Comments

Show 5 comments
  • Keepitshort 14 Jun 2009 at 17:12
    Aboriginal: Editorial advocating removal to King Island. Key quote #1: "We make no pompous display of Phi!lanthropy -- we say unequivocally, SELF DEFENCE IS THE FIRST I.AW OF NATURE. THE GOVERNMENT MUST REMOVE THE NATIVES -- IF NOT, THEY WILL BE HUNTED DOWN LIKE WILD BEASTS, AND DESTROYED!"
  • Keepitshort 14 Jun 2009 at 17:20
    Aboriginal: Editorial advocating removal to King Island. Key quote #2: "In the first place, they must be removed, either to the coast of New Holland, or King's Island. The latter is one of our Dependencies, fertile, well supplied with water, and no possibility of escape. There are two parties who have committed outrages -- the Oyster Bay and the Shannon parties. We would recommend their being taken, which couldeasily be effected -- placed at King's Island, with a small guard of soldiers to protect them, and let them be compelled to grow potatoes, wheat, etc. catch sea|s and fish, and by degrees, they will lose their roving disposition, and acquire some slight habits of industry, which is the first step of civilization. If they are put upon the coast of New Holland, they may be destroyed. If they remain here, they are SURE TO BE DESTROYED. If they are sent to King's Island, they will be under restraint, but they will be free from committing, or receiving violence, and we are certainly bound by every principle of humanity, to protect them as far as we can."
  • Keepitshort 14 Jun 2009 at 17:29
    Adoriginal: Editorial advocating removal to King Island. "Pragmatic" review of bad history to Dec 1826, and mention that aboriginal people are fighting for land, analogy with concurrent Xhosa Wars in South Africa, also North America: "It would be worse than useless, to shew how different things might have been -- it is enough to state things as they are ; and we find by every day's xperience, that the natives are no longer afraid of a white man -- that they know, how (sic) a gun is fired off, it is .seless. From attacking stock-keepers, they now attack huts, and in many instances, the fight hhas lasted for hours, until by dint of numbers, they have compelled the whites to retreat. They have tasted the sweets of civilized life, but they have no inclination for the labour of it. They have ceased to fear, and learn to abhor. They look upon the white men, as robbing them of their land, depriving them of their subsistence, and in too many instances, violating their persons. To discuss a question of this nature, it is necessary tb look at naked truths. It is too late to discuss the question, whether they might not have been civilized -- they have unfortunately seen nothing but pernicious examples. What intercourse has taken place,has produced only hatred, and revenge, and nothing, but a removal, can protect us from incursions, similar to the Caffrees in Africa, or the back-woodmen, in North America."
  • Keepitshort 14 Jun 2009 at 17:33
    Aboriginal: Editorial advocating removal to King Island: Commentary on trial of jack and Dick (executed for murder): "Having heard the disinctions in law, laid down by the Chief Justice in the Supreme Court, in the case of Jack and Dick, for murder, we tremble for the consequences to ur brother Colonists, on the one hand, whilst we are chilled with horror, with the probable results, on the other."
  • Keepitshort 14 Jun 2009 at 17:45
    Aboriginal: news Item p.3: "A Gentleman in the interior writes to his friend in town, that the natives are much worse than the late banditti of bush-rangers; and that Black Tom, and those with him, declare that they will murder every white man that they fall in with."

Add New Comment

49 corrections, most recently by anonymous - Show corrections

Colonial Times

HOBART TOWN:    

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1826.  

In conducting a Journal, which is under-    

stood to express the general sentiments and wishes of the people, and in some instances, to regulate and lead them, we are occasion- ally obliged to present those subjects to the   attention of our Readers, which the pressing necessity of the case requires, although they may be attended with painful results. It was this feeling which induced us to devote our space in the last two numbers, to the con- struction and operation of the Council, to the exclusion of our leading article, in continua- tion upon the political economy of this Go- vernment; and it is with the same feeling, that we now beg most earnestly, to draw the attention of all, to the present situation of those poor, wretched, but infatuated savages, the Aborigines of this Island. In devoting a few observations to the cause of humanity — in tracing the dangers to which the Settler must be exposed, and in pointing out a remedy, if possible, we are not only doing our duty, as Christians, but as Men ; and if we offer any observations which are entitled to weight, it is also the duty, as we are sure it will be  

the inclination, of Government, to act upon

them.

It would be worse than useless, to shew   how different things might have been — it is enough to state things as they are ; and we find by every day's experience, that the na- tives are no longer afraid of a white man — that they know, how a gun is fired off, it is useless. From attacking stock-keepers, they now attack huts, and in many instances, the fight has lasted for hours, until by dint of numbers, they have compelled the whites to   retreat. They have tasted the sweets of ci- vilized life, but they have no inclination for the labour of it. They have ceased to fear,

and learn to abhor. They look upon the white men, as robbing them of their land,     depriving them of their subsistence, and in too many instances, violating their persons.

To discuss a question of this nature, it is necessary to look at naked truths. It is too late to discuss the question, whether they might not have been civilized — they have un- fortunately seen nothing but pernicious ex- amples. What intercourse has taken place,

has produced only hatred, and revenge, and nothing, but a removal, can protect us from incursions, similar to the Caffrees in Africa, or the back-woodmen, in North America.

We deeply deplore the situation of the Set- tlers. With no remunerating price for their produce, they have just immerged from the

perils of the bush-rangers, which affected their property, and they are now exposed to the attack of these natives, who aim at their lives. We make no pompous display of Phi- lanthropy — we say unequivocally, SELF DE- FENCE IS THE FIRST LAW OF NATURE. THE    

GOVERNMENT MUST REMOVE THE NATIVES — IF NOT, THEY WILL BE HUNTED DOWN LIKE WILD BEASTS, AND DESTROYED!  

Having heard the disinctions in law, laid   down by the Chief Justice in the Supreme Court, in the case of Jack and Dick, for mur-

der, we tremble for the consequences to our brother Colonists, on the one hand,   whilst we are chilled with horror, with the probable results, on the other. It is impossi- ble to suggest a perfect plan, but having col- lected the opinions of imany intelligent per- sons, we are satisfied, that the first thing, is our own security; the second, the due and proper protection to the natives, and last,

and least, the expence of the measure to Go- vernment.           In the first place, they must be removed,

either to the coast of New Holland, or King's Island. The latter is one of our Dependencies, fertile, well supplied with water, and no pos- sibility of escape. There are two parties      

who have committed outrages — the Oyster Bay and the Shannon parties. We would

recommend their being taken, which could easily be effected — placed at King's Island,

with a small guard of soldiers to protect them, and let them be compelled to grow potatoes, wheat, &c. catch seals and fish, abd by de-

grees, they will lose their roving disposition, and acquire some slight habits of industry, which is the first step of civilization.

If they are put upon the coast of New Hol-

land, they may be destroyed. If they remain here, they are SURE TO BE DESTROYED. If they are sent to King's Island, they will be under restraint, but they will be free from  

committing, or receiving violence, and we are certainly bound by every principle of huma- nity, to protect them as far as we can.

We shall hail with joy any measure the Council may devise, to effectually relieve us from this calamity, but they may be assured           no half-measures will suffice, and as no one Member of the Council can speak upon this subject, experimentally, we hope they will   consult those who can, for it is one common     interest binds us all.    

We have heretofore frequently taken lip the subject of classification in our Gaols and Penal Settlements, and notwithstanding a great deal has been said upon it — about it, and in favour of it, nothing has as yet been done in furtherance of it. There appears to be a total indifference of this desirable object shewn ; and we, therefore, would again en- force the advantages which would inevitably be the result of solitary confinement being   resorted to in most cases, where now, indis- criminate confinement in the Penitentiary, and the abominable triangular punishments are made use of. Nothing can be more cer- tain, than the imperative necessity of abo- lishing both these methods of punishment (if it is intended to reform, and not render more ; hardened those on whom it is inflicted) unless it is the benefit which would ensue by their being abolished. When we assert this, the questions may very naturally be asked, why is it an imperative necessity ? what benefit is

certain io be obtained ? and what course, ought to be pursued ? We would say, it is an imperative necessity ; because, the pre- sent system tends more to demoralize, than to reform. In the first place, by the indis- criminate heaping together of all sorts of of- fenders, without regard to crime—former character—habits—or present course of life. A man, for instance, who has kept himself far removed from bad company—has been indus- trious—has been sober—has been honest in this country—has been well educated, and used to good society in England, perhaps, sent here more for an act of indiscretion, than of villainy—is for a trivial offence (per haps being out after eight o'clock, or missing his muster, thrust into the Barracks, among men who have committed the most abominable crimes—who have from their infancy been thieves—whose minds have been vitiated in early youth, and who have been taught to look upon every thing moral, as derogatory, to their character. These men taunt, ridicule, and in many instances offer personal vio- lence to the man who shall endeavour to keep aloof from them, and who is averse to join in their evil practices. By degrees, the disgust he felt at them at first, will wear off ; to avoid the ill-usage before alluded to, he will mix. in their society—he will become their companion—habit will teach him to look with indifference on those things which before had excited his horror and detestation ; and at last, he will become as bad as any of his as- sociates. Further, his having been treated with the same rigour as the vilest of charac- ters, will engender a hatred in his bosom against those very ordinances, which he ought rather to be brought to revere. He is hurled from his respectability, to the lowest of disgrace—unnoticed and undistinguished, he despairs of ever attaining to the character which has been taken from him; he there- fore gives way to all kind of vice, and comes out a blackguard, and a pest to society.— During his confinement, he has imbibed prin- ciples, which will, perhaps, cause him to ter- minate hts life in ignominy. Secondly, the use of torture is inhuman, and tends to de- moralize the man on whom it is indicted, in- asmuch, as it renders him more hardened and callous to infamy. We detest to see one man. torture another, and corporal punishment is torture. What can be more repugnant to hu- manity, nay, to even decency, than to see a poor wretch stripped, tied to a cart or trian- gle, his back lacerated and bleeding with stripes? What cap be more piercing to the bosom than his cries—his groans ? see him writhing with agony under - every lash.? Mark his countenance—his pallid cheek. See, unable to sustain the accumulated torture—he faints ! Can this be humane ? can this be ENGLISH ? Fie ! fie ! upon it, out upon it ! it is abominable! Further, the lash is not only an inhuman punishment, but it is an impoli- tic measure. The lash is a degradation, which no, Briton can look up after ; when he receives it, he loses all his national freedom—he is despised by all—he is shunned by all, and rainer than-meet the contumely, frown and scorn of the more respectable, who will not admit him into their society, he seeks the company of those who are worse than him- self. He is by his own disgrace taught to hate that which-is good. His smarting and scarred back, reminds him of the ignominy he has endured. We might say much more, but what we have already said, will be sufficient to prove it is an imperative necessity, that as both the present systems pf punishing pri- soners are radically bad, they should be abo- lished no soon as practicable.

With regard to the second question, "what   benefit would be certain to ensue ?" the an- swer is short and easy, lt is the decrease of crime—the reformation of prisoners—the quie- tude of the Colony, and the abolition of tor- ture. These would be the certain results of putting down the present system, if a proper course was pursued afterwards, and this brings on the last, though by no means least

important questions our theme. - "What course ought to be pursued ?" In our opinion, the following: — First, let solitary cells be built, and constructed on the same principle as they are doing at Sydney. The advantage of this is evident, for, by being alone, cut off for a time from every thing which would ab- stract his attention from his own situation, the culprit would be led to refleet on those deeds which had brought him there, and pro- bably resolve amendment ; at least, the chance is equal with that of his doing so either by flogging, or the present system of Peniten-    

tiary discipline, both of which we have already shewn, will only tend to make him much worse than he already is. Secondly, let   only the bare necessaries of life, bread and

water, be admitted within these cells, on any pretence (excepting illness, to be determined by the Surgeon) ; let tobacco, tea, or any other luxury, be strictly prohibited. Here

the advantage is equally obvious, as in the foregoing. "Nothing tends more to bring a man to a sense of his own guilt, than priva- tion ; and nothing tends so much to refor- mation the sense of his own guilt. Thirdly, let the offenders be allowed to, take the air every day, but to be strictly prohibited from speaking to each other. The advantage of this, is in order in some degree to make the confinement irksome—to be prevented from communicating with others at the same time that they are present is certainly a severe punishment, but not a torture. Fourthly, let the punishment for minor offences, be impri- sonment in the cells for any period not less than twenty-four hours, or more than twenty- eight days, according to the nature, of the offence, of course the second offence to meet a more lengthened period than the first.— Fifthly, let those who are labourers in the employ of Government be classified, not ac- cording to crime—so much as conduct.—

Sixthly, let those in the Barrack. Iron Gang,

be subject 'to similar classification, and al- lowed for good conduct to be reieased from their irons, arid placed in another class.— Seventhly let only those who are incorrigi- ble be put in the Gaol Gang, at the old Bar- racks.—Eighthly, let these men also be pro- hibited from tea, &c. This would serve to render this gang so much dreaded, that it would go far to do away with flogging for there are many men who would think more of being deprived of tobacco, &c. for one month in this gang, than of receiving fifty lashes monthly. Let those gangs who are sent upon the roads, be sent in classes ; for in- stance, let Lemon Springs gang, be No. 1 ; Bagdad, No. 2 ; Brighton, No. 3, &c. By this means, the same classification-would be ob-

served with regard to the Road parties, as in. the Barracks ; and it would be also advise able, that, on the report of the Superinten- dent, of the good behoviour of any man he should allowed to be put in some lighter gang—Tenthly, none of the prisoners in   the gaol gang, hold any communication with any one.—Eleventhly, let those prisoners who   behave well in any class, for a certain time, be stimulated to continue in their good con- duct by some reward or indulgence ; and let it be required of the Superintendent of every gang, that he carefully notice, accurately note, and faithfully report the conduct of each man in his gang, in order that he may receive such indulgence; in the event of his proving deserving of it. And twelfthly, let the prac- tice of flogging be entirely put down, and privation, hard labour, and solitary con- finement, substituted. We have thus gone through a few of the most striking features of the plan we would wish to see adopted. Our, limits prevent our entering more into detail at present. Therefore, we content ourselves with giving the hint, hoping, to see it im- proved, and acted upon by those who have such affairs at their control. In giving our                     opinion, we do so respectfully—we do so tem- perately, and we hope we may prove instru- mental in putting down the triangular tor- ture— in ameliorating the case of the deserv- ing—in punishing the guilty, and in effec- tually benefitting the Colony in general. If, we have strayed beyond the space which we generally allow such matters, we must apo- logise, and plead the importance, if not the general interest of our subject. We would     however observe, that all this cannot be ef- fected without time. We admit that much is

first to be done to accomplish so politic an un- dertaking ; and the most material thing is the erection of solitary cells, after a similar plan as those at Sydney. This operation, we think, would be more beneficial to the Co- lony, than a new Government-house, unless indeed, that both can be carried on at the same time.                

We noticed in the Government Gazette of last week, a very elaborate and sounding ar- ticle, on the subject of population. Some of its assertions maj be true, and whether they are or not, we will not give ourselves the trou- ble to enquire ; but, at the same time, others are so palpably false and inconsistent, that we cannot refrain from noticing them. We would ask the Editor bf that Journal, upon what grounds he has reason to believe that the Mother Country will, not afford any in- ducement to labourers but of employment to emigrate to these Colonies ? and when he sa- tisfies us on this head, we would again en-

quire, how it is that he can see no cause to re- gret this ? We tieli.eye^^'the.'';'Dpctorvtpbe;a Colonist, and as such,'we cannb\imagirie how he can be blind to tfte. advantages which must result from poor emigration, to; this Colony. " There > is,(he acknowledges) a'gerieral put cry against the .high prices* pfrjabpur,'/ and yet he." does not see sp serious a; cause, for apprehension on';thisjscoreras many'wp,i»}.d insist upon." We haye insisted upon its being a cause of com plaint j but we never said it was of apprehension ; theevil is riot likely to be apprehended, but.it is to be te^

arid we still maintain, that the .encourage- ment of poor emigration, would be attended with the most beneficial effects. We db riot

write,; we clo riot argue about the benefUj which England would;receive. Weyha'velthe] welfare orbur adopted land at heart, and we dp, not think ourselves disloyal^,; when, we erideavbur^jtpyfprward'^^h

'farly, when what we advance cannot be pre .judicial to th'et'Mother Country, if it js of no 1^riefit;tp;Ker.^MyBujt ;tb;|fbe! ppirit. iit^bulidt appear, that the Doctor wishes us tb believe, that la'bbur; is more, expensive in Americay than he.re. «This,is preposterous, as it is well known,- that- thp new .world, is one bf thej cheapest places in .the universe for labour, a's! well* as,:other ,things. ' Andwith re'garcVt'o: what he advances, respecting the riupber pf poisonerswhip bbtaiir ce^itllcatiM'pf^e^apjni^ -ticket-p£leave men,r^cVwP-beg^f^bservjeif 'that th$se'4$n^^^

brought up to a life pf idl^ hufacturirigy^

verjr'iiftlei-.s^rSrice;tb!tlib!igricultUristV; They

cannot perform the work required by a f*r

mer?their pursuits have been wholly differ* ent, and they.know almdst as much abo,i* » P^gnj^^^^^agnculturai;irijrilei«e?? a£ a icow"dpes,-about/a musket; KThb-sam' wteMpho,M>°d r^pecting the ^e^tioh ju the Government Gazette* that^ribsbbS are new hands distributed, than a brbporth*

nate number aro returned upon the hands of Government j and; on this subject we mav ^tate, that ari additional j and a verycogent *^on ?aJ. ^.S^^wijy; the Settler should do So, which is, that the present pried fe wheat, which we are aware to bc as low «l 5s. per bushel, jwill not;enable him to Inn' port fiveor six men, to db ope man's Wort" A.'""^Fn.®"'k"°ws npthirig about farmj ?V will eat as. much?drink as much?wear f' n^ch-^n foct, cpsTas^much as him whodoesl When he takes off. new hands, he does so under the,hope pf^get^ better, or mor° useful men; and,; if he finds what ho cots are nb better than those he had before WJ ask, is it unreasonahle in him to turn them in ? We maintain, that if the free ernie?, tion of poor people?we mean farmine men was encouraged, it, would not only brfne the' price ot labour to its. proper level, but it would ensure the Settler from havW his work neglected, which at present is the case

in consequence of riot one in thirty pf the hands he has assigned to him, or is able to procure by hire pr otherwise, uriderstandinff the system of work proper for a farm, lt is not in any way material to the farmer, whether he gets his work done by prisoners, or free men,, provided he gets it dorie, lt is not ma- terial which he. employs, when both are equallyuseless tb hiiri; lt is riotaf ree man he wants, if that free man knows no more about agriculturethan a prisoner? He wants a use- ful man, and it matters not whether he be free pr bond,; so that he is useful. But it may^ be observed, that the distress which h felt in England, is not sb much among the agriculturists, as the manufacturers; and it | may^be asked, as they are'usefess to theTas' mariiari Settler, what benefit would ensue fromj/je/j' coming hither. We reply, we do not talk;about the- means of relieving the dis- tress in England, we'leave that to those who haye wiser heads; but \ve think, speak, write, print, arid publish, for the good bf Tas mariiaV We would wish ¦'agriculturists^ (and not riiechariics, artizaris, br manufacturers) to be encouraged to emigrate hither?we have enough of the latter transported. We would be clearly understood^ when we so strenuously advocate the cause of poor emigration, to mean that of labouring arid farming men.

It appears by the accounts lately received^ that the affairs of these Colonies have been brought under the consideration of the British

Parliament, through the medium of General¦? Sir Thomas Bhisbane, . and Major Goul

BURN.v'-';JBotM

themselves as well pleased with those senti- mentsbf the "Colonists, which actuated 'd de rn and for the alteration bf Colonial'Laws, hut more especially for the privilege bf Trial 'by Jury, that boast of every true-hearted Briton. Anti it is with pleasure we stated that they appear io have fulfilled the promise made by theni, that they, would lay the" wishes bf this distant people before His Majesty's Ministers, and not only this,"but~ also they have : endeavour- ed by their 'exertions and interest, to; press

the. subject-sb far as possible on the attention ' pf the Home Government. A new; Act is in active preparatioivfor the better Administra- tion of Justice'; within these ^Colonies ;-'by which we ;hear.-we,aretb ha'Vbjyhat we have sb long arid5 earnestly desired?*f Titi al by Jury;',; and also that pur Councils are to be

very; corisiderably;augmented;: A njimber of mercantile arid agricultural Gentlemen are to. compose these bodies,1 whoj by represent itVg the'pebple, will form a "House of As- sembly." This is the grand desideratum; this is thefirst step to content, prosperity, and happiness." This is the riieasure to secure the welfare'of the 'Colonists. 'When this, is. the ca se,' we sh al 1 li ear bf;' rib hibre _unriecessary expenditure?-nb riibrb'Acts which nobody can understand; but Ave shall have: a plain, open j blatter bf fact Government, which will hear all sides and despise norie; Aijixipusly we await the:arrjval bf the wished-for intel- ligence, that Britain has thought us riot un- worthy thbsei:great privileges which have distinguished all her other Colonies, by which

\vb ihaintainibiirnatural bbast pf4t Fueepom.

In our, last nuhtber^wevmenfipnedj that Mr. RpAMbNT had been appointed ;by the Home Government^ as Clerk of the Council; and, although his appointmenthas not been ofH cjaHy published,i we' believe it has been so notified tb hiiri by the Local Goverhirient, that he is tb'filrthe situation bf Clerk to one

of the Couricilsybut^whichbf the twoi we « have notfbeeniable-correctly to learn. From what* We hayeibeen rible'to; gather, there ap- pears'- sufficient "grounds for the supposition, that it is bfthe'LegisIative; arid Captain Mon T^u'wiUiretairithe bfticebfClerk to the sExecu'tivbi By; thisy" it would appear* that the pbople of thisColbny are in future.to be saddlediwUH the expence of 1 two Clerks ot -the? Cdiincilsy-when one would be tully sufli cient to perform both'duties, -ilt is therefore much -to be 'wished (without anypersonal feeling we say it), that Mr. BelibMniajr not taU'lifitb: qliftp so^Pbd^hi«^Captairi ^Montafgu \: hairdbrie*; who (if we*re|rightly

iritB'medi'aridrbiirvauthbrity; is) among the >, "rabst respectable) has fbi- the^shbrt; time, he 'hasomciated^CIerJcUb the' twb:Councils, received, by way of salary, in addition Jo ms ^IFpay^asCaWa^

'sirm ot money, pretty nearly approaching "ONE-TiibusASb TbuNbs! n^potwUhstana-.

and shbuld never nave given puonvj^ *y -i

had 'we-hot been1 again assured most, so 1 leirinly bf its1 truth, ff Ht reallyMs correct, a more prodigious and lavish expenditure oi public rooney could not:possibly have been made. If the state <>f the ColbiiialRevenue, wai here, as it is every whera aliei puWisa*

«d^ttrt'r/tfWy,i'-.iiisteaay.brfl»jfMa^,--we,inIght readily bb convinced if this has, really been the case or not;v but as it is, we must -rest contented, and on bare'surmise, up

of tlie year, br what futurey itime^ithe^ Lpical Government may deem fit tpprder the;publi cation pf the. accounts ypf, the Colonial Re ve- nue and Expenditure.; y . v V

The public expression of feeling, respect- ing the appointment from home, bf jWr.;Scott, to'the pfiice of Surveyor-GeneraU and pf Mr. Beamont, to that of the Clerk of the Coun- cil, has been manifested in the warmest man- ner. We are glad to see things go on in the old path, arid tliat all the movements here, do not meet with approbation at home.. We have heard pf certain expressions; having been

used at the time bf Mr. B. receiving the official

_i'f_j.J /_^-l «-: .ur ti..._* * I. ? ._

give them all the money they wanted, they uinuld.resign ; but the Parliament nothing inti- midated, reduced the estimates Very consi- derably, and the Ministers, after chewing the cud, at length bent to the feeling of the times, and offered to do with less. We hope, jVJr. Beamont's appointment j will not drive any person to carry a threat of this descrip-

tion into effect, but that it will be deemed ex- j pedient to submit to riecessity. > ' ¦ ]

These appointments shew very clearly how I matters are going op in Dbwning-street;- We j have seen many private Letters from Gentle- men, materially interested in the Colony,and' the Public may rest satisfied, that in a short tune, greater changes will take place.

Some interesting papers have been this week put into our possession, which appear to throw very considerable light on the fate of the unfortunate French Navigator, Admiral Count de la Perouse, which has so long been, and to this day continues to be, involved in mystery. Further particulars have been pro- mised us, and if they are received our Rea- ders may depend on our giving a detail of these interesting circumstances the earliest opportunity. ?

Orders have been received from home, that

all the proceedings of the Supreme Court since its establishment shall be made out and trans-

mitted to His Majesty's Ministers forthwith., Theie will be a famous budget; and by the ! «.p. officio informations, itwilLbe seen Tri Eng- ' land what is termed libel in the Antipodal regions. We suppose this information is re- quired to correspond with the black and green hags, which went home tb His Majesty's Go- vernment about twelve months ago, and which were so muCh alluded to, not only in our Paper, but in many of the English News-

papers.

- , -?y»>-<-»> Ofci ? .

On perusing the Government Gazette of last week, which we did with rather unusual attention, we were struck with the injurious ^tendency pf the average prices of commodi- ties, as given every, week in that Journal. It -is surprising thal neither us, nor any of our Correspondents should have seen this before, ¦but, as the old woman said, " better late than riever." AU the statement, or nearly so, is wrong, but we will only notice one or two of the items.?First, wheat, 4s. 6d. a bushel. Is this an average price of wheat (although attempting to give an average price, when there is no market, is ridiculous), or is it not the lowest price ?. We are ready to admit, that it has been sold so low, but at the same time know that a much higher price has been obtained, consequently it cannot be called a fair average price;?Second, barley, 3s. a bushel. Where is it to be got ? If the wor- thy Doctor has it laying on his hands, at that price we will be glad tp take all, he,cari bring us.. And we would beg to correct him, and say that the current price of barley is as great, if not greater than that of wheat, and ?also to point out to .hinvthat, in the event of -this 'statement finding its way to .England, and there falling into the hands of persons who have thoughts of emigrating to these" Colo- nies, it will go far to make them abandon their project, for they will reason thus.??* It is not worth my while to go tb the ex pen ce and inconvenience of a Jong sea voyage, se- paratingmyself from my friends; and going to clear forest land in the Antipodes, at a great additional expenHce, if Lcanget no more for my produce than this.";; We feel assured he will see; the/truth of this, and in future give a more fair report, or no report at all.

A Gallant Son of Mars has been tot some

firn'e peculiarly attentive to a Lady, pp the

otherside of theIsland,whichi the Launces toniaris; riot understanding ariy.thing bf Pla^ tonic love, br^Frerich manners, were illiberal enough to construe unfavourably. We un- derstand, that a short time since, this hero was caught in the net of Cupid, and that he depa rted the house rather more abruptly than he entered it. We hope that he made an ho- nourable Tetreat, and that, as he is in the ha- bit of being very regular in his attendance at Church, he feels no compunction at any part pf the Decalogue. We dp not wish to make further allusions, butwe could,if necessary^ fire another shot. -y';>::>-; .;./¦ ?,< ."'.'¦ ;

We learn,that the late Attorney-General, J. T. GtiiiwiDRAND, Esq. has been offered by His Majesty's Government, the choice of two several appointments, as Attorney-General§ one at the Cape of Good Hope, the other at the Isle of France. But, wei should hardly Hunk Mr. Gellibrand would give up his ex- tensive private practice Jn thi»;Colony, for *ither of the above appointments, although both* nb doubt, are farmbre; lucrative ;thaa ?his'Jate^brie:here^-^^-:^;:^:;'^''r-v;--y,:yi'K jyy-.:'';.;-''

We also hear, that Mr; GellibrandI intends, to accompany His Honor Chief; Justice* Pept per, on the Northern Circuit:.--We understand i)is Honor will leave towuitp-morrow week.

We were surprised,at >nbt;.seeing any of the. new appointments officially notified in last Saturday's Gazette. We.rieed, not add that the public are.anxiously looking for the issue of ^morrow.i't ?,/,'\.' \ '.., , ?'' ,'; J

We some linye since, published an account pf the proceedings of the Game Societyj re- cently established here, for the express pur- pose of importing Game frpmy Enghirid;;' We were not^awarejthatthere was any species^ bf gairoe irivthis iColbriy, except quails^ arid' snipes;; buty/it; appears frbcri the following colloquy, whichi; toot place? at at houser in Macquarie-street, a short time prior to ohe bf the ships 'recently, sailing for Sydney) that there are Woodcocks, also! We dare riot

give names. " . ;;/:

A. I am astonished how you managed it ?

B. Oh 1.1 had been laying a trap for the last three.months, and now 1 shall go away for a short time, and let things get quiet. In the meantime, I have set & few springs to catch Woodcocks, and by the time I return, I have no doubt some will be taken I There is a mys- tery in this, which we do not pretend to un- derstand, nor what ts meant by the term, ¦«' Woodcock," but if ive had the. last edition of the Law Dictionary, we might perhaps explain it. We lay it before our Readers, pledging ourselves to the truth' of the state- ment, and though we do not pretend to ex- plain itsapplication, there are some who can, and the association of ideas arising from it 1

------------------------------------------------------------------------            

We some time ago noticed, that Govern- ment had purchased two small farms, near New-town,' formerly belonging to Dr. Brom- ley.?It has been long understood, that these farms were bought for the purpose of trying experiments; and for which, a.Mr. Robert-

son was engaged, with a competent salary, as a Superintendent. These experiments have as.yet produced no beneficial result. As the expense of these, establishments are great, we may say immense, (there, being,, we un derstand,_ no less thau sixty men constantly kept, which at the lowest calculation will cost i?40 per annum each, and six or seven carts, with teatris of horses, regularly em- ployed from the Public Works every day in conveying'from town horse manure) the Pub- lic will certainly look for some»coming advan- tages; and if no public advantage is likely to be gained by these experimental farms, why are they not thrown up as at Syd- ney, in order that the numerous men em- ployed on them may be distributed among the Settlers, who are much in want of labour- ing hands. Establishments like these should certainly not be kept up for supposed pri- vate ends, while'they are supported at the public expense.

In' our last number we mentioned that Cap- tain Ostler, of the ship Marquis of Hastings, had drowned himself, after being detected in an attempt to burn that fine vessel, to pre- vent some contraband goods, which had been taken on board, bein* discovered, lt appears that on the same morning, the 9th of Sept. when this circumstance took place, a note was found on the desk in his cabin to this effect .* .«*¦.U;A Gad crew, and bad first officer have been the destruction of W. Ostler." At two o'clock on the previous day, a fire was dis- covered, but soon extinguished, in the storer room of the ship. It must have been put into the scuttle by some person maliciously inclined. Captain Ostler struck his forehead, replying to Mr. Marlin, that it was a very strange thing, and then retired to his cabin. The vessel put into the Cape of Good Hope by desire or the crew, for refreshment, The fore and spring stays were found burned by vitriol. -She had put into Mossel Bay in dis- tress on the 1st of the same month. Row, the Chief Officer," had been suspended from duty by Captain Ostler on the 9th of August., One thousand chests of tea were sold at Ba- tavia to defray the expenses of repairing the damage sustained in the Java sea, and coffee taken in to supply thc_ deficiency.

It must be in the recollection of all our Readers, that the removal of the Seat of Go- vernment, first to Brighton, and then to New Norfolk, was begun with the erection of small buildings. Loreto, the new monument of official wisdom, has been commenced like its abortive brothers of. Brighton and New Norfolk, by building several small houses in its vicinity, as a pledge, we presume, that, a great house shalLbe built. The-foundation stone of Loreto itself is not yet laid; and we would recommend the individual of " deed

be-done" celebrity, as a fit person to perform this ceremony, at which we mean to be pre. sent, and watch the hand that lays the first stone : it would require some nerve we think. But, probably this ceremony will be a petto concern, like the edifice, itself. Some of our friends have suggested, that a portable Go- vernment-house, might, be made bf wood, to move on wheels, arid to be dragged into town on" birth-day. festivals. .We have great re- spect for our friends, but we cannot concur with them in this, scheme. We would much rather see our young Tasmanian beauties lose their shoes in the mud, and arrive nudis pe- di bus, at Loreto. '.:

THE NATIVES. -- On Monday last, the na- tives again attacked the sawyer's hut, about three miles from Mr. Kemp's, at the back of the Cross Marsh. They robbed the hut of every article it contained; but the men, we are glad to state, escaped unhurt. A Gentle- man in the interior writes to his friend in town, that the natives are much worse than the late banditti of bush-rangers; and that Black Tom, and those with him, declare that they will murder every white man that they fall in with. There are various opinions as to the cause of these attacks by the aborigines. -- That the Van Diemen's Land Company, by settling on their very exterisiye grant on the north-western part of the Island, which has long been a haunt for the Black Tribes, have drove them upon the settled districts; and that the recent execution of black Tom and Dick has kindled their animosity against the whites, are amongst the; most prevalent.    

^AccibENT.^^A? fiW^youthi;inanted:fJpnri; StbkesV^was-lately-^rid drowned iri>^the; North Esju'f It^Yawears^that' his Shod jfeliad; been.lying in the river for three weeks, having been missing during the whole of that period.

%;',-.¦¦^¦¦-./;?¦.-, .¦;:¦¦?':,¦=:¦:¦,: :^^r^--;;^""-';;-¦?¦'.?«:£%*

By the latest accounts received in the Co lony-,;.;we;::ieanrM>aA'the\British are still in ?the peaceable poaseitoibn/pfthewhole Indies. 1 W h eii^bnc«r.the forin ida bl e; jg hu r t poor, w n i c h

had ;sbylong;hield bu t,^w as5 ayerthro wri'",: li if Ie more i^maijied'tbybb^dpne' to establish;the British'ppwer'iri' Indra*;;,aiid we arp;happy to fiud that Peace' has^takeri; the place bf the dreitdfulblpbdshed^whlch has so long devast ed that valuable portion "bf the British do- minions. ^;;.y'-.y'.''.' ¦/'' '"';.'.'¦' :.'.:.7

We rejoice tb....observe the great benefit which the soil has received by'the late rains, particularly those bf Saturday last, which were heavy and continued.y The show for a pples t his season is. very grea t, a rid. we may safely how calculate on an abundant crop, as the fruit is getting pretty .strong. But the late winds have done much riiiscliief among the newly! formed green-gages' and plums, which have been scattered in all directions, and lay: like gravel in those gardens* which were exposed to the hurricanes. Upon the whole, fruit promises to be very plentiful.

¦'¦' ?. ? <»> m>'-.. -¦¦¦¦¦¦?

¦ The Legislative Council have been sitting during the whole of the week,-we under- stand, respecting the violence of the Natives. ** It is rumoured, that another "snug little Board of Enquiry" is on foot, connected with one of the Public Departments. Some of the new appointments have given rise to this " we

guess.1' - ¦

We have seen a copy of the official Paper of the Cape pf Good Hope, formerly known by the name of 'the " Cape Town Gazette." lt is now called " The Cape of Good Hope Go- vernment Gazette;" and contains nothing but official matter. ; ?

Yesterday a draft of one hundred prisoners, from the Gaol and Penitentiary,, were ship- ped on board a Government vessel, for Mac- quarie Barbour. ?

We very lately alluded to a negociation on the part of Government, for the purchase of Airs. Gilletts house, situated in Campbell street, and which has so lon* been erecting. We now learn,, that Mrs. Gillett has refused the 4600 offered by the Government ; and, in consequence, orders have been given that

the house be finished forthwith. <

On Sunday last the first marriage which, has been solemnized in any other place on this side of the Island, than St. David's Church, took place at Clarence Plains, be- tween Thomas Free and Mary Ann Waterson, both natives of the Colony. The Rev. R. Knopwood, M. A. who is Chaplain for the district, and who regularly performs Divine Service every Sunday at that Settlement and Kangaroo Point, performed the ceremony. We suppose that all the Colonial Chaplains

will now be invested with similar powers.

- - ..? ' ?gah* mti».i

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down