Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Tagged (None yet)

Add Tags

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

No corrections yet

Sale of the Tocal Stud.

[By tub Yaqbant.1

I suppose that I may safely set down tho sale of the Tocal horses on Tuesday as rather more than fairly successful, and Mr. T. S. Clibborn and his assistants, including genial Georgo Rowe, tho Mephistophelian Tom Payten and the inevitable whip are to bo complimented upon the result. And just hero I would' liko to say that the Reynolds family should bo eternally grateful

that such a place as JNew Zealand nnas a piace uu tho map, although, perhaps, they may be pardoned for considering. that any little favours they recoivo from the land across tho Tasman Sea is only in the way of recompense for providing tho Maorilanders with Frailty, the PocliahontaB of 'ustralia. New Zealand was represon ted yesterday by the. sturdy little Dan O'Brien, L. D. Nathan, and J. B. Williamson, and the trio of innocents abroad formed a little corner of their own, whence bids camo frequent and free. MessrB. Nathan and Williamson each havo small but select studs in the land of tlie inoa, but the latter was also on the look-out for something to suit his fellow countryman, Mr. Marshall. He is a nierry soul, is the self same cheery-faced, good-looking . J. B. William son, and Mr. Clibborn never lacked a starter, for the visitor called across the ring, 'Put me down a tenner, for everything and anything,' and this too previous generosity subsequently landed him with a couple of animals that he didn't want. ' Fancy 1' says he, ' coming all the way from New Zealand to buy ten guinea horses,' and I extended to, him my sympathy and my good right hand and commiserated in a stylo befitting the occasion. I would not be surprised to learn that Mr. William son is an Irishman, but I havo a shrewd suspicion that Mr. Nathan isn't. He is not a man to be bustled, but ho had a rare battle with his mate for Storm, whose relationship to Sou'-Wester, who lias done excellent service for New Zealand under silk and at the stud, was not forgotten. The daughter of Goldsbrough was sant off the mark by Mr. Wil liamson's tenner, and she climbed up tb 810 guineas, when the starter's pluck was rewarded, although he had previously offered to toss Mr.' Nathan for her. However, tho latter secured one of the bargains of the day in that beautiful mare Cantatrice, for whom ho gave 200 guineas. Of course it is much liko buying a pig in a poke in taking the daughter of Goldsbrough and Songstress (sold to Mr. William son for ten guineas) for stud purposes, but she is a lovely young mare that has never been knocked about, and if her name is not handed down to pos terity as tho dam of great performers, I will undertake to eat her. That is _ if Mr. Nathan will cook her as I desire. One of tho finest mores that was paraded, at any rate sho brought tho finest price, was Melos's sister Minuet, who was muchadmired as she strolled round with her shapely Simmer colt. The New Zealanders, and the Thompson, brothers, from Widdin wanted her, but Messrs. H., E., A., and Y. White outstayed them, and there was a murmur of appreciation when the hammer fell at 500 guineas, Minuet has not been the success at the stud that her sister Melodious (dam of Wallace) has been, but it is possible that change of quarters and stallions will do much for her. She is a great rangey mare with a fine rein, not at all like her sister Melodia, who followed her into the ring, but the last-named favours her grand sire, Tho Barb — ' the Shakespeare of horses' the veteran James Wilson dubbed him— and Mr. Wilson collected her for 180 guineas. He also-got the imported Kilmorey for 260 guineas, and if Frank Reynolds knows anything about the science of breed ing the New Zealander has a bargain, for the mare was bought especially to be mated with Medallion and to produce a corker, and she has a filly by that horse at foot. I wish to disabuse the public mind of any. idea that the last has-been seen and heard of the Tocal stud. From such a calamity may the good Lord deliver us. The fact is that the blood stock sold yesterday, and the cattle, etc., to be disposed of later on, were the property of the family as a family, and the death of good, kindly, sweet-mannered Mrs. Reynolds, senior, necessitated a realisation and a division. But Mr. Frank Reynolds had in addition some half-dozen choice mares, his own private property and Syd. also had the nucleus of a nice little stud over at Duninald. Yesterday Algerine, Chlorine, Equa tion, Sweotbriar, Salutation, Ta Ta, Welcome, Queehie, and Medalet were purchased by Mr. M'Donald, on behalf, of Mr. Frank Reynolds, . and, tell it not in Gath, Medallion also returns to Tocal. Mr. Sydney Reynolds's rather more modest require ments were met by securing Patrie and Ondine, but Percy Reynolds went nap as he (through Mr. George Kisa) gavo 1290 guineas for Simmer, and in future the scene of the conjugal labours of the black son of St. Simon will be Hobartville, which Mr. Percy has leased; and the glories of which Simmer, I hope, is destined to revive. I have repeatedly assured my readers that Simmer was a fine horse, but I doubt if any of them expected to be introduced to such amagnificent animal as they saw yesterday. Some English writer, who is now probably in an' asylum, described the son of Dutch Oven'as a decrenit nonv with an awkward

gait, one that was never trained because such a task would be useless. The fact . of the matter is that Simmer is almost seventeen hands high, built in proportion throughout, 'with tremendous length and leverage, and was never trained because he knocked his wither in by tumbling backwards whilst playing as a yearling. Mr. Reynolds gave littlo more than half vi'ilue for this grand young stallion. I was delighted .to see Mr. Thomas Cook go in for Sweet William, for Billy deserves a happy home in the Autumn of his 'life, and as he is very strongly impregnated with Sir Hercules blood he should be of great value among the ,Tur:wille mares. Although Billy will be twenty-three years old next birthday, he is as well preserved as a professional beauty and does not look half the age. He has absolutely the best constitu tion of any stallion I knew, and will be a valued assistant to Invader and Ruenalf at Turanville. A stallion that has failed greatly of lato is the once beautiful Splendor, for whom Mr. Reynolds gave the best part of a thousand sixteen years ago, and although he was full of life and excitement yester day the company was too critical to indulge in rash ventures, and Mr. Frank Mack had little difficulty in buying him for 40 guineas. The ups and downs of blood stook are wonderful, but if the stately son of Speculum only lasts says for a season, Mr. Mack should easily get his money back with a bit of selvage, particularly if another Jeweller comes to light, but then Jewellers of the equine persuasion are few and far between. Some three or four years back Mr. E. R. White, of Merton, tried to buy Norah, by Goldsbrough from Lady Laura, with whose breeding he is somewhat enamoured— from the Reynolds' estate, but failed, although he offered four times what ho gavo for her yesterday. But she failed to breed on two or three occasions, and so depreciated in value, but she is in foal now, and her gallantyoung owner is very pleased at the bargain. All the visitors were delighted with the condition in which the horses were turned out by John Kidd, the clever and painstaking stud groom, who has lived nearly half a century at Tocal, whose superior exists nowhere, and who was m great request throughout the day. The untried fillies and geldings were in thorough, witb the exception of Ondine, who is in training, and is a really lovely young mare, although she may not prove a corker on the turf, and thoy fetched fair values. It was rather funny when the uninitiated went round sampling the foals before the sale, for I heard several of them remark ' Why, bless my soul, they'vo all got windgalls or ringbone already ?' The fact was that the youngsters' legs had swollen a bit through being walked along the hard road from Tocal paddocks, and of course a foal's hoofs and bone are little else than gristle, The crowd was efficiently catered for by Mr. Jamea Atkinson of the Centennial Hotel, who, with the assistance of hiB brother Willing acting as aido-camp, provided a profusion of good food and liquors, which wero always on tap at the psychological moment. The weather waB anything but favourable for such a noteworthy event, but breeders nnd sporting men generally are not composed of sugar, although some peoplo consider them the salt of the earth, and they turned up in large numbers, despite tho showers and the muddy going, and they came from all quarters, New Zealand sending representatives in the persons of

Dan u lsrion, whose name is inseparably associated with the doings of Carbine, Trenton, and othor famous horses, and Messrs. Williamson and Nathan. Big John Murray cams from Moree, intent on bargains, whilst J. M'Donald was down from Muckabundie with the same object in view. There wore six of the Lochiel Thompsons from Widden, and those veritable sons of Anak, ThomaB Cook olid Gus Hooke, towered above their fellows at tho ring-side. Whites wero there from Eding lassie, Boll trees, and Saumarez (Inveroll), and of courso tho Reynolds brothers were nob absent.

The cousins Rodney and R. H. Dangar chatted sociably close to B. Bettington of Brindley Park, and the Clift Brothers, W. H. Mackay, H. J. Adams, F. ! Dodds, H. L. M'Dougall, Holmes (Quirindi), R. B. j Wallace, the Hon. J. N. Brunker, Captain Markwell, John Jones (Sydney), Tlieo. Cooper, jun. (Aubin Vale, Inveroll), F. Mack (Macquarie), John Hart, J. I M'Intosh (Moruya), Georgo Quinton Crok«r, Bill i Rouse, the Lees, Badgery, and others wero on the | spot. Mr. J. S. Smith, of Tucka Tucka.also lent the ' light of his countenance, and altogether it was a goodly collection of owners and breeders, and trainers were there in the shape of John Allsopp, Teddy Keys, James Monaghan, Tom Brown, and tho in evitable Tom Payten. I also noticed Willi: m Forrester, from_ Warwick Farm, in search of a Highborn, I suppose. Mr. Clibborn set forth the terms, conditions, etc., and explained that all arrangements for the con venience of buyers had been made. He referred to tho history of the stud and regretted that it should hare to be disposed of, through the death of Mrs. Reynolds, the property being the common property of the family. Results : — ' . MARES. Algerina (1S85), by Hawthornden (imp.), from Algeria (imp), by Blinkhoolie, with filly by- Medal lion, J. A. M'Donald, 260 guineas Buena (1895), by Sweet William from Ruby, by Tim Whiffior (imp.), served by Kingsley (imp.), B. M. Osborne, 40 guineas Chlorine (1888), by Grand Flaneur from Banksia (imp.), by Wild Oats, served by Splendor. J. A. M'Donald 110 guineas Cantatrice '(1895), by Goldsbrough from Song stress, by The Drummer (imp.), served by Simmer, L. D. Nathan, (N.Z.) 200 guineas. Cleopatra (1887), by Goldsbrough from Habena, by Yattendon, served by Gibraltar, M. Harris, 00 guineas Evergreen (1896), by Sweet William or Splendor from Camelia, by Kelpie (imp.), served by Medallion, C. Smith, 10 guineas. Epine (1892), by Sweet William from the Tbe Thorn, by The Barb, served by 'Mednllian. William son (N.Z.) 25 guineas . . Equation (1888), by Grand Flaneur from Fair Duchess (imp.) by Blair Athol, served by Simmer, with filly by Gibraltar. J. A. M'Donald, 13u guineas ' Egale (1892), by. Goldsbrough from Equation, by Grand Flaneur, served by Splendor with filly by Medallion. J. and W. Thompson, 210 guineas Florence (1881), by Maribyrnong or Tim Whiffler (imp.) from Evangeline, served by Simmer — F. Mack, 15 guineas. . Gala (1805),. by Goldsbrough from Merrygo Ronnd, by Hamlet, served by Simmer, with filly by Simmer. A. Hooke, jun., 110 guineas Gavotte (1894), by Splendor from Minuet, by Goldsbrough, with colt foal by Simmer, and served by him again. J. and W. Thompson, 300 guineas. ' Kilmorey (imp., 1892), by Kilwarlin from Union, served by Simmer with filly by Medallion, J: B. Williamson, 260 guineas Lady Agnes (1896) by Neckersgat from Peradven ture (imp.) by Adventurer, served by Simmer, J. B. Williamson, 30 guineas Minuet (1886), by Goldsbrough from Melody, by The Barb, served by Simmer, with colt by the sams sire, Messrs. H. E. A. and V. White, 500 guineas Melodia (1889), by Goldbrough from Melody by The Barb, served by Simmer and with colt by same sire, J. B. Williamson, 180 guineas Mignard (1892), by Splendor from Mingera, by Yattendon, served by Simmer with filly by the same sire, M. Osborne, 140 guineas Mingera (1880), by Yattendon from The Fly, by Fisherman (imp.), served by Simmer, Mr. A Hooke, jun., 10 guineas .. Norah (1889), by Goldsbrough from' Lady Laura, by Hamlet, served by Simmer, E. R. White, 70 guineas ' Neringla (1885), by Goldsbrough from Mabel, by Millionaire (imp.), served by Simmer, J. B. Wil liamson, 10 guineas | Orchestra (1893), by Goldsbrough from Melody, by The Barb, served by Simmer with colt by Splendor, L. D. Nathan (N.Z.), 220 guineas Patrie (lS95),by Splendor from Tauri, by The Drummer (imp.), served by Medallion, E. W. Sparke, 100 guineas Queen Mab (1S87), by Goldsbrough from Titania, by New Warrior (imp.), served by Simmer with Medallion colt, W. Mooney, ISO guineas Sweetbriar (18S6), by Goldsbrough from Tha Thorn, by The Barb, served by Medallion with filly by Simmer, J. M'Donald, 140 guineas Songstress (1886), by The Drummer (imp.) from Canary, by Lapidist, served by Splendor — J. B. Williamson, 10 guineas Sorella (18S2), by Goldsbrough from Happy Thought, by The Barb, served by Simmer — J. Pearse, 12 guineas Salutation (1S90), by Segenhoe from Welcome (imp.) by Dutch Skater, served by Medallion, and with filly by same sire — J. M'Donald, 180 guineas Specula (1893), by Sweet William from Sweet briar, by Goldsbrough, served by Splendor, with filly by Medallion — D. Cullen, 50 guineas

Spagetti (1893), by Splendor (imp.) from vermi celli, by Gang Forward (imp.), not served — J. B. Williamson, 10 guineas Storm (1S90), by Goldsbrough from Seabreeze, by the Barb, served by Simmer with colt by Splendor — J. B. Williamson, 310 guineas Ta Ta (1888), by Segenhoe from Adieu (imp.) by Blair Athol, served by Simmer with filly by Medal lion — J. M. McDonald, 170 guineas Toi Toi (1896), by Splendor or Sweet William from Tauri, by The Drummer (imp.), served by Simmer — L. D, Nathan, 35 guineas Tauranga (1884), by The Drummer from Titania, by New Warrior (imp.), served by Simmer with filly by Medallion — F. Mack, 50 guineas Vera (1880), by Kelpie (imp.) from Blink Bonny, by The Barb, served by Medallion, with colt by Medallion — E. Holmes, 30 guineas Welcome Queenie (1893), by Welcome Jack (N.Z.) from Queensberry, by Hawthornden, served by Medallion, with filly by Medallion — A. A. W arden, 190 guineas. STALLIONS. Sweet William (foaled in 1878), by Yattendon from Lady Hooton (imp.), by Stockwell. — T. Cook, Turanville, 26 guineas Splendor (imp., foal6d 1880), by Speculum from Bathilde, by Stockwell. — I)1. Mack 40 guineas Simmer (imp., foaled 1894), by St. Simon from Dutch Oven, by 'Dutch Skater. — G. Kiss, 1290 guineas ' : Medallion (foaled 1887), . by . Nordenfeldt from Locket (imp.) by Thunderbolt.— J . A. M'Donald, 350 guineas FILLIES AND GELDINGS. Ondine, three years, by Goldsbrough from Tauri, by The Drummer (imp.), (in training),— O. K Young, 110 guineas. Oran, three years, by Goldsbrough from Welcome Queenie, by Welcome Jack,— G. Kiss, 105 guineas Medalet, three years, by Medallion froinTa Ta, by Segenhoe. — A. A. Warden, 45 guineas Ch f, three years, by Splendor from Vera, by Kolpie, R. Gibson, 26 guineas Br f, three years, by Sweet William from Storm, by Goldsbrough.— L. D. Nathan, 55 guineas. Br g, three years, by Goldsbrough from Florence, by Maribyrnong or Tim Whiffler — R. Godfrey, 35 guineas Br g, own brother to the above. — J. S. O Donnell, 30 guineas ' Br f by Sweet William — Bolle of Cobham, 13 guineas . Ch.f., two years, by Gibraltar from Neringla, by Goldsbrough— E. Holmes, 16 guineas B f, two years, by Sweet William from Sea Foam, by The Drummer (imp.)— J. Pearse, 17 guineas Br g, two years, by Goldbrough from Florence— R. Godfrey, 35 guineas B g, J two years, by Medallion from Melodia, by Goldsbrongh— M. Murphy, 28 guineas Ch g, two yearB, by Medallion from Merrygo Round, by Hamlet— T. Stewart, 14 guineas Ch f two years, by Medallion from Equation, by Grand Flaneur.— J. B. Williamson 45 guineas. Honeymaid (half-bred), by Perfection, with foal by trotting stallion.— Jos. Brown 34 guineaB. Diadem, by Lord Clifton, was passed in ; Curfew, by Goldsbrough, and who is dam of Hereford, went to F. Mack for 105 guineas. A brown mare by Glenalvon did not elicit a bid. A pony stallion was j purchased by T. Post for £10. 1

Digitisation generously supported by
1 of 2
Library Council of New South Wales
Digitisation generously supported by
1 of 2
Library Council of New South Wales
Digitisation generously supported by
2 of 2
State Library of NSW Digital Excellence Program
Digitisation generously supported by
2 of 2
Play Pause
1 2

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down