1933-07-01, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: JAMES WATT. (1 July 1933) New South Wales. Department of Education.

User activity

Share to:
JAMES WATT. (1 July 1933)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/259953165
Physical Description
  • 637 words
  • article
  • illustration
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • xna, The Dept., 1933-07-01
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • JAMES WATT. (1 July 1933)
Appears In
  • The school magazine of literature for our boys and girls, v.18, no.6 Part 1 Class 3, 1933-07-01
Author
  • New South Wales. Department of Education.
Published
  • xna, The Dept., 1933-07-01
Physical Description
  • 637 words
  • article
  • illustration
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Part Of
  • The school magazine of literature for our boys and girls
  • Vol. 18 No. 6 Part 1 Class 3 (July 1, 1933)
Subjects
Summary
  • JAMES WATT. 1. Puff, puff, puff! Rubble, bubble, bubble, bubble ! Puff, puff, puff ! 2. Does your kettle sing ? Our kettle often sings. Sometimes, in the afternoon, it sings merrily — “ Get the gold-rimmed teacups out, The sugar and the cream. You’d better hurry, hurry, hurry ! Don’t you see the steam? 3. Now I am going to tell you a story of another kettle. It was a Scotch kettle, which a long time ago stood on the stove in the house of a man named Watt. It was just a plain black iron kettle, and looked like any other kettle. Indeed, if it had not been for Mr. Watt’s little son, James, the kettle would never have had a story. 4. One morning the kettle was hanging over the open fire. James was sitting nearby reading a book. As the flames danced up, the kettle began to sing— “ I think it must be cozy, lad, ' To sit on a settee, And read a book, but now I think You’d better look at me — At me, me, me, me, me ! ” 5. Jamie put down his book and looked at the kettle. He watched the steam floating up the big chimney. Up it went, and the kettle kept on singing. The water went bubble, bubble, bubble. At last the lid went tippity-tip. “ How strong the steam is when it can lift the lid!” thought Jamie. And the kettle sang— “ Yes indeed, deed, deed, deed, deed!” Then the steam gave the lid such a tip that it almost went flying from the kettle. And the kettle sang as loudly as it could sing— “ Follow the lead, lead, lead, lead, lead ! ” Jamie did follow the lead, as you shall see. 6. He was not a strong, hearty boy. He could not romp and play as other boys could, and was often away from school. 7. Every day Jamie studied with his father and mother. He liked to learn new things, and to find out things for himself. He did this even when he was playing. He would often take his toys to pieces to find out how they were made, and then put them together again. 8. When Jamie’s father saw how much his son liked to make things, he gave him a set of tools and a place in his workshop among his own workmen. Here Jamie worked dav after day. He worked so well that one of the workmen said one day, ‘ 1 Jamie has a fortune in his finger-tips. ’ ’ What do you think he meant by that ? 9. By and by, when Jamie grev/​ to be a man, he worked very hard. He never forgot the song of the kettle, and the strong little workman that pushed up the lid. 10. About this time another man had found out how strong steam is. This man had made a little engine that he thought could be worked by steam. It worked for a few minutes only and then stopped. 11. James Watt took the engine to his own workshop and found out what the trouble was. Soon after he made an engine of his own that did work. 12. After that he made many other kinds of steam engines. One of these was a fire engine, another an engine for pumping water out of mines. Some were used for making cloth. 13. And now, all around the world, mills are whirring, whirring; steamboats go chug, chug; and long trains run, choo, choo. What is making them go ? It is that same little fellow “James Watt and the Tea Kettle." From the painting by MARCUS STONE, R.A. that pushed up the kettle lid. How Jamie had made him work ! 14. Now 7 , wasn’t there a fortune for all the world in Jamie’s finger-tips ? “ The Riverside Reader ” (Houghton, Mifflin Co., New York). Adapted.
Terms of Use
Language
  • English

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

Other suppliers

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment