Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

1 correction by donna.brooks - Show corrections

By Electric telegraph and Special

Messenger to Yass

RIOT AT LAMBING FLAT.

FATAL COLLISION BETWEEN RIOTERS

AND POLICE.

| FROM OUR SPECIAL COMMISSIONER.]

BURRANGONG, SUNDAY, 6.30 p.m.

THREE of the ringleaders of the late riots were arrested to-day. Great excitement prevails at the present time, and a " roll-up " is now coming from Tipperary Gully to release the

prisoners.

The whole of the force here are under arms, several of the stores in the town are filled with men armed to protect them.

11.30 p.m.

COLLISION WITH THE FORCE.-About 1000 men crossed the creek and made for the Camp.

A deputation of four arrived, and requested to see the officer in command of the camp. Captain Zouch and Mr. Commissioner Griffin received them. They asked if any, and what number, had been arrested with respect to the late riots. They were informed that three were arrested ; they then stated that they were re- quested to demand their release. Both Captain Zouch and Mr. Griffin firmly, yet coolly, de- clined to release the prisoners, informing the deputation at the same time that the law must take its course-that the parties arrested would be brought before the court on Monday morn- ing, and, exhorting them to return, impressed upon them the necessity of using their endea- vours to disperse the mob.

Scarcely had this taken place, and before Captain Zouch could get back to the camp, a  

volley was fired from the mob, and I became aware of the dangerous position I was in, as two or three bullets passed close to me.

Mr. Griffin read the Riot Act. The mob still approaching the camp, with cries of " Roll up," " Release the prisoners." Every endeavour was made, and caution given, to induce them to desist. Orders were at last given to fire. One volley was fired over their heads. This did not appear to intimidate them, and at last the mounted troopers were ordered to the front. They had scarcely drawn up when a volley was fired, and two of the troopers' horses fell. The excitement now became intense ; the troopers were now ordered to charge, but not to fire. Shots were fired in continual succession at them, and the greatest credit is due to the troopers for the cool ivay in which they, under these circumstances, obeyed their orders. The mob now closed in and approached the camp. They were again cautioned. Heedless of this, they endeavoured to make a rush. Orders  

were given, and the foot police fired two volleys ; orders at the same time being given to the mounted men to charge. This was done, and the crowd were driven across the creek. Sergeant Brennan of the troopers was wounded, a bullet entering his arm; two other troopers are wounded, four horses were shot, one having four bullets in him. The troopers in their charge did great execution with their swords. At the present time it is impossible to say to what extent. Several are known to be wounded, one man was killed. The body lies at the Empire Hotel, he having been shot through the head. From the darkness of the night, as it was raining at the time, it is impos- sible at present to get a correct account of the

wounded.

I have had occasion to speak of the proceed- ings that have taken place here on several occasions ; but in this instance I wish it to be distinctly understood that the officers in charge here deserve ' the thanks of the colony for the cool and determined way in which they endea- voured to prevent these unfortunate proceedings, and, finding it impossible to prevent a collision, for the manner in which they allowed the crowd to disperse. I cannot particularise one more than another; I was present throughout the whole proceedings, and wish to state that for up - holding the law and endeavouring to stop these illegal proceedings, all the officers, commissioners, and men engaged on these fields deserve the thanks of all classes in the colony. The Government will now, it is to be hoped, be fully alive to the state of this place, and will find that the accounts I have been obliged to send have not been exaggerated.

MONDAY, 3 a.m.

All at present is quiet. Reports say that another " roll-up " is to take place early this

morning.

The force here are still under-arms. Raining hard at present.

Escort, 3123 ozs., and £420.

[The above should have reached us on Monday night, but did not, owing to the telegraph line being interrupted (between Berrima and Goulburn) from Monday till yesterday atternoon, and as the Govern- ment had possession of the line for upwards of four hours yesterday evening, it did not reach us till

midnight.]

Digitisation generously supported by
Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation
Digitisation generously supported by

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down