God arise, and all His foes      

Be scattered far.   2. So Israel prayed, and Thou, O Lord,    

Wast with him then ;   Be with us now, who draw the sword    

For war again.    

3. Grant Thou our soldiers courage high,  

When foes are near,     To strive, to suffer, or to die,      

Untouched by fear.      

4. Grant strength to those who mourn

to-day   Their loved ones lost ;       Yea, those who give their best, nor stay  

To count the cost.    

 

5. Fight Thou for us, that we may fill    

Thy courts with praise ;    

Then teach us mercy, teach us still;    

The fall'n to raise. 6. Yet more and more, as ages run,  

Bid warfare cease ;       And give to all beneath the sun  

Love, Freedom, Peace.    

A. C. AINGER.    

SIR ALFRED MILNER.

"Cape Colonist," writing from Cape-

town to The Times of November 21, says:-  

In the Daily Chronicle just received here   the following statements are made, con-   tributed, it is said, by its correspondent    

here, who is a renegade Englishman fight-   ing for the Afrikander party as against   Imperial rule :-    

"The Afrikanders regard Sir Alfred Milner as keeping entirely aloof from   Dutchmen, who are never at Government House, which is overrun by Rand Leaguers.     Sir Alfred Milner is regarded as a purely     English Governor, and not as the head of     both races. The Dutch describe him as   Governor of the League."    

Knowing, as I do most intimately, the     true facts of the case, I can only charac- terise the aspersions of partisanship above     quoted as cruelly unjust and maliciously   untrue. No Governor into whose hands  

the destinies of this colony have been   placed evinced greater anxiety from the   first than did Sir Alfred Milner to win     the esteem and confidence of every   nationality in this colony, especially the   Dutch; and to this end, acting on the   well-known maxim that to understand a   people thoroughly, their tastes, sentiments,     and ideas, you must in the first place study v and become versed in their language,   Sir Alfred Milner Bet himself (not-   withstanding his multifarious duties) to   acquire a perfect knowledge of the Dutch

language, engaging a Dutch Reformed     Church minister as his tutor, and so well   did he succeed that at the late conference     with the President, Paul Kruger, he ad-   dressed him in good Cape Dutch instead of     in stiff official English, conceiving that he   could pay no greater compliment than in    

sinking for the time being his own lan- guage. Not only so, but from the first Sir     Alfred Milner traversed the colony from   east to west, attending every public func- ~r¡ tion and entering heartily and with sym-   pathetic interest into every effort made for    

the amelioration of the people of this   colony, and so assiduously did he cultivate   tho good opinion of the Dutch colonists   that a leading member of tho community,   in speaking of him, said his only fault was     his " Dutch proclivities."  

But, alas ! his knowledge of the Dutch '   language and his careful daily perusal of   the Dutch newspapers revealed a state of    

things for which he was wholly unprepared.     In the pages of a large section of the Dutch     press he first learned of the deeply laid   schemes of the Afrikander party to " throw   off the foreign yoke," and to establish a   Dutch Republic, and his speech at Graaf     Reinet was, I believe, made after he heard   that some Afrikander at that place had   fired at the Queen's flag.    

Tho position of Sir Alfred Milner has   for the past six months been one of extreme    

difficulty and painful isolation. With an   unsympathetic, if not actually hostile,   Ministry, with no official friend in whom     he could confide and take counsel, and with       a full knowledge of the disloyalty and dis-   affection of a large number of Afrikander     colonists and renegade Englishmen, he has

had " to battle the watch alone," conscious  

only that he was treading the path of duty   to this colony and to his Queen and   country.      

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down