Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Tagged (None yet)

Add Tags

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

1 correction by doug.butler - Show corrections

"THE PASSION-

FLOWER."

WELL PRODUCED AND ACTED.

The revival of "The Passion Flower" by the Turret Theatre management deserved a larger audience than gathered to see it on

Saturday night. For this play of Benavente's   has an unusual plot; it has been beautifully produced by Mr. Scott Alexander, and it embodies some splendid acting. Except for one or two minor changes, Saturday's cast was the same as that at the performances earlier in the year. Thus, Miss Phyllis McGrath and Miss Adele Quinn were able to represent forcefully once more the two women, mother and daughter, who come into conflict so strangely, yet under conditions of such piercing psychological truth, because they are loved by the same man. Apart from the intensity of their portrayals of character, both actresses were worthy of the highest praise for the clearness and flexi- bility of their enunciation.

Neither of the two new members of the cast played his part convincingly. Mr. Jack Appleton, as the weak-spirited Norbert, was never for a moment in repose, but always staggering melodramatically to and fro; and Mr. James Hatten, as the servant, Bernabe, mumbled his lines, and had frequently to be prompted.

A special feature of "The Passion Flower" is its stage setting. Each of the two scenes sets the Spanish atmosphere immediately, by the very simplest means. In their sim- plicity lies their high artistic value. It is interesting to recall that "The Passion Flower" was presented here in a screen version seven or eight years ago, with Norma Talmadge in the role played on the Turret Theatre stage by Miss Quinn.

Digitisation generously supported by
Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation
Digitisation generously supported by

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down