Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

4 corrections, most recently by anonymous - Show corrections

PERSONAL PARTICULARS.

[As it is difficult in some cases to obtain a record of the services of Australian sol- diers who have been killed or wounded in action, we shall be glad to publish short personal notes on the careers of such offi- cers or men, provided that the paragraphs are duly authenticated by a relative.]  

CAPTAIN F. M. HOOKE.  

Captain Frank Morton Hooke, whose   death from wounds is reported, was    

a son of Mr. V. W. Hooke, of       Brighton, who is in the firm of Messrs. Groves, McVitty, and Co. He was 26 years of age, and was a single man. As senior captain of the 6th Battalion he was one of the most popular officers in the force. Colonel Semmens, under whom Captain Hooke served, stated the other day that he   was deeply grieved to hear of his death.   When Colonel Semmens was given his com- mand he telegraphed to Captain Hooke at Bendigo asking him if he would take charge

of a company. Captain Hooke was in Mel- bourne next day. "Besides being person- ally popular," said Colonel Semmens,  

"Captain Hooke was one of the most effi- cient officers of his rank at the front. He held

certificates for almost every department of military work-signalling, engineering,  

musketry, topography, field sketching, and   light horse work." Captain Hooke was educated at the Brighton Grammar School, and began his military career in 1908, at the age of 19 years, as a second lieutenant in the 6th Australian Infantry Regiment. He reached the rank of lieutenant in the    

same corps two years later, and was made   a captain in March, 1912. In the following July he transferred to the 63rd Infantry   Regiment, and was seconded from that   corps for temporary duty as an area officer at Bendigo in 1913. He held that appoint-   ment at the outbreak of the war.    

A pathetic circumstance connected with Captain Hooke's death was that two days       after he had been notified of his son's     death Mr. Hooke received letters from brother officers holding out even hope of   Captain Hooke's early return to Australia.       One of these letters was from Lieutenant   Spargo, who was also wounded, and read     as follows:- "Frank was hit by a dum-dum      

bullet in the shoulder and fragments   entered his side, doing little damage. The     wound in the shoulder was more serious, so much so that the arm had to be ampu-   tated at the shoulder. I fully expect that in a few weeks he will be sent to England,   and then home to Australia. Most of our officers have been wounded and half of our men, and many, unfortunately, are  

killed."    

SERGEANT T. A. SPRITCH.  

Sergeant Thomas Arthur Spritch (killed  

in action at the Dardanelles) was born at The Semaphore, Adelaide, and was 36 years of age. With the exception of Mrs. M.   Crow (sister), of Commercial Bank, Wood-     end, Victoria, his relatives reside in South  

Australia.

SERGEANT H. D. HOGBEN.

Sergeant Harold D. Hogben (killed in ac- tion) was 23 years of age, and was born in     Goornong, where his father, Mr. William Hogben, of Bayne street, Bendigo, formerly resided. Sergeant Hogben, who was a first   cousin to the mayor of Bendigo (Councillor

W. Wilkie) was employed by the Bendigo  

City Council until about three years, ago, when he joined the Melbourne police force.

CORPORAL J. D. GROSE.

Corporal Joseph Donald Grose (killed) was 24 years of age, and was the son of   Mrs. Grose, of Soldier's Hill, Ballarat, his   father having died while he was on his way to Egypt. He was born at Gordon, and   was employed as a fitter at Munro's agri-

cultural machinery works.  

LANCE-CORPORAL H. R. BAKER.

Lance Corporal H. R. Baker (died of   wounds) was the son of Mr. J. O. R. Baker, of Hay, England. He enlisted from Numur-   kah, where he was employed by Mr. A. MacPherson. Whilst in Egypt he was offered a commission in the Indian army, but refused, as it meant returning there.     PRIVATE A. PAULIG.  

Private A. Paulig (killed) was the son of   Mr. H. Paulig, of Curtis street, Ballarat   East. He was shot on June 2, and had his     21st birthday a few days previously. He had declined a commission in India. His brother also was killed in Gallipoli.

PRIVATE J. McDONALD.

Private John McDonald (killed) lived with his mother at Mount Pleasant, Ballarat.

He was born at Mount Blowhard, and was 28 years of age. He was engaged at farm

work.  

PRIVATE A. H. McCOY (New Zealand.)

Private A. H. McCoy, of Canterbury   (N.Z.) Battalion (died of wounds), was     the son of the late G. H. McCoy, LL.B., and   grandson of the late Professor Sir Frederick   McCoy, Melbourne University. He went to sea at an early age, and gained a cap- tain's certificate some years ago. He was visiting his people on holiday leave when

he enlisted. F. H. McCoy, of Melbourne,

is his brother.

PRIVATE G. R. HUGHES.

Private Griffith R. Hughes (died of

wounds) was the oldest son of Mr. Griffith     Hughes, engine-driver, Ararat. Prior to     enlisting he was a painter and decorator at   Williamstown, from which place he enlisted.     He was 21 years of age.  

PRIVATE R. A. ADAIR.  

Private R. A. Adair (died of wounds)   was 22 years of age, and was the son of Mr. J. Adair, formerly of Ballarat. He enlisted

in New South Wales.

PRIVATE H. HIRD.  

Private Harry Hird, who left with the 7th Battalion, 1st Australian Expeditionary

Force, died of wounds. He was 17 years of age when he enlisted, and a pupil of the Kyneton High School. His only close rela- tive is a young sister residing at Kyne-

ton.

PRIVATE R. J. OLIVER  

Private R. J. Oliver (killed in action) was  

the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Oliver,

Clunes, and late of Rutherglen and Won- thaggi. He was in the employ of Messrs. Beard Bros., Wonthaggi. He was 18 years  

of age.

PRIVATE E. ILETT.

Private E. Ilett was a native of Warrion,    

and was well known in the district. He was

19 years of age, and was the son of Mrs. F.  

Ilett, a widow.

PRIVATE A. H. AYRES.  

Private Arthur Henry Ayres (killed in  

action) was the third son of Mr. Charles Ayres, formerly of Terang, but now of Otago, New Zealand. He was a native of Terang and was 27 years of age. A brother is Mr. John T. Ayres, of Terang. He was a married man, and his widow is a daughter of Mrs. McRae, an old resident of Warrack-  

nabeal.

PRIVATE H. C. COLLINS.

Private H. C. ("Charlie") Collins (killed in action) resided with friends at Fairfield, and was employed as a draper at Tread- way's prior to enlisting. He was about 23 years of age, and his parents reside in Eng-   land. A brother is with the British forces

in France.

PRIVATE W. B. FLETCHER.

Private W. B. Fletcher was in the 14th Battalion. He leaves a wife and five young       children, now residing at Traralgon. He and his wife came from Edinburgh, Scotland, 4½ years ago. They lived in Berwick before   coming to reside in Traralgon. He was 35 years of age.  

PRIVATE A. McCALLUM.

Private Austin McCallum (killed) was tihe     son of Mr. J. McCallum, boot merchant, of Ballarat East. He was aged 22, and en-   listed at Sydenham, having previously been   engaged in the iron working trade. He has   a brother at the front. His cousin, Private     S. Smith, was reported killed a week ago.

CORPORAL A. M. PEARCE.

Corporal Arthur M. Pearce (killed) was   the son of Mr. Pearce, a State school     teacher at Bendigo. At the outbreak of

the war he was a clerk in the Australian   Mutual Provident Society. He was a noted footballer, having played with the   Melbourne team for ten years. He was the "full back" of the team and his dashes from goal were always features of the Mel- bourne play. He was a bona-fide amateur,   never even accepting his expenses. "Joe"

Pearce, as he was known to all interested in football, was one of the most popular players, and before he left Victoria the     Melbourne team and supporters entertained   him. In replying to the toast of his     health, he said: "I have thought this thing     over, and have considered it every way. I  

am young, strong, healthy, athletic, and I think I ought to go, and if I don't come       back, well, it won't much matter." In  

addition to being an interstate footballer he was a good cricketer, playing sub-district   cricket with the Coburg team, and was good         at lawn tennis and lacrosse. As a mark of   respect to his memory the Melbourne team wore crape arm-bands on Saturday.  

PRIVATE DANAHER.

Private E. B. Danaher (killed in action) was a son of Mr. D. Danaher, of 30 Shields       street, Flemington. He belonged to the 58th Essendon Rifles, under Lieut.-  

Colonel Elliott, and was one of the first to enlist. He was educated at the Boundary road State school, and was a   member of the A.N.A., Flemington branch.        

He was in the employ of Messrs. Armstrong and Allen, tinsmiths, Rankin road, Ken- sington. He was a nephew of Mr. Rod Danaher, of the Western Family Hotel, Swanston street, city.  

CORPORAL W. H. BARKLEY. (N.Z.).

Corporal W. H. Barkley (wounded) is 23 years   of age, and is a native of Ensay, Gippsland, and       has lived for the past three years in Duntroon, New Zealand, where he was in the Light Horse.       His mother resides in Bairnsdale.

PRIVATE J. HARDINGHAM.

Private Hardingham (wounded) was a resident   of Broken Hill, New South Wales. In 1913 he came to Melbourne to study theology, with a view   to taking holy orders in the Church of England     He was a student in St. John's College, East St.     Kilda, and was known in the Fern Tree Gully  

district where he acted in the capacity of lay  

reader.  

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down