2019, English, Photograph edition: Drought Killed Archontophoenix cunninghamiana - Bangalow Palm, September 2019 Black Diamond Images

User activity

Share to:
Drought Killed Archontophoenix cunninghamiana - Bangalow Palm, September 2019
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/265196105
Physical Description
  • image
Published
  • 2019-09-25 15:08:27
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Drought Killed Archontophoenix cunninghamiana - Bangalow Palm, September 2019
Creator
  • Black Diamond Images
Published
  • 2019-09-25 15:08:27
Physical Description
  • image
Subjects
Summary
  • © All Rights Reserved - Black Diamond Images Family : Arecaceae After possibly the worst, and continueing, winter spring droughts I can ever remember on the NSW Mid North Coast these Bangalow Palms have suffered 'crown collapse'. With no water entering the trunk of the palm it becomes emaciated resulting in the heavy head of frons toppling over at the crownshaft. This effectively signals the ultimate death of the palm as once the centre fron is broken the palm cannot produce any new frons. The palm may hang on for some considerable time if rain arrives soon after an event like this however it eventually dies. These palms have dropped over in the crownshaft about 2 weeks ago, in mid September 2019, and have had no rain so the frons are not remaining green and are dying more quickly than I've ever seen before. I have lost at least 14 large Bangalow palms this way since they hit the wall a couple of weeks ago. Each day I go down into the forest I see another 7-10 metre palm with its crown dropped over. After growing these palms from seed, having planted the seedlings almost 25 years ago, it is heartbreaking to say the least. The cause is the result of a drying climate and is undoubtedly an impact of what seems destined to be irreversable climate change. I live very intimately with my rainforest and am a daily visitor to all my planted trees and it is apparent to me that the climate is changing. Winter rain has dropped away substantially over the last 10-15 years with longer timeframes between reasonable falls. Storms often drop rain in a particular location and just a few kilometres away there is not a drop recorded. When good rains do come these days they seem to arrive in bucketloads with most of the rain running off the land surface without time to soak in. When flood events have occurred here during the last 20 years they have become progressively more damaging. I don't intend to engage in debate as to the causes of this lack of rainfall except to say I am in agreement with the vast body of scientific evidence which advocates for urgent action to ameliorate climate change impacts. I also have formed the view, which is supported by recent scientific studies, that the massive land clearing across inland Australia since white settlement has gradually led to a reduction in rainfall. My frequent visits into western NSW in the last year have educated me as to the continuing massive extent of land clearing that is going on for cattle grazing, cotton and other crop farming. Depite the evidence for the climate benefits of large scale tree planting I've seen very little evidence of revegetative planting out in the west of NSW in my most recent travels. Without tarring all farmers with the same brush what makes the situation worse is that it seems that significant numbers of Australian farmers continue to oppose the science of climate change, denying there is even a problem. For this reason they continue to do what they've always done. A climate change denying friend who owns a large sheep property in western NSW told me he will only plant trees as a participant in a government approved revegetation scheme for which he will get paid. Other big corporate farmers may plant trees if it allows them to access carbon credits, or if it allows them to clear new land.IDENTIFYING AUSTRALIAN RAINFOREST PLANTS,TREES & FUNGI - Flick Group --> DATABASE INDEX
Terms of Use
  • © All rights reserved
Language
  • English
Identifier
  • 48792078037

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Flickr. Open to the public Photograph English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment