English, Book edition: Information on Australian Red Cross work in Egypt and France / by Eric Lloyd-Jones. Australian Red Cross Society.; Lloyd-Jones, Eric.

User activity

Share to:
Information on Australian Red Cross work in Egypt and France / by Eric Lloyd-Jones
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/32400648
Physical Description
  • 2596 words
  • Book
  • 15 leaves ; 14 cm.
Published
  • xx, -
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Information on Australian Red Cross work in Egypt and France /​ by Eric Lloyd-Jones.
Also Titled
  • Information on Australian Red Cross work in Egypt and France
Author
  • Australian Red Cross Society.
  • Lloyd-Jones, Eric.
Published
  • xx, -
Physical Description
  • 2596 words
  • Book
  • 15 leaves ; 14 cm.
Subjects
Summary
  • Information on Australian Red Cross Work IN EGYPT AND FRANCE ERIC LLOYD-JONES Commissioner of the Australian Red Cross in Egypt Websdale, Shoosmith Ltd., Printers, Sydney I Information on Australian Red Gross Work in Egypt and France. Stock in Egypt as on May 7th, 1916, was, on the whole, large, particularly in articles which can be made by Red Cross workers, such as Socks, Pyjamas, Shirts and Mufflers, of which there were abundant quantities then at our Central Stores in Cairo. A fair stock to commence with had been forwarded to France to our Depots at Marseilles and Rouen. At the same time, the Stock, although large, will all be needed should the Australian Troops shortly participate in the expected general offensive on the Western Front, for the casualties are certain to be extremely heavy, and up to the present time, it must always be borne in mind since the Red Cross organisation in Egypt was initiated, the Australian casualties have not been really heavy, consequently the demands upon Stock have not been anything like what they will probably be in the near future. Besides this fact, any surplus goods can always be most profitably employed in eking out the all tooslender slender supplies of the French Red Cross, so that workers can safely continue their labours, feeling that their efforts will be of real use, either to our own sick and wounded, or to those of our gallant Allies. Up to the time of my departure from Egypt, on May 13th, approximately 4,000 cases of Red Cross Goods had been sent from the centres in Egypt to those in France, and more will be following ing every few weeks until the great bulk of our Stock will be at Marseilles and Rouen, and probably the major portion at Rouen, around which centre practically all the Clearing Hospitals, Casualty Stations and Field Ambulances are situated. The only Australian Hospital of which I know as being near Marseilles is the No. 2 General Hospital, in command of Colonel Morgan Martin. No. 1 General Hospital is near Rouen, which is, of course, practically cally behind the lines at present occupied by the Australian Troops. Our main centres of operations tions in regard to distributing goods in Egypt prior to my departure were Cairo and Ismailia. There is, or was, a large camp of Australians at Tel-el-kebir, but this was always supplied from our Cairo centre, the troops on the Suez Canal being supplied from Ismailia, where we had a beautifully situated little Store on the banks of the Canal, and a Motor Launch which carried our Supplies over to the Clearing Hospitals or Field Ambulances on the other side of the Canal. We also had a small distributing centre at Suez. Although the number of Australians in Hospital was small, it was necessary for us to have a Stock there, as well as a Representative, to supply ships returning to Australia with Sick and Wounded with all the articles necessary for their comfort en route. There are also two Convalescent Homes near Alexandria, both of which, however, we supply latterly from Cairo, there being not enough work in Alexandria since the evacuation of Gallipoli, and the comparatively small number of Australians in Malta to warrant a Representative being kept in that centre, although we have a Store in Alexandria which is now being used as a Clearing Centre from which goods are shipped to France every two or three weeks. The Australian Hospitals around Cairo early in May were No. 3 General Hospital, situated at Abassia, in what were formerly Barracks, which, after a few alterations, now form an admirable Hospital; No. 1 Auxiliary Hospital, commonly known as Luna Park, situated at Heliopolis; No. 3 Auxiliary Hospital, usually known as the “Sporting ing Club,” also at Heliopolis; the No. 4 Auxiliary Hospital, used for Infectious Diseases, Abassia; and the Ist Australian Dermatological, also at Abassia. At Alexandria there were the Ras-el-tin Convalescent Depot, and the beautiful Red Cross Convalescent Home at Mantazah, overlooking the waters of the Mediterranean. This latter was a former palace of the Khedive, which has been taken over by the British Red Cross and the Australian Branch (jointly), and very much extended and improved, proved, until it now forms a delightful spot, capable of accommodating about 1,200 convalescents. Of course, in addition to the Hospitals named, there are also all the Field Ambulances, Casualty Clearing Hospitals, and Casualty Clearing Stations attached to the various units of the Australian Army, which were still in Egypt in May. But there is very little doubt that the Red Cross Work in Egypt will, from now onwards, very materially decrease, although it seems likely that there will always have to be some Stock and some form of Representation there. As to the work in France, I regret that I am not in a position to give you any first-hand information, tion, but I feel quite sure that it has been well initiated by the Red Cross Representatives who were first there, including Mr. Murdoch, one of my Fellow-Commissioners. A large Store has been secured on the Wharf at Marseilles, where practically cally all the incoming Troops are landed from Egypt, and practically the first thing they see is the large Red Cross Sign outside our Stores, so that they are not likely to be ignorant of the fact that the Australian Red Cross is in France, and ready to offer them every possible service. We have also, I understand, secured fine accommodation tion in Rouen, which appears practically certain to be our main distributing centre; in fact, it seems likely that if the Australian Troops are to be sent to England for their convalescence and final treatment ment in Hospital, and from there to be returned to Australia, the No. 2 General Hospital from Marseilles seilles will probably be moved up north, in which case the Red Cross Store at Marseilles would only be required for the reception and forwarding of goods to Rouen. In regard to the Enquiry Work, there is no doubt that this Section of the Red Cross organisation has amply justified its existence, and the thousands of reports sent in by the diligence of our Searchers have gone far towards easing the anxiety of many minds. Wherever there are Hospitals or Camps with Australian Soldiers in them outside England, where the British Red Cross Society Searchers act for us, the Searchers of the Enquiry Section of the •Australian Red Cross have been at work amongst them, including Malta and Lemnos, and the kindly and ready manner in which their enquiries have always been answered by the men shows beyond doubt that their efforts are appreciated. Finally, I can assure the Workers for the Red Cross that the goods they make, and the time and money they have lavished on behalf of the Sick and Wounded, are not wasted, and are fully appreciated by the men. This I can say from personal experience, ence, and without fear of contradiction. There must, obviously, be a few cases of extravagance, and also of dishonesty on the part of some men in getting goods from the Red Cross which they do not really need, but, as a whole, the work of the Red Cross is now on strictly business lines, and is being administered by a very competent and thoroughly conscientious and keen body of Representatives. sentatives. AUSTRALIAN RED CROSS. ITS WORK IN EGYPT. One of the most valuable works in connection with the War in this particular part of the Globe has been carried out by the Australian Branch of the British Red Cross Society, which, under the joint commissionership of Messrs. Norman E. Brookes, E. Lloyd Jones, and J. A. Murdoch, has its spacious Egyptian Headquarters at Shepheard’s Hotel, and has, moreover, recently opened up operations in a new sphere. The quiet and definite labour accomplished by the band of workers of this branch is only seen at its best by a visit to one of the huge stores which exist —almost unknown to most of us—in the various thoroughfares through which we pass daily, namely, Sharia Emedel-Din, el-Din, Sharia Abbas, and other streets in the vicinity. In any one of these may be seen cases by the thousands of all kinds of goods calculated to bring comfort to and alleviate the condition of the sick soldier, whose special needs, like those of his wounded mate, the Society makes it its business to meet by setting in motion a generous and unceasing stream of supplies of every imaginable description. As an indication of the broad scope of the Society’s activities, it may be mentioned that the provision of a tin of peaches, or a musical instrument for a hospital, has become merely a matter of organised routine. While the Australian is in Hospital his requirements ments are every bit as important in the eyes of those who are working for the Australian Red Cross, as are those of his compatriot who is being transferred to another base hospital, or invalided home. To this end, the Society has established a Red Cross Store in nearly every Australian Hospital, pital, which is in the charge of an Australian lady, who issues whatever articles the men may require to the ward sister or orderly, by whom it is conveyed veyed to its proper destination. A department of the organisation of which it could be impossible to speak too highly, is the distribution tribution of gifts at Cairo Station by Australian ladies. The presentation of the gifts takes place before the departure of a hospital train for Suez— containing hundreds of sick and wounded men bound for Australia. A thoroughly efficient system is adopted, whereby the ladies who have volunteered for this work give to every man on the train a neat cardboard box, which has been packed with good things, such as pipes, cigarettes, tobacco, playing cards, shaving brushes, chocolate, soap and stationery, ery, and tucked away inside is a touching little message from the packer in far-off Australia. The recipient, it has been found, seldom fails to express his delight and thanks to the donor on the papers so thoughtfully included in the packet. In regard to these men everything possible is done at Suez to ensure their comfort during the voyage. Each man, as he steps on board the transport port is given a well-filled kit bag, containing numerous articles of the greatest utility, comprising two suits of pyjamas, one shirt, one undershirt, two pairs of socks, two face washers, four envelopes, six sheets writing-paper, one tin of tooth powder, one pair of deck shoes, ten packets of cigarettes, one lead pencil, seven handkerchiefs, one towel, one cake of soap, and half a pound of tobacco. These bags, which are totally unexpected by the men, naturally come as a great surprise to them. Later on, they are further supplied with deck chairs, cushions, extra food delicacies, and fruit. They are thus adequately quately set up for the four weeks’ voyage home, a journey which will terminate amidst wonderful scenes of joy and patriotism, as the great vessel steams slowly into harbour, where thousands of eager mothers, wives, and sisters are looking forward to catch the. earliest glimpse of their kith and kin. ASSISTING THE HOSPITALS. The Australian Red Cross has done much to help in the equipment of the Australian Hospitals. Necessities of all kinds have been issued to them, consisting of toilet requisites, tooth powder, razors, shaving soaps and goods, such as Horlick’s, Allenbury’s, bury’s, Benger’s and Lactogen, together with tinned ned fruits of every description. Nor does the assistance rendered stop at gifts in kind, for monetary tary grants are also bestowed upon them through the medium of the Hospital O.C. In many Oases, too, surgical instruments and other clinical necessities sities have been presented, so that many of the splendidly equipped operating' theatres which have been in such constant use these many months past owe much to the Australian Red Cross for the completeness pleteness of their arrangements. As regards clothing and other utilitarian commodities, modities, thousands of suits of pyjamas, shirts and other garments have been issued to the patients through the quarter-master’s stores, and such articles cles as do not appear in the Red Cross schedule have been purchased by the officer commanding, who is given discretion to expend in this manner the funds placed at his disposal by the Society. Now that mental recreation is a recognised principle ciple of the art of healing, and has received the sane- tion of the highest medical authorities, every society professing to interest itself in hospital work has striven to the utmost to provide relaxation and entertainment for surgical or medical cases recovering ing from wounds or shock. Recreation sheds—well sheltered from the sun and wind by grass mat roofs —have been erected by the Australian Red Cross Society, and these have been lavishly stocked with books and newspapers. Much has been accomplished in the way of entertainment tainment by the Society, which has organised concert parties, engaged professional orchestras for regular performances, provided orchestral instruments, ments, pianos, and gramaphones for hospitals, and whatever could be sent in the way of musical instruments ments to the Field Ambulance sections. Men in Hospital have been taken for excursions by the Convalescent Outings Society, to which the British and Australian Red Cross Societies both contribute equally a monthly sum, and, in addition, the Australian Red Cross provides motor cars every afternoon in the week for excursions for the men. For patients who are sent down to recuperate by the sea, a beautiful Convalescent Home has been established at Mantazah, near Alexandria, which is maintained by the two Societies for the joint benefit of the Convalescent Australian and English Soldiers, where accommodation is available for a thousand men. Various Convalescent Nurses’ Homes in Cairo and Alexandria are also equipped and supported by the co-operation of the two Societies. A great boon has been conferred upon the men in Hospital by the excellent arrangements which have been made for providing them with free haircutting cutting and shaving in comfortable kiosks, or other appropriate buildings, often expressly built for the purpose. Sports play an important part in the life of the convalescent, and here again the Society steps forward, and by a generous distribution of cricket and other sporting and gymnastic outfits, enables him to indulge in those health-giving pursuits to the top of his bent. THE ENQUIRY BUREAU. Possibly no department of the Red Cross organisation tion so thoroughly repays the efforts of the workers as the Enquiry Section, which does so much to relieve the anxiety and suspense of the many relatives who have soldiers belonging to them in hospitals in Egypt and elsewhere. Missing men are happily often traced with complete success, and the welcome news despatched by cable to their anxious relations at home. Thousands of enquiries from the various States of the Commonwealth are dealt with at the Bureau, where, by means of its very complete plete research system, either a satisfactory result is obtained, or else it is established that all likely sources of information have been fully investigated. In conclusion, it may be said that there are many aspects of this wonderful organisation which have not been touched upon, and much silent work has been done anonymously. It is through such untiring efforts as these that the Australian Branch of the British Red Cross Society has earned for itself the gratitude and admiration of all those who have come in contact with it.
Notes
Terms of Use
Language
  • English
Dewey Number
  • 940.477/​1
Identifier
  • 940.477/​1 (DDC)
Libraries Australia ID
Contributed by
Libraries Australia

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (3)
  • ACT (2)
  • NSW (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

These 3 locations in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
National Library of Australia. Open to the public 2019432; FERG/3923 Book English
State Library of NSW. Open to the public M Q940.4771/2 Book English
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Book English
Show 0 more libraries...

These 2 locations in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
National Library of Australia. Open to the public 2019432; FERG/3923 Book English
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Book English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in New South Wales:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
State Library of NSW. Open to the public M Q940.4771/2 Book English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

Found at these bookshops

Searching - please wait...

You also may like to try some of these bookshops, which may or may not sell this item.

Other suppliers

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment