1916-09-15, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. (15 September 1916) Burke, Keast, 1896-1974.

User activity

Share to:
ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. (15 September 1916)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/264322434
Physical Description
  • 2334 words
  • article
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • xna, Baker &​ Rouse, 1916-09-15
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. (15 September 1916)
Appears In
  • Australasian photo-review., v.23, no.9, 1916-09-15
Author
  • Burke, Keast, 1896-1974.
Published
  • xna, Baker &​ Rouse, 1916-09-15
Physical Description
  • 2334 words
  • article
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Part Of
  • Australasian photo-review.
  • Vol. 23 No. 9 (15 September 1916)
Subjects
Summary
  • ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. W.A.K., HILLGROVE. —“Babes in the Wood” and “Lost”—very good attempts, and the expression sion of the youngsters first-class. The objection is the spottiness of the background. “The Bubble” rather a hackneyed subject, very well done as far as it goes. There is a curious foreshortening of the boy’s knees, probably due to underexposure of the lower part of the plate. EJ., SYDNEY. —“The Pond” —a post-card style of subject from a rather harsh negative. W.J.C., ARMIDALE. —“Reg”—an excellent portrait trait of the boy, one that would be appreciated by his people. E.M.G., BRISBANE. —The figures in “Home” are hopelessly out of focus. To get both figures and distant landscape equally sharp, as you desire, with a quarter-plate hand camera, you would need to put the indicator at, say, 25 feet and stop down to at least i/​22. Give bulb exposure. G. GUILDFORD —ln “A Home Group” your figures are too stiff, and the whole of the print is equally sharp. It is desirable when photographing graphing a group to place the figures away from the background. The latter should preferably be out of focus. H. BUGILBONE SIDING.—Creek scene from a fully exposed plate, insufficiently developed, or else the print has been very much over-exposed. T.K.C., BURNIE. —If “Mother” ever used a camera before she would realise that she could not photograph anything the way she is holding it. When you attempt a genre picture you should see that the idea is reasonable". E.H.M., MENlNDlE.—“Reflections on the Darling” ling” from an excellent negative. You have a good opportunity in your district to make a series of pictures of this kind which will be more interesting esting as time goes on. “The Shearing Shed” —- not of interest, except to the owner. Fair, technically, nically, except for some halation. L.W.H., NEWTOWN.—Group of three required considerably more exposure, probably three times as much, and then development for softness. It is always advisable not to have the heads in a straight line, S.S., CREMORNE.—“Mosman” from an excellent lent negative, but you should exercise more care in the trimming of prints. The edges should be perfectly clean. G.P., SANDRINGHAM.—“Her Grandson's Letter”—this ter”—this plate required considerably more exposuse use in order to get detail in the shadows. Idea good; oval trimming ineffective. G. 8., MANLY, Q. —Child with cocky—a good attempt for a boy of fifteen. Plate or film wanted more exposure: this would have given you a softer result. L.C.R., RIANA.—The objection to “Reflections” is that the whole thing is so artificial. The idea and its execution were good. “The Meeting of the Waters” from a negative fair, technically, but of little general interest. Apparently, you get a good deal of halation. You should use backed plates, or film. 8.C., WOLLONGONG.—Competition in the “Home Portrait” section was much too keen for your prints to have any chance. Both are of fair quality considering the difficulty and your age. G.C., BROKEN HlLL.—Portrait of boy required more exposure and longer development to secure contrast. Call at the Kodak Branch. Broken Hill, and they will gladly explain where you are at fault. J.G.. MELBOURNE.—The best of your four is “Winter Sunshine,” and this had great possibilities bilities if treated right. Technical woi;k especially good as working against the light. “Pioneers”— grouping too stiff and models very self-conscious. The poster idea distinctly good, although parts of background are not at all attractive. Aboriginal model excellent, particularly so as photographed through glass. E. SUMMER HlLL.—“Breakers” from a very hard negative. Such a subject required clouds to complete it. F. NORTH CARLTON. —“ ’Neath the Bridge”—a fair attempt, but you are extremely careless in your trimming and mounting. A.W.. F'ORBES.—You are not carrying development opment far enough, and your prints lack contrast. From the same negative you will get a very much better result on Velox or Nepera gaslight paper which will increase the contrast. Packet was sealed against inspection, and we had the pleasure of paying twopence on it. D. TOOWOOMBA. —The best of your prints is “Keep very still, please!” although this would have been better taken the upright way of the plate, and your model, of course, should have looked into the finder of his camera. The two others are out of focus, and considerably underexposed. exposed. “Gallipoli’s Heroes” —from a negative of fair quality, spoiled by the lines of the background. ground. LB., BRISBANE.—“GIeam o’ Dawn” is rather a freak sky, and unsuitable for competition, otherwise wise a very successful result. W.C.W., KYOGLE. —Two of the “Three Roses” have apparently given up the fight, and the other is triumphing over them. Flowers should only be photographed when fresh and bright. They sometimes droop very quickly. I. , KATOOMBA.—“What shall I play?” is an ambitious attempt. The camera should have been pointed to the right. This would have thrown the figure to the left and also secured a darker background. Exposure was insufficient, and you should avoid light patches in the background. A.A.S., TlPARRA.—Apparently, you are not carrying development far enough, and vour prints do not show sufficient contrast. This is very marked in “A Portrait in Shade,” the best of those sent being the group of five; the next best, the “Home Portrait.” A.W.M., WAHROONGA.—“Portrait” pleasing, although from a much under-exposed film. You must also pay more attention to the trimming of your prints. W.H.C.. TOOWOOMBA.—“A Home Portrait” of very fair technical quality, the principal objection tion being the ugly lines of staircase in background. ground. In a portrait the face is the most important. ant. Nothing should be included that clashes with it. E. MELBOURNE.—“Getting Better”—a very fair attempt, but rather beyond the scope of the little camera, except when used with portrait attachment. J. HORSHAM.—“The Sitter”—from an under-exposed negative— not nearly as successful as much of your other work we have seen. E.M.T. CHATSWOOD.—AII your prints are good, and carefully mounted, except for the white tint on a grey mount, and vice versa; the mounting being best in a “Garden Study.” Prints of very technical qualitv, but not strong enough to win in the competition. Models somewhat camera-conscious. The group of three on the beach would make a fine enlargement. E.A.D.. HE.YFIELD.—Your work is rather ambitious bitious and much too gloomy, although well executed. E.M., GLENFERRIE.—-The best is lady with mirror. _ This, however, is spoiled by the many distracting lines of background. The subject is worth trying again, the vertical way of the plate, and concentrating on the upper part of the figure and mirror only, with a perfectly plain background. The models in the other three are too cameraconscious, conscious, and the whole thing very artificial. A.V.C., STANTHORPE.—“At-Home Portrait” required much more exposure, and there is conwderable wderable distortion in the hand nearest the camera. There is also too much white and the lines of rattan chair are irritating. E. NEUTRAL BAY.—The best is “Sunny Smile.” ’ It does not, however, make a good “At- Home” portrait because the child is rather overdressed dressed for the part. The two of child on rug have a very spottv and distracting background. All your work is of excellent technical quality, but you must aim for greater simplicity in treatment. ment. S. ST. KILDA. —Portrait of ladv has been taken from too low a view-point, the better of the two being the larger print. Do not seal your packages. ages. If you do we have to pay n fine. L.G F., MARYBOROUGH. —“Patriotic Workers” ers” —from a good negative with, apparently, some surface defects on print. Not suitable for competition. petition. F. TILL TILL. —River scene lacks foreground, ground, and is an uninteresting view. From a negative fair, technically. H.C.1., TILL TlLL.—“Antwerp” only of topical interest. T. MERINO RIDGE.—“A River Steamer” from a first-class negative. The vessel is badly placed on print and more space should have been allowed in front. Horizon line also off the level. “Friends” from an insufficiently developed negative. tive. K.P.P., ADELAIDE.—The “At-Home Self Portrait” from a much under-exposed plate. Very tastefully mounted. “Dawn” spoiled bv part of crane in foreground. “Thro’ the Mist” rather too indistinct to be of interest. 8.T.H., ST. KILDA.—In “Distant Thoughts” the camera has been placed too low. The lens should, as a general rule, be opposite the eyes of the sitter. V. L. de P., ASHFIELD.—Some of your prints have considerable merit. The best, probably, is “Sketching.” The objection to this is the awkward line of foot where cut off. It would be an advantage, tage, too, to trim away an inch from the left hand side; otherwise, excellent. “At Sunset” too impressionistic, pressionistic, and hard line of distant hills cuts the print in two. “Day Dreams”—an effective piece of work; not well placed on print, and oval unsuitable. suitable. “Making up her Mind”—a good portrait: line above head should have been softened. In “His First Portrait”—camera has been tilted, and it would be an advantage to trim portion off righthand hand side. “Her Hobby”—excellent, technically. We compliment you on the very fine work are doing with so inexpensive a camera, and also on the success of your enlarging methods. A.M.M., INVERCARGILL.—VVe suggest that you enlarge from the centre portion of the negative tive of boy fishing. At present, the whole of the picture is contained in, say, two inches of the centre of the plate. K.T., WOOLLAHRA. —Your work is very fair, technically. In group on the sand your models are all too stiff and camera-conscious. In “The Tea Party” you should have avoided the distracting ing lines of the fence. “Duck Pond, Botanical Gardens”—a good post-card style of subject. In such a scene as “Boiling the Billy” it is desirable to concentrate on the figures and fire only, and have your models doing something in keeping with the scene instead of standing looking at the camera. W. GLEBE. —Your work is distinctly ambitious, bitious, but you have carried impressionism so far that it is difficult to say where the photograph leaves off and the sketch starts. J.S., EAST MELBOURNE.—Your prints all have considerable merit, but seem to have just missed the point. The technical quality is all one would wish. H.H.W., NORTH SYDNEY.—Bush scene not of any interest, being merely a jumble of straight trunks, and parts of the print have apparently not been in contact with the negative. “The Pagoda,” being an architectural subject, your camera should have been carefully levelled. The tower is tilted over. In anv case, merely of interest as a souvenir of travel. “Home Portrait” work not at all good and suggests copies rather than prints from original negatives. The one of the child is very much over-decorated. For competitions it is desirable sirable to avoid fancy floral borders. BRISBANE. —“Home Portrait” fair, but too much in studio style. “A Profile” not at all pleasing. It is only an occasional face that lends itself to this treatment. ONEHUNGA.—DaffodiI from a good negative, rather “Japanesy” in treatment. D. CORAMBA. —“A Bush Home” —typical of out back country. Figure much too central. In timber mill the view you have got is quite uninteresting. teresting. Why not make some special negatives of the bullock teams shown under picturesque conditions, such as on bush tracks, etc.? You are doing excellent work with your little camera. J.W.C., GAYNDAH.—“The Six-in-Hand” is from a very successful negative; apparently, copied from large print. In such subjects you should allow much more space in front of the team. R.A.M., BALLARAT.—“FIower Study” very good, technically, except for large amount of space above blooms. “Fairyland,” technically perfect. F. ESSENDON.—“At-Home Portrait,” quite spoiled by very crude working up. “A Shady Pool” suffers from same trouble, and the lettering ing on prints should be confined to the back. Please pay more attention to your trimming. The “Shady Pool” print is a quarter of an inch narrower rower at the top. G. MULLET CREEK. —Your attempts are rather ambitious and not altogether successful. Let us see more of your work from time to time. A.C L„ BRIGHTON.—SmaII print of soldier very much better than large one. Neither is successful, cessful, however. What was he supposed to be doing? A.J.S., SYDNEY.—Portrait of lady, first-class technically. Would apparently have been better treated as a three-quarter face, as nose is badly defined. E. SOUTHPORT.—“Sand Dunes” good, technically, nically, but full of distracting lines. W.A.A., DAPTO. —For “Home Portrait” you should have avoided the figured curtain background ground and the large table. “Home Portraiture” is at its best with the simplest possible treatment. “Arum Lilies” fairly good, technically, but grouping ing much too stiff for competition purposes. 0.8 , HOBART. —“An Interior” not at all artistic, and camera has been tilted. There is lack of definition on the right-hand side. Figure in “Home Portrait” badly placed, there being to 1 much space above the head. Working up not well done. H. ONEHUNGA.—“Lake Rotorua” good, technically, and some months would have been amongst the prize-winners. J.D.R., ONEHUNGA.—“Light’s Last Rays,” from a splendid print, the objection to it being the hard line of distant shore repeated in the clouds. D. , EMERALD.—“Mischief” too much in studio style. For “Home Portrait” work it is desirable to avoid this as far as possible. Technique nique excellent. G.M., SYDNEY.—“A Peaceful Pool”—an excellent lent example of work done with a V.P.K. W.W.H., ELSTERNWICK.—PIease put all necessary details on the back of each print sent in. “Flamingoes” rather decorative, and would be more effective in larger size on rough surface paper. E. ST. KlLDA.—“Mother”—a fine type of Australian motherhood. As a portrait, rather too severely treated. J.D.W., LINDFIELD.—“Portrait” from an under-exposed plate, resulting in lack of detail in the high lights. A good result for a boy of twelve. N.V.S., BOMBALA.—“A Home Portrait” of very excellent quality considering the technical difficulties. The defects are—figure too much to right and circular mask unsuitable. R.S., ST. KILDA—“The Soldiers’ Afternoon Tea”—a splendid result for a boy of eleven. If possible, when taking similar subjects again, get a little further away, and include the whole of the figures. We congratulate you on winning your first prize.
Terms of Use
Language
  • English
Identifier
  • 770.5 (DDC)

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment