English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: War Honours for the A.I.F. ( ) Australia. High Commission (Great Britain)

User activity

Share to:
War Honours for the A.I.F. (  )
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/264118763
Physical Description
  • 2636 words
  • illustration
  • 2533 words
  • 2495 words
  • 2571 words
  • 2593 words
  • 2591 words
  • 2614 words
  • 2246 words
  • 2432 words
  • 2598 words
  • 2666 words
  • 2442 words
  • 2603 words
  • 4073 words
  • 3012 words
  • 2752 words
  • 3344 words
  • 2400 words
  • 2386 words
  • 2423 words
  • article
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • enk, Published by the authority of the High Commissioner for Australia
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • War Honours for the A.I.F. ( )
Appears In
  • Anzac bulletin : issued to members of the Australian Imperial Forces in Great Britain and France by authority of the High Commissioner for Australia., no.Supplement, p.69
  • Anzac bulletin : issued to members of the Australian Imperial Forces in Great Britain and France by authority of the High Commissioner for Australia., no.Supplement, p.49
  • Anzac bulletin : issued to members of the Australian Imperial Forces in Great Britain and France by authority of the High Commissioner for Australia., no.Supplement, p.13
  • Anzac bulletin : issued to members of the Australian Imperial Forces in Great Britain and France by authority of the High Commissioner for Australia., no.Supplement, p.57
  • Anzac bulletin : issued to members of the Australian Imperial Forces in Great Britain and France by authority of the High Commissioner for Australia., no.Supplement, p.53
  • Anzac bulletin : issued to members of the Australian Imperial Forces in Great Britain and France by authority of the High Commissioner for Australia., no.Supplement, p.17
  • Anzac bulletin : issued to members of the Australian Imperial Forces in Great Britain and France by authority of the High Commissioner for Australia., no.Supplement, p.25
  • Anzac bulletin : issued to members of the Australian Imperial Forces in Great Britain and France by authority of the High Commissioner for Australia., no.Supplement, p.45
  • Anzac bulletin : issued to members of the Australian Imperial Forces in Great Britain and France by authority of the High Commissioner for Australia., no.Supplement, p.73
  • Anzac bulletin : issued to members of the Australian Imperial Forces in Great Britain and France by authority of the High Commissioner for Australia., no.Supplement, p.21
  • Anzac bulletin : issued to members of the Australian Imperial Forces in Great Britain and France by authority of the High Commissioner for Australia., no.Supplement, p.29
  • Anzac bulletin : issued to members of the Australian Imperial Forces in Great Britain and France by authority of the High Commissioner for Australia., no.Supplement, p.65
  • Anzac bulletin : issued to members of the Australian Imperial Forces in Great Britain and France by authority of the High Commissioner for Australia., no.Supplement, p.77
  • Anzac bulletin : issued to members of the Australian Imperial Forces in Great Britain and France by authority of the High Commissioner for Australia., no.Supplement, p.61
  • Anzac bulletin : issued to members of the Australian Imperial Forces in Great Britain and France by authority of the High Commissioner for Australia., no.Supplement, p.41
  • Anzac bulletin : issued to members of the Australian Imperial Forces in Great Britain and France by authority of the High Commissioner for Australia., no.Supplement, p.37
  • Anzac bulletin : issued to members of the Australian Imperial Forces in Great Britain and France by authority of the High Commissioner for Australia., no.Supplement, p.81
Author
  • Australia. High Commission (Great Britain)
Published
  • enk, Published by the authority of the High Commissioner for Australia
Physical Description
  • 2636 words
  • illustration
  • 2533 words
  • 2495 words
  • 2571 words
  • 2593 words
  • 2591 words
  • 2614 words
  • 2246 words
  • 2432 words
  • 2598 words
  • 2666 words
  • 2442 words
  • 2603 words
  • 4073 words
  • 3012 words
  • 2752 words
  • 3344 words
  • 2400 words
  • 2386 words
  • 2423 words
  • article
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Part Of
  • Anzac bulletin : issued to members of the Australian Imperial Forces in Great Britain and France by authority of the High Commissioner for Australia.
  • Supplement (1919)
Subjects
Summary
  • War Honours for the A.I.F. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the following awards to the undermentioned Non-Commissioned Officers and Men : Awarded the Military Medal. 217 Sgt. J. Mooney, Inf.; 1776 Pte. A. Morgan, Inf.; 15470 Pte. A. G. Morris, A.M.C.; 3445 Pte. C. H. Morris, Inf.; 2736 Pte. J. A. Moss, Pnr. Bn.; 1063 Dvr. A. H. Mountford, Inf.; 2265 Cpl. M. M. Muir, M.G. Corps; 3873 Pte. N. C. Munro, Inf.; 953 L.-Cpl. E. A. Murray, Inf ; 1938 Cpl. J. Murtagh, Inf. ; 776 Sgt. F. A. G. Newland, Inf.; 2300 Sgt. H. J. Nichols, Inf.; 7790 Pte. J. R. Norrish, Inf.; 1790 Pte. J. H. Northey, ' Inf.; 33313 Gnr. T. L. Norton, F.A.; 351 Pte. W. O?Brien, Inf.; 3365 L.-Cpl. B. L. O?Farrell, Inf.; 1626 Cpl. L. T. S. Ogilvie, Inf.: 6099 Pte. J. J. O?Meara, Inf.; 1074 S. J. J. u?Neil, Inf.; 2422 L.-Cpl. B. O?Neill, Inf.; 39079 Gnr. D. J. O?Sullivan, F.A.; 5168 Pte. J. J. J. O?Sullivan, Inf.; 61 Pte. P. O.?Sullivan, Inf.; 15428 Spr. H. J. Owen, E.; 6218 Sgt. (now 2nd Lieut.) F. Packham, Inf.; 5170 Sgt. C. H. Palmer, Inf.; 3529 Pte. C. F. Partridge, Inf.; 518 L.-Cpl. W. J. Pearce, Inf.; 1983 Pte. S. J. Pegley, Inf.; 2827 Pte. T. Perrie, Pnr. Bn.; 13295 Dvr. C. J. Perry, A.S.C.; 429 L.-Cpl. J. P. Petri, Inf.; 1123 Pte. C. J. Plenty, Inf.; 29 Cpl. R. H. Pottenger, E.; 445 Pte. L. T. Powell, Inf.; 4878 Pte. J. P. Pringle, Inf.; 3598 L.-Cpl. C. G. Pryce, Inf.; 6171 Pte. F. Quinn, Inf.; 5187 L.-Cpl. J. H. Quinn, Inf.; 1733 Sgt. C. Raison, Inf.; 4892 Cpl. (L.-Sgt.) R. B. Raper, Inf.; 2883 Sgt. (T.- Coy. 8.M.) W. T. Reed, Inf.; 31452 Gnr. B D. Reynolds, F.A.; 235 Dvr. A. Rhodes, Inf.; 691 Pte. G. Richards, Inf.; 29774 Dvr. H. H. Richards, F.A.; 7811 Pte. H. H. Richardson, Inf.; 2727 L.-Cpl. R. J. Richardson, Inf.; 3422 Cpl. W. T. Richmond, Inf.; 1685 a Pte. W. D. Ridley, Inf.; 7064 Pte. G. Roberts, Inf.; 340 Pte. F. H. Robertson, Inf.; 4893 Pte. F. Robins, Inf.; 7129 Pte. B. O. Roder, Inf.; 6871 Pte. 6. W. L. Rofe, Inf.; 3467 Pte. W. M. Rogers, Inf. ; 13350 Pte. C. N. Roscholler, A.M.C.; 5452 2nd Cpl. E. A. Ross, E.; 13641 Pte. F. L. Rowe, A.M.C.; 3532 Pte. G. B. Rowe, Inf.; 681 L. L. Russell, Inf.; 3121 Sgt. W. P. Ryall, Inf.; 700 Pte. T. H. Ryan, Inf.; 3467 Pte. J. Salvado, Inf.; 1612 Cpl. E. Schwab, Inf.; 442 Pte. F. Scrivener, Inf.; 1240 Sgt. E. G. Searle, Inf.; 4298 Sgt. A. Settle, Inf.; 155 Cpl. H. L. Seymour, Inf.; 5628 Pte. (T.-Cpl.) H. S. Shannon, Inf.; 168 Pte. J. Shubert, Inf.; 6643 L.-Cpl. W. A. M. Simms, Inf.; 1706 Pte. J. R. Sinclair, Inf.; 4210 Cpl. H. M. Skinner, Inf.; 2960 Pte. A. Since, Inf.; 293 A.-Sgt. A. S. Smith, Inf.; 3718 Pte. G. Smith, Inf.; 566 Cpl. J. A. Smith, M. Corps; 2016 Pte. T. W. Smith, A.M.C.; 3415 a Pte. M. Solomons, Inf.; 148 Cpl. A. G. Stamp, Inf.; 2924 Pte. H. T. Stanton, Inf.; 3494 Spr. J. M. Stark, E.; 5686 L.-Cpl. L. Strawhorn, Inf.; 2564 a Pte. B. S. Stevenson, Inf.; 718 Pte. J. M. Stewart, Inf.; 2887 Pte. L. S. Stienberg, Inf.; 2206 Cpl. J. A. Stoddart, Inf.; 219 Sgt. (A.-Coy. S.M.) W. W. Stumbles, Rly. Oper. Coy.; 3608 L.-Cpl. J. L. Sullivan, Inf.; 1883 Pte. E. A. Taylor, Inf.; 7082 Pte. W. H. Taylor, Inf.; 2008 Cpl. W. H. Taylor, Inf.; 2767 Pte. C. P. Tierney, Inf.; 4570 Pte. L. Thomas, Inf.; 6940 Pte. A. V. Thomson, Inf.; 3636 Pte. W. J. C. F. Tong, Inf.; 1188 Gnr. J. Toohey, F.A.; 190 Pte. E. N. Toope, Inf.; 3560 Pte. J. F. Treanor, Inf.; 7314 Pte. R. J. Trigwell, Inf.; 310 Cpl. W. Tripp, Inf.; 2356 L.-Cpl. (T.-2nd Cpl.) G. Trubi, E.; 522 Sgt. H. W. Turnbull, Inf.; 2887 Pte. P. Turnbull, Inf.; 4900 Pte. A. Turner, Inf.; 1152 Pte. W. T. Turner, Inf.; 2889 Pte. H. Twining, Inf.; 663 Sgt. H. B. Tyler, M.G. Corps; 1120 L.-Cpl. W. Valentine, Inf.; 7584 Pte. A. D. Vance, Inf.; 20447 Spr. F. Van de Plasche, B.; 3144 Cpl. J. Vernon, Inf.; 6329 Pte. W. N. Wakeman, Inf.; 792 Pte. A. C. Walker, Inf.; 4545 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) F. M. Walker, Inf.; 7343 L.-Cpl. J. T. Walsh, Inf.; 3143 Sgt. F. L. Warner, Inf.; 2414 Bomdr. J. Warnock, M.T.M. By.; 3268 Cpl. J. W. Watkins, Inf.; 179 Sgt. J. E. Watson, Pnr. Bn.; 5715 Pte. T. Watson, Inf.; 961 Pte. W. Watts, Inf.; 5128 Spr. G. M. Weaver, E.; 4291 Pte. H. F. L. Wehsack, Inf.; 7383 Spr. L. R. Weidner, E. ; 3491 Dvr. C. St. C. Westlake, E.; 448 Sgt. F. Wheal, Inf.; 3245 Pte. G. C. White, Inf.; 1791 Pte. H. J. Williams, A.M.C.; 4289 Pte. T. W. Willis, Inf.; 994 Cpl. P. S. Wilson, Inf.; 5228 L. A. J. Winn, Inf.; 1099 Cpl. B. Winters, Inf.; 1446 a Bomdr. (T.-Cpl.) W. G. Witham, M. By.; 2482 Spr. A. C. Wood, E.; 13372 Pte. A. J. Wood, A.M.C.; 4148 Spr. P. G. Wood, E.; 3022 Sgt. T. H. Woolnough, Inf.; 2758 Spr. G. A. Young, E. The Meritorious Service Medal. 4447 Pte. G. Hathaway, L.T.M. ,By. The Distinguished Conduct Medal. 1605 B.S.M. R. D. Allcroft, Fd. Arty.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During the period under review he has discharged the duties of his responsible position with energy and ability, and his behaviour under fire has been distinguished by gallantry and disregard of danger and great resource in overcoming difficulties. It was mainly owing to his resolution and ability when in charge of parties taking supplies to the front line that the guns of the battery were never short of ammunition, tion, no matter how difficult were the conditions ditions of transport. 2327 Gnr. C. E. Anderson, Fd. Arty.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He was severely gassed on two occasions, sions, but declined to leave his post, and on another occasion he went to the rescue of some wounded in a ?pill-box? that had been smashed by an 8-in. shell and was still under heavy fire. In spite of great difficulty and danger, with the aid of another gunner he extricated the wounded and carried them to a place of safety. He has always set an example of great courage and devotion to duty that is worthy of the highest praise. 9 B.S.M. C. T. Ballingall, M.T.M.B.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During the period under review he has at all times in action displayed the greatest gallantry and devotion to duty, and his resolution and resourcefulness in taking up ammunition to the front line under heavy fire, in building gun emplacements, ments, and maintaining the mortars in action have been of the greatest value. 1372 Pte. (L.=​Cpl.) W. F. Barker, A.M.C. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion votion to duty. His work, in charge of stretcher-bearers, has been characterised by a well-developed sense of responsibility under ordinary conditions, and under fire by personal courage and great initiative. He is as fearless as he is indefatigable. 808 Sgt. W. N. Berkeley, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This N.C.O. has rendered good and gallant service during the period under review. He was present at two very important portant actions in which the unit was engaged, gaged, behaving with mucfy gallantry and devotion to duty. He was wounded in each of these battles, and in all has been wounded four times during his three years? service in the field. 3468 Pte. (L.?Cpl.) C. H. Blackmore, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion votion to duty. During the movements preparatory to an attack the signal section suffered heavy casualties, among whom were the signal officer and sergeant. Corpl. Blackmore, then a private, took charge of the section, and after the attack established communication between Battalion Headquarters quarters and the companies in the line. The energetic work and devotion to duty of Corpl. Blackmore maintained the communications munications in a most satisfactory manner. At a later date, when the section was further reduced by casualties, he was continually tinually at work as an operator, with practically tically no rest for four days, and was frequently out under heavy shell fire repairing ing the lines. 8179 Sgt. T. H. Briggs, Fd. Arty.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During very heavy fighting, on two different ferent occasions he found his subsection reduced to two gunners besides himself. In spite of the difficulty, he kept his gun in action, without relief, for many hours, showing conspicuous courage and endurance ance and qualities of leadership and resolution tion which were of the greatest value. - 9438 Sgt. G. C. Brodie, Engrs.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This N.C.O. was in charge of a party detailed tailed to construct a strong point immediately diately behind the furthest objective. He showed conspicuous gallantry in taking his men through the enemy barrage, and exceptional ceptional skill in-organising the work and carrying it to a successful conclusion. His conduct throughout was a very fine example and encouragement to the men. 1689 a Pte. (L.=​Cpl.) W. E. Brown, Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an important attack by our troops this N.C.O. displayed most selfsacrificing sacrificing devotion to duty, attending to the wounded of his company under very heavy shell fire. Later on in the action he took charge of his section, after its sergeant had become a casualty, and showed a fine example of courage and leadership to the men. 3714 Sgt. L. Buchanan, Pnrs. ?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He was in charge of a working party which came under unusually intense hostile shell fire and suffered very severe casualties. ties. A connecting party in charge of an officer, who was wounded and evacuated, was ?working alongside. Sgt. Buchanan took charge of both parties, and setting them a very fine example of personal courage and disregard of danger, main tained them at work and completed the task. He personally dressed many of the wounded, and assisted the stretcher-bearers in getting them away. 19047 Gnr. (A./​Bd.) A. N. Burton, Fd. Arty.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion tion to duty. This man has rendered continuously tinuously good service as battery signaller, distinguishing himself by his courage and high example of devotion to duty. On one occasion, in the F.0.P., his officer was killed, but he continued to maintain communications munications with unflinching determination tion until he was relieved by another officer. 3028 a Sgt. B. L. Busteed, Pnrs. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He displayed exceptional coolness, and set a very fine example to the men working under him when repairing two breaks in a light railway at points which were being shelled by the enemy with peculiar intensity. sity. Although forced three times to withdraw, draw, he returned on each occasion to work with as few men as he could possibly employ to repair the line, and completed the repairs pairs under the most trying conditions. 3835 Pte. (T./​C.S.M.) P. H. Caine, Infy. ?For conspicuous courage, energy and devotion to duty when working with camel convoys. The bad weather and cold had reduced the morale of the native drivers and the capacity of the camels to the lowest ebb, but, almost unaided, for the officer in charge had been taken to hospital, he brought the camels through, and remained with the stragglers, collecting and camping them for the night, until he himself was rendered unconscious by cold and exposure. His gallant conduct was most praiseworthy. 342 C.S.M. T. S. Carter, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When he was in charge of a reconnoitring patrol he led them with great skill against an enemy patrol in charge of an officer whom he accounted for, securing important maps and identifications. His gallantry has been conspicuous in many actions, and he has been three times wounded in the last two years and a-half. 5000 Sgt. E. A. Chisholm, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an important attack by our troops this non-commissioned officer was engaged during the whole action, distinguishing himself by his gallantry and devotion to duty. When, during a lull in the fighting, his platoon were allowed to rest, he volunteered, teered, with self-sacrificing determination, to go out as a stretcher-bearer, and he brought in many wounded men. 3244 Pte. D. Chines, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This man has acted as stretcher-bearer in many actions in which the unit has been engaged, and has displayed high courage and disregard for danger, going to the aid of wounded comrades under heavy shell fire. He has saved many lives, and his determination and self-sacrificing endurance ance have set an example which has been worthy of the highest praise. 608 Sgt. W. Cruickshank, Light Horse R. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion tion to duty. During a reconnaissance he and his party of four were heavily shelled, and were always under hostile observation. Nevertheless, he carried out his mission with the greatest courage and a total disregard regard of all danger, measuring every well and cistern, and locating enemy day posts and watering places. 225 C.S.M. R. H. Dennis, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During severe fighting, this warrant officer has displayed great gallantry and disregard of personal danger, inspiring and cheering all about him by his example. His devotion tion to duty on all occasions has been conspicuous, spicuous, and he has been of the greatest assistance to his company commander. 2816 R.S.M. J. H. Dunne, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During severe fighting he was entirely responsible for the organisation of ammunition nition and ration carrying parties, whom he himself conducted to the front line under heavy fire and in the face of great difficulties. ties. He showed the greatest courage and disregard of danger in helping to recover the wounded during the battle, and at all times his fine example of unflagging devo- tion to duty has been of the utmost value to the battalion. 10 C.S.M. W. Edgar, M.G.C.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Whilst in charge of pack transport and supply parties he has personally superintended intended the delivery of rations and large quantities of S.A.A. to gun positions, day after day, under exceptionally heavy enemy shell fire. By the example of his courage and his disregard of personal safety he has enabled the gun crew to respond successfully fully to the many calls for barrages of machine-gun fire against enemy counterattacks, attacks, and at all times he has distinguished guished himself by his thoroughness and his devotion to duty. 2146 B.S.M. W. J. Ferridge, Fd. Arty.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During the period under review he has continually shown a fine disregard of danger in action. On one occasion, when ?gassed,? he declined to leave his post at the guns, and by his personal example exercised a most inspiriting effect on the remaining gunners. 99 B.S.M. A. Fitzsimmons, Fd. Arty.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. His coolness under heavy fire, loyal obedience, and devotion in the performance of the responsible duties of his position have materially contributed to the high standard of steadiness and discipline of his unit, to which his thoroughness and fine soldiery bearing have been an example. At an Australian Field Bakery in France. The regimental bootmaker at work. <Australian Official Photograph No. 3490.) H ?? 'y'* ' W l 1 Mm iM * <- W || liL life Iflp. \ -\% ~ ??fA W ?YT \ ' | t- liffi ;"! m s�b\*/​� t ' -m- II- r jj I gljife* ; ?�, . t \<Ml i w
  • War Honours for the A.I.F. The King has been graciously pleased to give directions for the following promotions in, and appointments to, the Most Distinguished guished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, for services rendered in connection with the War. Dated Ist January, 1919; MOST DISTINGUISHED ORDER OF SAINT MICHAEL AND SAINT GEORGE. To be Additional Members of the Third Class, or Companions, of the said Most Distinguished Order: ? Col. Herbert Brayley Collett, D.5.0., V.D., A.I.F. Col. William Walter Russell Watson, A.I.F. T./​Col. (Hon. Surg.-Gen.) Charles Snodgrass Ryan, A.A.M.C. Lieut.-Col. Frank Marshall, A.A.M.C. The King has been graciously pleased to give orders for the following promotions in, and appointments to, the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, for valuable services rendered in connection with the War:? MOST EXCELLENT ORDER OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE. To be Commanders of the Military Division of the said Most Excellent Order:? Col. (T./​Brig.-Gen) Thomas Griffiths, C.M.G., D.S.O. Col. (T./​Brig.-Gen.) John Patrick McGlinn, C.M.G. Lieut.-Col. (T./​Col.) Murray McWhae, C.M.G., A.A.M.C. Col. Henry Carr Maudsley, C.M.G., A.A.M.C. To be Officers of the Military Division of the said Most Excellent Order. Major Francis Teulon Beamish, A.A.M.C. Lieut.-Col. Stephen Bruggy, D.5.0., A.I.F. Major John Egbert Down, A.A.D.C. Major Guy Sherington, General List. Lieut.-Col. Bertram Milne Sutherland, A.A.M.C. Major (T./​Lt.-Col.) Walter Oswald Watt, A.F.C. Major George Charles Willcocks, M.C., A.A.M.C. Lieut.-Col. Charleton Yeatman, A.A.M.C. To be Members of the Military Division of the said Most Excellent Order;? Hon. Major Arthur Cressy Barry, Australian Comforts Fund. Capt. George King, A.I.F. Capt. Eric Alfred Lee, A.I.F. Lieut. (T./​Capt.) Rupert Livingstone Mayman, A.I.F. Qr.-Mr. and Hon. Capt. Clarence Robert Murphy, General List. Qr.-Mr. and Hon. Capt. William Andrew Perrin, General List. Lieut. William Price, A.I.F. Capt. William Henry Prior, General List. Capt. James Edmund Savage, A.A.S.C. The following are among the Decorations and Medals awarded by the Allied Powers at various dates to the British Forces for distinguished services rendered during the course of the campaign : His Majesty the King has given unrestricted stricted permission in all cases to wear the Decorations and Medals in question. DECORATIONS AND MEDALS CONFERRED BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE FRENCH REPUBLIC. Croix de Guerre. Major Arthur Samuel Allen, D.5.0., A.I.F. Captain Marcel Aurousseau, M.C., A.I.F. Col. George Walker Barber, C.M.G.., D.5.0., A.A.M.C. . ... . Col. (temporary Brig.-Gen.) Thomas Albert Blarney, C.M.G., D.5.0.. A.I.F. Major Thomas Faulkiner Berwick, D.8.0., A.I.F. Capt. John Gurner Burnell, M.C., Aust. Eng. Capt. (temporary Major) Leslie Gordon Campbell, bell, A.I.F. A . Major Alan Percy Crisp, D.5.0., Aust. Fd. Arty. Lieut.-Col. Patrick Currie, D.5.0., A.I.F. Lt.-Col. Charles Stewart Davies, D.5.0., A.I.F. Capt. (temporary Major) Algernon Wiseman Davis, M.C., A.I.F. Lieut.-Col. Francis Plumley Derham, D.5.0., Aust. Fd. Arty. Col. (temporary Brig.-Gen.) Harold Edward Elliott, C.8., C.M.G., D.5.0., D.C.M., A.I.F. Lieut. George Herbert Tver Gordon, L.H.R. Major Harold Greenway, D.5.0., Aust. Eng. Col. (temporary Brig.-Gen.) Harold William Grimwade, C.8., C.M.G., A.I.F. Major Ronald Garnet Hamilton, M.C., Aust. Eng. Lieut. Harold Ernest Harris, M.C., Aust. Eng. Major Frederick Wilson Hebb, A.I.F. Col. (temporary Brig.-Gen.) Sydney Charles Edgar Herring, D.5.0., commanding 13th Australian Brigade. . Capt. (temporary Major) Cyril Denis Horne, M.C., A.I.F. ? Capt. (temporary Major) Sydney Arthur Hunn, M.C., A.I.F. Capt. Harold Woodford Johnson, M.C., A.I.F. Capt. Monckton Bowes Kelly, A;I.P. Col. (temporary Brig.-Gen.) Raymond Lionel Leane, C.M.G., D.5.0., M.C., A.I.F. Lt.-Col. John Edward Cecil Lord, D.5.0., A.I.F. Maj. William Thomas Bartholomew McCormack, Aust. Eng. , . Col. (temporary Brig.-Gen.) Iven Giflard Mackay, A.I.F. Major Edmund Osborn Milne, D.5.0., A.A.M.C. Lieut.-Col. Henry William Murray, Y.C., D.5.0., D.C.M., Aust. M.G.C. Lieut. Joseph Henry Nott, L.H.R. Capt. Ronald Charles. Osborne, M.C., Aust. F.A. Major Herbert Peter Phillips, M.C., A.I.F. Major Eric Clive Pegus Plant, D.5.0., A.I.F. Capt. (temporary Major) Percival Thomas Roberts, D.5.0., A.I.F. Capt. William Lauchlan Sanderson, Aust. F.A. Capt. Frank Wadge, M.C., A.I.F. Major Frederick Lawrence Wall, A.A.M.C. Lieut.-Col. Harold Fletcher White, D.5.0., A.I.F. Capt. David Adie Whitehead. M.C., M.G.C. Lieut.-Col. Thomas Isaac Cornwall Williams, D.5.0., Aust. F.A. Lieut.-Col. Arthur Raff Woolcock, D.5.0., A.I.F. Croix de Gusrre. 7346 Sapper James John Boatwright. Aust. Eng. 4388 Sergt. James Michael Collery, M.M., A.I.F. 1959 Lce.-Cpl. John Joseph Curran, M.M., A.I.F. 65 Cpl. (temporary Sergt.) Archibald John Fletcher, A.I.F. 569 Staff Sergt. Alexander Francis Girling, Aust. Eng. 1852 Pte. Albert Hollingsworth, A.I.F. 2481 Sgt. Percy Jones, Aust. Fd. Arty. 2149 Pte. Walter MaCAuley, A.I.F. 2909 Dvr. Wallace Middleton, A.I.F. 3668 Cpl. Thomas Richard Pitchford, Aust. Eng. 566 Lce.-Cpl. Raymond Bramwell Ramage, Aust. M.G. Bn. 3532 Sgt. Eric Falconer Read, M.M., Pioneers. 2272 Co. Sgt.-Maj. Cecil William Rosendell, M.M. A.I.F. 1390 Co. Sgt.-Maj. Cecil Rush, A.I.F. 2438 W. 0., Class 1., Charles George Schroder, A.I.F. 2791 Co. Sgt.-Maj. William George Slocombe, A.I.F. 2876 Lee.-Sgt. (temporary Sgt.) William Norman Templeman, M.M., Aust. M.G. Bn. 3024 Sgt. James Lenora Walsh, Aust. Fd. Arty. 22845 Dvr. Arthur Leslie Williams. Aust. F.A. 3529 Sgt. Walter Henry Woodward, A.I.F. His Majesty the King- has been graciously pleased to approve of the following awards to the undermentioned Officers and Warrant Officers in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field : Awarded the Distinguished Service Order. Maj. John Charles Campbell, A.A.M.C. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This officer was in charge of stretcher-bearers, evacuating all wounded from the right sector of the advance throughout five days? fighting. He kept close behind the infantry and kept in touch with the various medical officers under constant heavy fire. One night a direct hit completely demolished his aid post, but he got his men to a place of safety and continued the evacuation of the wounded. He superintended the work for five days continuously with great courage and persistence, sistence, setting a fine example to all under him. Maj. Reginald Havill Norman, iM.C., A.1.F., attd. 12th Aus. Inf. Bde. H.Q. ? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty under heavy artillery and machinegun gun fire ; this officer went forward and got into touch with advanced troops, ascertaining ing their position and establishing liaison between units. He was untiring in his efforts to promote the success of the operation. tion. Maj. Herbert Peter Phillips, M.C., Pnrs. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This officer carried out reconnaissances sances immediately behind the infantry advance, reporting on damaged bridges, etc., and within 24 hours after zero had collected the necessary information for putting the work in hand. He was engaged In this work for three days under heavy shell fire,' completing his task under most trying circumstances. 2nd Lieut. James Shorrock, A.I.F.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This officer led his platoon in the attack with the greatest dash. On one occasion, well ahead of his men, he jumped into a trench, and single-handed captured twenty men and two machine-guns. A few days later, when the advance was held up by a strong point, he worked round to a flank, and again single-handed captured ten men and two machine-guns. These most daring actions saved the situation, and enabled the advance to continue. Awarded a Bar to Military Cross. Capt. William Montague Bell Cory,M.C., A.M.G.C. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in command of sixteen guns in a night attack on a village. Although his guns were all in position over a wide front, and he had very short notice of the attack, he had them all ready to move off at zero hour. He made a thorough reconnaissance of the forward positions, and sited his guns to cover the consolidation. tion. He has led his company in the attack on five different days, and always with good results. (M.C. gazetted Ist January, 1918.) Lieut. John Hugh James, M.C., Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This officer led his platoon against a strongly defended line, suffering heavy casualties from machine-gun fire, but he reached his objective and captured thirty prisoners. He superintended and encouraged aged the men in the consolidation of the position, exposed to constant machine-gun and rifle' fire. His determination contributed buted largely to the success of the operation. tion. (M.C. gazetted 25th August, 1917.) Capt. (T./​Maj.) Francis Roger North, M.C., Infy ? ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. His company was on the right, flank during the attack, and met with strong opposition, but, by skilful leading, he maintained his direction, and drove the enemy out of their position, thereby removing a serious menace to the advance. The cool manner in which he directed operations, in spite of casualties from heavy fire, had a remarkable influence over his men. (M.C. gazetted 15th October, 1918.) Awarded the Military Cross. Lieut. Frederick James Baxter, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During the advance this officer skilfully organised and led an attack on an enemy strong post, capturing one officer and twenty-eight other ranks. His work throughout was up to a high standard of efficiency. Lieut. George Malacbi Seward Brain, A.M.G.C.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During some operations, in order to bring a barrage fire on a wood, it was necessary to get sixteen guns into position in a village. This officer was given the task, and completed it during the night, although he had to cross a river, where all the bridges were broken, and he had to get some timber from an enemy dump to improvise one, and was under fire the whole time. Capt. Paul Francis Calow, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This officer led the directing company in an advance through dense fog, and his accurate leading was mainly responsible for the safety of the whole line. His company pany reached the final objective up to time, and immediately consolidated. Three nights later, he again led his company on a difficult enterprise with success, until he was severely wounded and had to be evacuated. He showed marked efficiency in two difficult operations. 2nd Lieut. Arthur James Crampton, Eng. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This officer moved forward with the attacking infantry to search for and remove land mines and traps from main roads. Assisted by one man he removed twenty-seven mines, and the fact that there was only one accident due to land mines on the main roads proved the thoroughness with which he carried out his task, and thereby enabled guns and limbers to get forward safely and quickly. Lieut. Alexander Dunn, Eng.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Following an attack this officer was in charge of the reconnaissance of roads, railways, wells, dumps, etc., in the captured tured area. By keeping close up and organising his various parties he was able to furnish headquarters with prompt information mation regarding water supply, tools and stores, etc., found. After seeing two tanks and a waggon blown up by mines, he, at great risk, removed or destroyed a number of others. He set a fine example of initiative and courage. Lieut. Maurice Alfred Fergusson, F.A.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He got his guns quickly into action in five successive positions, in close support of the infantry. On one occasion his prompt initiative in selecting a different route to that traversed by his battery commander, mander, not only saved the guns but the lives of many of his men. His cool judgment ment and foresight set a high standard to all ranks of his battery. Lieut. Harold John Filshie, M.T.M. By. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This officer, under heavy shell and machine-gun fire, succeeded without the aid of a carrying party in getting his 6-in. trench mortar emplaced, and by its fire cleared off some machine-guns which were holding up the infantry. In five days? advance he silenced many machine-gun posts, firing no less than 662 T.M. bombs in the process. He showed untiring energy. Lieut. Frank Hardy, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion" to duty. The battalion had to advance to its final objective, a distance of 4,000 yards, through dense fog. This officer, who was adjutant, superintended the movement, and guided the battalion in good formation to its destination. He was largely responsible for the success of the operation, as, regardless less of personal danger, he was always at hand to keep the C.O. informed of the general situation. 2nd Lieut. George Kingston Baron Hay, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and resource. source. When the enemy attacked his company, penetrating the line, he reorganised ised his platoon and held a defensive position tion under heavy fire. Later, he went out with a patrol and reconnoitred the ground occupied by the enemy, and was of great assistance in restoring the line. His coolness ness and prompt action in a difficult situation tion were an example to all. 2nd Lt. Herbert William Henningham. Pnrs.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion votion to duty. This officer, while leading his platoon in an attack on a village, was checked by machine-gun and rifle fire from an enemy post. He rapidly organised and led a party against it, killing or capturing the whole of the garrison, and enabling the advance to be continued. He showed great coolness and disregard of danger during the consolidation, and set a fine example to his men. Capt. Walter Hubert Hind, Infy., seed. L.T.M. By.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When six out of his eight guns had been destroyed, four while being brought forward in tanks, and two during the actual attack, he left the remaining maining two in charge of an officer, and forming up his other three sections, led them into attack as infantry. In this way he gave valuable help, outflanking and surrounding a machine-gun nest, which surrendered. He proved himself �biquitous either as an infantry or T.M. officer. Lieut. Robert Macintosh Isaacs, Eng.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Prior to an attack this officer carried out good work in marking out brigade assembly positions. He closely followed the attack, and vigorously set to work on consolidation when it was successful. ful. As no stores had arrived he organised parties for collecting captured stores, and thanks to his energy and leadership rapidly completed the consolidation. Lieut. Walter Lancelot Oscar Mallard, M.G. Corps.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When the tank which was bringing up his guns was put out of action two miles from the objective, he at once started to man-handle his guns forward, and got them forward with the first wave of infantry. Thanks to his energy and determination they were able to inflict heavy losses on the retreating enemy. Capt. Edward Daniel Mc�urnie, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and able leadership. ship. This officer, in command of the left company during a night attack, led his men through hostile shell and machine-gun fire to the final objective, where he quickly reorganised and consolidated. The two companies in this attack were so well led that they advanced 2,000 yards and captured tured 182 prisoners at the cost of only five men wounded. Lieut. Wilfred Crosbie Pleasance, Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry and determination. tion. Under a heavy barrage he succeeded in laying tape for the jumping-off line, and led the battalion up to it by zero hour through dense fog and smoke. He then kept well forward with the leading wave and sent back reliable and accurate information, mation, his work being of great assistance to the attack.
  • War Honours for the A.I.F. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the following awards to the undermentioned Officers and Warrant Officers in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field: ? Lt. John Donald Maqansh, sth A.L.H.R. ?For conspicuous gallantry and leadership. ship. This officer twice moved out with about twenty men to dislodge the enemy from some high ground. On the first occasion he was driven back, but later, working his way over difficult ground, he got close up and attacked about 150 of them, capturing twenty-six prisoners, one machine-gun, and four automatic rifles, with ammunition and other material. His coolness had a great influence on his men. Lieut. Stuart Robertson Macfarlane, Ist A.L.H.R. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He led his troop in a counter-attack with dash and initiative, seizing a bluff occupied by the enemy, and capturing over 100 prisoners as well as one machine-gun and some automatic rifles. He showed fine leadership, which carried the attack through without loss to his troop. Lieut. Louis Buvelot Marshall, F.A.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When signs of an enemy retirement were reported he at once went forward, though he was suffering from the effects of gas, and made a thorough reconnaissance of the brigade front under machine-gun fire, and sent back valuable information. He showed great coolness and initiative. Lieut. Guy Martin, M.G. Co. ?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and resource. He established his machine-guns on the flank of an attack, and inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy. Later, he made several reconnaissances connaissances to get in touch with the brigade on his left. He set a splendid example of courage throughout. Lieut. Thomas Truelove Morley, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He reconnoitred an assembly position tion under heavy fire and in a thick fog, and skilfully guided the companies to the areas allotted to them. At a later stage of the attack he again selected positions and assembled the companies for the attack on the final objective. He then advanced with the attacking troops, and assisted in the capture of an enemy machine gun, which he used with great success agpinst the enemy. He showed i splendid skill and resource. Lieut. William Kent Morpeth, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He advanced with the attacking troops, and sent back valuable information as to the progress of the attack. Though exposed to heavy shell and machine-gun fire, he continued to work backwards and forwards with utter disregard of danger. Capt. (now Maj.) Sydney Michael O?Riordau, A.A.M.C., attd. Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During the later stages of an advance, when the infantry were under heavy fire, he established his aid post in an advanced position and dealt very rapidly with the casualties. His initiative and coolness under heavy fire were an inspiration to all who came in contact with him. Lieut. William Charles O?Toole, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He led a party forward in an advance, and reconnoitred and cleared a road of obstacles and wire under continual shell, machine-gun and snipers? fire. His energy and initiative so inspired his men that 7,000 yards of road were cleared for traffic an hour after the beginning of the attack. Lieut. Albert James Pinkerton, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as signalling officer during two days? operations. He frequently crossed over the open under close-range machine-gun fire establishing and maintaining communication tion during the advance. It was owing to his determination and initiative that communication munication was kept up throughout. Lt. George Taylor Pledger, Ist A.L.H.R. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty at a critical stage of an attack, when the enemy had almost gained the right of a ridge; this officer collected a handful of regimental staff details and held a post against heavy odds. He repelled two attacks, using a rifle effectively himself, self, and thus time for reserves to come up. Lieut. Clarence Mclntosh Potts, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and good leadership ship in an attack. He led his company with great skill, capturing 150 prisoners and a battery of 5.9 guns. Later, after making a daring reconnaissance, he advanced vanced his line 2,000 yards and consolidated his position under heavy fire. He set a splendid example of coolness and determination mination to his company. Lieut. Walter Edward Shiells, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and good leadership. ship. He led his platoon with great determination mination in a rush on two enemy machinegun gun posts which were holding up part of the advance, captured the positions and killed the garrisons. Later, he cleared several large enemy dug-outs and took the occupants prisoners. He advanced with his platoon in the face of point-blank fire from a field gun and captured an anti-tank gun and its crew. He showed great coolness ness and initiative. Lieut. Harold Daniel Skinner, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and good leadership. ship. He led his men in an attack with great determination, and worked splendidly in consolidating the captured pdsition and organising the defence of the sector. On the next day he again advanced with his platoon to the objective under heavy fire. T./​Capt. Harry Smith, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. He led his company brilliantly under heavy flanking fire, and personally attacked a machine-gun post, shooting the gurtner and capturing the three other men and the gun. After gaining ing his objective he proceeded to a Tank which was on fire in the vicinity and rescued several of the garrison. This was done under intense machine-gun fire. He did splendid work. Lieut. John Edward Macartney Snape, F.A.?For conspicuous gallantry and determination mination during an advance. He led his section forward 600 yards in rear of the leading infantry and brought his guns into action. He successfully engaged several machine-guns which were checking the advance, and saved many casualties among the attacking infantry by his resource and initiative. 941 C.S.M. Kenneth Guthrie Stewart, M.M., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and good leadership in an attack. He showed great coolness and initative under heavy fire, and encouraged the men of his company by his excellent example. In the later stages of the attack he took command of a platoon and skilfully formed a defensive flank when the advance was temporarily checked on his right. Capt. Allan Fergus Taylor, A.M.G.C.? For conspicuous gallantr/​ and good leadership ship during an advance. He was in charge of sixteen machine guns, and on reaching the final objective he at once made a reconnaissance and got his guns into position under heavy fire. He sent back valuable information, and inspired his men by his energy and contempt of danger. Lieut. Eric Thewlis, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and initiative in an attack. Seeing a small isolated post maintaining taining the fight in close proximity to the enemy he rushed across the open to it under intense machine-gun fire. He rallied the men, whose officer had been killed, and consolidated solidated and held this important position until supports arrived. He displayed great coolness and determination. Lieut. Francis James Treloar, A.L.H.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in command of a post which was attacked by the enemy. He reported the attack while the enemy were still 1,000 yards off, and giving their exact line of advance, enabled the artillery to bring fire to bear, which compelled them to deploy. His personal courage and example were largely responsible for the repulse of the enemy with heavy loss. Capt. Frank Elliot Trenoweth True, A.A.M.C., attd. Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He moved forward with the assaulting troops under very heavy fire, established his aid post and organised his stretcher-bearers, and was the means of saving many of the wounded. He carried out his duties under heavy fire with great skill and courage. Capt. Francis Louis Trinca, A.M.C., attd. 2nd A.L.H.R.?For conspicuous gallantry lantry and devotion to duty. During an attack this officer, although suffering from fever, carried out his duties with great energy and total disregard of danger. Later he accompanied the troops in a counterattack, attack, attending to casualties in the open under fire, and setting a fine example of endurance. Capt. David Austral Twining, M.M., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and resource source in an attack. When part of the attacking line was held up by machine-gun fire he led forward a party under intense fire and worked round the flanks of the position. He captured the machine-gun and some prisoners and thereby prevented many casualties. He displayed untiring energy and courage throughout. Capt. Paul Ernest Voss, A.A.M.C., attd. v Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion tion to duty. He worked at his aid post under heavy fire throughout two days? operations, and attended to the wounded of two divisions. He set a fine example of courage throughout, and undoubtedly saved many lives. Lieut. (T./​Capt.) Harry Walker, Infy., attd. L.T.M.B.?For conspicuous gallantry and resource. He was wounded during an advance, but remained with his detachment until all his ammunition was expended. On 5 his way to the dressing station, hearing that ? the infantry were held up by machine-gun 1 fire and were in need of help, he at once e collected some men and led them forward a witty ammunition. He brought a mortar P into action, silenced the enemy machine- tl guns and enabled the advance to continue. ti He also put out of action an anti-tank gun rr which was hampering the advance of the � tanks. He showed splendid courage and s< initiative. __ tf Lienf. Leo Cecil Waterford, L.T.M.B. For conspicuous gallantry and resource. When an advance was being considerably A impeded by artillery and machine-gun fire, he rushed his gun into action in the open, tr and in a very short time destroyed the jo hostile machine-gun. Later he was severely hi ire wounded in an attempt to assist a wounded >y. man under heavy fire. He set a splendid :re example of courage and determination, he His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to confer the undermentioned ed Rewards on Officers and other ranks of the er Royal Air Force in recognition of gallantry id m flying operations against the enemy: J� Awarded the Distinguished Service Order. th Ca P t * Edgar James McClaughry, D.F.C. (Australian F.C.).?A bold and fearless officer, who has performed many gallant ?, deeds of daring, notably on 24th September, 1- when, attacking a train at 250 feet altitude, n he obtained a direct hit, cutting it in two, 11 the rear portion being derailed. He then lt fired a number of rounds at the fore portion, ? r which pulled up. Sighting a hostile twoseater seater he engaged and drove it down. Pron n ceeding home, he observed seven Fokker biplanes; although he had expended the greater part of his ammunition, Captain McClaughty never hesitated, but engaged the leader. During the combat that ensued e he was severely wounded by fire from a 1 scout that attacked him from behind ; turne e ing, he drove this machine off badly damaged. His ammunition being now 2 expended he endeavoured to drive off two f hostile scouts by firing Very lights at them. f Exhausted by his exertions, he temporarily lost consciousness, but recovered sufficiently x to land his machine safely. This officer has destroyed fourteen machines and four balloons, and has repeatedly displayed an ? utter disregard for danger in attacking ground targets. (D.F.C. gazetted 21st September, 1918; Bar to D.F.C. same date.) Awarded a Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross. Lieut. (A./​Capt.) Roby Lewis Manuel, D.F.C. (Australian F.C.). ?On many occa- I sions this officer has led his patrol with ! exceptional ability and courage, notably on 16th September, when, with a patrol of , eleven machines, he engaged fifteen hostile aircraft. By skilful manoeuvre he completely pletely defeated the enemy in a combat that lasted twenty minutes, at the expiration tion of which period only four hostile 3 machines remained in the air, and these P retired. Six of the enemy machines were 3 seen to fall in o manner that would justify " the supposition that they would crash. P (D.F.C. gazetted 2nd July, 1918.) Awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. 2nd Lieut. Thomas Harry Barkell (Aus- A tralian F.C.). ?Although this officer only o; joined his squadron some two months ago, m his outstanding ability soon qualified him sh Ed for the leadership of a patrol; and he has id already acted as leader in twenty-three offensive flights. His conduct of these patrols, and the results he has achieved, testify to his exceptional enterprise, and fufly justifies his early appointment to the 5d responsible position of leader. Lieut. David Frederick Dimsey (Austray y lian F.C.). ?This officer has displayed conspicuous spicuous bravery in carrying out contact r< patrols, notably on 16th September, when, , in face of intense anti-aircraft and machinegun gun fire, he flew over the line at a height ? t P f hundred feet, accurately pin-pointing ing the line until his observer was killed. He then returned to his aerodrome and rendered a valuable report of the situation. n Capt. Lawrence Janies Wackett (Austrai, i, lian F.C.).?During recent operations this ?- officy has rendered conspicuous service in i- taking oblique photographs and in supplyr r ing our troops with ammunition. On 25?th e September, flying at only 1,500 feet, he 1 obtained a complete series of oblique photo-1 -1 graphs of an area several miles behind the i enemy front line; although his radiator i was hit, he, by skilful piloting, succeeded in landing his machine safely at his aeror r drome. 7 Awarded a Bar to the Distinguished Conduct Medal. 967 C.S.M. L. J. Mathias, D.C.M., Infy. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. In advancing through a wood this warrant officer with four men captured three enemy strong points, killing three and taking sixteen prisoners. Although cut off from the rest of the company by dense fog, he went on with great dash, and rushed a field gun which was firing over open sights, capturing the gun, killing two gunners and taking two prisoners. His leadership and initiative in the attack and his energy in consolidating were an inspiration tion to all ranks. (D.C.M. gazetted 3rd June, 1918.) Awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. 3232 Sgt. H. D. Andrews, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. A unit on the left flank was held up while attacking a village, and he was one of a patrol of six who crossed the river to render assistance. He carried out daring patrol work and located enemy posts, and took a prominent part in the capture of a strong enemy post which yielded one officer and thirty-one other ranks and seven machineguns. guns. He later did valuable work in using the captured guns against the enemy. Altogether his party accounted for one officer, seventy-two other ranks and nine machine-guns. He did splendidly and showed great courage and initiative.
  • War Honours for the A.I.F. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the following award to the undermentioned Non-Commissioned Officers and Men : The Distinguished Conduct Medal. 709 Sgt. F. G. H. Garrett, Light Horse R.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Acting as a signaller, he has invariably performed exceptionally courageous geous and fine work, having been through every operation since the beginning of the war in which his regiment has taken part. His energy and zeal have been worthy of high praise. 3818 a Pte. E. Gorham, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This man, who has been stretcher-bearer in the battalion, has taken part in every one of the many severe actions in which the unit has been engaged, and on every occasion sion he has acquitted himsef as a fearless soldier, whose devotion to duty has never wavered. He has on several occasions attended to the wounded under heavy fire, and has undoubtedly saved many lives. 234 Sgt. P, J. Graham, Fd. Arty.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. On one occasion, when the gun detachment ment and the gun next to him were destroyed stroyed by an 8-in. shell, he steadied his men with much coolness, and when the No. 1 of the gun on the other flank was wounded, he commanded both guns and kept them in action under intense fire by his courage and determination. On another occasion he had two horses killed under him, and he was badly shaken, while many of his party, who were carrying ammunition, were killed or wounded, but he rallied them and completed ten trips to the battery position. His devotion to duty was a very fine example to all ranks, especially to some reinforcements who had lately joined the battery. 1786 Sgt. A. E. Hack, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an attack by our troops this N.C.O. displayed great gallantry in organising his company Lewis-gun crews under heavy fire. He succeeded in getting his four teams up to the final objective, and personally placed each gun in position, and enabled a party to go forward and capture an enemy machine-gun. He has rendered valuable services on patrol, and has obtained most useful information. 2472 Sgt. J. J. Hickey, L.T.M. By.?? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. As acting Q.M.S. he showed marked energy. The welfare of the men has been his one consideration. His supervision of the transport of rations under difficult and dangerous circumstances contributed largely to the success of his battery. 1590 Sgt. N, C. Hill, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. On one occasion when no officers were available, he took command of a large party of reinforcements, and, notwithstanding ing heavy shell fire and most difficult weather conditions, he succeeded in bringing ing them to the front line. His example of gallantry in action has often been remarkable, markable, and his steadiness and reliability when out of the line has been of the greatest assistance to his officers. 7563 Sapper W. Hockin, Engrs.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This man rendered peculiarly valuable service vice as linesman when many of the party of which he was one were wounded or shellshocked, shocked, remained on duty for thirty-six hours continuously, repairing lines under shell fire of a very intense description. On another occasion, when several casualties occurred from gas and he himself was suffering fering from its effects, he remained at his post and maintained about two miles of ground cable in a very heavily shelled area. His courage, endurance and devotion to duty were worthy of the highest praise. 7 Cpl. E. Holland, Engrs.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Throughout active operations lasting over two months he rendered conspicuously distinguished tinguished service as a motor cyclist, always showing the most determined pluck and tenacity of purpose when accompanying ing a brigade during an advance. 217 C.S.M. G. J. Horder, Pnrs.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During the whole period under review this warrant officer has shown remarkable powers of organisation and leadership whilst in charge of working parties. As a platoon sergeant he has shown admirable energy, and his very fine example of complete plete fearlessness and presence of mind under fire has inspired his men with respect and confidence. 1224 Driver R. E. Humphreys, A.S.C.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When on pack transport work and frequently under fire, he always displayed great courage and was a splendid example to his men. 605 Sgt. P. Jarry, Engrs.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during a time of great enemy activity. His gallant actions and energy have always set a first-rate example to his men under conditions ditions of extreme difficulty. He has not missed a single day?s duty in twenty-two months on active service. 681 Cpl. F. D. Johnson, Infy.-?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This N.C.O. has rendered good service as signalling corporal, being constantly out under heavy enemy fire of all descriptions, repairing and maintaining communication lines. He has continually set a very fine example of courage in the face of danger and devotion to duty at all times, and he distinguished himself by his behaviour in action, during severe fighting, when he was wounded. 822 C.S.M. D. C. Kilpatrick, Pnrs.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During strenuous active operations this warrant officer showed fine devotion to duty, great ability and conspicuous gallantry lantry when organising the works of his platoon, under exceptionally heavy enemy artillery fire. On one occasion, when his platoon was without an officer, he took command and successfully carried out all works entrusted to him. 2432 Sgt. H. C. King, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. The services rendered by this N.C.O. have been most meritorious, and he has been twice mentioned in despatches. On two occasions when he has been acting as company-sergeant-major, pany-sergeant-major, when the battalion was in line, he has carried out his duties with great courage under fire and in a highly efficient manner, setting a fine example of devotion to duty to all ranks of the battalion. 899 Sqd. S.M. (T./​R.S.M.) K. Lawlor, Light Horse R. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During a very severe enemy attack he worked unceasingly in the performance of his duties, showing the greatest energy and resource 'and a complete disregard of all danger, and it was in a very great measure due to his personal exertions that the firing line was so well supplied with ammunition and bombs. 17996 2nd Cpl. R, McD. Leslie, Engrs. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty, and ability when in charge of water-supply arrangements. He worked continuously day and night without relief for an extended period, and the success of the supply was largely due to the courage, zeal and untiring energy which he displayed. played. 806 R.S.M. M. Littlewood, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During the period under review he has performed most valuable service in his responsible sponsible position, indefatigable in devotion to duty, and distinguished himself by his courage and disregard of danger. He himself self conducted carrying parties with rations and supplies through heavily shelled areas to troops in the forward line, and at all times his loyal thoroughness and soldierly bearing have materially assisted in maintaining taining a high standard of discipline in the battalion. 2875 a Cpl. H. A. Lord, Pnrs.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. On ona. occasion, when in charge of a party engaged in establishing communications through a wood to the forward area, he behaved with great gallantry under heavy enemy fire, getting all the wounded to the dressing station and by his personal example encouraging the men in their difficult task so that the work was completed pleted in spite of the enemy fire. 967 C.S.M. L. J. Mathias, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. In action he has proved himself a fearless fighter and a capable and courageous leader. The good influence of his example of devotion to duty and his strong personality ality is conspicuous in the high esteem in which he is held by his comrades of all ranks. He has been a most successful instructor in bayonet fighting. 1391 C.S.M. H. McCabe, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. The valuable services rendered by this trustworthy warrant officer have been an example to all the battalion, distinguished, as they have been, by high courage in action, self-sacrificing devotion to duty, and unremitting care for the well-being of the men of his company. 3166 Sgt. A. T. McLean, L.T.M.B.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an attack by our troops he took forward two guns and successfully established them in the captured line, thereby giving most valuable assistance to the infantry when it was much needed, at a critical moment. He has frequently been called on to perform the duties of an officer, which he has carried out with courage, initiative and resource, inspiring the greatest confidence in those under his command. 602 Pte. J. Miller, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This man was one of a party of one officer and seventeen teen other ranks sent out to reconnoitre a position to be occupied by the battalion. He was one of only five who were not casualties, and he guided the units of the battalion successfully to the different places they were to occupy, performing his duty with courage and composure in spite of heavy enemy fire of all descriptions. Later, when carrying a message over ground swept by machine-gun fire, he was hit in the chest, but refused to delay to receive medical aid, and staggered on till he successfully delivered his message and then collapsed. His courage and endurance ance were worthy of the highest praise, no less than his determined devotion to duty. 233 Sgt. S. R. Murdock, Infy,?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This N.C.O. has distinguished himself by his coolness under fire and disregard of danger on many occasions. Once, when in charge of a platoon burying cable, seeing that the party, who were caught in a very heavy barrage, were becoming uneasy, easy, he jumped out of the trench, and, walking along the top, cheerfully encouraged aged and steadied his men. His example of courage and devotion to duty held his platoon together and undoubtedly saved many casualties. 2962 Sgt. A. J. Murphy, Engrs.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Under heavy fire he reconnoitred the ground forward of the front line, and, with B wiring party 60 strong, completed the wire entanglement of a position which had only been occupied during that evening. The work was accomplished under heavy fire, and the party sustained severe casualties, ties, and it was largely due to Sergeant Murphy?s coolness and the fine example he set the men that it was possible to complete the work. 10034 Pte. (L.=​Cpl.) J. F. Murphy, A.M.C. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as a stretcher-bearer. At a time of many casualties he carried day and night over rough ground continually subjected to heavy shell fire and often hampered by gas. In spite of great dangers his squad remained intact. This was mainly due to his masterly direction, great energy and courage. 1306 Cpl. J. Nancarrow, Engrs.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. While in charge of the pumping and electric tric power of mining systems, two out of three of his engines were smashed and the mines commenced to flood. By working continuously, in 56 hours he installed a new plant under shell fire, and, by keeping the remaining set running continuously heavily overloaded, the water was kept from rising more than two feet in the galleries. During a long period he has worked at repairs, often under heavy shell fire, and has shown a fine example of determination and courage. 3125 Sgt. F. L. Partridge, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During the period under review he has served with ability and distinction, taking part in every action in which the unit has been engaged. When acting as a platoon commander, at a time when officers were few, he displayed fine courage in action and excellent qualities of leadership in difficult operations. 3586 Pte. (L.=​Cpl.) S. S. Rawcliffe, Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During the period under review he was a member of a fatigue party attached to a field company, and was employed ployed daily in the forward area, often under heavy hostile shelling. His behaviour viour on all occasions has been especially admirable, and he has exerted a marked influence with the remainder of the party, preventing any confusion in trying circumstances. stances. 2235 Sgt. C. Robinson, Imp, Camel Bde. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During two days of severe fighting he showed most conspicuous courage and resource, never failing to run great personal sonal risk to obtain valuable targets for his machine-gun teams, and setting an example which, at a critical time, was of the highest value to all with him. 612 Sgt. L. J. Savage, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During two years? service in the field, in which he has taken part in every action in which the battalion has been engaged, he has frequently commanded a platoon in the line with great ability, displaying high qualities of gallantry and devotion to duty. He has frequently volunteered for tasks of danger, and as patrol leader he has obtained most useful information. His fine example has inspired confidence in his comrades of all ranks, whose respect and admiration he has won by his behaviour both in the line and out of it. 1625 Sgt. C. A. Schwab, M.M., A.M.C. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty whenever the unit has been in action. His fearlessness under fire, his initiative and resource have repeatedly gained for him the thanks of the medical officers under whom he was working. He showed exceptionally fine work in organising ing stretcher-parties, and while so engaged was wounded, but refused to leave until the completion of his task. 971 Cpl. R. J. Shippick, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an attack by pur troops he took command of a Lewis-gun detachment when the No. 1 became a casualty, and carrying on with great determination to the final objective through the protective barrage, he inflicted heavy losses on the retreating enemy. He remained in charge during the final consolidation, inspiring his men by his fearlessness and gallant behaviour, under very heavy shell and machine-gun fire. 1886 Pte. (L.'Cpl.) T. Simpson, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This man has for many months been a battalion scout, and his fearless courage and ability have enabled him to bring in the most valuable information on many occasions. His example has had a marked effect on the efficiency of the scouts of the battalion. 31 C.S.M. R. Sykes, M.G.C.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This reliable and trustworthy warrant officer has always been of the greatest assistance to his commanding officer, both in the line and out of it. Under fire he has displayed courage and cool judgment, and his steadiness and devotion to duty have been a fine example to the men under him.
  • War Honours for the A.I.F. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to confer the undermentioned award on the following Warrant Officers, Non-commissioned Officers and Men : Awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. 378 Sgt. M. McEvoy, L.T.M. Bty.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This N.C.O. had charge of two light trench mortars in the attack. With an infantry N.C.O. he rushed a dug-out, capturing two officers and important maps and papers. He next rushed a post with one man, capturing the garrison of ten men, On nearing the objective he rounded up about 20 of the enemy who were trying to escape. His initiative was a great asset in the attack. 893 Sgt. H. W. McKenzie, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. In an attack on a village his company came under close range machine-gun lire, all the officers becoming casualties and the men somewhat disorganised. This N.C.O. took command and rallied them in the face of heavy machine-gun fire, pressing on to the objective. On the way he located and rushed a machine-gun post single-handed, shooting the crew and capturing the post. Throughout his judgment and coolness were conspicuous. 2701 Sgt. W. A. McKenzie, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This N.C.O. worked his platoon forward under very heavy machine-gun fire, outflanking flanking a post which was holding up the advance. He then personally headed a rush, capturing two machine-guns and killing the crews. His courage and leadership ship inspired the men under him. 4560 Cpi. I. O. Mengersen, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This N.C.0., in charge of a fighting patrol of fifteen men, led them out under heavy barrage to clear a troublesome re-entrant. The patrol was engaged by machine-gun fire from both flanks and the right rear. Organising small bombing parties, he attacked and silenced three guns and held on for hours until ordered to withdraw. He set a splendid example of courage and coolness. 3181 R.S.M. J. Metcalf, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He assisted the company commanders, who were short of officers, in organising the advance. When the attack was checked by machine-gun fire he went forward through the fire and pointed out a suitable position for dealing with it. In unloading an antitank tank gun which had been captured, the charge exploded, injuring his hand, but he refused to leave until the next morning, continuing to supervise the supply of ammunition. munition. His endurance and determination tion inspired those with him. 742 C.Q.M.S. T. J. Mew, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When the advance was held up by an enemy strong point, this warrant officer placed his platoon in commanding positions tions to keep down the enemy?s fire, and then creeping forward with three men bombed the post, killing and wounding several of the enemy and putting a machine-gun out of action. The remainder surrendered. Owing to his daring initiative tive the advance was resumed, and he continued tinued to do splendid work up to the final objective. 4011 Sgt. B. R. Miller, Engrs.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This N.C.O. made a reconnaissance after the first objective had been reached, under heavy machine-gun fire, to ascertain if wiring could proceed. He was also in charge of parties at the second objective, when the work had to be carried out under harassing shell fire,. Thanks to his energy and coolness under fire an apron fence 100 yards long was completed by the evening right across the battalion front. 5407 Pte. A. A. Moore, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Assuming command of the platoon when his officer became a casualty, he led it forward in the face of heavy shell and machine-gun fire, capturing six prisoners, one machine-gun, and killing a number of the enemy. Later, while establishing a block in a trench, he went forward alone and met a hostile bombing party, killing two and driving off the rest. He showed dash and resource under trying conditions. 4538 Sgt. A. McD. Muir, M.M., Pnrs. ? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When this N.C.O. with his platoon were moving along a sunken road, they were suddenly fired at from both flanks and front. He displayed great coolness in keeping control of his men and getting them under cover, at the same time-keeping ing in touch with his company commander. His initiative and resource saved many casualties, and were a fine example. 2913 Sgt. W. Murray, M.M., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During the latter stages of the advance, the platoon of which this N.C.O. was in charge was held up by machine-gun fire from a strong post. He crept forward round the flank with a small party and bombed it, killing or capturing the whole of the garrison. After establishing* his platoon in the post, the enemy attacked down a communication trench, but he drove them back with heavy losses. He showed most skilful leadership throughout. 1807 Sgt. W. Nash, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This N.C.0., in charge of a bombing section, encountered an enemy post. He at once rushed it single-handed, shooting the occupants before they had time to fire. He then continued to advance upon a communication munication trench under heavy fire and' held the end of it until his men came up. He saved many casualties by his promptness. ness. 2761 Pte. R. E. Nicholls, M.M., Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an attack this man noticed a group of the enemy putting up a stiff fight in a gully, and collecting a small party of men led them across the gully to cut them off. Although the men with him were held up by the intense machine-gun fire he kept on and succeeded with thp help of an officer in taking several of the enemy prisoners. His daring and initiative tive were a fine example to his comrades. 284 Cpl. (T./​Sgt.) G. F. Nicholson, Pnrs. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. In the attack this N.C.O. personally sonally disposed of the crew of one enemy machine-gun, enabling his section to progress. gress. While consolidating he went out and rescued two wounded stretcher-bearers, and though wounded himself refused to leave the line. He set a fine example of courage and endurance to his section. 1543 L.=​Cpl. M. W. O?Connor, Inf., attd. L.T.M. By.?For conspicuous gallantry lantry and initiative. In the attack itself he kept his gun handy and twice blew up a machine-gun nest in face of its fire. Later, he went out under fire of all descriptions scriptions and brought in a wounded officer and two men who had been sniped while attending to him. As in the attack, so during and after consolidation, his example was an inspiration to his gun crew. 1389 C.S.M. W. Oswald, M.M., Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an advance in a village this warrant officer was in charge of his company pany mopping-up party. Perceiving a gap of about four hundred yards in the attacking ing line he immediately led his party into it, and bringing fire to bear on the enemy machine-guns enabled the battalions to close up again. Later, his company was subjected to galling enfilade fire, but, steadying the men, he led them forward and while they were digging moved freely about, encouraging them in their work. He was of great assistance to the C.O. in siting the new line and distributing the men. 2535 Sgt. J. R. Pascoe, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. In the advance this N.C.0., in command of a platoon, pushed his Lewis gun forward to a commanding position, and under cover of its fire made good his attack. Later, he crept forward with two men through a wood, capturing two men and" a machinegun gun and killing two. His leading and control of his platoon were admirable. 853 Sgt. J. H. Payten, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. With one man he rushed a strong point in a wood, killing two and capturing fourteen of the garrison and two machine-guns. Owing to dense fog it was difficult to maintain direction, but he kept his party well in hand and collected stragglers. In the next wood he rushed and captured another machine-gun post with twentyfour four prisoners. He distinguished himself throughout by sound leadership and initiative. tive. 125 C.S.M. D. C. Phillips, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During the first part of the advance through a dense fog he rendered great assistance in maintaining direction and liaison with adjoining units. When one of the platoon commanders became a casualty he took command and led it in the assault, capturing a machine-gun post which threatened to hold up the advance. A number of the enemy were killed, ten men and two machine-guns captured. He then bombed his way to his final objective and later beat off a counter-attack. His leadership throughout the operations was excellent. 615 Sgt. M. A. Pitt, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When the platoon commander was killed and the men disorganised this N.C.O. took command while under very heavy machinegun gun fire. He got his men under cover and crawled out over the open, exposed to the fire of numerous machine-guns at close range, to reconnoitre and get in touch with flank units. He succeeded in his efforts, and returning to his platoon led them on to their objective. He showed skill and initiative under trying conditions. 386 Cpl. D. Pritchard, M.G.C. ?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. While this man was in charge of a gun team in a Tank a direct hit set it on fire. Although it was burning fiercely he got out a wounded comrade, the gun and several ammunition boxes. He then mounted the gun under heavy shell fire and stopped the enemy in, a rush on his party. He showed consummate coolness at a critical moment. 1807 Sgt. F. J. Robbins, M.M., Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. While working along a forward sap severe machine-gun , fire was brought to bear on his party. Leaving his party under cover he took stock of the situation, and, rushing up to the barricade over which the machine-gun was firing, was first through the gap, fighting the enemy in a hand-tohand hand conflict. Thanks to his energy and dash the opposition was overcome and his men resumed the advance. 1143 Sgt. A. Ryan, M.M., Engrs.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty with the brigade forward party as telephone line sergeant. He was responsible for the laying and maintaining of the telephone lines from the brigade to the forward station and on to battalion headquarters, all the time under heavy artillery and machine-gun fire. He set a great example of determination and resource to his linesmen men and runners. 1268 Cpl. J. Ryan, Infy.?For conspicuous ous gallantry and devotion to duty. This N.C.O. led a bombing party 400 yards along a trench in the face of heavy machine-gun fire and bombed the enemy out of several positions. He personally accounted for five of the enemy, and, though wounded in the hand, continued to bomb for another hour, untiljie was again severely wounded. His energy and endurance ance set a fine example to the men. 2484 Pte. F. G, Sellick, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This man as battalion scout moved ahead of the attacking troops looking for machine-gun nests and posts. When found he used his light Lewis gun to keep their heads down till they were rushed by the oncoming troops. His energy and skill prevented casualties in the attacking waves. 6594 Sgt. G. Sexton, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. On four separate occasions his company was suddenly confronted by enemy machinegun gun fire. On each occasion this N.C.0., in charge of a Lewis-gun section, brought his gun into action with great promptitude, quickly silencing the opposition. On one occasion, in some tall crops, he stood up in full view of the enemy firing from the hip until he had put the enemy machine-gun out of action. Throughout the day he displayed played initiative combined with coolness. 3912 Sgt. (now 2nd Lieut.) R. Sinclair, M.M., M.G.C. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When the section commander was severely wounded and the Tank carrying the guns and crews knocked out by a direct hit, he removed all the wounded from the Tank, then with the survivors got the guns and gear out and rushed them" forward into action under heavy machine-gun fire. His presence of mind and energy greatly assisted the advance and saved casualties. 1439 Sgt. W. L. Sinclair, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This N.C.O. organised and led his platoon forward, after its commander had become a casualty. With one section he outflanked a machine-gun post of two guns, taking the crews prisoner, which was carried out over open ground under heavy fire. He then reconnoitred to the front and gained touch with the unit on his right, returning with information which enabled a trench mortar battery to silence an anti-Tank gun. His energy and resource materially assisted in the capture of a village. 5395 Sgt. W. C. Stafford, C.T.S., attd. H.Q. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion votion to duty as a topographer attached to brigade. He had to resect, with plan table, eighteen forward battle positions for field artillery. The only fixed points which could be used were in enemy territory, and were not visible from battery positions themselves, and consequently he had to set his plan table up on high ground between the battery positions and the enemy. This meant he was in full view of the enemy, who, during the whole time (about eight hours) he was fixing these eighteen batteries, teries, were shelling him with 5.9 in, howitzers. He successfully accomplished his work, thus enabling the field batteries to fire with accuracy on zero day. In the subsequent attack he kept in close touch with the batteries, and had all the new positions accurately resected the same evening. ing. He performed most valuable service. 3025 a Sgt. E; A. Sumner, Pnrs. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in reorganising the men of his platoon, which had suffered some casualties. Later, while making a reconnaissance with his company commander, they came under heavy fire, the latter being killed. In spite of this he completed his task, and set a splendid example to his comrades during a trying time. 2402 C.S.M. S. W. Tooth, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Iq an advance, when the right flank was held up by machine-gun fire, this warrant officer organised a small party of men, outflanking the post, and killing or capturing ing the garrison. He then mopped up two dug-outs, accounting for two officers and forty men. He set a splendid example throughout. 3193 Pte. J. W. Walker, Inf.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When his platoon was held up by machinegun gun fire at fifty yards range, he rushed ahead with a Lewis-gun, firing it from the hip, killing the crew and capturing the gun. On four other occasions during the advance he was largely instrumental in the capture of machine-guns and their crews. On reaching the objective he went out with two or three men and a few bombs and collected at least twenty more prisoners. His conduct earned the admiration of his comrades.
  • War Honours for the A.I.F. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to confer the undermentioned award on the following Warrant Officers, Non-commissioned Officers and Men : Awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. 553 R.S.M. A. R. Baker, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This W.O. kept well in front guiding and controlling the advance, and although twice wounded, collected his men and led them round the safest way. Later, he collected and detonated, enemy bombs and placed them in dumps, a task which was carried out at great personal risk. He was of the greatest assistance in consolidating the line. 2446 Pte. R. E. Barrie, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He kept well ahead in the advance and rushed machine-gun posts and snipers, causing them to surrender. Later in the day when the battalion runners had become casualties, he acted as runner and got valuable able information through to battalion headquarters. quarters. He worked untiringly with great determination and initiative. 2518 Sgt. G. A.* Bliss, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an advance through a wood in a dense fog many men became separated from their units. This N.C.O. collected a scattered tered platoon and led it forward under heavy barrage until he joined up again with his company. He led a party of these men against a machine-gun post, capturing ten prisoners and three guns. Later, with another party, he captured two more guns and twelve prisoners. He inspired his men with confidence, and was of great assistance ance to his company commander. 1672 Sgt. W. H. Boyes, M.M., Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. While this N.C.O. was in charge of a liaison post between two battalions the enemy, under cover of an intense barrage, attacked on the left, forcing back the troops on that flank. He at once organised a party, shooting the leading man and dispersing persing the rest with rifle grenades. While working along the trench directing fire on the retreating enemy, he was severely wounded. Owing to his immediate grasp of the situation this attempt of the enemy was checked and the line reoccupied. 148 Sgt. C. Carlson, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. On his commander becoming a casualty he took charge of the platoon, handling it with skill and initiative. He rushed a machinegun gun which was checking the advance, killing two and capturing the remainder of the crew, as well as thirty more from a dug-out just behind. He set a fine example to the men of his platoon. 1578 Cpl. (A./​Sgt.) C. J. Clarke, M.M., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion tion to duty. This N.C.O. assisted in maintaining communicatiorts throughout the operations, personally running lines and maintaining them over bare ground swept by field-gun fire over open sights. He worked for forty-eight hours mending breaks, and remained four hours after the unit was relieved helping the incoming unit in a village under shell fire of all calibres. 3058 Sgt. S. Collett, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty., This N.C.O. was in charge of the Lewisgun gun teams of his company and kept moving from post to post under heavy machine-gun fire, keeping the guns in action, and when casualties occurred often firing the gun himself until a fresh gunner was sent up from the rear. His coolness and determination tion under difficult conditions was of the highest order. 88 Sgt. D. B. Cowan, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When the platoon was held up by artillery and machine-gun fire, the commander being killed and several others wounded, this N.C.O. grasped the situation, reorganised the platoon, and arranged for the evacuation tion of the wounded. His coolness and resource reduced casualties and ensured an unbroken line. 398 Sgt. (T./​C.S.M.) G. Cowen, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This W.O. was responsible for touch being kept with the next unit, advancing in a fog. He was eminently successful, and, moreover, single-handed rushed a machine-gun nest, capturing eight of the crew, though the gun was got away. He subsequently organised a party to clean up a valley, and made many prisoners. He did splendid work throughout the action. 1803 L.=​Cpl. T. Cox, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. In company with another N.C.O. he rushed a strong point, capturing two machineguns guns and fourteen prisoners. With the same N.C.O. he rushed and captured another post in the next wood, and also assisted in the capture of twenty-four prisoners. Throughout the advance he showed the utmost determination to get forward, and his courage was most marked. 2472 Sgt. T. O. Davies, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This N.C.0., who was signalling sergeant, took charge of all headquarters signallers and runners when his officer was wounded, and supervised the arrangements under heavy machine-gun fire. The final objective tive was captured at 12.10 p.m., and by 1.10 p.m. he had all companies connected by telephone to battalion headquarters. He kept these lines in repair, going out for this purpose under heavy shell fire. His incesshnt work kept battalion headquarters in touch with the situation. 2547 Sgt. S. Dempsey, Pnrs. ?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When a runner, who was sent back to report the situation, was wounded before he had gone thirty yards, this N.C.O. at once went back with the message, which he knew to be urgent, binding up the wounds of the runner on the way, and brought back necessary instructions, having to crawl 300 yards across the open under sniping and machine-gun fire. Later on he crept out with a Lewis gun and silenced a machine-gun which was enfilading ing the platoon. His daring initiative was a fine example to his men. 1701 Pte. H. V. Emery, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an advance he rushed a trench occupied by the enemy, and alone captured thirty-two prisoners. Later, he rushed a machine-gun post, capturing its five occupants pants and a gun. He also directed a tank to another strong point, which was destroyed. He set a brilliant example to his comrades. 7 3930 L.=​Cpl. C. Finch, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. At the commencement of the attack he was No. 2 of a Lewis-gun section. Early in the advance the whole crew except this man became casualties. He took charge of the gun and carried it and the spare parts in addition to his panniers to the final objective, several times bringing it into action with great effect, and covering the consolidation by his fire. Finally he rushed out and bombed a machine-gun, killing two and capturing five of the crew, bringing them and the gun back with him single-handed. 536 Sgt. E. P. Foster, Inf. ?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and able leadership when his company was temporarily checked by direct fire from a field battery. He did excellent work in rallying the men and working them forward. After reaching the final objective he cleared the ground for several hundred yards in advance, inflicting severe casualties on the enemy. His example was eagerly followed by his men. 4818 L.=​Cpl. E. B, Gibson, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When his company was held up in front of a strong post and no Tanks were available he pushed forward alone in face of heavy machin6-gun fire, bombed the post and captured twenty-five men and three machine-guns, bringing them back to the lines. He has always displayed exceptional tional courage and initiative. 8183 L.=​Cpl. J. A. Gill, A.M.C.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When a battery on the forward slope was being heavily shelled, the officer and most of the gunners being killed or wounded, this N.C.O. led his squad up at the double, collected the wounded and carried them to comparative safety. After dressing their wounds he helped his squad to carry them to the motor loading post. He undoubtedly saved the lives of the wounded by his quickness and resource. 2913 Sgt. J. E. J. Golden, Inf.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This N.C.0., leading his platoon in the attack, rushed two machine-gun posts, capturing the crews intact. He then pushed forward with a Lewis gun team and engaged a field gun firing over open sights, and put it out of action. His energetic getic initiative prevented many casualties. 6182 M.T. Sgt. C. J. Graham, A.S.C.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in driving a motor ambulance along roads which were being heavily shelled and searched by machine-gun fire. On his return he took out and posted other ambulance lance cars, so that the evacuation of the wounded was carried out quickly and systematically. Two days later he repeated this by night, his coolness and resource on both occasions being the means of saving many lives. 5845 Cpl. (T./​Sgt.) R. H. Grant, Inf.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This N.C.O. with one man rushed an enemy trench, from which the advance was being held up. He killed several and captured two officers, forty-seven men and a machine-gun, thereby clearing the way for a further advance. This magnificent action had an inspiring effect on the men with him. 1842 Sgt. H. Greer, Inf.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When his platoon commander became a casualty he took command and cleared out two large dug-outs, taking about fifty prisoners. On reaching the final objective he established a forward machine-gun post in face of heavy machine-gun fire. His organising capacity and skilful leadership were a great asset. 2290 Pte. W. A. R. Harris, Inf.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Wfyen his section commander became a casualty he took command and, pushing forward, was th� first to reach a battery of 5.9-inch guns which were action. These were quickly silenced and the crews captured. In several days? fighting he showed keenness and resource as a patrol leader. 948 C./​Q.M.S. J. C. Hayes, Inf.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack on a village. Seeing a r unit on the left flank held up by rifle and machine-gun fire he took a patrol of five s men across the river, and by skilful leadert t ship succeeded in locating and rushing , several enemy posts, capturing or killing , the garrisons and clearing up the area in D front of the right flank of the attacking r troops for a considerable distance. In i particular he rushed one strong post, r capturing one officer, thirty-one other > ranks, and seven machine-guns. Altogether his party accounted for one officer, seventyone one other ranks and nine machine-guns. He did spendid work and showed great : courage and initiative. 4540 2nd Cpl. R. Huddy, Engrs.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an advance the enemy blew craters at some cross roads in a village. This N.C.O. was in charge of a party of sappers clearing the route for transport, and worked unceasingly under heavy fire for three hours. Although more than half his party became casualties, he completed the task and got the transport through. This was solely due to the example which he set to his men. 5609 Pte. A. Janies, Inf. ?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This man crawled forward by himself, and, throwing a bomb into a machine-gun post, rushed it. His bomb killed one of the gunners, and he shot two others and bayoneted one. He then assisted in rounding ing up twenty-five prisoners and another gun. Later, he captured another gun by bombing down a trench, when the crew jumped up and surrendered. He set a fine aggressive example, which had a great effect on the men with him. 6290 Sgt. R. A. Jeffers, M.M., Inf.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. On his platoon commander becoming a casualty, he assumed command and led his men with great dash across a bare ridge swept by artillery and machine-gun fire, capturing many prisoners and several machine-guns. He then cleared some low ground along a river, and, seeing an enemy battery of field guns enfilading the front line, he took a Lewis gun on to the bank and dispersed the gunners, in spite of fire from two machine-guns. This daring act saved numerous casualties. 190 Sgt. A. Jones, M.M., Inf.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This N.C.O. single-handed attacked an enemy machine-gun which was interfering with the progress of a platoon on his flank, capturing the gun and- crew. He successfully fully reorganised and led to their objective parties which had become scattered in the thick fog. On arrival at the objective he gave great assistance in consolidating it, under heavy fire, setting an excellent example all round. d 1164 Sgt. R. J. Kealy, Inf.?For cone e spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When the officer in charge of two platoons g was wounded during an attack, this g N.C.O. took charge, t and, handling his n men with great skill, surrounded a strong g point, which he rushed at the head of his n men, capturing twenty prisoners and three ?> machine-guns. This minor attack cleared r the front for the remainder of the company r to advance on its objective. 4521 Pte. W, C. Kelly, Inf.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. 1 After his section leader was wounded he took charge and led it forward through r heavy machine-gun and rifle fire, and continued tinued fighting after being wounded him-3 -3 self. He stuck to it until the consolidation s of the final objective was completed, when 3 he had to give in. Right through the 1 attack he showed coolness and daring, inspiring the men with him. > 4774 Pte. F. M. Klemm, Inf.?For con; ; spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty, i This man, as No. 1 of a Lewis gun, handled it with great skill, pushing forward and attacking a hostile machine-gun post, killing two of the crew and capturing the remainder. The following day he pushed his gun forward into No-man?s Land, and by his fire covered the advance of another battalion. Although his gun was plastered by bullets, he kept it in action. 864 C.S.M. J. McD. McCash, Inf.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This W.O. was responsible for guiding two platoons through a thick fog on the first day of the attack, and got them to the right place by the time the fog lifted. The following day, when the advance continued without the assistance of Tanks, he swept aside all opposition by his determination, and it was mainly due to his action on the right flank of the company that the advance was successful. 886 Sgt. (T./​C.S.M.) J. McConnell, M.M., Inf.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When the platoon commander mander was badly wounded, he took command, mand, although wounded himself, and handled the men with skill in a difficult situation. On being checked by machinegun gun fire from a flank, he personally went out to the flank with a machine-gun, and by his fire drove the enemy back. He showed coolness and judgment throughout, and kept his men on the move forward. 6602 Cpl. T. W. McDonald, Inf.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This N.C.O. led a fighting patrol, under heavy fire, and captured a hostile gun against heavy odds. The enemy then attempted to surround his party, but, taking the attack in flank, he captured fourteen prisoners and two machine-guns. His determination led to this success.
  • War Honours for the A.I.F. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the following awards to the undermentioned Warrant Officers, Non-commissioned Officers and Men for gallantry and Distinguished Service in the field:? The Distinguished Conduct Medal. 964 Sgt. H. T. Stagg, M.G.C.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. His coolness, courage and self-sacrificing devotion to duty have been a distinguished example. He voluntarily remained four days and nights with his gun, with only the shelter afforded by a shell hole, in order to allow his men to get rest in turn, in a place in which there was only room for two at a time. When the adjoining gun position was blown in by a shell and the two gunners killed, while the N.C.O. in charge was severely shaken, he recovered the gun and rebuilt the position under heavy fire, and remained in charge of this gun also for three days. 2766 Sgt. G. Stewart, Fd. Arty.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Whilst the battery was in action it was heavily bombarded by the enemy with gas shells, and Sgt. Stewart was badly gassed, but he declined to leave his post as the strength of the battery had been much reduced by casualties. At a later date of the engagement, when a whole gun detachment ment had become casualties from the explosion sion of a hostile shell, he went, without hesitation, on his own initiative, to the gun and kept it in action till another detachment arrived. The fine example of this capable and fearless N.C.O. was worthy of the highest praise. 1653 Sgt. R. A. H. Taggart, Light Horse Regt.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion votion to duty. During the period under review this N.C.O. has distinguished himself self in action by his courage and coolness, and the fine example he has set his men has been worthy of high praise. In carrying ammunition to the front line during severe engagements he has rendered valuable services. 1701 C.S.M. H. Todd, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He has taken part in all the numerous actions in which his unit has been engaged, distinguishing himself by his coolness under fire, and his disregard of danger in the performance of his responsible duties. His valuable influence over the N.C.O.?s and men of his company has been due as much to his personal example of cheerfulness ness and determination in the face of difficulty culty and danger, as to the good discipline which he has easily maintained. 261 Gnr. (L./​Bdr.) J. R. Tulloch, Fd. Arty.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion tion to duty. As linesman and telephonist he has on several occasions during his two years? service as such in the field shown himself thoroughly reliable under the most trying circumstances, maintaining communication munication with the battery from the O.P. under shell fire of unusual intensity. On one occasion during the retirement of the guns of his battery his coolness under heavy fire was an example to all his party. 368 C.S.M. D. Walker, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During the period under review his devoted courage and gallant leadership have been conspicuous on many occasions, and his coolness under fire and cheerfulness in the face of difficulties have sustained the spirits of his men during severe fighting. Regardless less of personal danger, he has frequently assisted to dig out men who have been buried, and thus saved many lives. 1010 Sgt. G. E. Watkins, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This N.C.O. has for a long period rendered valuable service as sergeant in charge of the scouts of the battalion. As leader of numerous patrols he has been the means of securing valuable information in Noman?s man?s Land, and at all times he has set a very fine example of coolness and complete fearlessness. 349 Sgt. H. Welshman, Engrs. ?For conspicuous gallantry and continuous fine work, both in and out of action, for a period of over six months. He invariably displayed great coolness and courage under fire, and his splendid example did much to encourage all ranks with him. 284 Pte. D. White, M.G.C. ?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. On one occasion he and the No. 2 gunner were buried by a shell explosion. Having extricated himself, he dug his companion out, and carried him through heavy shell fire to medical aid. Although severely injured and shaken, he returned to his gun and carried on with most resolute determination, nation, until relieved some hours later. On another occasion, when wounded in the head and face and almost blinded, he stuck to his gun, and only left his post in obedience to orders. His gallantry and endurance have been very conspicuous on many occasions. sions. 1115 Sgt. (A./​C.S.M.) W. M. Wilkin, Imp. Camel Bde.?For conspicuous gallantry lantry and devotion to duty. On all occasions sions he has never failed, both in and out of action, to show conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty, and particularly in severe fighting, lasting two days, when his courage, coolness and energy were of the highest order and his services to his C.O. invaluable. 22228 Sgt. J. Williams, Fd. Arty.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During the period under review this N.C.O. has rendered good service, and has set a very high example to all around him of courage under fise and cheerful devotion to duty under all circumstances. On one occasion, when both wounded and gassed, he continued to fight his gun with determined mined gallantry and self-sacrifice. 1608 Cpl. G. Wilson, L.T.M. Bty.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When in charge of a Stokes mortar he displayed played great courage and coolness in handling ling his gun during an enemy counterattack. attack. In spite of very heavy hostile shelling he maintained a continuous fire from his mortar, doing much execution among the enemy. His gallantry and daring have been conspicuous on many occasions, and he has set a fine example to his men. Bar to Distinguished Conduct Medal. 1855 C.S.M. H. J. Fowles, D.C.M., M.M., Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in an attack. He accompanied the company commander and went over with the first wave. On reaching ing the first objective he located an enemy machine-gun which was holding up the advance to the second objective. He immediately diately rushed forward single-handed, killed one man, and captured the gun and remainder mainder of the crew. Later, while in charge of a mopping-up party, he brought in fifty prisoners. He set a magnificent example of gallantry and initiative. (D.C.M. gazetted 16th August, 1917.) 131 Sgt. J. Maguire, D.C.M., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and dash in an operation tion against an enemy position. When his platoon was subjected to heavy machinegun gun fire from a flank, he organised a small party, and attacked the post with bombs, capturing the gun and two prisoners. Later he led a patrol forward, and with rifle fire and bombs dispersed an enemy party which was forming up to attack. Throughout the action he displayed brilliant courage and leadership. (D.C.M. gazetted 18th June, 1917.) 1480 Sgt. W. Vickers, D.C.M., M.M., Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion tion to duty during an attack. He led his section against an enemy machine-gun which was coming into action, killed the crew, and captured the gun. During consolidation, solidation, after the capture of the final objective, he went out alone and brought in fifteen prisoners who were in shell holes in front of the line. Throughout the operations tions he set a splendid example of courage and leadership. (D.C.M. gazetted 3rd September, 1918.) The Distinguished Conduct Medal. 34 S.S.M. H. G, Ayres, M.M., Mtd. Regt.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion votion to duty. During an attack, when a Hotchkiss gun was put out of action through casualties to the team, he left his position with the lead horses, galloped out to the gun under heavy fire, and remained there working it until another team could be organised to relieve it. Throughout the operations his courage, resourcefulness and devotion to duty were most marked. 2871 Pte. E. E. Baulch, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He was a company runner and was wounded early in the attack, but remained on duty. When the final objective was reached he was again wounded, but continued tinued to carry despatches. When on his way to battalion battle post with a particularly larly important message a gas shell burst at his feet and he was blinded. Nevertheless less he groped his way on along a trench and was finally met by the commanding officer himself, to whom he delivered the despatch, which contained information urgently required. His courage, endurance and devotion to duty were magnificent. 97 Sig. Cpl. I*. H. L. Bligh, L.H. Regt. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on the'field. When the telephone wires were found to be disconnected by shell fire he immediately ran to deliver a message over ground swept by shell and machine-gun fire, and delivered it successfully. fully. Later he took two led horses forward under heavy fire and got away two men of the field ambulance, getting wounded in doing so. * 3761 Pte. V P. Bolger, Inf.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He rushed a machine-gun post singlehanded handed and despatched five of the team with the bayonet. When the remaining man endeavoured to train the machine-gun on him he slewed it round, though his hand was shattered in doing so, and grappled with the enemy, whom he killed. He then dismounted the gun, which he carried with him to the R.A.P. where he was ordered to proceed. His gallant and determined action at a critical moment enabled our advance to proceed with few casualties. 266 Pte. F. Boothey, M.G. Corps.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty while acting as runner during an attack. He gave great assistance in mounting some light enemy machine-guns and showing a machine-gun officer, under heavy fire, where he had seen guns undermanned. His initiative and disregard of personal danger were of great assistance in thus increasing fire against an enemy counter-attack. 1290 Dvr. A, Boylan, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an attack he rushed an enemy machine-gun and captured it, killing two of the crew and making prisoners of the others. Our advance, which was nearly held up, proceeded without a check. His gallantry and -dash were witnessed by the whole platoon, who were greatly encouraged by his brilliant example. 3774 Sgt. C. Brooker, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry during an attack on the enemy trenches. Although early wounded he rallied his platoon and led them on to the objective, himself being the first into the enemy trench and killing three of the enemy before falling down unconscious from loss of blood'. He shoWed a splendid example of courage and devotion to duty to his men. 2257 Pte. G. Cargill, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and initiative during an attack on enemy trenches. When his platoon was held up by a strong machinegun gun post, he rushed forward and placed his Lewis gun on the enemy trench slightly to a flank and swept it with his fire, effectually silencing the machine-guns. His act of courage and promptitude enabled the advance to continue. 785 Sgt. H. C. Clucas, M.M., Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He commanded a platoon in the attack and captured a trench system, when many of the enemy were killed and several prisoners taken. He led his men with great skill and determination, himself killing several of the enemy with the bayonet. An enemy counter-attack was annihilated by fire of a Lewis gun which he had placed in a most effective position. By his personal gallantry and dash he set a splendid example to his men. 1886 a Pte. T. S. Cullen, Infy.;?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He was company runner, and while carrying ing a message he came across an enemy machine-gun post carefully hidden. He rushed the post single-handed, killing the whole crew and capturing the gun. His gallant and dashing exploit saved many casualties. 4695 Pte. P. Debono, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when the enemy raided and had entered the trenches at places. He was then carrying a message overland to the front line. On reaching the trench he was faced by six of the enemy; he immediately bayoneted one, and his determined attack so cowed the others that they at once surrendered. Thanks to his prompt and gallant action six of the enemy were accounted for. 3734 Cpl. A. J. Duncan, M.M., Infy.? For conspicuous skill and courage during a daylight operation, when he advanced with his platoon and captured an enemy post. To cover consolidation he pushed his Lewis gun forward under heavy fire. In spite of losing the whole crew, he kept the gun in action, silencing one enemy machinegun gun jind keeping down the fire of two others, thus enabling his platoon to consolidate solidate in time to resist a heavy counterattack.- attack.- 3089 Sgt. H. Duncan, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in a raid. He attacked an enemy machinegun, gun, killed some of the crew, and captured two. During the clearing of the enemy trench he displayed fine courage, and throughout the operation set a striking example to his men. 837 Pte. A. J. Dunn, Infy.?For conspicuous- spicuous- gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. He formed part of the attacking wave, and when the advance was held up by an enemy machine-gun post he rushed towards it. Several men followed, and the gun was captured. Throughout the day he made several journeys with wounded through heavy shell and machinegun gun fire, and, although wounded, continued this work for some hours before he was sent to the dressing station. 3550 Pte. M. J. Fitzgerald, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He took command of his section when the commander was severely wounded early in the attack, and led it with conspicuous success. He was on the outer flank of his unit, and kept touch with the outer battalions lions while clearing the resistance offered by enemy posts* On reaching the objective he captured an enemy machine-gun, which he set up and used against the enemy. He was wounded during the consolidation, but carried on till the end of the day, when he was ordered back to the R.A.P. His initiative and powers of leadership were remarkable, and he displayed fine courage under fire and great endurance. 101 Sgt. G. W. French, L.H. Regt.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in defence of a hill. Acting as troopleader leader on the exposed corner of the hill, he twice led bayonet charges to clear away enemy bombers who had reached to within twenty yards of his position. Although one-third of his troop of sixteen became casualties, he hung on to his exposed position tion and set a splendid example of coolness and determination to his men. 2657 Pte. J. Gallagher, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. He was No. 1 of a Lewis-gun team, and his section encountered tered an enemy strong point with two machine-guns and thirty men. All the section except him were killed. He got his gun into action, firing from the hip, and after using up two magazines, he, with two men from another section, rushed the post and captured the two guns and seven prisoners, the only ones left alive. His prompt action and conspicuous gallantry enabled the rest of the platoon to advance.
  • War Honours for the A.I.F. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the following awards to the undermentioned Warrant Officers, Non-commissioned Officers and Men for gallantry and Distinguished Service in the field : The Distinguished Conduct Medal. 1105 L.=​Cpl. (T./​Cpl.) B, V. Schultz, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion tion to duty during an attack. With two others he located a dug-out which was full of the enemy. He left his men outside, went in and captured the lot, four officers and twenty-three other ranks (the whole of the battalion headquarters). It was a splendid piece of work, showing great daring and initiative. 5086 a Sgt. D. H. Scott, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He accompanied an officer on patrol and surprised and captured the garrison of an enemy post. Several times he was instrumental mental in locating enemy posts, in some cases rushing them single-handed and capturing turing the occupants. He also did most valuable work in helping to establish the new line, which was advanced some hundreds of yards. He showed great courage and initiative. 577 Pte. F. M. Shaw, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as No, 1 of a Lewis gun during an attack. He rushed forward and engaged an enemy machine-gun, enabling his men to get into the post and bayonet the garrison. Shortly afterwards he rushed at another machinegun gun post two hundred yards away, firing from the hip, killing the officer and another man. Eight enemy dead were found in the post. Throughout the operation he showed conspicuous gallantry, dash and initiative. 298! Cpl. P. G. Shilcock, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He commanded his section, which he only joined as they were lying waiting for the signal of zero hour, with great success, capturing an enemy machine-gun post after a determined resistance. His platoon commander mander and sergeant were wounded, and he took command and drove back a party of the enemy who were endeavouring to develop a flank attack. He displayed qualities of leadership and initiative of a very high order and set a splendid example of courage under fire. 2398 L.=​Sgt. T. G. Strachan, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as one of a silent daylight raid consisting of an officer and sixteen other ranks. He led his party with conspicuous daring, and during an encounter, in which he captured a prisoner, he was wounded in the leg. In spite of this he held his prisoner and brought him back to the lines. When his officer was severely wounded he brought him, under heavy machine-gun fire, into the trench. He then remained at his post for four hours until he collapsed and was carried to the regimental aid post. He set a fine example of courage and determination, tion, 3957 Cpl. (Sgt.) G. E. Thomas, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty, and coolness in leading a small party of men against a strong enemy position. In spite of wire entanglements hidden in the crops and a heavy barrage of bombs and machine-gun fire, he succeeded in entering the position and killing thirty of the enemy, the remainder fleeing in disorder. order. 1742 Cpl. G. W. Torney, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. When a portion of the line was held up he dashed forward alone against an enemy machine-gun post, threw a bomb amongst the crew, jumped into the post and single-handed killed the crew and captured the gun. The attack then proceeded. ceeded. He behaved magnificently. 2732 Sgt. G. W, Turner, M.M., Infy. ? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When in charge of a patrol of two men he rushed an enemy post, killing the three occupants, captured a machine-gun, and brought his party back without casualties. ties. Later, in an attack on enemy machine-gun posts, he led his men with great ability through heavy machine-gun fire to his objective and brought back information mation which contributed largely to the success of the operations. He set a fine example of courage and devotion to duty to his men. 6432 Pte. A. G. Weatherall, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when a party of fifty of the enemy raided the front line and commenced to enfilade the trench with machine-gun fire. He immediately jumped up on the parapet with his Lewis-gun, and, though exposed to machine-gun and hand - grenade fire, brought a heavy fire to bear on the enemy. Continuing to fire from the hip, he moved along the parapet, causing heavy casualties to the enemy and greatly contributing to the success of the bombing party attacking down the trench. He did very fine work. 404! Sgt. J. W. Westwood, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty, and good leadership during an attack. He early took charge of his platoon and led them with great daring and ability to the final objective. After consolidating his position he went with one man to get in touch with the company on his right, and, finding them held up by an enemy machinegun, gun, he, single-handed, rushed the post, wounded the gunner and captured three prisoners and the gun. He showed splendid courage and initiative. 4225 Cpl. R. A. Wilkin, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty while in charge of a post of eight men and a Lewis gun. He was attacked by enemy raiding parties from three directions. Two parties were driven off, and, when the third entered the trench from the rear of his post, he immediately rushed them and drove them out. Owing to his courage, initiative and resource the raid was a failure. 1112 Sgt. G. Yeates, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in a raid. Whilst arranging his Bangalore torpedoes for destroying the enemy wire an enemy bomb wounded him and one of his men. He remained absolutely quiet, and though suffering great pain from his wound, fired one of the torpedoes personally according to programme. He stayed at his post during the operations assisting in the evacuation of wounded and prisoners, and then proceeded back to his lines, reorganising ing and checking his platoon before reporting ing to the regimental aid post. His cool courage enabled the raiding party to surprise prise the enemy after finding his wire broken. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of the Victoria Cross to the undermentioned: ? Awarded the Victoria Cross. Lieut. Alfred Edward Gaby, late A.I.F. ?For most conspicuous bravery and dash in attack, when, on reaching the wire in front of an enemy trench, strong opposition was encountered. The advance was at once checked, the enemy being in force about forty yards beyond the wire, and commanded manded the gap with machine-guns and rifles. Lieut. Galjy found another gap in the wire, and, single-handed, approached the strong point while machine-guns and rifles were still being fired from it. Running along the parapet, still alone, and at pointblank blank range, he emptied his revolver into the garrison, drove the crews from their guns, and compelled the surrender of fifty of the enemy with four machine-guns. He then quickly reorganised his men and led them on to his final objective, which he captured and consolidated. Three days later, during an attack, this officer again led his company with great dash to the objective. The enemy brought heavy rifle and machine-gun fire to bear upon the line, but in the face of this heavy fire Lieut. Gaby walked along his line of posts, encouraging his men to quickly consolidate. solidate. While engaged on this duty be was killed by an enemy sniper. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to confer the undermentioned rewards on the following Officers of the Royal Air Force, in recognition of gallantry in flying operations against the enemy:? The Distinguished Service Order. Lieut. (T./​Capt.) Arthur Henry Cobby, D.F.C. (Australian F.C.). ?On the 16th August this officer led an organised raid on an enemy aerodrome. At 200 feet altitude he obtained direct hits with his bombs and set on fire two hangars; he then opened fire on a machine which was standing out on the aerodrome. The machine caught fire. Afterwards he attacked with machinegun gun fire parties of troops and mechanics, inflicting a number of casualties. On the following day he led another important raid on an aerodrome, setting fire to two hangars and effectively bombing gun detachments, tachments, anti-aircraft batteries, etc. The success of these two raids was largely due to the determined and skilful leadership of this officer. (D.F.C. gazetted 3rd August, 1918; Ist and 2nd Bars, 21st September, 1918.) \ The Distinguished Flying Cross. Lieut. Roderick Charles Armstrong (Australian F.C.). ?During recent operations tions this officer was engaged in reconnoitring noitring a certain area at low altitude; receiving no response to his repeated calls to our infantry for flares, owing to the supply being exhausted, he descended to an even lower altitude in order to recognise and locate our troops, and so completed an accurate and detailed report of the area, displaying gallantry and determination of a high order, for he was subjected to intense machine-gun fire during the whole time, s Lieut. Thomas Latham Baillieu (Australian lian Flying Corps). ?On a recent reconnaissance sance this officer, owing to low visibility, was compelled to descend to a height of from 20 to 100 feet in order to locate our troops; this he succeeded in doing, and, after flying for an hour and a half at this low altitude, he returned with an accurate report of the situation in that area. Returning ing a few hours later, he obtained further information regarding the line in that locality, though exposed to heavy machinegun gun fire. Lieut. (T./​Capt.) Stanley George Brearley (Australian F.C.). ?During recent operations tions information as to the rear disposition of enemy troops in a certain sector was urgently required. To obtain this Captain Brearley proceeded over the enemy lines in the face of heavy anti-aircraft fire to a distance tance of twelve thousand yards at an altitude tude of only 1,800 feet. He, assisted by his observer, made an extensive reconnaissance, and brought back a most accurate and detailed report, which proved of the greatest value. The work of this officer is invariably ably reliable and accurate. Lieut. John Gonld=​Taylor (Australian F.C.). ?On the 28th of August, when on reconnaissance, this officer was attacked by five Fokker biplanes; with characteristic boldness and skill he drove them off, shooting ing down one out of control. He then continued tinued reconnaissance, sending down calls on three hostile batteries (which were neutralised), six parties of transport and two trains. During recent operations this officer has rendered most valuable service in sending down calls, displaying keenness of observation and great power of endurance. ance. While on this duty he never hesitates to attack the enemy as opportunity occurs. Lieut. Arthur Edward Grigson (Australian lian F.C.). ?A very gallant and resolute officer who has crashed four enemy aircraft. On the Ist of August, while observing for one of our batteries, he saw an enemy aeroplane plane that had brought down four of our balloons ; he at once dived from 4,000 to 200 feet and engaged it; in the combat the enemy machine crashed. Lieut. Edward Fearnley Rowntree (Australian tralian F.C.). ?Between the Bth and 11th August this officer carried out six contact patrols at very low altitudes and in face of heavy machine-gun fire. No difficulty deters this officer from accomplishing his task. On August 11th, while subjected to heavy machine-gun fire, he flew for an hour and a half over a certain area and eventually ally established the position of our line ; this was the more difficult owing to the low visibility at the time. Lieut. Frank Alyn Sewell (Australian F.C.). ?Lieut. Sewell has proved himself a cool and courageous officer on many occasions. sions. He has destroyed three enemy machines. On August 11th he rendered conspicuous service ; flying for two hours under 200 feet altitude he established the locality of our line by actual recognition of our troops, bringing back a most valuable report. During the whole time he was subjected to heavy machine-gun fire. Lieut. James Lee Smith (Australian F.C.). ?This officer has shown conspicuous bravery in attacking enemy kite balloons and in carrying out reconnaissances of very low altitudes. While on a recent patrol far over the enemy lines he observed a kite balloon; he at once attacked it at low altitude. While thus engaged, he was himself self attacked by an enemy machine ; this he drove off and he then completed his patrol, obtaining valuable information of enemy back areas. The following are among the Decorations and Medals awarded by the Allied Powers at various dates to the British Forces for distinguished services rendered during the course of the campaign : His Majesty the King has given unrestricted restricted permission in all cases to wear the Decorations and Medals in question. Decorations and Medals conferred by the President of the French Republic. Croix db Gukrre. Lieut.-Col. Alexander Hammett Marks, D.5.0., Australian Army Medical Corps. Major (temporary Lieut.-Col.) Valentine Osborne Stacey, Australian Army Medical Corps. Lieut. Frederick William Appleton, 14th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Major Arthur Balfour Douglas Brown, D.5.0., Australian Provost Corps. Capt. Daniel Timothy McAuliffe, 4th Australian Pioneer Battalion. Lieut. Edward John McKay, 31st Battalion, talion, Australian Imperial Force. Lieut, (temporary Capt.) James Walley? 3rd Australian Divisional Salvage Co.
  • War Honours for the A.I.F. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to award the Royal Red Cross to the undermentioned Ladies of the Nursing Services in recognition of their valuable services in connection with the war. Dated 3rd June, 1918: ? Royal Red Cross. Ist Class. Miss Alma Bennet, Matron, Aust. A.N.S. ; Miss Annie Elizabeth Dowsley, Matron, Aust. A.N.S. ; Miss Teresa J. Dunne, Matron, Aust. A.N.S. 2nd Class. Miss Ethel B. Butler, Senior Sister, Aust. A.N.S. ; Miss Elizabeth Dalyell, Senior Sister, Aust. A.N.S. ; Miss Elizabeth L. Horne, A./​ Matron, Aust. A.N.S. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the following awards to the undermentioned Officers and Warrant Officers in recognition of their gallantry an(J devotion to duty in the Field:? Bar to Military Cross. Capt. John Harrison Allen, M.C., Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and resource in an attack. When a gap of some 500 yards appeared in the line, and the advance was held up, he at once led his company forward, ward, and by skilful leadership captured the enemy position with over a hundred prisoners. He set a splendid example of coolness and initiative at a critical time. (M.C. gazetted 7th November, 1918.) Capt. Roy William Harburn, M.C., Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry and fine leadership ship during an attack. He led his company splendidly under heavy fire, gained his objective, and consolidated his position. In this operation his company and another made a big advance and captured nearly 200 prisoners. He rendered most valuable service. vice. (M.C. gazetted 16th September, 1918.) Lieut. William Emlyn Hardwick, M.C., Infy.-r-For conspicuous gallantry and devotion tion to duty. When the flank of an advance was seriously hampered by machine-gun fire he led forward a party, drove the enemy from their position, captured a machinegun gun and six prisoners, and established a post on the captured ground under heavy fire. He showed great courage and skill. (M.C. gazetted 26th April, 1917.) Lieut. (T./​Capt.) James Sullivan, M.C., M.M., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and resource in attack. When the advance was held up by machine-gun fire he organised ised two parties, and ?leading one of them himself, overcame the enemy?s resistance and inflicted heavy losses on them. He then established himself in a position of great tactical importance and gained touch with the units on his flanks. His coolness and skill were of the greatest value at a critical time. (M.C. gazetted 7th November, 1918.) Lieut. John Albert Wiltshire, M.C., Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry and initiative. On two occasions he led forward bombing parties under heavy fire and captured considerable siderable ground from the enemy. He also drove the enemy, in spite of strong resistance, ance, from a position which was holding up the advance. He showed splendid coolness and determination.?(M.C. gazetted 16th September, 1918.) Awarded the Military Cross. Lieut. James Coombe Birt, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. He led his men splendidly to their objective, himself rushing an enemy strong point and capturing twenty of the enemy and two machine-guns. On the objective he quickly consolidated his position and sent back helpful information. Later, he led a party against an enemy strong point and captured forty prisoners and four machine guns. He did magnificent work. Lieut. Leslie Bolitho, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. He did excellent work throughout, and when the position was somewhat obscure he made a reconnaissance of the line under heavy machine-gun fire and obtained information which was of great assistance to his commanding officer. When the latter was wounded he commanded manded the battalion most successfully until relieved. Capt. John McClelland Boyd, A.L.H.R. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When the enemy were endeavouring ing to occupy some high ground overlooking ing three of our posts, he observed for and directed the fire of our guns against them. This caused the enemy to withdraw, and he then sent out a party to keep touch, covering their advance by accurate fire. Throughout the operation he showed coolness ness and initiative. Lieut. (T,/​Capt) Martin Cahill, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He organised his company for an attack at very short notice, and led them forward under heavy machine-gun fire. Having penetrated the enemy?s line, by skilful leadership he succeeded, in working round in rear of their position and captured a large number of prisoners and machineguns. guns. He showed splendid initiative and resource. Capt. Donald Chalmers, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. He handled his company brilliantly and captured five machine-guns and crews without loss to his company. He also made a personal reconnaissance, with the result that he captured 120 prisoners. Next day he sent forward a patrol, which captured three machine-guns and sixteen prisoners. He did splendid work. Lieut. Frederick Stanley Croker, Engrs. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Under heavy fire he repaired a bridge which was urgently required for the advance of artillery and horse transport during an attack, and though wounded he remained at work until the bridge was completed. He showed splendid determination tion and resource. Lieut. Cornelius Aloysius Deane, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and resource. He led his company with great skill in an attack. When part of the attacking troops lost direction in the thick fog and a gap occurred in the line, he filled the gap and then led his men in the capture of an enemy headquarters, taking 18 officers and 250 other ranks prisoners. He showed splendid leadership and courage. Lieut. Harold Arthur Devenish, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when in command of a Tank and Lewis guns during an attack. Just before reaching the final objective his Tank was disabled by a direct hit, and a number of men wounded. He immediately got his personnel together, and under heavy enfilade filade fire advanced and established his post according to instructions. He then returned to the Tank, and although severely wounded superintended the evacuation of the wounded. Lieut. Arthur Schorey Dickinson, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and good leadership. ship. When the advance of his battalion was held up by a party of the enemy in a gully he led his platoon forward under intense fire and inflicted heavy losses on the enemy, capturing some 50 prisoners. His courageous and determined action enabled the advance to be continued. Lieut. Guy Lindon Ditchbourne, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. When his platoon was held up by an enemy strong point he personally rushed the post, his act resulting in the capture of forty prisoners, four machine-guns, and two light trench mortars. Later, he assumed command mand of his company, and led them brilliantly. liantly. Throughout he set a splendid example of courage and determination. Capt. William Lemuel Edward Domeney, Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry and able leadership in an attack. After clearing strong opposition from a village he led forward a party and captured an enemy strong point which was holding up the advance, taking twelve machine-guns and some fifty prisoners. He set a fine example of courage and initiative to his company. Lieut. Harold Doust, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. He took forward a patrol and captured three machine-guns and sixteen prisoners, killing several of the enemy, with only three casualties on his own side. His fine action greatly helped the advance, and throughout the operations he did splendidly. Lieut. Osric Mervyn Elliott, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and initiative in an attack.' When progress was delayed owing to a lack of bombs and ammunition he led a party across a fire-swept area, organised battalion headquarter details, and carried forward the necessary supplies under continuous tinuous fire. His prompt and courageous action enabled the attack to continue successfully. cessfully. Lieut. Arthur Claude Farmer, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and fine leadership during an attack. When his company commander mander was wounded he assumed command, mand, and under heavy enfilading machinegun gun fire reorganised the company and led them forward to the final objective and consolidated solidated his position in spite of the fact that he was wounded. He displayed great courage and ability throughout. 2nd Lieut. Arthur Clement Foster, 3rd A.L.H.R. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. At daybreak the post of which this officer was in command was strongly attacked. He met each assault with coolness and determination, and the large numbers of dead lying in front of his post bore witness to the fine defence which he and his garrison put up. Lieut. Charles James Fulton, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and initiative. When his company were caught by heavy machinegun gun fire during an attack he at once went out in front of the leading wave and rallied the sections, which had sustained heavy casualties. Though wounded, he led his men to their objective and continued to direct the fighting until he collapsed. His determination and courage were an inspiration tion to his men. Lieut. Roy Gordon Garvie, M.G. Sqd.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. While in charge of a section of machine-guns his post was surrounded. He quickly shifted his guns so as to fife to the rear as well as the front, and by inflicting heavy losses on the enemy, who had passed and were attacking the second line, materially assisted in holding out until a counter-attack re-established the line. Lieut. Wesley Goninon, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. When his company commander became a casualty he assumed command, and led the company brilliantly, capturing his objective and consolidating under heavy machine-gun and artillery fire. He set an excellent example to all ranks. Lt. Stanley Edmund Gregory, A.L.H.R. ? ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an attack by the enemy this officer manoeuvred his squadron into a position from which he enfiladed them, causing them to retire with loss. During the retirement he charged with two troops and captured forty-five prisoners, one machine-gun, and two automatic rifles. His coolness and quickness were largely responsible for the success of the counterattack. attack. Lieut. George Warwick Griffin, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During several days? minor operations tions he showed a splendid offensive spirit in numerous hand-to-hand encounters with the enemy. In a bombing attack he captured tured 300 yards of the enemy trench system, but an enemy counter-attack divided his company and the position became critical. He at once lead a party against superior numbers of the enemy, drove them back, and restored the situation by his determined action. Lieut. Lindsey James Henderson, 2nd A.L.H.R.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This officer held a post of twelve men which was attacked by the enemy. Though wounded hirpself, and with his garrison reduced to four men by casualties, ties, and completely surrounded, he held on against great odds, inflicting heavy casualties. ties. Later he joined in a counter-attack, which resulted in the capture of numerous prisoners. Capt. Lancelot John Hunter, A.A.M.C., attd. Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When the battalion was heavily shelled in a bivouac for two hours he attended to the wounded with utter disregard regard of danger. During an attack he followed closely behind the attacking troops and attended to the wounded under heavy fire. He set a splendid example of selfsacrifice. sacrifice. Capt. Thomas Ross Jagger, A.A.M.C., attd. Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He carried on his work under heavy fire during two attacks and attended to the wounded of his own and o!her units with utter disregard of danger. He set a splendid example of courage and self-sacrifice. Lieut. Arthur Phillip Percival Kemp, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and good leadership during an advance. When an enemy strong point offered a determined resistance he took charge of his company, the company commander having been killed, and led them with great determination against the strong point, which he captured tured with a large number of prisoners. He then led his men forward to the final objective. He set a splendid example of courage and initiative. Lieut. Leslie Norman Larnach, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and good leadership. ship. He led his platoon with great skill in an attack, and though wounded continued tinued to advance to the objective. His courage and initiative were a splendid example to his men. Lieut. William Watt Leggatt, attd. Div. Sig. Co., Engrs.?For conspicuous gallantry lantry and devotion to duty as signalling officer during an attack. He continually moved forward under heavy fire, and, keeping ing in close touch with the fighting, established lished new stations as the advance progressed. gressed. It was entirely due to his energy and courage that the communications were maintained throughout the advance. Lieut. Percy Albert Lisle, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and good leadership. He led his platoon with great dash and skill in an attack, and when held up by machine-gun fire he succeeded in capturing the guns and their crews. After the capture ture of the second objective he led a fighting patrol in a most determined manner and dislodged an enemy post. Lieut. George Melling Livesey, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Under heavy machine-gun fire he successfully led a party against an enemy position, capturing ti|ree machine-guns and fourteen prisoners and killing a number of the enemy. The enemy, with at least 100 men, immediately counter-attacked, and closed round his party. Nevertheless, he held on to his prisoners and guns and fought his way back with them to his lines. He showed marked courage and determined leadership. Capt. John Loughnan, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and good leadership. He cleared a village of the enemy, capturing 150 prisoners and two 8-inch howitzers with their tractors by the swiftness of his advance. Later, he led his men with great dash and determination in another attack and captured fifteen machine-guns. He skilfully covered the flank of another battalion which had direction, and consolidated his objective. Lieut. Percy Flinders Lucas, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and determination. He was guiding the battalion in an advance when the leading company was thrown forward to fill a gap of 300 yards and to clear a wood. He took control of the left platoons, and owing to his good leadership and initiative the wood was surrounded and 100 prisoners were captured. Lieut. Jack Henry Lunnon, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. He led his men brilliantly on to the objective, tive, and when an enemy machine-gun prevented vented consolidation, he, with two men,, worked round to a flank and rushed the gun, capturing it and the crew. He showed marked courage and determination.
  • War Honours for the A.I.F. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the following awards to the undermentioned Officers, Warrant Officer, Non-Commissioned Officers, and Men, in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field;? Awarded the Military Cross. Lieut. Harold Conrad Renshaw, Eng.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. After seven nights of work in heavily shelled and gassed areas, this officer undertook the strengthening of tunnels under a road to enable armoured cars to pass. He organised and guided a larger, carrying party under intermittent shell and machine-gun fire, and got all materials up before dawn. Although suffering from gas he continued at work all day and completed pleted his task before dark. But for his resource and leadership the road would never have been ready for the cars to use in support of the attack. Lieut. George Thomas Trewheela, Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This officer handled his company with skill when the attacking enemy forced an entry into the trenches on his flank. He promptly stiffened the danger points and kept the brigade flank intact. He then organised a bombing party and drove the enemy along the trench. Later, by adroit dispositions of snipers and Lewis guns he inflicted heavy casualties on the retiring enemy. His initiative and coolness under intense fire readjusted a critical situation. Lieut. (T./​Capt.) Stanley Richard Warry, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion tion to duty. This officer led his company with marked initiative in a ..successful attack, reaching his objective with very few casualties, although strongly opposed by the enemy, not by machine-gun fire and artillery, but by bombing from aircraft. He kept battalion headquarters constantly informed of the situation, and contributed greatly to the success of the operation. Awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. 165 Sgt, A. V. Chan, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during the attack on Lihons, 11th August, 1918, in charge of a platoon on the right. When the objective was reached, he found a defensive flank as the unit on his right had not got up. The enemy then counterattacked attacked in front, and as his platoon was very weak he let them come into the trench, when each man threw his one remaining bomb and then rushed in with the bayonet, completely surprising the enemy, and restoring storing the situation. He handled his men with fine judgment. 828 a Pte. J. Cheverton, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in the advance near Lihons on 10th August, 1918. He, with three others, captured a strong post, killing the crew of a machinegun, gun, and enabling the advance to continue. When all the N.C.O.?s in the vicinity had become casualties jre collected stragglers and led them through the wood, advancing with a patrol 400 yards towards the enemy?s defences, bringing in useful information to the company commander. 636 L. =​ Cpl. J. Clark, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on 23rd August, 1918, near Foncancourt, in charge of limbers moving through St. Martin?s Wood to the battalion dump. He made three separate trips under H.E. and gas shelling, bringing the limbers through, though the horses were almost unmanageable. able. His courage and determination ensured the supply of rations and ammunition. tion. t 3634 L.-Cpl. R, Cock, Infy.?For conn n spicuous gallantry and initiative in' the attack on Bth and 9th August, 191�, east of Amiens. On the first day he led his section through the village of Warfusee, although it was unknown whether it was occupied. The next day, when his platoon commander was wounded, he advanced alone and bombed the foremost enemy post, putting a machine-gun out of action and capturing the crew. His keenness and energy in leading the platoon and sniping from advanced positions were worthy of high praise. 3712 Pte. A, C. Collard, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during the attack on Herbville Wood on 23rd August* 1918. He rushed at a nest of machine-guns, arid, throwing a bomb between the two guns, killed two and wounded three of the enemy. The remainder mainder went back to another post, but, turning their own guns on them, he drove them out of that too. Later he ran along the parapet of a trench, bombing the enemy with their own bombs until they surrendered. dered. His courage and initiative were amazing. 206 C.S.M. A. Dickinson, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on Bth and 9th August, 1918, east of Villers-Bretonneux. On the first day when parties of various battalions lost direction in the fog and wire, he guided them back to their correct positions through the enemy barrage. The following day he was of great assistance to his company commander, mander, who was the only officer left unwounded, touring the whole front, getting into touch with flank units, and getting valuable information under continuous tinuous fire. 3068 Sgt. T. Duncombe, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in charge of the support platoon in the attack on Herbville Wood on 23rd August, 1918. He brought his platoon forward to reinforce under heavy fire of all sorts with very few casualties. Later he went forward and sniped two machine-gunners who were firing from the entrance to a dug-out; he then threw two bombs into the dug-out, which brought up twenty-three men, including cluding an officer, who, finding he was alone, attempted to retaliate, but he promptly shot him, and controlled the others until his men came up. 2612 Cpl. J. H. Farrell, M.M., Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty at Lihons on 9th August, 1918. He was the only man of his section left, so he attached himself to another company, taking charge of a gun section which had lost its leader. At the head of this section he stormed a strong post in a quarry, driving the enemy out. Although wounded, he continued in control of his men, until he was again wounded and had to be carried off the field. 6309 L.=​Cpl. E. L. Ford, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in the attack on Mont St. Quentin on Ist September, 1918. During the advance he repeatedly provided covering fire with his Lewis-gun team, keeping his gun in action despite point-blank fire, and silencing two enemy guns. He captured twenty-five prisoners single-handed, cowering them with a burst of fire from his gun, which he held at his hip. His grit and enterprise were an example to all around him. 2642 2nd Cpl. W. J. Harrison, Engrs.? At Flaucourt on 31st August, 1918, this N.C.O. was in charge of transport which was suddenly shelled heavily. Three drivers were wounded and horses killed. He himself was wounded; nevertheless, with great courage and endurance he helped the other wounded to a place of safety, and then returned and organised the work of clearing the wreckage until he was wounded severely a second time. He set a fine example of devotion to duty under very trying conditions, and his action prevented a serious block in the traffic, which would have led to further casualties. 5706 L.=​Cpl. C. S. Higginbotham, Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on 10th August,' 1918, near Lihons, when the company was held up by extremely heavy machine-gun fire. He and one man went forward and captured the gun, killing the crew of six. They then got the gun into action against the enemy. The next day he did some most useful daylight patrol work, showing courage and initiative on all occasions. 4751 Pte. G. Johanson, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during the advance east of Villers-Bretonneux neux on Bth August, I#lB. Acting as infantry observer in a fighting tank, he several times got out and guided it through the mist under heavy fire, to keep it in touch with the infantry progress. Many enemy parties were encountered, and on one occasion he and another man killed eight before he could rejoin the tank. 14336 Cpl. (L.=​Sgt.) A. P. Johnston, Wireless Sig. Sqdn.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during two attacks at Ramadi on 28th/​29th September, 1917. He carried on the good work under heavy fire and under most trying circumstances. stances. During previous operations he has rendered most valuable assistance and displayed marked coolness. 919 Sgt. H. Kelly, Infy. ?For conspicuous ous gallantry and devotion to duty on the morning of 23rd August, 1918, near Peronne, when the attack was held up by machine-gun fire from a post seventy yards in front. He ran forward alone through intense fire and rushed the post, bayoneting some of the crew and bringing in twelve prisoners. On reaching the objective he took charge of the platoon after the officer had been wounded, reorganising the men under heavy fire. 6390 Pte. R. A. Kemp, Infy. ?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on 23rd August, 1918, at Herleville Wood. He volunteered for tank work in the attack, and when his tank ran into a tree within a few yards of a dug-out, and coming under heavy fire burst into flames, the scrambled out half-suffocated, cated, were met by point blank machinegun gun and rifle fire. He grasped the situation, tion, and with a few men dashed forward, and in a hand-to-hand struggle captured the position, rescuing three of the wounded tank crew, who had been made prisoners. 2305 R. N. Kirby, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack on Rainecourt on 11th August, 1918. He rushed a machine-gun post single-handed, and although wounded in the attempt, succeeded in capturing and holding two machine-guns and fourteen of the enemy until the remainder of his section came up. He set a fine example of courage and initiative to the men with him. 592 Sgt. C. T. Law, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during the attack on 2nd September, 1918, east of Mont St. Quentin, in charge of the company Lewis guns. When the advance was checked by machine-gun fire he took the gun of one of his crews, who had all become casualties, and single-handed, under very heavy fire, worked to a flank, firing the gun from his hip with such accuracy that he kept the hostile fire down and enabled his company to capture the position. 5124 L.=​Cpl. W. A. H. Law, M.M., Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty at Lihons on 10th August, 1918, where strong opposition was met with. He dashed forward from a flank with his Lewis gun section, and in the face of heavy fire attacked three machine-guns, keeping his gun in action under a hail of bullets until he silenced their fire. He was always foremost most with his section in every stage of the advance. 2636 Sgt. W. Lehane, M.M., M.G.C. ? For conspicuous gallantry near Etinchem on night of 12th/​13th August, 1918, when in charge of two guns sent forward with the infantry. After disposing his guns for the defence of the new position he reconnoitred noitred the surrounding area and came on a party of the enemy, whom he fired on with his revolver. On their bolting into a dug-out he stood over the mouth and called on them to surrender. They did so to the number of sixty, and with the help of two other men he marched them to an infantry post, and then returned to his guns. He showed great courage and initiative. 2285 Sgt. J. J. Luck, M.M., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on 9th August, 1918. In the advance on Rainecourt he was on the left flank of the battalion, which was unprotected and exposed to fire from a strong post about eighty yards off. He and five men crawled within bombing range and then rushed it, capturing one officer, twenty-nine other ranks, one anti-tank gun, two heavy machine-guns, and a Lewis gun. His prompt and fearless action was of the greatest value to the advance on that flank. 6629 L.*Cpl. J. Lynch, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devbtion to duty on 23rd August, 1918, at St. Martin?s Wood as liaison N.C.O. to the forward companies. He worked backwards and forwards through the barrage, maintaining constant touch between attackers and supports and keeping Battalion Headquarters accurately informed of the situation. When his company pany was mopping up in the wood, he captured thirty of the enemy, and later went out under heavy fire and located the flank battalion on the right. 2893 Sgt. C. H. Masters, M.M., Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty at Herbville Wood on 23rd August, 1918. He took charge of the platoon when his officer became a casualty, and getting them into a suitable position charged with the bayonet, getting into the wood and capturing 40 prisoners and three machinegum. gum. Later he bombed his way alone 200 yards up a trench, killing six of the enemy, and clearing the way for his platoon to advance over the top. 1758 Sgt. J. A. McClure, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty at the capture of Mont St. Quentin on Ist September, 1918. In the first attack he led the men of his platoon forward with great determination under a hail of fire, and reorganised them for the second attack. In the village he did splendid work, personally sonally capturing two machine-guns and disposing of their crews, and superintending ing the consolidation under close machinegun gun fire. 3990 L.=​Cpl. W. Moore, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on 23rd August, 1918, when his company was held up by machine-gun fire in the advance on St. Martin?s Wood. He crept'out to within fifty yards of the post and endeavoured voured to snipe the gun team, but, failing in this, he fetched up two rifle grenades, with which he killed two, and then captured tured the remaining six, enabling the company pany to advance. 4008 Pte. T. G. Mullane, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on 9th August, 1918, near Vanvillers, in leading a charge against a machine-gun post which was causing heavy casualties. After capturing the post he rallied a few men and cleared the trench to his flank for several hundred yards. He continued his untiring efforts the next two days, and set a fine example to his comrades. 82 Pte. W. S. Neal, Infy.?For conspicuous ous gallantry and devotion to duty during the attack near Mont St. Quentin oh 2nd September, 1918. He was attached to the brigade snipers, and came into action against a large party of the enemy running along a shallow communication trench, killing twenty with his rifle fire. An officer then fifed point-blank at him at forty yards range, but missed, and he immediately retaliated by shooting him. The rest of the enemy then turned round and surrendered. dered. He also put a machine-gun out of action by shooting three of the team. His coolness was remarkable. 2965 Sgt. A. I. O?Connor, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in command of a platoon during an attack on Peronne Ist September, 1918, both in the assembly and the advance under heavy fire. The next day, all the officers being casualties, he took charge of the company, and was everywhere in desperate fighting throughout the day, reconnoitring, reorganising, organising, filling gaps, gaining touch with the flanks, and drawing fire so as to cover other units in the advance. Over and over again he rose to the occasion and restored a critical situation, his conduct winning the admiration of all with him.
  • War Honours for the A.I.F. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the following awards to the undermentioned Warrant Officers, Non-commissioned Officers and Men for gallantry and Distinguished Service in the field: ? The Distinguished Conduct Medal. 3749 Cpl. M. L. Goodger, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in charge, of a section during an attack. He led his men into the enemy trench and then began bombing up the trench, greatly assisting the assaulting company to push home their attack. He was badly wounded, but continued to bomb the enemy position, and made about ten of them prisoners. soners. He showed splendid coolness and determination. 601 Sgt. G. Goodwin, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in an attack. He handled his platoon with great skill after his platoon commander became a casualty. When his platoon was held up by an enemy machine-gun post he got the assistance of a tank and led his platoon against the post, capturing ten of the enemy and two machine-guns, and enabling the line to advance. His determined mined leadership and initiative were of greqt value. 100 Sgt. H. McK. Gordon, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in charge of the right mopping up party in a raid. H* led the attack on an enemy machine-gun, which was destroyed and the personnel of the team killed. At the end of the raid he got his wounded officer and his team safely back to the lines. He showed fine courage and leadership. 1783 Sgt. C. G. Ham, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. He took charge of two greatly reduced platoons and advanced to the assault, capturing two machine-guns and killing or capturing the garrison of an enemy strong post. He set a fine example of courage and determination to his men. 2491 Pte. J. L. L. Hannah, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during a raid. He was the first of his section to reach an enemy bombing post of six men, of whom he personally killed five, and took the sixth prisoner. The way was thus cleared for the remainder of his section, who, working to the flanks, mopped up several of the enemy. He did splendid service, and contributed greatly to the complete plete success of the raid. 8732 L.'Cpl. J. T. Harper, Engrs.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when ordered to place an entanglement round a captured enemy post. He, with three others, moved forward to the post several hundred yards under heavy fire, and proceeded to erect 150 yards of entanglement ment under direct observation of the enemy. While the work was being completed he twice went back to report progress, and ask what he could do further. Finally, he carried despatches to battalion headquarters through heavy enemy barrage. He set a splendid example of coolness and devotion to duty. 5363 Sgt. A. Harris, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. He assumed command of his platoon and led his men with great dash towards the objective. Being held up by machine-gun fire he rushed forward with two men, captured two machine-guns and several prisoners, and pushed on to his objective. During consolidation he made a personal reconnaissance and sent back valuable able information to his company commander. mander. He displayed fine courage and initiative. 3237 L.=​Cpl. J. R. C. Hayward, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During the attack and capture of am enemy trench system, this N.C.0., who was in charge of a Lewis-gun team, was wounded in reaching the first objective. He continued to lead his section, and pushed on 100 yards beyond the final objective, tive, when it was captured, to protect the work of consolidation. He was wounded a second time, but remained at his post and led his party against an enemy machinegun, gun, which was taken, though he himself was wounded for the third time and had to be evacuated. His courage, endurance and brilliant leadership were an inspiration to the men under his command. 1939 Sgt. F. B. Heinze, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. During the advance he directed his men through the enemy wire and led them with great dash, himself killing ing several of the enemy. During consolidation, dation, under heavy enemy opposition, he placed his Lewis guns in No-man?s Land, so that a good field of fire could be obtained. Next day he led a small party forward under heavy machine-gun fire, and seized an enemy post 200 yards ahead of the line, capturing six prisoners. He then crawled forward another fifty yards and made a valuable reconnaissance. He showed fine courage and leadership and did excellent service. 7499 Sgt. J. T. Humphreys, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty and perseverance in leading his men in a raid, when he killed the first three of the garrison himself and captured a machinegun, gun, which he carried along until his leg was, shattered by a shell. He then encouraged couraged his men to further efforts, and after the raid was over, started to crawl back with the captured gun. When he had completed half the distance he was picked up by his officer. 5833 Cpl. A. D. Hutchison, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in an attack. When a party of the enemy held up the advance of his company, he dashed out with his Lewis gun, killed a number of the enemy, and overcame the resistance. He was of great value in moving?along the top of the trench with the party which was mopping up the trench system. After the objective had been taken he moved forward under enemy machinegune gune fire and overcame an enemy post, capturing two machine-guns, with their crews. With his gun he pursued the enemy by fire, and accounted for several of them. He did splendid service. 1661 Sgt. J. E. V. K. Ingvarson, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as a platoon sergeant during an attack. His platoon commander having become a casualty, he led the platoon with great dash and ability, gaining the final objective, and establishing a strong point. When the enemy counter-attacked and occupied pied a portion of the front-line trenches, he organised a bombing section to work down the trench and at the same time placed a Lewis-gun in position to cover the party. This enterprise was most successful, as the enemy were ejected from the trenches by the bombers and cut off by the fire of the Lewis-gun, suffering many casualties. This N.C.O. showed great initiative, and set a very fine example to his men. 5713 Cpl. J. Lihou, M.M., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in charge of a Lewis-gun section during an attack. Throughout the advance he fired from the hip with great effect, and when an enemy post threatened to hold up the line he engaged it so effectually that a bombing section was enabled to approach it from a flank without casualties and kill all the occupants. Shortly after, when one of his section became a casualty, he carried his gun as well as his own right up to the final objective. He set a splendid example of cheerfulness and cool confidence to his men. 3171 Sgt. P. L. Little, M.M., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty while battalion intelligence N.C.O. during an enemy counter-attack. When the enemy temporarily succeeded in entering the trench past the bomb blocfc, killing the officer in charge and the N.C.0., Sgt. Little, on his own initiative, reformed the remainder of the party and led them again to the attack. He killed many of the enemy, re-established lished the position, and cleared up a serious situation. His conduct throughout was a fine example to his men. 3380 Cpl. A, London, M.M., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. While accompanying an officer on patrol he surprised and captured the garrison of three of an enemy post. He handed them over as prisoners, and proceeded to another post, and with great daring engaged and captured the four occupants. Later in the day he joined in an attack on an enemy strong point, and succeeded in getting behind the post and bombing it, thereby greatly assisting the attacking party and contributing largely to the success of the operation. He showed courage and initiative tive of a high order. 1569 Sgt. P. Lynch, M.M., M.G. Corps. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. While he was in charge of a Vickers gun covering the consolidation solidation after the final objective was reached, he saw an enemy machine-gun come into action in a small trench some 300 yards in front. He promptly carried his gun to a position from which to engage it satisfactorily and silenced He then led a small party forward, and after a sharp bomb fight captured the gun and five prisoners, soners, leaving several dead enemy in the trench. Throughout the action he set a fine example of courage and determination. 5151 Cpl. C, McAllister, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in an qttack. He led his men with great dash and kept touch with the flank company, filling up gaps which several times formed in the line. During consolidation, when a strong enemy party were seen working forward ward to a post in front of the line, he led an attack against them, dispersing the party and inflicting many casualties. His coolness and courage were an example to all about him. 3085 C.S.M. J. Meek, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. Before the furthest objective was reached the majority of his officers had become casualties. He was of the greatest assistance to the remaining officers in holding the company together and during consolidation. Owing 'to his coolness and energy the company were fully prepared for enemy counter-attack. 4134 Spr. R. A. Miller, Engineers.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. After his officer and N.C.O. had become casualties, he pushed on with the platoon allotted for digging a strong point, selected the site and taped out the position in spite of heavy shell and machine-gun fire. When most of his party pushed on in their eagerness ness to be in the fight, he organised a fresh party, who dug in, while he reconnoitred and noted down the position on both flanks. He then hastened back to headquarters with the valuable information obtained by his ability and resource. 907 Sgt. A. T. Morrison, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. In broad daylight he and two other ranks surprised an enemy post and captured nine prisoners and a machine-gun. He showed fine courage and initiative. ' jj 149 C.S.M. A. L. Mugglestone, Engrs.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Under considerable shelling by the enemy he supervised the removal of trucks and supplies from a yard, assisted by a corporal and a sapper. During this time the track was broken in four places. He showed great devotion to duty. 4109 Cpl. C. H. Napier, Infy. ? For con? ? spicuous gallantry and fine leadership during an attack. He led his section of four against a party of the enemy who were taking cover in some small dug-outs and bombed them out, killing most of them and capturing two prisoners. Later, he led his section against an enemy machine-gun and attacked it with bombs, capturing the gun and six prisoners. He set a splendid example of courage and initiative. 6707 Cpl. W. A. Nelson, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in an attack. During the advance he led a rush against an enemy machine-gun post, capturing the gun, killing two of the crew, and taking the rest prisoners. Later, he pushed his men some way forward in the direction of the enemy to provide covering fire for the battalion. Throughout he showed great determination and initiative. 2951 Tpr. H. Newth, Mtd. Rgt.?For conspicuous courage and devotion to duty. He engaged and captured two enemy machine-guns, though his own detachment were all casualties and he had to work his own gun alone. He has always set a fine example of coolness in action. 6553 Pte. J.?O?Loughlin, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in putting out of action an enemy machinegun gun during an attack. On the first objective tive being reached, this gun opened fire on our troops, who were digging in. He rushed forward, bayoneted the gunner and captured the gun. A splendid performance. 6099 Pte. J. J. O?Meara, M.M., Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an attempted enemy raid he leaped on to the parapet and bombed the enemy back. He was severely wounded, but continued to inflict many casualties with his bombs until the block in the trench was re-established. His courage and promptitude tude were of the greatest value. 2415 Cpl. A. G. Penny, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion Ho duty during a raid. He successfully rushed an enemy machine-gun post with his section, himself bayoneting three of the garrison. Inspired by his skill and courage, his party worked along either flank and accounted for all the enemy in that part of the trench. On the signal being given to withdraw, he got all his men back to the lines, having contributed tributed greatly to the success of the raid. 3883 Cpl. (T./​Sgt.) W. G. Phillips, M.M., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion tion to duty as Lewis-gun sergeant of one of the assaulting companies during an attack. When an enemy machine-gun threatened to hold up the advance, Sgt, Phillips, followed by three men, rushed straight at the gun and shot five of the crew with his revolver. The gun was captured and several prisoners taken. Throughout the operation he set a splendid example of coolness and determination. 329 Sgt. P. H. Rede, L.H. Regt.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during a raid. He led his men with great dash in the occupation of a hill, and though overwhelmed by numbers several times, he charged into the enemy with fixed bayonets, holding them at bay. His prompt action, bold initiative, and courageous example to his men were of great value. 2012 Cpl. J, V, Reilly, Infy. ? For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. In broad daylight he and two others went out and captured two of the enemy from one outpost and returned safely. Later, the same party visited another post which was strongly held and killed eight of the enemy. He and his party showed fine courage and initiative. 2080 Sgt. D. M. Reuben, M.M., L.T.M. Bty.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion tion to duty in charge of two Stokes mortars during an attack. He fought his guns most effectively during the advance and during a counter-attack by the enemy. In order to knock out an enemy machine-gun, he dismantled his mortar, dashed forward to a shell-hole, and held the barrel in his bare hands while his comrade dropped the shells down the muzzle. He did fine work. 2699 C.S.M. (now 2nd Lieut.) W. R. Rogers, M.M., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. Owing to the delay caused by enemy machine-gun posts, the barrage kept getting ahead of the infantry. This warrant officer constantly went from end to end of his company and backwards and forwards from the barrage curtain to where men were being delayed, bringing them forward again. His quick insight and ability greatly contributed to the success of the operation. 15258 Spr. W. G. Ross, Engrs.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty while employed with Bangalore torpedoes during a raid. He got right up to the enemy?s wire without being observed, but almost immediately after an enemy bomb landed Jn the wire between the two torpedoes. pedoes. Notwithstanding the danger from explosion, he remained absolutely quiet. His cool behaviour enabled his party to successfully surprise the enemy.
  • War Honours for the A.I.F. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the following Awards to the undermentioned Officers and Warrant Officers in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field:? Bar to Distinguished Service Order. Lieut.=​Col. John McArthur, D.5.0., Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry while commanding manding his battalion during an attack. He preceded the battalion to the jumpingoff off line, and under very heavy fire issued final instructions to the companies. When the advance was temporarily checked he went forward and personally conducted operations, being severely wounded while doing so. It was largely due to his splendid leadership and fine initiative that the battalion reached all its objectives. (D.S. O. gazetted 7th November, 1918.) Lieut. * Col, Maurice Wilder - Neligan, C.M.G., D.5.0., D.C.M., Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry in a night attack on a village. Owing to his skill and courage, the plan of enveloping the village was successfuly cessfuly carried out, resulting in the capture of 200 prisoners and 30 machine-guns. The attacking force suffered less than 20 casualties.?(D.S.O. ties.?(D.S.O. gazetted 25th August, 1916.) The Distinguished Service Order. Lieut. Francis Joseph Burke, Infy.?For fconspicuous gallantry during an attack. He led his platoon with great dash, singlehanded handed rushing a minenwerfer and killing the crew. With a party of six he then took a machine-gun post, capturing the gun and the garrison of eight men. Next, with his platoon, he rushed and captured two field guns, killing four of the crew and capturing ing twelve. After reaching the final objective tive he went forward with one man and killed four of the enemy. Throughout the operation his courage, determination and leadership were a magnificent example to all. Lieut.=​Col. Frederick Royden Chalmers, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. He filled a dangerous gap between his flank and the next battalion by organising ing and leading forward his staff of signallers lers and runners, capturing several prisoners, soners, of whom he himself took three. Under very heavy fire he then pushed on ahead of the objective, and seized a most advantageous position, from which he made a valuable reconnaissance of nearly a mile of the newly-captured front. His initiative and personal courage were a splendid inspiration spiration to his battalion. Lieut. Clayton Edginton Davis, M.C., Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. He led his own company and another with splendid dash, and took a position of great importance to the advance. His devotion to duty and absolute fearlessness ness won the admiration of all ranks, and his brilliant work and exemple materially assisted in the success of the operation; Maj. Frederick Neill Le Messurier, A.M, Corps.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion votion to duty. He was continuously in the front line during both stages of an attack, assisting in collecting and arranging for the prompt disposal of the wounded to the rear. He behaved splendidly, and by his untiring efforts and a complete disregard of his own safety he greatly assisted the brigade gade throughout. John McArthur, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and able leadership. Having personally supervised all preliminary nary arrangements, he carried out a night attack on the enemy?s well-organised trench lines, which was entirely successful. He remained at work for forty-eight hours, showing a splendid example of courage and devotion to duty which inspired all ranks of the battalion. Lieut.=​Col. Stanley Llewellyn Perry, M.C., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during, an advance. Though early wounded, he refused to leave, and successfully commanded and. controlled the capture of the final objective, afterwards directing consolidation and placing the line in a defensive condition. His gallant conduct duct inspired all ranks. Lieut.�Col. Arthur Mitchell Wilson, A.M. Corps.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion votion to duty during an attack, while in charge of bearer divisions. He followed close on the heels of the infantry into captured tured villages, establishing bearer posts, and effected the evacuation of the wounded with remarkable rapidity. He worked splendidly throughout, and by his untiring devotion to duty saved a number of lives. Bar to Military Cross. Lieut. George Burrows, M.C., Engrs.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. He was in charge of a section of sappers accompanying one of the assaulting battalions, and on reaching ing the final objective he saw a long-range gun, an engine, and some ammunition coaches which were on fire, on a siding some 200 yards beyond the front line. He immediately took two sappers forward under heavy machine-gun fire, raised steam on the engine, and shunted the burning waggons to another siding, and brought the gun back well within his lines. His determined courage and initiative resulted in the capture of a very valuable gun. (M.C. gazetted 19th November, 1917.) Lieut. Percy Muir Dun, M.C., M.M.? For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. He led his men splendidly through dense fog, and on two occasions headed a charge against machine-guns, capturing the guns and some forty prisoners. His determined courage cheered his men, and was largely instrumental in getting them forward. (M.C. gazetted 13th May, 1918.) Capt. Frank William Fay, M.C., A.M. Corps.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion votion to duty during an attack. He was in charge of motor ambulances, and before moving them forward he reconnoitred the roads at considerable risk in his car. He remained on duty continuously for four days, exploring each route and opening up new tracks for each successive advance. By his untiring zeal and devotion to duty he enabled the evacuation of the wounded of two divisions to be smoothly continued. (M.C. gazetted 16th September, 1918.) Capt. Charles William Scott French, M.C., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. With two men he attacked a battery of 4.2-in. guns, and personally shot the officer and captured the others and the battery. He also exhibited great courage in attacking ing the many machine-gun positions encountered countered during the advance. (M."C, gazetted 3rd June, 1918.) Lieut. Gilbert Harry, M.C., M.M., Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He went forward under heavy machine-gun and rifle fire to within a hundred dred yards of the enemy posts, and obtained information which was much required. He displayed fine courage and determination. (M.C. gazetted Ist January, 1918.) Lieut. Stanley Albert Hill, M.C., Pnrs. ? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He completed a sap from our original front line to the captured position, under heavy shell and machine-gun fire, in spite of great unforeseen practical difficulties ties and dangerous obstacles left by the enemy. His untiring energy and personal disregard of danger greatly encouraged his men. (M.C. gazetted 19th November, 1917.) Capt. Roy Kintore Hurcombe, M.C., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion tion to duty during an attack. He led his company splendidly, and with great dash gained his objective, after which he personally sonally led an attack on a machine-gun nest and accounted for many of the enemy. Later he captured an officer and two men. He set a very fine example to all under his command. (M.C. gazetted 19th November, 1917.) Lieut. Ernest Bointon Mason, M.C., Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. Finding that troops on the right were held up by enemy machine-guns, he organised an attack from both sides, leading one personally, and killed or captured all the gun crews. Later, when rushed by the enemy and wounded, he and a few men put them to flight, taking two prisoners. He displayed splendid dash and leadership, and his work was of great value to the advance. (M.C. gazetted 24th September, 1918.) Capt. William Francis James McCann, M.C., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and fine leadership during an attack. He led one of the attacking companies with great dash, and helped very materially in the success cess of the operation. Wherever the situation tion was most critical he was to be found directing and encouraging his men, and his fine example inspired all under his command. mand. (M.C. gazetted 22nd September, 1916.) Capt. William Robert Creen McNaught, M.C., Fd. Arty.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. While his battery was under close range and direct enfilade fire he safely extricated his guns, and by his fine example of cool courage and judgment inspired and assisted his men throughout a critical period. Thanks to his efforts the battery changed its position with comparatively few casualties. ties. (M.C. gazeted 19th November, 1917.) Lieut. HarokLFord Pearson, M.C., Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as intelligence officer during an attack. He followed up the attack to collect identifications and information early, sending the results to battalion headquarters quarters without delay. He then took charge of a company, and with three men disposed of the crews of five howitzers, capturing the guns and sixteen prisoners. ' His prompt courage and determination had a most inspiring effect on his men. (M.C. gazetted Ist January, 1918.) Lieut. Roy Edred Potts, M.C., Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. He worked his company skilfully round a strong enemy point and cut off the garrison, capturing fifty-four prisoners and four machine-guns. He then consolidated the position. Later, he led a party against an enemy machine-gun post, capturing six prisoners soners and a machine-gun. He showed marked courage and devotion to duty. (M.C. gazetted 26th July, 1918.) Capt. Arthur Leslie Varley, M.C., Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. He went forward ward through heavy fire, supervised the collection of ammunition, water, and material, rial, and delivered them to the battalion holding the captured position, thus supplying ing them with sufficient to hold off an en&​my counter-attack. By his courage and initiative he rendered very valuable service. (M.C, gazetted 25th August, 1917.) Lieut. James Vincent, M.C., D.C.M., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion votion to duty during an attack. In very thick fog he went forward and successfully laid the tape on the battalion jumping-off line, which was two miles away. He then guided the Tanks into position, and during the advance he preceded the battalion with his scouts, spraying enemy positions with three light Lewis guns, and at one point cutting off the retreat of about 100 of the enemy. He set a splendid example of cool courage and determination. (M.C. gazetted 26th July, 1918.) The Military Cross. Capt. John Harrison Allen, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and good leadership. When the enemy attacked our first wave from a point in the rear, Captain Allen, who was in command of the second wave, quickly grasped the situation and counterattacked attacked with most determined vigour, killing ing a large number of the enemy and taking fifteen prisoners and a machine-gun. His dash and initiative greatly contributed to the success of the operation. Lieut. Cyril Garfield John Ashmead, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. When his platoon was checked by heavy machine-gun fire he went forward and personally led the Tanks, encouraging them and his men to press on, and showing coolness and power of command at a critical time. Later, he brought in three wounded officers who were lying out in front of his platoon. Capt. Edmund Beaver, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. By able leadership of his company under most difficult conditions he greatly assisted the advance, and when held up by machine-gun fire he led a party forward and captured two guns and their crews. After taking his objective he went forward with a party and captured a heavy minenwerfer and seven men. He showed great courage and ability to command. Lieut. Arthur Charles Boorman, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. After reaching the final objective his platoon was suffering casualties from machine-gun fire. He took three men, rushed the post, and inflicted.heavy casualties. ties. Throughout the operation he showed great coolness and marked powers of command. Lieut. Leonard George Boxall, M.T.M. By.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion tion to duty when responsible for trench mortar operations during an attack. He put down an effective barrage, which greatly assisted the infantry in their advance. vance. Later, he led a party into newlycaptured captured territory and captured a 77m. gun and a 4.2-in. gun, which were turned on the enemy with good effect. Thanks to his fine leadership his party captured some fifty prisoners altogether. Lieut. William Braden, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and initiative. During the attack and capture of an enemy system of trenches he displayed remarkable skill in the way he established the necessary ' blocks, handling his men and selecting positions with great ability, and overcoming coming enemy resistance with much dash. His courage and determination were fine examples to his men. Lieut. Lindsay Gordon Bristow, L.H.R. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in patrol work. He twice reconnoitred noitred the most advanced infantry line, and sent back information which contributed buted greatly to the clearing up of an obscure situation. He was wounded on the second occasion, but remained on duty until his final report despatched. Lieut. David Brown, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry during an attack. He went forward with mortars, and under heavy machine-gun fire got his guns into action and knocked out two machineguns guns Which were impeding the advance. Throughout his courage, initiative and devotion votion to duty inspired his crew. Lieut. Alan Edmund Burke, F.A.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. While his battery was being enfiladed at close range wilh high explosive and gas shell, this officer, by his personal effort and disregard of danger, succeeded in withdrawing drawing five of the guns. He set a fine example to all ranks of the battery. Lieut. Leslie William Henry Cleland, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. While leading his platoon the advance was checked by an enemy machinegun, gun, which put a Lewis-gun section out of action. He immediately picked up the gun, and, firing from the hip, accounted for all the crew of the machine-gun. He showed fine courage and promptitude. Lieut. Frank Clift, Infy.?For conspicuous ous gallantry and devotion to duty. He was badly wounded by an enemy bomb, but, in spite of his injuries, he remained at his post directing operations until his platoon had begun to consolidate their position and had got touch with the unit on their flank. His example of determination tion and endurance had a great -effect on his men. Capt. Clive Robert Trevor Cole, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. He led his company splendidly, over-running an enemy strong point and killing or capturing the occupants. Though wounded, he reorganised his company under heavy fire and carried on up to the close of the operations. By his pluck and devotion to duty he set a very fine example to his men.
  • War Honours for the A.I.F. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of the Victoria Cross to the undermentioned Officers, N.C.O.?s and Men: ? Awarded the Victoria Cross. 2742 Pte. Robert Matthew Beatham, A.I.F.?For most conspicuous bravery and self-sacrifice during the attack north of Rosi&​res, east of Amiens, on 9th August, 1918. When the advance was held up by heavy machine-gun fire, Pte. Beatham dashed forward, and, assisted by one man, bombed and fought the crews of four enemy machine-guns, killing ten of them and capturing ten others, thus facilitating the advance and saving many casualties. When the final objective was reached, although previously wounded, he again dashed forward and bombed a machinegun, gun, being riddled with bullets and killed in doing so. The valour displayed by this gallant soldier inspired all ranks in a wonderful manner. 726 Pte. George Cartwright, A.I.F.? For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty on the morning of 31st August, 1918, during the attack on Road Wood, south-west of Bouchavesnes, near Peronne. When two companies were held up by machine-gun fire from the south-western edge of the wood, without hesitation Pte. Cartwright moved against the gun in a most deliberate manner under intense fire. He shot three of the team, and, having bombed the post, captured the gun and nine enemy. This gallant deed had a most inspiring effect on the whole line, which immediately rushed forward. Throughout the operation Pte. Cartwright wright displayed wonderful dash, grim determination, and courage of the-highest order. Maj. Blair Anderson Wark, D.5.0., A.I.F. ?For most conspicuous bravery, initiative and control during the period 29th September to Ist October, 1918, in the. operations against the Hindenburg Line at Bellicourt and the advance through Nauroy, roy, Etricourt, Magny La Fosse and Joncourt. On 29th September, after personal reconnaissance connaissance under heavy fire, he led his command forward at a critical period and restored the situation. Moving fearlessly at the head of, and at times far in advance of, his troops, he cheered his men on through Nauroy, thence towards Etricourt. Still leading his assaulting companies, he observed a battery of 77mm. guns firing on his rear companies and causing heavy casualties. Collecting a few of his men, he rushed the battery, capturing four guns and ten of the crew. Then moving rapidly forward with only two N.C.O.?s, he surprised prised and captured fifty Germans near Magny La Fosse. On October Ist, 1918, he again showed fearless leading and gallantry in attack, and without hesitation and regardless of personal risk dashed forward and silenced machine-guns which were causing heavy casualties. Throughout he displayed the greatest courage, skilful leading and devotion to duty, and his work was invaluable. 1153 L.=​Cpl. (T.=​Cpl.) Lawrence Car* thage Weathers, A.I.F. ?For most conspicuous spicuous bravery and devotion to duty on the 2nd September, 1918, north of Peronne, when with an advanced bombing party. The attack having been held up by a strongly held enemy trench, Cpl. Weathers went forward alone under heavy fire and attacked the enemy with bombs. Then, returning to our lines for a further supply of bombs, he again went forward with three comrades, and attacked under very heavy fire. Regardless of personal danger, he mounted the enemy parapet and bombed the trench, and, with the support of his comrades, captured 180 prisoners and three machine-guns. His valour and determination resulted in the successful capture of the final objective, and saved the lives of many of his comrades. 23 L.=​Cpl. Bernard Sidney Gordon, M.M., A.I.F. ?For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty on the 26/​27 th August, 1918, east of Bray. He led his section through heavy shell fire to the objective, which he consolidated. Single-handed he attacked an enemy machine-gun which was enfilading the company on his right, killed the man on the gun, and captured the post, which contained tained one officer and ten men. He then cleared up a trench, capturing twenty-nine prisoners and two machine-guns. In clearing up further trenches he captured? twenty-two prisoners, including one officer, and three machine-guns. Practically unaided, he captured, in the course of these operations, two officers and sixty-one other ranks, together with six machine-guns, and displayed throughout a wonderful example of fearless initiative. 1717 Pte. John Ryan, A.I.F. ?For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty during an attack against the Hindenburg defences on 30th September, 1918. In the initial assault on the enemy?s positions Pte. Ryan went forward with great dash and determination, and was one of the first to reach the enemy trench. His exceptional skill and daring inspired his comrades, and, despite heavy fire, the hostile garrison was soon overcome and the trench occupied. The enemy then counter-attacked, and succeeded in establishing lishing a bombing party in the rear of the position. Under fire from front and rear, the position tion was critical, and necessitated prompt action. Quickly appreciating the situation, he organised and led the men near him with bomb and bayonet against the enemy bombers, finally reaching the position with only three men. By skilful bayonet work, his small party succeeded in killing the first three Germans on the enemy?s flank, then, moving along the embankment, Pte. Ryan alone rushed the remainder with bombs. He fell wounded after he had driven back the enemy, who suffered heavily as they retired across No-man?s Land. A particularly dangerous situation had been saved by this gallant soldier, whose example of determined bravery and initiative tive was an inspiration to all. 3244 a Pte. James Park Woods, A.I.F. ? For conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty near Le Verguier, north-west of St. Quentin, on the 18th September, 1918, when, with a weak patrol, he attacked and captured a very formidable enemy post, and subsequently, with two comrades, held the same against heavy enemy counterattacks. attacks. Although exposed to heavy fire of all descriptions, he fearlessly jumped on the parapet and opened fire on the attacking enemy inflicting severe casualties. He kept up his fire and held up the enemy until help arrived, and throughout the operations displayed a splendid example of valuer, determination and initiative. The King has been graciously pleased to give orders for the following promotions in, and appointments to, the Most Honourable able Order of the Bath, for valuable services vices rendered in connection with the military tary operations in France and Flanders. Dated Ist January, 1919; ? MOST HONOURABLE ORDER OF THE BATH. To be Additional Members of the Military Division sion of the Second Class or Knights Commanders, manders, of the said Most Honourable Order: Major-General Charles Rosenthal, C.8., C.M.G., D.S.O. To be Additional Members of the Military Division sion of the Third Class, or Companions, of the said Most Honourable Order;? Col. Julius Henry Bruche, C.M.G. Col (T./​Brig.-Gen.) Walter Ramsay McNicoll, C.M.G., D.S.O. Col (T/​Brig.-Gen.) Walter Adams Coxen, C.M.G., D.S.O. Col. (T./​Brig.-Gen.) Cecil Henry Foott, C.M.G. Ihe King has been graciously pleased to give directions for the following promotions tions in, and appointments to, the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, for services rendered in connection nection with military operations in France and Flanders. Dated Ist January, 1919: MOST DISTINGUISHED ORDER OF SAINT MICHAEL AND SAINT GEORGE. To be Additional Members of the First Class, or Knights Grand Crgss, of the said Most Distinguished tinguished Order : Major-Gen. Sir John Monash, K.C.8,, V.D. To be Additional Members of the Second Class or Knights Commanders, of the said Most Distinguished Order; ? Cyril Brudenell Bingham White, C.B C.M.G., D.5.0., A.D.C. M K.C?B?'vD r J � SePll JOlm Talbot Hobbs ? To be Additional Members of the Third Class. o^c^e^ l^ PanlOllS, � f said Distinguished Col. D (T,Brig.-Gen.) Edwin Tivey, C.8., D.5.0., 06110 EVan Alexander Wisdom, � D S Or �rig ?? Geil ? ) Jam6S Cam P bell Stewart, S ob Ivan Gifford Mackay, D.S.O. �d" S Q T '^ Brig '' Henry Arthur Goddard, Col. James Adam Dick, A.M.C. Lieut.-Col. Carl Herman Jess, D.S.O. Lieut.-Col. Hectoi* Osman Caddy, D.S.O. Lieut.-Col. Ernest Edward Herrod, D.S.O Lieut.-Col. William Gillian Allsop, DSO DSO 01 " Herbert Thomas Christopher Layh, Lieut.-Col. Donald Ticehurst Moore, D.S.O. Lieut.-Col. Bertie Vandeleur Stacy, D.S.O. ' Lieut.-Col. John Dudley Lavarack, D.S.O. Lieut.-Col. Charles James Martin. _ be King has been graciously pleased to give orders for the following promotions in and appointments to the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, for valuable services rendered in connection with military tary operations in France and Flanders MOST EXCELLENT ORDER OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE. To be a Commander of the Military Division of the said Most Excellent Order. Principal Matron Miss Grace Margaret Wilson, To be Officers of the Military Division of the said Most Excellent Order:? Capt. Robert Cairns Amis Anderson. Capt. Robert Gordon Chirnside. Major John William Donnelly. Major David Moore Embelton. Major Charles Napier F'inn. Capt. William Lockhart Hamilton. Lieut. Gordon John Cooper Hargreaves. Capt. Charles Howard Helsham. Lieut.-Col. Frank Le Leu Henley, DSO Major Reginald Mitchell Hore. Capt. (T./​Major) Sydney Arthur Hunn, M.C Major Arthur Wellesley Hyman. Capt. Samuel Barningham Lacey. Capt. Harry James Lane. Major (T./​Lieut.-Col.) John Thomas McColl M C Major (T./​Lieut.-Col.) Alfred Fay*Maclure ? ( Major Frank Keith Officer, M.C. < Capt. Leslie Clive Parker. Majbr Charles Walter Robinson. i Capt. William Lachlan Sanderson. < Capt. Frank Veall Saunders. < Lt.-Col. Vernon Ashton Hobart Sturdee, D.S.O. ( Lieut.-Col. William George Dismore Upjohn. < Qr.-Mr. and Capt. Lionel Antony Parry Ward. 1 To be Members of the Military Division of the \ said Most Excellent Order:? j Hon. Capt. Alexander McCallum. J Lieut. George Smith. , AWARDED THE DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER. Lieut.-Col. Walter William Alderman, C.M.G A.1.F., attd. JS.Z.F. ? Maj. James Sinclair Standish Anderson, M.C. infy. Bde. U.-Qrs. Maj. Frank Herton Berryman, Fd. Arty. Maj. Harry Charles Bundock, H.A.B. Maj. Henry Gervais Lovett Cameron, M.C.. A.I.F. ? ? Maj. Eric Campbell, Arty. Maj. Reginald Biakeney Carr, Engrs. LieuV-Coi. Roy William Chambers, A.M.C. Maj. Cyril Albert Clowes, M.C., Arty. Maj. Hugh John Connell, M.C., A.I.F. Lieut.-Col. William Edward Lodewyk Hamilton Crowther, A.M.C. Maj. Edward John Dibdin A.I.F. Lieut.-Col. John Farrell, A.I.F Maj. Arthur William Hutchin, Gen. List Maj. John Morphett Irwin, Fd. Arty. Maj. Joseph Edward Lee, M.C., A.I.F. Maj. (T./​Lieut.-Col.) Edmund Frank Lind, A.M.C Maj. Eyrl George Lister, Fd. Arty. Maj. Robert Arthur Little, Fd. Arty. Lieut.-Col. George William Macartney, A.M.C. Maj. John James Lawton McCall, A IP Maj. Walter Paton MacCallum, M.C., AIF Maj. Archibald McKillop, A.M.C. Maj. Sydney Albert Middleton, A.I.F. Maj. Edward James Milford, Fd. Arty Maj. Claude Morlet, A.M.C. Maj. William Alexander Morton, A.M.C., attd. 1 4 .A. Lieut.-Col. Thomas Murdoch, A.I.F. Maj. Harold Hiilis Page, M.C., A.I.F. Maj. John Henry Francis Pain, M.C., A.I.F. Maj. Hubert Stanley Wyborn Parker, Pd." Arty. Maj. Robert Stewart Reid, Engrs. Maj. Burford Sampson, A.I.F. Lieut.-CoL Willisyn Henry Sanday, M.C., A.I.F Maj. Alexander Sanderson, M.C., Engrs. Maj. Vincent Wellesley Savage, A.M?C. "Jaj. William Campbell Sawers, A.M.C. Maj. Thomas Browne Slaney, Fd. Arty. ii ? �/​? G � orge Ingram Stevenson, C.M.G., Arty. Maj. (T./​Lt.-Col.) Frederick Street, A.I.F. Maj. Francis Thornthwaite, M.C., Fd. Arty Maj. Raymond Walter Tovell, A.I.F. la e ut.-C�l. Charles Vincent Watson, A.I P Maj. Stanley Holm Watson, M.C., Engrs. Capt. Frank Alan Wisdom, M.C., A.I.F. AWARDED A BAR TO MILITARY CROSS. Lieut. Maurice Alfred Fergusson, M.C., Fd. Arty Capt. William Dane Wallis, M.C., Divl. Arty. * AWARDED THE MILITARY CROSS. Lieut. Phillip Lewis Aitken, Infy. Lieut. Laurence Wendover Barnett, Infy Lieut. Percy Aubrey Bull, Infy. Lieut. Harry James Burnett, Fd. Arty. Lieut. Allan George Macleod Burns, Engrs Qr.-Mr and Capt. Laurence Cadell, Infy Capt. Eustace James Colliver, Infy Lieut. Richard Cooper, A.S.C. Lieut. Edward Richard Cox, A.S.C. Capt. Noel Millar Cuthbert, Infy. Lieut. (T./​Capt.) James Davidson, Infy. Qr.-Mr. and Capt. Geoffrey Egg, Infy. Capt. George Frederick Fitzgerald, M.G C Qr.-Mr. and Capt. Edward Freeman, Infy Capt. Alfred Victor Gallasch, Infy. Capt. Keith Irvine Gill, M.G.C. and Thomas Robin Hammond, Lieut. Leslie Elliot Harding, Infy. Lieut. Geoffrey Koeppen Henderson, M.M., Infy Lieut. Cyril Bruce Hislop, Bde. Hqrs 7 Lieut. Pahl William Hopkins, M.G.C. Capt. Max Ulrich Hubbe, Pnrs. Capt. Milton Livingstone Fredericks Jarvie Prov. Corps. ? Capt. Clarence Walter Lay, Infy. Capt. Norman John MacKay, A.M.C., attd. Infy Capt. David Mac Key, M.G.C. J , Capt. Allan Neil McLennan, M.G.C. Capt. Donald McLeod, Infy. Frederick Brayshaw McWhannell, Infy. Capt. Albert Cohn Morris, Engrs Lieut. John Wesley Mott, D.C.M., Engrs. L 'attd L T C M Pt By DaVid Montague Muir > Infy., t Lieut. Henry Herbert Neaves, Infy. j Lieut. Roy Mc�ae Pattie, Ed. Arty, Lieut. Thomas Giles Paul, Infy. , Qr.-Mr. and Capt. Collison Clapham Pearson Inf Lieut. Hugh Frank Pennefather, Infy. , Qr.-Mr. and Capt. Edgar Ewart Plucknett, Infv Lieut. George Fox Priestley, Inf. Capt. Douglas Frank Rae, M.G.C. Lieut. Leonard Victor Reid, L.H.R Lieut. John Ride, Pnrs. Lieut. Harry Robbins, Infy. Capt. Septimus Archdale Robertson, A.S.C. Lieut. Edwin Charles Rogers, Infy. Lieut. Frank Rogerson, Engrs. Capt. Francis Palmer Selleck, Infy Capt. George Leslie Smith, Engrs. Lieut. John Morrison Smith, Engrs. Li ??K, Walfcer Willoughby Smith, Infy., attd. L.T.M. By. Lieut. George Holmes Thornton, Pnrs. Lieut. Theodore Glyn Watkins, Infy. Capt. Nelson Frederick Wellington, Infy Lieut. Lawrence Joseph West, Arty. Lieut. (T./​Capt.) Roland William Wild, Pnrs Capt. Owen Beresford Williams, Engrs. Rev. Bicton Clemence Wilson, M.A.. C.F.. 4th J. CT-/​3rd CL), Chap. Dept., attd. Ist Bde., AWARDED A BAR TO THE DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL. 3068 Sgt. S. Collett, D.C.M., Infy. 864 C.S.M. J. McD. McCash, D.C.M., Infy, AWARDED THE DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL. 2785 Sgt. H. L. Andrews, M.G.C. 1701 C.S.M. H. Anson, Infy. 2561 S.-Sgt. G. R. Asprey, A.S.C . 3036 Pte. W. H. Baker, M.G.C. 4139 L.-Cpl. J. Barrett, Pnrs. 25347 Sgt. W. H. D. Beadle, Fd. Arty. 7472 Cpl. V. J. Bean, A.S.C. 6515 Sgt. W. A. Birchmore, Fd. Arty 265 C.S.M. C. A. Boyd, A.S.C. 3118 Sgt. N. W. Cairns, Infy. 1821 Sgt. W. S. Carman, Fd. Arty. 2359 C.Q.M.S. F. O. Cavanagh, Infy. 5995 R.S.M. L. Collins, Infy. 15222 Sgt. T. S. Daniels, Fd. Arty. 7988 Cpl. (T./​Sgt.) C. Davies, Fd. Arty. 2627 C.S.M. G. L. W. Deacon, Infy. 4459 Cpl. R. W. Druery, Infy. 3080 Sgt. R. A. Fuller, T.M.By. 1838 Sgt. W. Furniss, Fd. Arty. 498 C.S.M. H. W. Furze, Infy. 832 Sgt. (T./​R.S.M.) H. Gillam, Infy. 3479 Sgt. A. L. Greenwood, Infy 79 Cpl. J. Hall, T.M.By. 1133 Cpl. C. R. Harvey, T.M.By IS" 0 ? 1 - U./​Sgt.) F. W. T. Helmore, T.M.By. '195 Sgt. S. Hooper, Infy. fnfo ?? Jenk y n > attd. H.Q. Pd. Arty. 3082 Pte. J. Jensen, Infy. 2096 C.S.M. F. S. Jones, Infy. 2332 C.S.M. F. G. Jurd, Pnrs. 5735 L.-Cpl. F. C. Kingston, Infy. 3518 Sgt. A. Locke, Fd. Arty. 252 Cpl. H. D. Lonie, Pnrs. 504 Sgt. O. J. Looney, Infy. 3373 a Sgt. C. H. Lorking, Infy. * 81 C.S.M. T. W. Marriott, Infy. 481 Sgt. E. H. Mathews, Infy. 599 Sgt. D. Macauley, Infy. 3786 Cpl. R. McCann ,-JH.T.Coy., attd. Fid Amb 53 ( W- M -) T - H. McColl, M.M. Inf.' 1592 Sgt. A. McDonald, Infy. 2178 Sgt. J. M. McDonald, Infy. 341f B.S.M. K. W. C. McEntyre, Pd. Arty. 1906 Onr. (T./​Bdr.) T. McLean, Fd. Arty 6354 Cpl. C. O. McLear, Infy. 141 C.S.M. F. V. McPhee, Infy. 1039 Sgt. P. R. Philpot, Infy. 2434 C.S.M. (T./​R.S.M.) P. Robertson, Infy. 2743 S|t. (T./​C.S.M.) J. C. Ross, Infy. 643 Sgt. T. Ross, Engrs. 5062 Cpl. (T./​Sgt.) T. Ryan. Infy. 286 Sgt. J. S. H. Semple, Infy. 747 Cpl. A. W. H. Slater, A.S.C. 20013 Cpl. J. B. Stark, Pd. Arty 301 Sgt. (now 2nd Lieut.) A. S. Thomson, Engrs 1740 a Sgt. J. R. Trotman, Infy. g 18400 Sgt. A. L. Tully, M.M., Engrs. 631 Cpl. L. T. Whitmore, M.G.C. 250 Sgt. F. C. Wicks, Engrs. 9122 Sgt. C. C. Wills, Pd. Arty,
  • War Honours for the A.I.F. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the following awards to the undermentioned Officers, Warrant Officer, Non-Commissioned Officers, and Men, in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field: ? Awarded the Military Cross. 5889 L.'Cpl. C. Peterson, M.M., Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when his platoon was held up by a strong post during the attack on Allaines on 2nd September, 1918. He advanced with his Lewis gun under intense fire to within fifty yards of the post, and with neutralising fire enabled the men of his platoon to rush it, capturing six officers and sixty other ranks. Although wounded he kept his gun in action until the situation was clear. 386 Sgt. G. T. Piper, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on 9th August, 1918, near Van*filers. When his platoon officer* was wounded, he took charge of the platoon and led it to its objective through heavy fire, helping the company commander in the consolidation. His courage and disregard of danger set a fine example. 655 Cpl. J. A. Renwick, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on 31st August, 1918, at Mont St. Quentin, when the advance of his company was held up by a machine-gun post. Instructing his section to keep up a frontal fire on the post, he worked round the flank to within bombing distance, and successfully silenced it. Later on, he rushed and killed a sniper, and bringing up the rest of his section, seized the entrance to two dugouts, outs, capturing twenty prisoners. 3908 Sgt. H. J. Robinson, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on 23rd August, 1918,, at Herleville Wood. When only one officer was left in his company, pany, he took command of the right half, and led the men to their objective, superintending intending the consolidation quite regardless of fire. Later, after beating off a counterattack, attack, he with two men set out under heavy fire, and established communication with the flank. 7685 Cpl. A. R. Simpson, Wireless Signal Sqdn.?For conspicuous gallantry during an advance at Khan Baghdidi on 26th March, 1918. On this occasion, as at all times, he displayed unfailing energy, initiative, tive, and coolness under fire, and set a fine example of devotion to duty to those with him. 4794 Pte. G. H. White, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in the attack east of Mont St. Quentin on September 2nd, 1918, as No. 1 of a Lewis gun. When his company were advancing across a flat swept by machine-gun fire, he located the gun causing the damage, and, pushing to within shity yards of the post, shot the crew. Although in an exposed position, he then turned his gun on to the left flank, and, dislodging the enemy, exposed them to the fire of the advancing infantry. His expert and cool handling of the gun was largely responsible for the ultimate occupation of the objective. 6413 L.Cpl. G. E. H. W. Wilkinson, Infy.?For conspicuous gajlantry and devotion tion to duty on Bth and 9th August, 1918, east of Amiens. In the second attack, when the battalion had progressed 600 yards beyond the objective, and nearly all officers and N.C.O.?s were casualties, he took command of fifteen or twenty men and consolidated. After three runners had been wounded, he took a message back to battalion talion headquarters himself. The next day he was the only one of a party who volunteered teered to bring up S.A.A. to a newly captured tured position who got through with his load. His fighting spirit was an inspiration tion to his comrades throughout the attack. His Majesty the King has been graciously, pleased to approve of the award of a Bar to the Military Medal to the undermentioned Non-Commissioned Officers and Men:? Awarded a Bar to the Military Medal. 592 Cpl. A. E. Noonan, M.M., A.I.F. (M.M. gazetted 21st September, 1916.) 526 Cpl. J. Taylor, M.M., A.I.F. (M.M. gazetted 22nd January, 1917.) 362 Sgt. B. E. Harman, M.M., A.I.F. (M.M. gazetted 26th March, 1917.) 1559 Sgt. G. C. Lowes, M.M., A.I.F. (M.M. gazetted 26th May, 1917.), 2700 Sgt. C. A. Williams, M.M., A.I.F. (M.M. gazetted 18th June, 1917.) 9 Sgt. C. R. Mclvor, M.M., A.1.F.; 640 Sgt. H. C. Hinckfuss, M.M., Aust. Eng.; 1511 Sgt. J. A. McKelvie, M.M., Aust. Eng. (M.M.?s gazetted 12th December, 1917.) 705 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) A. Harris, M.M., L.T.M. By.; 5688 Cpl. V. W. Lalor, M.M., A.1.F.; 380 Sgt. W. H. Hutchings, M.M., A.1.F.; 263 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) J. Smith, M.M., A.1.F.; 5037 Sgt. G. F. Armstrong, strong, M.M., A.I.F. (M.M.?s gazetted 17th December, 1917.) 2747 Pte. W. R. Warren, M.M., A.1.F.; 3291 Cpl. W. H. Hammersley, M.M., A.1.F.; 1878 Pte. P. McGregor, M.M., A.I.F. (M.M.?s gazetted 28th January, 1918.) 527 Cpl. W. A. Haden, M.M., Aust. Eng.; 2291 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) P. G. Coppock, M.M., A.I.F. (M.M.?s gazetted 4th February, 1918.) 713 Dvr. S. Ennis, M.M., Aust. F.A. (M.M. gazetted 23rd February, 1918.) 3548 Cpl. (L.-Sgt.) E. R. Jarvis, M.M., Aus. E. (M.M. gazetted 6th August, 1918.) 2398 Sgt. A. McLeish, M.M., Infy.; 1800 Cpl. M. McGinnity, M.M., Infy.; 7027 Pte. G. V. Jaesche, M.M., Infy. (M.M.?s gazetted 29th August, 1918.) 1853 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) T. J. E. Burley, M.M., Aust. Eng. (M.M. gazetted 13th September, 1918.) 8592 Sgt. W. H. G. Dean, M.M., F.A.; 2383 Co. S.M. W. T. Reed, M.M., Aust. F.A.; 1032 Pte. J. M. Eustace, M.M., A.1.F.; 4878 Pte. J. P. Pringle, M.M., A.1.F.; 663 Sgt. H. B. Tyler, M.M., M.Q. Bn. (M.M.?s gazetted 21st October, 1918.) Awarded the Military Medal. 3754 Sgt. Abbott, W. C., Inf.; 102 Sgt. Adam, J. P., M.G.C.; 308 Sgt. Addison, W. S., Inf.; 15807 Pte. Albon, H. S., A.M.C.; 2552 Pte. Alcorn, D. J., Inf.; 4356 Sgt. Alford, R. D? Inf.; 2552 Pte. Allen, A. 8., M.G.C.; 2472 Pte. Allen, R., Pnrs.; 452 Pte. Allitt, J. W. H., Inf.; 301 Dvr. Ambery, W. J. 0., F.A.; 4493 Pte. Andrews, L. J., Inf.; 2123 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Annan, F. C., Inf.; 91 Cpl. Anset, F., L.H.R.; 705 Pte. Arbuckle, A. G., L.T.M. By.; 1784 Sgt. Armstrong, R. J. T., Inf.; 518 Sgt. Arthurs, A. C., Inf.; 802 Pte. Ayre, A. H? Inf. 5340 Pte. Bache, A., Inf.; 3682 Sgt. Bagshaw, H. J., A.M.C.; 9411 Dvr. Baggott, H. H? A.S.C.; 6659 Spr. Bailey, C. H., Aust. Eng.; 5330 Cpl. (L.-Sgt.) Baker, J. W? Inf.; 5046 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Baldwin, W., Inf.; 2573 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Barker, S. B? M.G.C.; 1371 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Barnard, H., A.M.C.; 1075 Cpl. Barrand, L., M.G.C.; 115 Pte. Bartlett, H. S? Inf.; 6607 Pte. Bassham, H. 8., Inf.; 3684 Pte. Beaton, H. E., Inf.; 7103 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Beatty, R. S., Inf.; 2236 Pte. Beckett, J., Pnrs.; 4359 Pte. Belbin, A. G., Inf.; 3017 Sgt. Beilby, H., Inf.; 6923 Sgt. Bell, W. R? Inf.; 2781 Cpl. Bennett, R. L., Inf.; 427 Pte. Bennett, T? Inf.; 1072 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Berry, G. H., Inf.; 958 Sgt. Best, W. J., Inf.; 2333 Pte. Birks, A. H., Inf.; 128 Sgt. Billing, E. W., Inf.; 1257 Sgt. Binger, B. J., A.M.C.; 39 Sgt. Bishenden, A., Inf.; 1995 Dvr. Black, W. C., F.A.; 13073 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Blackwell, J. D., A.M.C.; 4996 Pte. Blake, A. E., Inf.; 4143 Pte. Blake, W., Inf.; 10587- Sgt. Blanch, C. V., Eng.; 1281 Bmdr. Bloomfield, F. A., Fd. Arty.; 4505 Pte. Bollow, J. W., Inf.; 1798 Pte. Bott, F. E., Inf.; 7958 Pte. Botten, F. D? A.M.C.; 7348 Cpl. Bourke, E., Inf.; 1324 Pte. Bowley, A. N., M.G.C.; 1672 Sgt. Boyes, W. H., Inf.; 1133 Sgt. Brackenridge, G., Inf.; 4127 Pte. Bredhauer, G., Inf.; 466 Pte. Brent, H. J. A., Inf.; 4884 Sgt. Bridge, J., Eng.; 816 Pte. Briskey, W. C., Inf.; 828 Pte. Broxam, F. E., Inf.; 3123 a Pte. Brown, E. 8., Inf.; 1433 Sgt. Bryant, L., M.G.C.; 495 Pte. Bubbers, T., Inf.; 3355 Pte. Buchanan, G. A., Inf.; 2176 Pte. Buckenara, C. L., Inf.; 380 Pte. (L.Cpl.) Buckland, land, F. J., Inf.; 567 Co. S.M. Burnett,. G. 0., Inf.; 2106 Cpl. Burton, F. W., Inf.; 5179 Pte. Bye, A. J., Inf. 3048 Sgt. Cathie, G. A. L., Inf.; 5307 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Caldwell, A. V., M.G.C.; 321 Pte. Caldwell, M., M.G.C.; 4353 Pte. Cameron, G., A.M.C.; 1515 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Cane, C. 8., Pnrs.; 295 Cpl. (A.-Sgt.) Capel, J. P., L.T.M. By.; 3592 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Garrison, P., Inf.; 40 Pte. Carroll, L., Inf.; 412 c Pte. Casson, H. J. E., M.G.C.; 4180 Cpl. Cato, L. F., Inf.; 7219 Pte. Cilento, W. A., Inf.; 4751 Pte. Chisholm, D. V., Inf.; 3042 Pte. Clarke, A. R. J., Inf.; 2296 Pte. Clarke, H., Inf.; 2557 Pte. Cleland, G. R., Inf.; 1696 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Clements, R. A. H., Eng.; 5994 a Cpl. Clements, H. C., Inf.; 398 Pte. (T./​Cpl.) Coakley, J., Pnrs.; 718 a Pte. Cockshutt. W., Inf.; 6547 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Coleman, C., Inf.; 11461 Gnr. Collier, R. T., Fd. Arty.; 2303 Pte. Collins, H. H., Inf.; 7672 Pte. Collins, N. J., A.M.C.; 13089 Dvr. Clothier, C. C.. A.S.C.; 6737 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Colwill, C., Inf.; 3708 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Collyer, W. H., Inf.; 5333 Sgt. Connelly, J. A., Inf.; 5560 Pte. Connole, P. J., Inf.; 5676 Pte. Cook, A. J., Inf.; 3007 a Pte. Cooper. J. R? Inf.; 833 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Cope, T. E., Inf.; 0740 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Corke, H. J., Inf.; 621 Pte. Costello, B. W.. Inf.; 2898 Spr. Goughian, C. M., Eng.; 2288 Pte. Cox, W. L.. Inf.; 7720 Pte. Craik, J.. Inf.; 3011 Cpl. Crawford, W. H? Inf.; 2588 Sgt. Crossland, H., Fd. Arty.; 2629 Spr. Culph, E. H., Eng.; 2357 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Currie, A., Inf. 3387 Pte. Daniels, A. H., Inf.; 835 Pte. Davies, T. S.. Inf,; 8397 Dvr. Davis, A. E.. A.S.C.; 1932 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Davis, A. E., Inf.; 3016 a Pte. Davis, D. 8., Inf.; 1379 Cpl. Davison, P., A.M.C.; 5330 Pte. Dawe, A. L., Inf.; 2065 Cpl. Day, P. S., Inf.; 1531 Pte! Deal, C. W., M.G.C.; 3227 Pte. Deeker, M. P., Inf.; 37594 Gnr. Delaney, J., Fd. Arty.; 3539 Sgt. Densley, A. 1.. Inf.; 2021 Dvr. Denton, W. D? Pd. Arty.; 2896 Pte. Devonshire, shire, J., Inf.; 630 Pte. Dick, J. R., Inf.; 2014 Gnr. Dimmack, B. F., Fd. Arty.; 3509 Pte. Dineen, P. J., M.G.C.; 637 Pte. Dingwall, H. A. S? Inf.; 1185 Sgt. Disney, C., M.G.C.; 2793 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Doherty, C. 8.. L.T.M. By.; 2358 Pte. (L.Cpl.) Drewitt. E? M.G.C.: 412 Pte. Duffy, J. A., Pnrs.; 2148 Pte. Duffy, M., 1nf.:'1669 Pte. Duffy. R.. Inf.; 16693 Pte. Duggleby. J. T., A.M.C.; 7480 Cpl. Dunn, S. R., Eng.; 1906 Pte. Dwyer, J. J., Inf.; 6242 Dvr. Dwyer, W. J., Fd. Arty. 2373 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Earll, W. J., Inf.; 10535 Spr. (T./​2nd Cpl.) Easton, W. J., Eng.; 13770 Pte. Eaton, G. T., A.M.C.; 1337 Pte. Edmunds, J., Inf.; 4183 Pte. Edwards, F. E., M.G.C.; 5790 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Eggar, E. L., Inf.; 8045 Pte. Elder, G. Inf.; 1092 Sgt. Eldridge, I. N., Inf.; 2057 Pte. Elvidge, F. T., Inf. 355 Sgt. Faint, W., Inf.; 313 Pte. Fannon, 8., Inf.; 5300 Sgt. Farrelly, M. A., Inf.; 11058 Cpl. Farlow, T., Fd. Arty.; 3548 Pte. Faulks, A. G., Inf.; 3786 Pte. Featherston, S. E., Inf.; 3536 Pte. Feehan, P. T., Inf.; 5502 Pte. Felton, R. C., A.M.C.; 2405 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Ferguson, J., Inf.; 1129 Pte. Ferguson, E. A., Inf.; 7556 Spr. Finniss, L. H., Engrs.; 10607 Cpl. Fisher, C. H. Engrs.; 4483 Cpl. Fitzpatrick. F. L., M.G.C.; 1175 Pte. Fitzpatrick, W. J., Inf.; 9869 Cpl. Fletcher, J. D., Eng.; 3095 Pte. Fogorty, P. J., Inf.; 850 Pte. Foley, J. F., Inf.; 33471 Gnr. Pollett, H. A., Fd. Arty.; 2068 Cpl. Folpp, N. V. M.G.C.; 339 Sgt. Forster, G. B? Inf.; 2810 Pte. Forsyth, W. J., Inf.; 3761 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Poster, S. A., Inf.; 3529 Dvr. Fotheringham, A. H., Fd. Arty.; 26069 Gnr. Fotheringham, D. G., Fd. Arty.; 3074 Sgt. Foulston, F. W., Pnrs.; 1747 Gnr. Francis, G. W? Fd. Arty.; 96 Sgt. Frankham, G., Inf.; 4126 Pte. Freeman, A. P., M.G.C.; 13 Cpl. Freeman, A. R., Pnrs.; 1645 Cpl. Freeman, C. 8., L.T.M. By.; 29074 Gnr. Friend, E. E.. Fd. Arty.; 11835 Dvr. Pry, E., Fd. Arty.; 63 Pte. Fry, F. W., Inf.; 7232 Pte. Furness, G. E.. Inf. 811 Sgt. Gale, K. St. C., M.G.C.; 1947 Pte. Garland, G., Inf.; 2177 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Gasperino, H? Inf.; 7572 Sgt. Gates, G. H? Inf.; 3568 a Pte. Gibb, Inf.; 3389 a Pte. Gibbins, W. R., Inf.: 1093 Dyr. Gibson, C. H., Fd. Arty.; 658 Pte. Giddins, E., Inf.; 17618 Pte. Gilchrist, W? A.M.C.; 4172 Pte. Giles, G. J., Inf.; 2020 Pte. Goodland, W. A., Inf.: 523 Sgt. Goodrich, F. A. E., Light Horse R.; 1835 Co. S.M. Goodwin, R., Inf.; 23 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Gordon. B. S., Inf.; 12384 Cpl. Gould, T. E., Fd. Arty.; 351 Sgt. Graham, E. R., Inf.; 3813 Pte. Grant, P, F.. Inf.; 4420 Pte. Gray, J. W. Inf.; 4877 Pte. Greber. E. G., Inf. 7017 Pte. Hagan, ,T., Inf.; 6628 Pte. Hall. C. R., A.M.C.; 1667 Pte. Hall. L., Inf.; 1875 Pte. Halloran, T. H. J., Inf.; 3159 Cpl. Hamill, H. P., M.G.C.; 2768 Sgt. Hancock, G? Inf.: 37877 Gnr. Hanlon, L. A., Fd. Arty.; 14638 Dvr. Hannah. T. W.. Fd. Arty.; 7247 Pte. Hare, J., Inf.; 13001 Pte. Hare, L. G.. A.M.C.; 2316 Pte. Harris. E. E., Pnrs.; 3053 Pte. Harris. F. W., Inf.; 2818 Pte. Haskins, W., Inf.; 5881 Sgt. Harrison, J. L., Engrs.; 3250 Cpl. Hart, H. E., Fd. Arty.; 389 Cpl. (L.-Sgt.) Hastings. H. R.. Inf.; 1735 Dvr. Hay, L? Fd. Arty.; 105 Cpl. (T./​Sgt.) Hayball, R., Pnrs.; 865 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Haydon, F.. Infy.; 9343 Dvr. Hayson, C., A.S.C.; 799 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Heaford, W., Inf.; 7869 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Heagney, A.. A.M.C.; 4808 Pte. Heitmann, F. E.. Inf.; 9604 Dvr. Hely, J. T., A.S.C.; 2628 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Heydon, C., Pnrs.; 872 Pte. Hickson, A. E,. Inf.: 2321 Pte. Higgle, D.. Inf.: 4514 Gnr. Hilder, T. R.. Fd. Arty.; 5342 Pte. Hinks, ,T. E.. Inf.; 6471 Pte. Hodges, A. E.. Inf.; 6264 Pte. Hobby, L. R.. Inf.: 2286 Pte. Holliday. R. 8., A.M.C.; 5878 Cnl. Holt, A. V., Inf.: 5392 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Hope. W? M.G.C.; 1717 Sgt. Horton. S. F? Inf.: 461 a Dvr. (L.-Cpl.) Hose, W. J., M.G.C.: 15170 Dvr. Hoskins, W. H., A.S.C.; 222 Pte. Hullah, .1.. Inf.; 451 Sgt. Hunter, R. A., Inf.: 4175 Pte. Hutchison, C.. Inf.; 379 Cpl. Hutchinson, J.. Inf. 2964 Dvr. Illingworth, P. E.. M.G.C.; 2291 a Pte. Irvin. D. C.. Inf.: 2588 Pte. Isbister, G.. Inf. 2696 Pte. Jaggs, A. E. W.. Inf.; 479 Pte. Jamieson, W. R.. Inf.; 1575 Gnr. James. A. J., Fd. Arty.; 1486 Pte. Jell. C.. Inf.; 2190 Gnr. Johnson, M. L.. Fd. Arty.; 2333 Pte. Jones, 'A., Inf.: 915 Pte. Jones. C. A.. Inf.; 2370 Pte. Jones, J.. Inf.; 2525 Pte. Juers, A. H., Inf. 12807 Pte. Kay, G. F.. A.M.C.; 6063 Pte. Kelly, G. R.. Inf.: 2600 Sgt. Kelly. J. E.. M.G.C.; 846 Pte. Kenyon, R. S.. Inf.; 3789 Sgt. Kirwan. 8. J.. Inf.; 611 Cpl. Knipe, R.. C.. Inf.: 4465 Pte. Knowles, A., Inf.; 94 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Kohlmeyer, H. W., A.M.C.: 539 a Pte. Kuhlmann. C., Inf. 24413 Cpl. (T./​Sgt.) Lafrank, A., Fd. Arty.; 11542 Dvr. Lament, C. A. P. D.. Fd. Arty.; 6862 Pte. Lauchland. A. V.. Inf.; 179 Cpl. Lawrance, G. W.. Eng.; 13808 Pte. (L.-Cnl.) Lawrence. J. A.. A.M.C.; 529 Cnl. Lay. F. H., Inf.; 5149 Cpl. Lee, A.. Inf.; 1864 Pte. Lee. J. L. G.. A.M.C.; 2636 Sgt. Lehane, W., M.G.C.; 1758 Cpl. Lewis, J. A., Inf.; 1228 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Lewis, J. C., Inf.; 6796 Spr. Leyshon, C. H. E., Eng.; 515 Cpl. Limbert, E. E., M.G.C.; 641 Sgt. Lind, E. E., Inf.; 4380 Pte. Linnane, M., Inf.; 1133 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Lipscombe, G., L.T.M. By.; 9137 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Little, F.. A.M.C.; 3869 Pte. Lord, H., Inf.; 1769 Pte. Lorymer, H., Inf.; 857 Cpl. Love, J. J., Inf.; 2011 a Sgt. Lovett, L., Fd. Arty.; 11024 Spr. Lowe, H. N., Eng.; 2929 a Sgt. Lowrie, W. J., Inf.; 2678 Pte. Lyon, H. K., Inf. 7439 Pte. Macfarlane, C. W? Inf.; 2405 Pte. Mackereth, A., M.G.C.; 1676 Pte. Maginn, E. J., Inf.; 239 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Maloney, B. F., M.G.C.; 3067 Dvr. Mankey, A., Fd. Arty.; 1469 Sgt. Mann, E. W.. Inf.; 2442 Gnr. Markley, H. A., Fd. Arty.; 1957 Pte. Marks, H. E? Inf.; 5161 Pte. Marmo, J. J., Inf.; 1958 Pte. Marron, O. J., Inf.; 1940 Pte. Marsh, 8., Inf.; 3079 Sgt. Marshall, R. W., Inf.; 6949 Sgt. Marshall, W? Inf.; 3070 Pte. Martin, E., Inf.; 5057 Pte. Mason, C. W.; Inf.; 2785 Cpl. Mason. J. L., Inf.; 584 Sgt. Massey, T. M., Inf.; 18500 Fitt.-Sgt. Maxwell, W. A. W., Fd. Arty.; 3316 Pte. McArthur, A., A.M.C.; 2609 Sgt. McArthur, T. A., Inf.; 6127 Pte. McCaffrey, F? Inf.; 657 Sgt. McCafferty, J., Fd. Arty.; 32298 Gnr. (T./​Bmdr.) McCallum, H. 8., Fd. Arty.; 1600 Sgt. McDougall, N. A., Inf.; 3549 Spr. McKay, D. C. N? Eng.; 3015 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) McClintock, S., Inf.; 5755 Sgt. McClure, D. T., Inf.; 2730 Cpl. McCrohon, W. C., Inf.; 722 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) McGill. J. B? A.M.C.; 2402 Spr. Mclnerney, P., Eng.; 2367 Pte. McLachlan, H. H., Inf.; 1193 Sgt. McLean, A., Inf.; 59 S.-Sgt. McLennan, A. 8., Inf.; 1885 Sgt. Mc- Lennan, H. G., Inf.; 2378 Sgt. McManus, M. J., Inf.; 2694 Pte. McMartin, E. V., Inf.; 1704 Pte. McNeich. W. H.. Inf.; 2389 Bmdr. McPherson, B? Fd. Arty.; 1716 Cpl. McPherson, D., M.G.C.; 1710 Cpl. Mc�ae, J., Inf.; 135 Pte. Mellish, W. W.. Inf.: 2739 Pte. (L.-Cnl.) Melville. D. J., Inf.; 497 Pte. Midson, A. M., Inf.; 32488 Dvr. Miller, A., Fd. Arty.; 9926 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Miller, H. W.. Eng.; 2358 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Mills, T. J., Inf.: 2637 Pte. Mitchell. A. C., Inf.: 461 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Moore, D. M.. M.G.C.; 1876 Pte. Moore, G. R.. Inf.; 1456 Dvr. Moran. W.. Fd. Arty.; 4561 Pte. Mortimer, A., Inf.: 3595 Pte. Motbey, P. H., Inf.; 2689 Pte. Mounsey, N. J. E., A.M.C.: 1958 a Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Mowat. H. D.. Inf.; 1957 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Mowat. L. M. R.. Inf.; 239 Sgt. Moysey. W. B. T.. M.G.C., 2483 Cpl. Mumme, H. G..' Inf.; 801 Pte. Murphy. G. T? M.G.C. 1885 Pte. Neal. A.. Inf.; 181 Sgt. Neave, A. G. F.. Inf.: 5159 Pte. Nelson, W. A., Inf.; 2904 a Pte. Nickols, S. A.. Inf. 240 Pte. O?Brien, L. G., M.G.C.; 460 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) O?Connor, D.. Inf.: 5893 Pte. O?Grady, P? Inf.: 3860 Pte. O?Neill. H. A. A., Inf.: 3189 Pte. Onions. B. L? Inf.: 1605 Pte. (T./​Cpl.) Ogston, H., M.G.C.; 1793 Pte. O?Loughlin. E. F? Inf.: 2627 Cpl. Orkney. H. S., Eng.; 5945 Pte. Ormiston, F. J., Inf. 3874 Sgt. Page, W. M.. Fd. Arty.; 4440 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Pagram, E. A.. Inf.: 2447 Spr. Palmer, J. H.. Eng.; 7300 Pte, Pardon. E. J., Inf.; 1073 Pte. Patch. V. R? Inf.: 12372 Pte. Patience, D., A.M.C.: 4293 Bdr. Parry. D. G.. Fd. Arty.; 6072 Cpl. Payne, G. E.. Inf.-; 1266 Gnr. Paul, A.. Fd. Arty.; 5889 Pte. Peterson, C.. Inf.; 4884 Sat. Pitcher. B. G., Inf.; 264 Pte. Philin, A. E. V., Inf.: 2819 Pte. Phillips, A. 8.. Inf.: 1805 Sgt. Prescott. J.. Inf.; 291 Pte. (T./​Cnl.) Prentice, G. N.. M.G.C.: 28820 Gnr. Press. P. F., Fd. Arty.; 4111 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Primmer, 1.. Inf.; 3136 Pte. Price. G. F? Inf.: 3200 Pte. Prince, T.. Inf.; 2854 Cpl. Pringle, J. L? Inf.; 676 Pte. (T./​Cpl.) Polkinchorne, S.. Inf.; 3613 Pte. Pontee, F., Inf.: 6319 Cpl. Pound, G. T., L.T.M. By.; 908 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Pully Bank, W. C.. Inf. 22239 By. S.M. Quarry. A. C.. Fd. Arty. 650� Bmdr. Ramsden (D.C.M.). W. H., Fd. Arty.; 1603 Pte. Rankin. D. P.. Inf.: 1926 a Pte. Raymond. F., M.G.C.: 425 a Sgt. Bedford. G. B? M.G.C.: 5457 Pte. (T./​Cpl.) Rees. R.. M.G.C.; 7898 Pte. Reid. J. W.. A.M.C.; 8633 Gnr. Richards, R. E. F.. Fd. Arty.: 5084 a Pte. Richardson, C. N.. Inf.; 2021 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Richardson. J.. A.M.C.; 2143 a Pte. Riddle. G. H? Inf.: 6767 Pte. Riley, J. G. 8., A.M.C.; 7787 a Pte. Rindberg. A., Inf.; 10340 Cnl. Ripper. J. H., Eng.: 1808 Cnl. Robb, G., Inf.: 31376 Gnr. Roberts, T. H.. Fd. Arty.; 2522 Cpl. Robbins, D.C.M.. W. F? Inf.: 6391 Pte. Robinson. S. W., Inf.; 2487 Set. Rollins, B. W.. Inf : 2871 Pte. Rose. H.. Inf.: 560 Pte. CL.-Cpl.l Rose, R. C.. Inf.: 14233 Spr. Rutherford. H.. Fn<r 2019 Pte. Sadler. J. R.. Inf.; 5406 pte. (L.-Cpl.) Savage. E. G? Inf.; 1082 Pte. (L.-Cnl.) Schuhmacher, macher, E. T? Inf.; 3161 Sgt. Seal. G. C., Inf.; 1254 Cpl. See, G. E., Inf.; 2386 Pte. (T./​Cpl.) Seton, C., Pnrs.; 32108 Dvr. Shardlow, F. P., Fd. Arty.; 19935 Dvr. (A./​Bdr.) Sheehy, M.C., Fd. Arty.; 4514 Pte. Shortt, H. G., Inf.; 2160 Pte. Skugar, G. M., Inf.; 7315 Pte. Sloan, R. A., Inf.; 12764 Pte. (L-.Cpl.) Sloane, W., A.M.C.; 365 Cpl. Simcock, J. C., Fd. Arty.; 6261 2nd Cpl. Sims, A. V., Eng.; 1894 Gnr. Smith, A., Fd. Arty.; 984 Sgt. Smith, A. E., Inf.; 2645 Pte. Smith, E. A. G., Inf.; 2526 Dvr. Smith, J. A., M.G.C.; 2661 Pte. Smith, L. F., M.G.C.; 5202 Pte Smith, M., Inf.; 17160 Gnr. Smith, S. M., Fd. Arty.; 130 Pte. Snell, T. F., Inf.; 2074 Gnr. Southam, A., Fd. Arty.; 6137 Pte. Spry, J. 8., Inf.; 93 Sgt. Stanford, E. C., Inf.; 3006 Pte. Stevenson, E., Inf.; 2998 Spr. Strahan, L. J., Eng.; 1349 Cpl. Stuart, W. G. R., Inf.; 343 Pte. Sturgess, G. S., Inf.; 3476 Pte. Sundstrom, G., Inf.; 2825 Dvr. Sutton, H. W., A.S.C.; 6644 Pte. Swanson, K., Inf.; 4007 Sgt. Sweetnam, R., Inf.; 25644 Gnr. Swift, J., Fd. Arty.; 22286 Sgt. Sylvane, J., T.M. By. 3162 Sgt. Tandy, J. T. Inf.; 7359 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Tardent, E. A., Inf.; 1008 Pte. Taylor, P. H., Inf.; 2461 Pte. Taylor, R. E? Inf.; 796 Cpl. Thomas, J., Pnrs.; 2467 Pte. Thomas, R. J., Inf.; 2424 Pte. Thomas, W. N., Inf.; 5445 Pte. Thompson, son, G. J. 8., Inf.; 7111 Pte. Thomson, H. L., Inf.; 2845 Spr. Thomson, J. C., Engrs.; 4630 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Thorpe, A. S., Inf.; 4227 Pte. Thorpe, J., Inf.; 1266 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Tilden, J. W., Inf.; 10899 Spr. Titchbon, H. G., Eng.; 2786 Pte. Toft, A. S., Inf.; 609 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Treloar, R. C., M.G.C.; 3665 Pte. Tucker, C. H., Inf.; 20263 Sgt. Tuckfleld, C. W., Fd. Arty.; 13013 Pte. Tuffy, H. J., A.M.C. 3665 Gnr. Veale, C. R. J., Fd. Arty.; 3038 Pte. Verrall, F. H? Inf. 18369 Dvr. Wagstaff, G. D. A., A.M.C.; 3732 Pte. Waite, W., Inf.; 3736 Pte. Wallace, J., Inf.; 1255 Cpl. (T./​Sgt.) Walsh, J., M.G.C.; 3900 Spr. Wardop, J. H? Eng.; 6606 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Warner, A., Inf.; 16564 2nd Cpl. Watts, C., Eng.; 783 Cpl. Watt, J. G., Inf.; 2726 Pte. Watson, C. J. J., Pnrs.; 1302 Dvr. Watson, J., Fd. Arty.; 1035 Sgt. Watson, S. J., Fd. Arty.; 2376 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Weaver, R? Inf,; 6614 Cpl. Webb, L. A., Inf.; 304 a Cpl. Weir, T.?, Inf.; 2953 Gnr. West, R., Fd. Arty.; 4121 Pte. Weston, P. M., Inf.; 48 Spr. Wheildon, A. W., Eng.; 4623 Cpl. Whiting, F. W., Inf.; 2413 Pte. Wilkie, R? Inf.; 236 Cpl. Wilson, J. S., M.G.C.; 10014 Pte. Wilson, J. J. C., Eng.; 3684 Pte. Wilson, R. A., Inf.; 2438 Pte. Wilson, W. H., M.G.C.; 2925 Pte. (T./​Cpl.) Williams, A. 8., Inf.; 7111 Pte. Williams, T. G., Inf.: 2284 Pte. Williamson, A., Inf.; 1651 Cpl. Willoughby, I. J., Inf.; 3448 Pte. Winchester, R. H., Pnrs.; 1929 Dvr. Windsor, S., Fd. Arty. ; 964 Pte. Winter, D., Inf.; 2193 Cpl. (L./​Sgt.) Woodbine, D., Inf.; 5782 Pte. Work, J. D., Pnrs. 21492 Cpl. Yates, J. F., Fd. Arty. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the following awards to the undermentioned Officers and Warrant rant Officers in recognition of their gallantry lantry and devotion to duty in the Field: ? Awarded a Second Bar to the Distinguished Service Order. Lieut.-Col. Norman Marshall, D.5.0., M.C., A.I.F. ?For conspicuous gallantry in the handling of his battalion. Between Ist and 3rd September, 1918, he captured the greater part of Peronne, after fierce enemy opposition, personally organising the attack on the ramparts and the mopping-up ping-up of the town. Through his splendid energy and example to his men the town was held, and three guns and about 600 prisoners captured by his battalion. (D.S.O. gazetted 19th November, 1917; Bar gazetted 16th September, 1918.)
  • War Honours for the A.I.F. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of the Distinguished tinguished Conduct Medal to the undermentioned mentioned Non-commissioned Officers and Men for gallantry and distinguished service in the Field: ? The Distinguished Conduct Medal. 528 C.S.M. R. Scanlon, M.M., Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When a runner from battalion headquarters quarters was wounded as he was approaching ing company headquarters, this warrant officer went to his assistance under a very heavy fire of snipers and machine guns, and carried him to a place of safety, thereby by securing delivery of an important message. On the next day, when an officer was wounded and the stretcher-bearers who attempted to approach him were obliged to desist, the stretcher being knocked to pieces by the heavy fire of the enemy, this warrant officer went out and reached the officer, dressed his wounds, and carried him fifty yards to a place of shelter. The example of this fine act of self-sacrificing courage had a most marked effect on his men. 1579 Sgt. A. H. Seccombe, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. By his complete disregard for his own safety and fine example to his men he did much towards successfully holding a captured tured position, which he had taken and consolidated, solidated, with the platoon he commanded when its officer had become a casualty. He repelled three strong counter-attacks, and, though wounded in the face, he remained on duty till relieved. 349 Pte. W. T. Thomson, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Selecting the route with great skill and judgment, he led a fighting patrol which was sent forward to attack an enemy post and obtain identification. When the enemy wire was encountered, he broke his way through with his hands and led the rush on the post. Though wounded, he continued tinued to fight, and captured one of the enemy. Though exhausted with loss of blood, he was the last man to leave the position, and with great courage covered the withdrawal of the remainder of the party. On the same evening he, with a N.C.0., volunteered to bring in a wounded officer, whom they reached after crossing some 600 yards of, ground swept by machine-gun fire, and brought back safely to the R.A.P., having carried him about a mile under fire. He set a fine example of courage and endurance to all his comrades. 4619 Cpi. J. F. Walters, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an attack on an enemy position, which resulted in the capture of a strong point, he behaved with great gallantry and rendered valuable assistance to bis platoon commander, whom he replaced when the former was wounded, until another officer arrived. Later on he advanced and bombed an enemy machine-gun, which was causing many casualties to our men and put it out of action. His conduct and example greatly? helped to secure the success of the operation. tion. 1634 C.S.M. R. Werrett, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack when he led a party against a hostile post with the greatest courage and determination. The post was demolished and twenty-eight prisoners captured, tured, thus allowing the company to carry out its work of consolidation. After the objective had been taken he rendered invaluable able assistance to his C.O. in the organisation tion of working parties and defensive posts, and personally led carrying parties. 307 Sgt. (now 2nd Lieut.) E. V. White, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion tion to duty. During an attack this N.C.0., who was in charge of the advance party of his platoon, led them with great gallantry lantry against a machine-gun post, which he captured, taking the gun and accounting for all the gunners. He then collected his party and proceeded, with the greatest dash, to occupy the objective which had been assigned to them. He brought up a Lewis gun, which he disposed with much judgment ment to help in overcoming the last elements ments of the enemy?s resistance, and then went out under heavy rifle fire to help in selecting positions for the outposts. Throughout the day he showed fine qualities ties of judgment and cool determination, which inspired his mbn with great confidence. dence. 1754 Pte. C. Wollin, Infy.?For conspicuos spicuos gallantry and devotion to duty. This man volunteered as a stretcher-bearer to a raiding party, and soon after starting the other bearer became a casualty. During the next four hours he worked with the greatest gallantry and devotion to duty, under heavy fire, single-handed, bringing in the casualties, his work being rendered peculiarly difficult as the standing crops in No-man?s Land made it necessary to search for casualties at times right up to the enemy?s wire. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of a Bar to the Military Medal to the undermentioned Non-commissioned Officers and Men : Awarded a Bar to the Military Medal. 2493 Sgt. R. B. Batton M.M., Inf.; 425 Sgt. P. Mortimer, M.M., Inf.; 1942 Pte. E. W. Hargreave, M.M., Inf.; 3797 L.-Cpl. A. G. C. Gledhill, M.M., Inf.; 5895 Bomdr. E. Sedgwick, M.M., F.A.; 3295 Sgt. G. Fitzgerald, M.M., Inf.; 160 Pte. (L.-Cpl ) T. Gorman. M.M.. Inf.; 1518 Pte. W. C. Gray, M.M., Inf.; 6362 L.-CpL D. W. Johnson, M.M., Inf.; 2333 Sgt. C. G. Bishop, D.C.M., M.M., Inf.; 117 Cpl. L. T. Binns, M.M., Inf.; 10011 Cpl. (A./​Sgt.) E. J. Auckett, M.M., F.A.; 762 Pte. A. Hall, M.M., Inf. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of the Military Medal for bravery in the Field to the undermentioned Non-commissioned Officers and Men : Awarded the Military Medal. 4129 Pte. W. F. Allan, Inf.; 2340 Pte. (T./​Cpl.) H. A. Allen, Inf.; 3243 Cpl. W. L. G. Armstrong, Inf.; 805 Cpl. (L.-Sgt.) R. F. Arnold, Inf.; 7324 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) F. G. Barton, Aust. A.M.C.; 2289 Pte. W. Baxter, Inf.; 761 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) S. W. Beckwith, Inf.; 4512 Pte. F. J. A. Bent, Inf.; 1634 Sgt. R. H. Bird, Aust. A.S.C.; 2116 Pte. A. H. Blackmore, Inf.; 4363 Pte. J. W. Biankenberg Inf.; 4983 Cpl. (L.-Sgt ) C. Blatchforth, Inf.; 14655 Fitt. (A./​Bomdr.') A. Borneman, Aust. F.A.; 29470 Sgt. G. M. Brown, Aust. F.A.; 702 Pte. R. L. Brown, Inf.; 308 Sgt. J. Bruggy, Inf.; 3255 Gnr. (A./​Bomdr.) L. C. Brydon, Aust. F.A.; 5675 Pte. C. H. Carrington, Inf.; 965 Sgt. J. L. Clark, Aust. M.G. Corps; 29048 Gnr. H. C. Cobcroft, croft, Aust. F.A.; 31369 Gnr. S. P. W. Cockburn, Aust. F.A.; 4388 Sgt. J. M. Collery, Inf.; 7161 T./​Sgt. A. A. Cook, Aust. F.A.; 4548 Gnr. E. M. Corrigan, Inf.; 2148 Dvr. W. E. Cousens, Inf.; 1789 Pte. J. .1. Craigie, Inf.; 7345 Pte. B. Crockenberg, berg, Inf.; 322 Dvr. W. N. Crosson, A.A.S.C.; 1144 Sgt. B. E. Cruikshank, Inf.; 1904 Pte. G. F. Cunningham, Inf.; 2354 Spr. (L.-Cpl.) C. Curling, Aust. E.; 4179 Pte. E. Dagg, Inf.; 11052 Gnr. (A./​Bomdr.) E. W. Denniss, Aust. F.A.; 1611 a Sgt. W. D. Dickson, D.C.M., Inf.; 5342 Pte. J. T. Douglas, Inf.; 706 Pte. R. C. Downing, Inf.; 6537 Pte. E. Dunkinson, Inf.; 98a Spr. T. P. Dunne, Aust. E.; 2055 Sgt. C. I. Ebbrell, Inf.; 1197 Pte. (A./​Cpl.) M. Elder, Inf.; 4699 Pte. J. Ellison, Inf.; 151 Cpl. G. C. Farnham, D.C.M., Aust. L.T.M. By.; 54 Coy. Q M.Sgt. C. Fincham, Aust. M.G. Corps: 485 Dvr. H. R. N. Forcus, Inf.; 113 Pte. L. K. T. Fry, Inf.; 457 Sgt. H. H. Gellard, Inf.; 3795 Pte. N. Giles, Inf.; 6561 Pte. A. R. Goss, Inf.; 5017 Cpl. A. W. Gould, Inf.; 4783 Pte. L. W. Greenleaf, Inf.; 1974 Bomdr. A. R. Gunson, Aust. F.A.; 2381 Cpl. W. E. Hansen, Inf.; 62 Dvr. B. Hardner, Inf.; 4045 Sgt. S. M. Harvey, Inf.; 1762 L.-Cpl. T Haydon, Inf.; 1405 Cpl. E. B. Hayward, Aust. F.A.; 2368 Spr. J. H. Hellewell, Aust. E.; 4428 Gnr. N. Hodges, Aust. F.A.; 2380 Pte R. Holloway, Inf.; 2162 Cpl. C. Holm, D.C.M., Inf.; 1959 Pte. C. Holt, Inf.; 2871 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) A. Hoskin, Inf.; 7266 L.-Cpl. X. Howard, Inf.; 1632 Cpl. A. Howarth, Aust. A.S.C.; 1960 Pte. J. A. Hubble, Inf.; 1706 Pte. H. L. Jenkins, Inf.; 3518 Sgt. A. L. Jennings, Inf.: 1915 L.-Cpl. M. D. Jinks, Inf.; 2402 Cpl. E. E. Johnson, Aust. M.G. Corps; 6837 Pte. (L.- Cpl.) J. S. Kennett, Inf.; 362 Sgt. R. King, Inf.; 6340 Pte. S. J. Kitchener, Inf.; 714 a. Pte. R. P. Knight, Inf.; 6109 Pte. E. Konza, Inf.; 4478 Cpl. J. Lambert, Inf.; 472 Dvr. C. W. L. Leahey, Aust. Pnr.; 1987 Gnr. A. Ley, Aust. F.A. ; 3338 Gnr. A. Lindsay, Aust. F.A.; 2285 Sgt. J. J. Luck. Inf.; 5873 L-Cpl. A. F. Lynas, Inf.; R/​20 Sgt. J. A. S. Lyon, Inf.; 2058 Dvr. T. J. Lyttle, Aust. A.S.C.; 336b Pte. F. D. Maher, Inf.; 2205 Pte. M. J. Maher, Aust. L.T.M. By.; 1044 Cpl. (L.-Sgt.) S. Mahoney, Inf.; 5811 L. J. Marsh, Inf.; 1384 Dvr. A. E. Mattson, Inf.; 6401 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) J. P. McCall, Inf. ; 14121 Bomdr. N. McGinty, Aust. F.A.; 2950 Gnr. J. McNulty, M.T.M. By.; 3080 Stg. C. Metcalf, Aust. A.S.C.; 5368 Pte. G. Milliken. Inf.; 7437 Sgt. W. J. Mitchell, Inf.; 1678 Dvr. W. H. Moroney, Aust. A.S.C.; 2413 Pte. T. H. Morris, Inf.; 3181 Pte. M. Musgrave, Inf.; 6088 Cpl. T. M. Nicholls, Inf.; 1879 L.-Cpl. W. W. Nichols, Aust. L.T.M. By.; 1978 Sgt. G. P. Nolan, Inf.; 5382 Pte. (L.-Cpl ) W. W. Nuttall, Inf.; 818 Cpl. (L.-Sgt.) D. P. Oiiver, Inf.: 6380 Pte. E. B. Olsen, Inf.; 963 Sgt. J. L. Partridge, Inf.; 1859 Pte. W. Posstoors, Aust. L.T M. By.; 2454 Pte. G. R. Peacock, Inf.; 6089 Pte. F. W. Perkins, Inf.; 2760 a L.-Cpl. J. H. Phillips. Inf.; 6607 Pte. W. H. Phillips, Inf.; 2765 a Sgt. E. A. Pullen, Inf.; 871 Gnr. H. W. Purnell, Aust. F.A.; 7328 Pte. F. T. C. Reynolds, Inf.; 2252 Pte. V. J. Rocklifl, Inf.; 2562 Sgt O. B. Rustand, Inf.; 8671 Sgt. J. A. Ryan, Inf.; 4034 Pte. L. R. Saltmarsh, Inf.; 5873 Pte. R. C. Scotland, Inf.; 6357 Cpl. (L.-Sgt.) H. R. Scott, Inf.; 4227 Pte. R. Scott, Inf.; 4062 Gnr. T. Sikes, Aust. F.A.; 213 a Pte. 8. C. Sinclair, Inf.; 597 L.-Cpl. A. J. Smith, Inf.; 876 Sgt. J. C. Smith, Aust. F.A.; 2004 Cpl. J. O. Smith, Inf.; 4774 Pte. P. E. Smith, Inf.; 1403 Pte. S. N. Smith, Inf.; 690 Sgt. W. G. Speechley, Inf.; 4542 Pte. V. E. Splatt, Inf.; 377 Gnr. E. A. Spring, Aust. F.A.; 3153 Pte. W. H. Stafford, Inf.; 2062 L.-Cpl. E. R. Stewart, Inf.; 13972 Pte. J. Sturrock, Aust. A.M.C.; 2396 Sgt. H P. Swift, Inf.; 27964 Dvr. R. Swinton, Aust. FA.; 2203 Pte. F. Taylor, Inf.; 291 Pte. J. Taylor, Inf.; 24 Pte. P. Turley, Inf. ; 343 Cpl. A. Y. E. Turner, Aust. M.G. Corps; 35085 Gnr. J. A. Wallace, Aust. F A.; 5469 Spr. F. L. Ward, Aust. B.; 606 Sgt. W. Waters, Inf.; 564 Dvr. G. T. Watkins, Inf.; 3509 Cpl. J. A. Watt, Inf.; 281 Pte. S. Watts, Aust. M.G. Corps; 2403 Pte. R. Whiddon, Inf.; 1887 Cpl. R. V. Wild, Inf.; 1647 Cpl. L. M. Williams, Aust. L.T.M. By.; 1168 Cpl. S. L. Williams, D C.M., Inf.; 6171 Pte. C. C. Wilson, Inf.; 5242 Pte. E. J. Wilson, Inf. ; 208 Gnr. G. W. Wilson, Aust. F.A.; 3956 Pte. G. Winter, Inf.; 6166 Cpl. (L.-Sgt.) N. F. Woolston, Inf.; 2242 L.-Cpl. W. V. Wright, Inf. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the following awards to the undermentioned Officers and Warrant Officers in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field:? Awarded a Bar to the Distinguished Service Order. Lieut.*Col. Terence Patrick McSharry, C.M.G., D.5.0., M.C., Infy.?For great gallantry and decisive action during an attack. When the battalion was held up by an enemy strong point, which the artillery lery and tanks had missed, the situation for a time was critical, as the barrage was gradually moving onwards and the battalion lion was subjected to heavy machine-gun fire. He at once pushed on to the leading company, where his presence and prompt actions resulted in the capture of the position. tion. When the final objective was gained he supervised the consolidation and reorganisation organisation under heavy machine-gun fire. (D.S.O. gazetted 4th June, 1917.) Awarded the Distinguished Service Order. Capt. Forbes Campbell Dawson, M.C., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and a fine display of tactical skill during an attack over difficult ground covered with undergrowth and deep shell-holes, many of which the enemy ha ?* turned into machinegun gun posts. He mopped up each post and secured his objective, accounting for 50 killed, 30 prisoners and 10 machine-guns. Though wounded he remained at duty for 46 hours. All the captured guns were at once mounted, turned on the enemy, and kept in action during the fight, materially assisting in repelling enemy counterattacks. attacks. Capt. William James Dalton Lynas, M.C., Inf. ; ?For remarkable courage and leadership during an attack. He supervised vised the placing of the men on the ? jumping ing off ? line, and though wounded in t�wo places just after zero, he nevertheless led his company to the assault. He was then again wounded, but refused to go back until the position was taken. Of seven machine-guns and four trench mortars captured by his company, he took several himself, and personally inflicted many casualties on the enemy. Major Roy Stanley McLeisb, Mtd. R.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He displayed great courage and initiative in carrying out the difficult task of reconnoitring in front of the infantry and holding a forward position until relieved. lieved. In this and subsequent operations his fine leadership and sound judgment were conspicuous. Lieut. James Basil Minchin, M.C., Infy. ?For conspicuously gallant conduct during an attack. He led his platoon on the first enemy positions and personally killed one officer and several other men, capturing in all one officer, twenty other ranks, one machine-gun and one heavy minenwerfer. In his advance he next rushed a machinegun gun nest, killing six of the enemy (two of whom he accounted for personally), and capturing the balance of the crews' and guns. Then, discovering his company commander had been killed, he assumed command and brilliantly completed the task assigned to the company. Awarded a Bar to the Military Cross. Lieut. Cecil Arthur Auchterlonie, M.C., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry during an attack on the enemy trenches. His company commander becoming a casualty, he assumed command and led his men forward most gallantly, being the first into the objective and killing several of the enemy. When it was known that the enemy were making for a counter-attack he went forward and brought back information mation as to their numbers and position, and then brought Lewis gun-lire to bear on them, inflicting many casualties. Throughout the operation he showed great courage and initiative. (M.C.. gazetted 24th September, 1918.) Capt. Vernon Carlisle Brown, M.C., A.M. Corps.?For great courage and resource source in evacuating wounded from a forward area. The routes were being heavily shelled, and he established bearer relay posts in suitable' positions after a full reconnaissance of the ground. During the whole operation his perseverance and initiative contributed largely to a quick evacuatiorf of the wounded, while his energy and example stimulated the men. (M.C. gazetted 19th November, 1917.) Lieut. Reginald William Sampson, M.C., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion tion to duty. He led a patrol of four to reconnoitre a farm which was to be raided later. While doing so his party discovered an enemy post, which they rushed, killing two and capturing seven of the enemy, and then returned. Later, when ordered to take the farm, he led his men brilliantly, working up on the flank and rushing and occupying the farm. He then successfully dealt with three machine-gun posts on his right, himself leading a party against one and capturing five of the enemy and a gun. (M.C. gazetted 18th June, 1917.) Lieut. Howard Wilson Scudds, M.C., Infy,?For conspicuous gallantry and determination termination in leading his platoon forward to the attack. By good leadership and skilful handling he quickly reached his objective and inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy. Later, with one of his platoon, he moved forward again and captured a machine-gun and five prisoners. (M.C. gazetted 19th November, 1917.) Awarded the Military Cross. Lieut. Edward James Archer, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and quickness of perception ception in dealing with an enemy post, which put up a strong resistance with bombs and machine-gun lire. Having located the post on a daylight reconnaissance, sance, he led forward a party of six and succeeded in killing nine of the enemy and taking two prisoners and a machine-gun, which were brought in under heavy fire from other enemy posts. Lieut. Arnold Baker, Infy.?During an attack he led a bombing party with the greatest gajjantry and determination. In face of heavy fire he personally captured a machine-gun, shooting three of the crew. After establishing a block in the captured trench, he made a daring reconnaissance forward, and finding better tactical ground he returned for his platoon and occupied it, capturing another machine-gun at the same time. He showed great courage and initiative. Capt. Isaac Manly Barrow, A.A.M.C.? Under heavy fire he dressed wounded in an open trench, and when the battalion attacked he advanced with them and established lished his dressing station behind the front line. When two of his bearers were wounded carrying a casualty, he dashed forward under direct machine-gun fire to their assistance. Later, he was severely wounded. Throughout the operations he showed conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Capt. George Albert Blumer, Aust. A.M. Corps.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When the R.A.P. was heavily shelled, a direct hit causing casualties ties amongst the staff, he succeeded, singlehanded, handed, in getting the wounded away, and attended to many cases in the area of the bombardment. Throughout the period his courage and determination saved many lives.
  • War Honours for 'the A.I.F. His Majesty thq King has been graciously pleased to confer the undermentioned award on the following Warrant Officers, Non-commissioned Officers and Men:? Awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. 2256 Sgt. F. P. Weisheit, Inf.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an attack on enemy trenches this N.C.0., with his party, rushed a defence post, capturing two machine-guns with their crews. He also dealt with several dug-outs, entering them with total disregard regard of danger, and brought in thirty prisoners. His determination and offensive sive spirit were invaluable ifi this attack. 653 L.=​Cpl. W. N. Whittard, Inf.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This N.C.O. was in charge of a party of signallers moving forward with the front wave to establish a forward communication tion post. When held up by a machinegun, gun, he dashed at it alone, shot three and bayoneted two of the enemy, and took five prisoners. On reaching the objective, he personally ran out lines to all the companies, panies, under heavy fire, and maintained communication throughout the day by his energy in repairing breaks. 3968 Sgt. E. A. Williams, Inf. ?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During the march to the jumping-off tape this N.C.O. directed and controlled his platoon with great coolness when it got into a heavy barrage and brought it through without loss. In attacking the second objective, when rifle and machinegun gun fire checked, the platoon, he rallied his men and dashed forward, causing the enemy to surrender. He set a remarkable example to his men. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of the following to the undermentioned Non-commissioned missioned Officers and Men : Bar to the Military Medal. 263 Sgt. A. H. Armstrong, M.M., Inf.; 90 Sgt. S. Sargeant, M.M., Inf. (M.M.?s gazetted 26th May, 1917.) 1669 Sgt. S. R. Bagnall, M.M., Inf. (M.M. gazetted 9th July, 1917.) 635 A./​Sgt. W. E. L. J. Warland, M.M., L.T.M. By. (M.M. gazetted 17th December, 1917.) 318 Cpl. (L.-Sgt.) D. P. Oliver, M.M., Inf. (M.M. gazetted 7th October, 1918.) 3647 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) H. F. Browne, M.M., Inf.; 34 Pte. J. Anderson, M.M., A.M.C. (M.M.?s gazetted 21st October. 1918.) His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of the Military Medal for bravery in the Field to the undermentioned Warrant Officers, Noncommissioned commissioned Officers and Men : The Military Medal. 2878 Pte. Adams, E. A.; 3454 Cpl. Ambler, H.; 5030 Pte. (T./​Cpl.) Anderson, D. C.; 5488 Pte. (T./​Cpl.) Anderson, B.; 4730 Cpl. Anderson, W.; 1074 Pte. Angus, C.; 3511 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Arnold, W. E.; 4979 Pte. Ashton, W. G.; 2568 Pte. Atkinson, C. B.; 771 Cpl. Bagley, C. L.; 6721 Pte. Baker, W. G. T.; 6891 Pte. Ball, G.; 165 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Barnes, A. E.; 711 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Battese, C. H.; 9412 Pte. Blinman, J. C.; 5968 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Buckle, S. A.; 5104 Pte. Burdett, H. W. E.; 1982 Pte. Bye, P. A.; 2778 Pte. Carpenter, A. A.; 499 Pte. Catton, J.; 3210 Cpl. Collett, C. T.; 3563 Pte. (T./​Cpl.) Cooney, R.; 1495 Pte. Coverdale, J. A. V. L.; 1991 Pte. Crawford, ford, D.; 2132 Pte. Darrach, A. T.; 6436 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Donohue, J.; 2915 Pte. Doyle, T.; 2929 Spr. Ellis, L.; 27 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Emmerson, A. E. ; 2178 Pte. Farrar, L., 4693 Pte. Featherstone, J.; 3836 Pte. Forrest, A.; 3287 Sgt. Fox, J. J.; 4417 Pte. Garr, G.; 3326 Cpl. Gibbs, O. R.; 4287 Spr. Gill, E. H. G.; 1921 Sgt. Greening, W.; 1677 Cpl. Haines, J. W.; 1110 Pte. Hobson, O.; 3666 Pte. Homan, A.; 3158 a Pte. Hughes, F. J.; 2132 Gnr. Hughes, W. J.; 1147 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Humphreys, J. W.; 4292 Pte. Hyde, D. W.; 4119 Sgt. Jaques, R. F.; 1114 Pte. Jarvis, R. W.; 2696 Pte. Jones, W. V.; 5395 Sgt. Keith, C. J.; 3335 Sgt. Kenny, W. J. (D.C.M.); 350 Cpl. Kimberley, G. J. C.; 2939 Pte. King, G. L.; 906 Cpl. Kitchen, S.; 463 Cpl. Laing, J. W.; 1320 Pte. Lambert, B. L.; 4551 Cpl. (T./​Sgt. Leslie, A.; 269 Sgt. Lochens, W.; 4324 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Logan, J. C.; 2171 Cpl. Lowcock, E.; 7968 M.T. Dvr. Maiden, W. R.; 2943 a Pte. Maisey, R. T.; 6352 Pte. Marks, C. H.; 4842 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) McArdle, R. F.; 3679 Pte. McCaflerty, R. P.; 886 Sgt. McConnell, J.; 2117 Pte. McDermott, W. A. L.; 297 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) McDonald, A. P.; 299 C.Q.M.S. MeFerran, H.; 3593 Sgt. McGovern, T. J.; 495 Pte. Milgate, P.; 5383 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Morey, H. H.; 26317 Gnr. Neville, J. J.; 2217 Pte. Newland, A. G.; 4154 Pte. Nicholls, R. W.; 608 Spr. O?Connell, J. P.; 5089 Pte. Olsen, O.; 5167 Cpl. Olsen, W. H.; 914 Cpl. Parker, J.; 1718 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Phipps, A. G.; 2134 Pte. Player, W.; 4245 Cpl. Quinn, T. J.; 334 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Rankin, F. T.; 3603 Pte. Rawlings, W. R.; 1741 C.Q.M.S. Rayner, W. R.; 5100 Pte. Reed, H.; 1220 Sgt. Reedy, J. T.; 546 a Pte. Reilly, E. J.; 3611 Cpl. Robinson, C. C.; 2742 Pte. Rodger, J. W.; 2789 Sgt. Ross, J.: 148 Pte. Sanders, W. R.; 1513 Cpl. Schafer, O. H.; 5402 Cpl. (L.-Sgt.) Schinkel, H. O.; 1228 Pte. Scothern, B.; 3426 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Scullin, E. A.; 4858 Spr. Semple, J.; 2371 Sgt. Sinclair, W. L.; 152 Pte. Slingo, H.; 3422b Cpl. (T./​Sgt.) Smith, F. O. C.: 1173 Pte. Snoxall, J. D.; 3434 Pte. Spratt, A. J.; 2989 Pte. Standley, H. J.; 1675 Pte. Sturtevant, J. R.; 3010 Cpl. (L.-Sgt.) Swaffleld, J. B.; 5111 Pte. Tobin, C.; 2743 Pte. Tuite, T.; 3460 Cpl. Twyford, H. A.; 4244 a Pte. Uridge, H. S.; 1980 Pte. Utting, C.; 2093 Cpl. Vaughan, T.; 637 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) Wade, W. J.; 797 Pte. Warne, R.; 454 Pte. Whitehead, F.; 370 Pte. Williams, G.: 653 Sgt. Woosham, F. W.; 3321 Pte. Wright. L.: 2924 Pte. (T./​Cpl.) Young, J. E. v The following? are the correct descriptions tions of Non-Commissioned Officers and Men whose names have appeared in the London Gazette for the award of the Military Medal:? Bar to Military Medal. London Gazette dated 4th February. 1918. 1706 Pte. H. L. Jenkins, M.M., I.F. (Gazetted as Military Medal.) Military Medal. London Gazette, dated 28th January, 1918. 1046 Sgt. G. D. Gorry, F.A. London Gazette dated 4th February, 1918. 1908 Sgt. P. Brown, Inf. London Gazette, dated 16th July, 1918. 2337 Fitt. H. J. F. Bottrill, F.A. (Gazetted as Botterell.) London Gazette, dated 29th August, 1918. 7085 Pte. A. D. Watson, I.F. London Gazette dated 13th September, 1918. 329 Sgt. R. L. Malseed, L.H., attd. Inf. 278 A./​L.-Cpl. F. H. Cassells, M.G. Corps. (Gazetted as Cassels.) 4926 Pte. F. Strong, A.I.F. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of the Victoria Cross to the undermentioned Officers, Non-commissioned Officers and Men: ? Awarded the Victoria Cross. Lieut. Edgar Thomas Towner, M.C., M.G. Corps.?For most conspicuous bravery, initiative and devotion to duty on Ist September, 1918, in the attack on Mont St. Quentin, near Peronne, when in charge of four Vickers guns. During the early stages of the advance he located and captured, single-handed, an enemy machinegun gun which was causing casualties, and by turning it on the enemy inflicted severe losses. Subsequently, by the skilful, tactical handling of his guns, he cut off and captured tured twenty-five of the enemy. Later, by fearless reconnaissance under heavy fire, and by the energy, foresight and promptitude with which he brought fire to bear on various enemy groups, he gave valuable support to the infantry advance. Again, when short of ammunition, he secured an enemy machine-gun, which he mounted and fired in full view of the enemy, causing the enemy to retire further, and enabling our infantry to advance. Under intense fire, although wounded, he maintained the fire of this gun at a very critical period. During the following night he steadied and gave valuable support to a small detached post, and by his coolness and cheerfulness inspirited the men in a great degree. Throughout the night he kept close watch by personal reconnaissance on the enemy movements, and was evacuated exhausted hausted thirty hours after being wounded. The valour and resourcefulness of Lieut. Towner undoubtedly saved a very critical situation, and contributed largely to the success of the attack. Lieut. Lawrence Dominic McCarthy, A.I.F. ?For most conspicuous bravery, initiative and leadership on the morning of the 23rd August, 1918, in attack near Madame Wood, east of Vermandovillers (north of Chaulnes). Although the objectives of his battalion were attained without serious opposition, the battalion on the left flank was heavily opposed by well-posted machine-guns. Lieut. McCarthy, realising the situation, at once engaged the nearest machine-gun post, but still the attacking troops failed to get forward. This officer then determined to attack the nearest post. Leaving his men to continue the fire fight, he, with two others, dashed across the open and succeeded ceeded in reaching the block. Although single-handed, as he had his comrades, and despite serious opposition and obstacles, he captured the gun and continued to fight his way down the trench, inflicting heavy casualties, and capturing three more machine-guns. At this stage, being some 700 yards from his starting point, he was joined by one of his men, and together they continued to bomb up the trench until touch was established with an adjoining unit. LieUt. McCarthy, during this most daring advance, single' ' handed killed twenty of the enemy and captured in addition five machine-guns and fifty prisoners. By his gallant and determined action he saved a critical situation, prevented many casualties, and was mainly, if not entirely, responsible for the final objective being taken. 2358 Sgt. Albert David Lowerson, A.I.F. ?For most conspicuous bravery and tactical tical skill on the Ist September, 1918, during the attack on Mont. St. Quentin, north of Peronne, when very strong opposition sition was met with early in the attack, and every foot of ground was stubbornly contested by the enemy. Regardless of heavy enemy machine-gun fire, Sgt. Lowerson moved about fearlessly directing his men, encouraging them to still greater effort, and finally led them on to the objective. tive. On reaching the objective he saw that the left attacking party was held up by an enemy strong post heavily manned with twelve guns. Under the heaviest sniping and machine-gun fire, Sgt. Lowerson rallied seven men as a storming party, and directing them to attack the flanks of the post, rushed the strong point, and by effective bombing captured it, together with twelve machine-guns and thirty prisoners. Though severely wounded in the right thigh, he refused .to leave the front line until the prisoners had been disposed of and the organisation and consolidation of the post had been thoroughly completed. Throughout a week of operations, his leadership and example had a continual influence on the men serving under him, whilst his prompt-and effective ? action at a critical juncture allowed the forward movement ment to be carried on without delay, thus ensuring the success of the attack: 6594 Sgt. Gerald Sexton, A.I.F.?For most conspicuous bravery during the attack near Le Verguier, north-west of St. Quentin, on the 18th September, 1918. During the whole period of the advance, which was very seriously opposed, Sgt. Sexton was to the fore dealing with enemy machine-guns, rushing enemy posts, and performing great feats of bravery and endurance without faltering or for a moment taking* cover. Whep the advance had passed the ridge at Le Verguier, Sgt. Sexton?s attention was directed to a party of the enemy manning a bank, and to a field gun causing casualties and holding up a company. pany. Without hesitation, calling to his section to follow, he rushed down the bank and killed ' the gunners of the field gun. Regardless of machine-gun fire he returned to the bank, and after firing down some dug-outs induced about thirty of the enemy to surrender. When the advance was continued tinued from the first to the second objective the company was again held up by machine guns on the flanks. Supported by another platoon, he disposed of the enemy guns, displaying boldness which inspired all. Later, he again showed the most conspicuous spicuous initiative in the capture of hostile posts .and machine-guns, and rendered invaluable support to his company digging in. 2631 Cpl. Arthur Charles Hall, A.I.F.? For most conspicuous bravery, brilliant leadership and devotion to the operations at Peronne on the Ist and 2nd September, 1918. During the attack on the Ist September a machine-gun post was checking the advance. Single-handed, he rushed the position, shot four of the occupants and captured nine others and two machineguns. guns. Then, crossing the objective with a small party, he afforded excellent covering support to the remainder of the company. Continuously in advance of the main party, he located enemy posts of resistance and personally led parties to the assault. In this way he captured many small parties of prisoners and machine-guns. On the morning of the 2nd September, during a heavy barrage, he carried to safety a comrade who had been dangerously wounded and was urgently in need of medical attention, and immediately returned to his post. The energy and personal courage of this gallant non-commissioned officer contributed buted largely to the success of the opera- , tions, thrpughout which he showed utter disregard of danger and inspired confidence in all. 1876 Pte. (T./​Cpl.) Alexander Henry Buckley, A.I.F.?For most conspicuous bravery and self-sacrifice at Peronne during the operations on l/​2nd September, 1918. After passing the first objective his halfcompany company and part of the company on the ' flank were held up by an enemy machinegun gun nest. With one man he rushed the post, shooting four of the occupants and taking twenty-two prisoners. Later on, reaching a moat, it was found that another machine-gun nest commanded the only available foot-bridge. Whilst this was being engaged from a flank Corporal Buckley endeavoured to cross the ' bridge and rush the post, but was killed in the attempt. Throughout the advance he had displayed great initiative, resource and courage, and by his effort to save his comrades from casualties, he set a fine example of selfsacrificing sacrificing devotion to duty. 6939 Pte. Robert Mactier, A.I.F. ?For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty on the morning of the Ist September, 1918, during the attack on the village of Mt. St. Quentin. Prior to the advance of the battalion, it was necessary to clear up several enemy strong points close to our line. This the bombing patrols sent forward failed to effect, and th# battalion was unable to move. Pte. Mactier single-handed, and in daylight, thereupon jumped out of the trench, rushed past the block, closed with and killed the machine-gun garrison of eight men with his revolver and bombs, and threw the enemy machine-gun over the parapet. Then, rushing forward about twenty yards, he jumped into another strong point held by a garrison of six men, who immediately surrendered. Continuing to the next block through the trench, he disposed of an enemy machine-gun which had been enfilading our flank advancing troops, and was then kilted by another machine-gun at close range. It was entirely due to this exceptional valour and determination of Pte; Mactier that the battalion was able to move on to its ? jumping-off ? trench and carry out the successful operation of capturing the village of Mt. St. Quentin a few hours later. 1584 a Pte. William Matthew Currey, A.I.F, ?For most conspicuous bravery and daring in the attack on Peronne on the morning of Ist September, 1918. When the battalion was suffering heavy casualties from a 77 mm. field gun at very close range, Pte. Currey, without hesitation, tion, rushed forward under intense machine gun fire and succeeded in capturing the gun single-handed after killing the entire crew. Later, when the advance of the left flank was checked by an enemy strong point, Pte. Currey crept around the flank and engaged the post with a Lewis gun. Finally, he rushed the post single-handed, causing many casualties. It was entirely owing to his gallant conduct that the situation tion was relieved and the advance enabled to continue. * Subsequently he 'volunteered to carry orders for the withdrawal of an isolated company, and this he succeeded in doing despite shell and rifle fire, returning later with valuable information. Throughout the operations his striking example of coolness, determination, and utter disregard of danger had a most inspiring spiring effect on his comrades, and his gallant work contributed largely to the success of the operations.
  • War Honours for" the A.I.F. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the following award to the undermentioned Officers and Warrant Officers in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field: ? v Awarded the Military Cross. Capt. Bertram Kenelin Burnie, Mtd. R. ?During our attack he captured a group of enemy machine-guns which were holding ing up our advance. Later, by skilful manoeuvring, he worked round the flank of the enemy, who were resisting with determination, termination, and, though his party had suffered heavy casualties, he forced the enemy to retire and the advance continued. He set a fine example of personal courage, and displayed admirable qualities of leadership. ship. Capt. Richard Scott Carrick, Engrs.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty and ability in pushing forward with a platoon allotted to him for the digging of a strong point. He carried out the work without a protective screen, and, when the assaulting troops closed in to cover the gap in front of his strong point, he went forward ward through heavy shell and machinegun gun fire and pointed out the front line position. Lieut. John Evan Davies, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and endurance while commanding a company during an attack. Although wounded by shell fire at zero hour, he led his men forward and mopped up several machine-gun posts, killing the garrisons. He consolidated on the objective, tive, and, although weak from loss of blood, remained at duty for forty-six hours until relieved. 2nd Lieut. William Victor Diamond, Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry and dash whilst leading his platoon against an enemy position. In face of heavy machinegun gun fire and bombing he successfully gained his objective. Later, he beat off two counter-attacks and killed several of the enemy. He also organised and led parties against enemy posts which were harassing his platoon and holding up the platoon on his flank. He set a fine example of courage and determination. Lieut. Avelyn Clarence Dunhill, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry while in charge of a fighting patrol, when, after an unsuccessful successful attack on an enemy post, he reorganised organised and made a second attempt, bombing and rushing the position. The post was completely mopped up, and a much-needed identification procured. Lieut. Nevinson Willoughby Faulkner, M.M., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. Owing to heavy casualties amongst linesmen men he went out himself three times under heavy fire to repair broken telephone lines. Next night he twice helped to carry rations to the front line, each trip being through heavy enemy barrage. 2nd Lieut. George Edward Gaskell, Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry and leadership. ship. He made several daring reconnaissances sances with small parties, and his patrols during one morning were responsible for the capture of one officer and thirty-one other ranks, besides three machine-guns. He did splendid service. 2nd Lieut. Ernest Either Hitchcock, D.C.M. ?For great gallantry and skill while leading his platoon, which was the centre of an attack, and which met with much opposition. When a frontal assault on a heavily garrisoned enemy strong point was temporarily held up, he split his men into two parties, and, attacking from both flanks and rear, succeeded in gaining his objective. Twice wounded early in the attack, he yet carried on until met by his company commander, who ordered him to the dressing station. Lieut. Francis Patrick Laracy, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and leadership. With a small patrol of four other ranks he surprised and captured various enemy posts, capturing twenty-eight prisoners and four machine-guns. He then reported the situation to his company commander, and, during the main operation that followed lowed he rendered assistance in co-operation by making a further advance, capturing seven prisoners and a machine-gun. With the aid of reinforcements he then linked up with the unit on his right, while the position tion gained was consolidated. Thanks to his splendid patrol work valuable ground was won with slight casualties and with considerable loss to the enemy, Lieut. Claude Ronald Morley, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and leadership. He took out a patrol of four other ranks, and got round in rear of enemy posts, of which there were six in the area with a garrison of four or five men each, and some with machine-guns. With his little party he surprised one post after another and captured tured twenty-five prisoners and four machine-guns, thus enabling the line to be advanced 250 yards. He did splendid service. Lieut. Victor Morton, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He left the lines with eight men to secure an identification. Observing thirty of the enemy working in a trench he led his men to the flank to secure the greatest fire effect. On a signal the covering party opened fire, while he, with his sergeant, rushed to the nearest of the enemy, seized him alive, and brought him back to the lines. Capt. James Kevin Murphy, Infy.?This officer in an attack led his company with most conspicuous gallantry and skill to the first objective, which was a very strongly held position. He personally led a party who destroyed a machine-gun crew. On moving forward again he was severely wounded, but continued his command until he heard that the final objective had been captured. He behaved splendidly, Lieut. Albert Murray, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous daring in dealing with a troublesome some hostile machine-gun. Crawling over No-man?s Land, he entered the enemy?s trench and worked up it for about 150 yards until he located the sentry mounted on the gun. He killed the sentry and captured tured the gun. After bombing a dug-out and killing an officer and four men, he made good his way back with two prisoners. Capt. (T./​Major) Francis Roger North, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion tion to duty during an attack. Though badly shaken by a bursting shell he stuck to duty and led his two attacking companies to their objective. The whole success of the operation was due to the way he handled and organised his command, and throughout out he set a very fine example to those under him. Lieut. Harold Charles Pinsent, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry when his platoon was held up by two machine-guns. He immediately rushed the post, killing two of the enemy, and capturing both guns. The following night he skilfully attacked an enemy post with his platoon, capturing eight prisoners and one machine-gun without out casualties to his men. He showed great courage and first-class leadership. Lieut. Janies Ravie Robb, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. At a critical stage when his men were momentarily held up by heavy bombing from the flank posts he rushed the position with a small party and killed the garrison. Later, at the head of his men, after strenuous fighting, he gained the final objective. He set a splendid example of pluck and enthusiasm to all ranks. Lieut. Frank Sharp, F.A.?As forward observation officer during the attack on and capture of a village he maintained connection nection with battery headquarters with great skill and devotion to duty, in spite of heavy enemy shell fire. One of his party having been very severely wounded, he dressed his wounds with much care under the heavy fire, and,' having found and mended the break in the wire, which the man was repairing when wounded, he carried him to a place of comparative safety, and then returned to his duty. He displayed throughout a disregard of his own safety worthy of the highest praise. Lieut. Sidney James Smith, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry during an attack on enemy trenches. He rushed forward and bombed two machine-guns out of action, which were causing heavy casualties to his platoon. By his fine courage and promptitude tude he saved many lives and set a splendid example to all ranks. Lieut. Percy James Whittaker, Infy.? As signalling officer during an attack he displayed such energy and devotion to duty that within five minutes of the objectives being taken all companies were in telephonic phonic communication with battalion headquarters quarters and with one another. During the whole night he worked unceasingly at his duties, and twice went through heavy barrage to restore communication. He behaved gallantly and set a fine example to those around him. Lieut. Rupert Roy Frederick Willard, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion votion to duty in leading a fighting patrol to capture an enemy strong point. He was the first into the enemy trench, silenced a machine-gun and killed one of the team. Having completed the capture of the post he made his way in daylight across open country and obtained touch with troops on the flanks, apprising his company cofnmander mander of the situation. Lieut. Herbert Duncan Willis, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty while commanding his platoon in an attack. Sixty yards from the jumping-off position he encountered an enemy machinegun gun post, which he rushed, killing an officer and man. He then moved forward through marshy ground and tangled undergrowth growth and mopped up a second machinegun gun post. Finally, he established himself on the final objective, pushed out a battle post, and consolidated the line. Lieut. Alfred Benjamin Reginald Edward Willison, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry during an attack on enemy positions. He led his platoon with great ability -and determination termination and carried two objectives. On taking the final objective he reorganised organised his platoon in such a manner as to strengthen the whole company front. This organisation, under most trying conditions, ditions, was excellent, and his brilliant leadership enabled his platoon to capture and consolidate the objectives with very slight losses. Lieut. Stanley Walton Young, M.M., Infy.?For indominable courage and leadership ship during a raid, when he led his party against two enemy strong posts and mopped them up, he himself killing five of the enemy and putting a machine-gun out of action. After the raid he picked up his sergeant, who had been badly wounded, and carried him back through a regular hail of machine-gun bullets. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the following awards to the undermentioned Non-Commissioned Officers and Men : 2nd Bar to Military Medal. 762 L.-Cpl. A. Hall, M.M., Aust. Inf. (M.M. gazetted 13th September, 1918. Ist Bar gazetted 7th October, 1918.) Bar to Military Medal. 1794 Sgt. W. R. Young, D.C.M., M.M., Inf.; 6040 Pte. J. H. Harris, M.M., 1.F.; 378 Cpl. (Sgt.) D. C. Stewart, M.M., E.; 5837 Pte. M. Bercovltch, vltch, M.M., 1.F.; 1655 Sgt. J. Lonergaa, M.M., I. ; 784 Cpl. R. E. Sullivan, M.M., I.F.s 2879 Cpl. C. O. Power, M.M., A.M.C.; 8726 L.-Cpl. R. R. Rowley, M.M., A.M.C.; 1677 Sgt. P. W. Bales, M.M., 1.F.; 784 Sgt. P. C. Mudford, D.C.M., M.M., 1.F.; 1940 Fitt. Cpl. R. W. Peter, M.M., F.A.; 1473 Cpl. H. F. Parker, M.M., M.T.M. By.; 2453 Pte. C. Wood, M.M., M.G. Corps; 4744 Cpl. A. B. Blackmur, M.M., 1.F.; 2612 L.-Cpl. J. H. Farrell, M.M., 1.F.; 5376 Sgt. W. H. Fletcher, M.M., 1.F.; 3748 Cpl. C. Godfrey, M.M., 1.F.; 7765 Sgt. R. J. Jones. M.M., E.; 4548 Cpl. W. Messer, M.M., L.T.M. By.; 4889 Pte. J. A. Speight, M.M., Inf.; 6681 L.-Cpl. P. J. Broder, M.M., 1.F.; 5319 Sgt. R. J. Denny, M.M., Inf.; 933 Sgt. A. G. Prime, M.M., Inf.; 2480 L.-Cpl. G. E. Weiley, M.M., Inf.; 10683 Sgt. A. N. Symes, M.M., E.; 4732 L.-Cpl. L. P. Ardill, M.M., 1.F.; 1663 L.-Cpl. W. H. Boxer, M.M., I.F. ; 2914 Pte. A. T. Giles, M.M., I.F. Awarded the Military Medal. 3676 Pte. A. A. Aalto, Inf.; 158 Cpl. F. Abbot, Inf.; 13504 Pte. W. C. Acworth, A.M.C.; 7205 Pte. F. J. Allison, Inf.; 5757 L.-Cpl. W. Allwood, Inf.; 4430 L.-Cpl. C. W. Amps, Inf.; 227 Pte. D. J. Anderson, Inf.; R1503 Cpl. (L.-Sgt.) H. R. W. Anderson, Inf.; 34 Pte. J. Anderson, A.M.C.; 5551 Pte. J. S. Andrews, Inf.; 1031 Pte. F. Angus, Inf.; 1309 Pte. K. Arnold, Inf.; 4357 Pte. J. Arthur, Inf.; 672 Pte. E. Auty, Inf.; 4753 Cpl. H. K. Baker, Inf.; 250 Cpl. N. Barber, Inf.; 1992 Cpl. P. C. Barber, M.T.M. By.; 1336 Cpl. J. E. Barker, Inf.; 2054 Pte. F. F. Barnard, Inf.; 4449 Cpl. W. F. Barry, Inf.; 15 Pte. T. D. Bartho, Inf.; 2680 Cpl. R. H. Bassham, Inf.; 12595 L.-Cpl. T. R. Bawden, A.M.C.; 2789 Pte. H. J. Berry, Inf.; 8168 Pte. J. L. Best, A.M.C.; 4434 Sgt. F. M. Billiet, Inf.; 294 Cpl. E. B. Bishop, Inf.; 6233 L.-Cpl. J. H. Bleakley, Inf. ; 1724 L.-Cpl. H. Blythe, Inf.; 1215 Gnr. R. S. Boggett, F.A.; 294 Sgt. C. Booth, Inf.; 2745 2nd Cpl. B. J. Boots, E.; 6717" Pte. J. E. Bowman, Inf.; 2580 Pte. W. T. Bowman, Inf.; 2692 Pte. W. P. N. Boyce, Inf.; 1620 Cpl. A. W. Brecht, Inf.; 334 Sgt. B. V. Bridges, Inf.; 2087 M.T. Dvr. G. R. Bridgland, A.S.C.; 98 Sgt. H. Bridle, Inf.; 15654 Gnr. W. P. Brown, H.T.M. By.; 3647 Pte. H. F. Browne, Inf.; 5318 Pte. W. Bryan, Inf.; 19126 Spr. W. T. Bryant, E.; 2133 L.-Cpl. E. H. Buckley, Inf.; 3040 Pte. L. H. Buckley, Inf.; 6792 a Pte. (L.-Cpl.) A. P. Burke, Inf.; 1977 Spr. J. Butler, Inf.; 2134 ,Sgt. G. Cadd, Inf.; 2769 Sgt. C. J. M. Campbell, Inf.; 1658 L.-Cpl. G. Campbell, Inf.; 137 Sgt. L. Canning, Inf.; 2128 Cpl. R. B. Carroll, Inf.; 4682 Pte. H. H. Carter, Inf.; 5685 Pte. P. H. Carter, Inf.; 5057 Pte. R. A. B. Carter, Inf.; 2315 Cpl. (L.-Sgt.) W. W. Casterton, Inf.; 1159 Cpl. E. J. Catley, A.S.C.; 3388 Pte. F. A. Chamberlain, A.M.C.; 637 Bomdr. C. F. Clark, M.T.M. By.; 3006 Sgt. R. W. J. Clark, Inf.; 2369 Gnr. C. Clarke, F.A.; 18432 Pte. W. J. Clarke, A.M.C.; 4358 Sgt. J. N. Clifton, F.A.; 9646 Pte. T. M. Coleman, M.T.M. By.; 6060 Cpl. H. W. Conway, Inf.; 2388 Pte. L. A. Cook, Inf.; 51 Cpl. R. Cook, Inf.; 6300 Pte. J. A. Corbett, Inf.; 15609 Spr. W. Craddock, E.; 6777 a Sgt. A. J. Crawford, Inf.; 30290 Gnr. W. H. Crowley, F.A.; 4712 Cpl. C. E. Cruse, Inf.; 5667 L.-Cpl. A.'Croydon, Inf.; 2130 L.-Cpl. J. H. Cubbins, Inf.; 37 Sgt. P. Cue, M. Corps, 626 Cpl.- J. Currie, Inf.; 2589 Sgt. D. Curry, Inf.; 2020 L.-Cpl. M. J. Daley, Inf.; 5584 L.-Cpl. R. A. Davies, Inf.; 2777 Pte. W. P. Davies, Inf.; 14764 Spr.' A. P. Dean, B.; 3592 Sgt. W. Dean, F.A.; 2015 Pte. S. A. Deards, L.T.M. By.; 4697 Pte. E. P. A. Delo, Inf.; 1254 L.-Cpl. J. Dickson, Inf.; 2271 Cpl. (T.-Sgt.) E. J. Dorizzi, Inf.; 277 L.-Cpl. W. R. S. Drummond, Inf.; 12609 Pte. R. H. Drury, A.M.C.; 6758 Pte. A. Duck, Inf.; 6159 Pte. J. E. Duncan, Inf.; 2321 Pte. E. Dunn, Inf.; 863 Cpl. T. V; Dwyer, M.G. Corps; 4460 Pte. G. Dyball, A.M.C.; 5008 L.-Cpl. R. H. Dyer, Inf.; 4679 Pte. T. W. Dynes, Inf.; 6756 L.-Cpl. 6. C. Bakins, Inf.; 1485 Sgt. W. Bastment, Inf.; 6764 Sgt. W. J. Eaton, Inf.; 442 L.-Cpl. R. W. C. Eddy, Inf.; 4062 Sgt. H. D. Edgar, Inf.; 6244 L.-Cpl. E. M. Edwards, Inf.; 5078 Pte. A. W. Elgood, Inf.; 1514 Dvr. J. H. Ellis, A.S.C.; 964 L.-Cpl. D. J. Emery, Inf.; 1032 Pte. J. M. Eustace, Inf.; 5076 Pte. C. M. Farrell, Inf.; 3801 Cpl. B. F. Feely, L.T.M. By.; 556 Bomdr. V. C. Fletcher, M.T.M. By.; 7707 Pte. B. Flewell-Smith, Inf.; 2646 Pte. T. A. Foret, Inf.; 3279 L.-Cpl. E. V. Fowler, Inf.; 650 Cpl. W. R. Fowler, Inf.; 922 L.-Cpl. A. Fraser, Inf.; 4485 L.-Cpl. W. Fraser, Inf.; 5222 Bomdr. (T.-Cpl.) H. R. Fuller, M.T.M. By.; 2647 a Pte. H. T. Fyfe, Inf.; 584 Pte. T. H. C. Gardner, Inf.; 1545 Cpl. E. L. Garland, Inf.; 2662 Cpl. (L.-Sgt. T. G. Gaydon, Inf.; 16158 Pte. A. Gepp, Inf.; 254 Sgt. J. T. Gilligan, F.A.; 2656 Dvr. C. Giltrow, F.A.; 4695 L.-Cpl. D. Gorman, Inf.; 4742 Pte. T. Griffiths, Inf.; 6463 Pte. G. B. Groves, Inf.; 4634 L.-Cpl. G. R. H. Hall, Inf.; 7334 Pte. V. A. Hall, Inf.; 5025 Pte. H. J. Hallawell, Inf.; 4407 L.-Cpl. R. E. Hamstead, Inf.; 1594 Cpl. A. Hancock, F.A.; 30 Pte. R. G. Hanson, A.M.C.; 18728 Spr. R. G. Harbour, E.; 3126 L.-Cpl. A. K. Harris, Inf.; 956 Spr. G. M. Harris, B.; 4133 L.Cpl. P. S. Harris, Inf.; 5104 Sgt. J. W. Harris, Pnr. Bn.; 36 Sgt. S. J. Harrison, Inf.; 3382 L.-Cpl. A. Harvey, E.; 4209 Pte. F. B. Hastings, Inf.; 5707 Pte. S. P. Hastings, Inf.; 3034 Pte. F. H. Hawke, A.M.C.; 2428 Pte. T. Henderson, Inf.; 7257 Pte. H. Herlihy, Inf.; 7808 Pte. D. Higgins, Inf.; 3129 Pte. I. P. Higgs, Inf.; 3081 Sgt. F. G. Higham, Inf.; 2088 Cpl. P. E. Hill, A.S.C.; 6283 Pte. R. Hill, Inf.; 2998 Pte. M. T. Hogan, Inf.; 2510 Pte. F. N. Horton, Inf.; 2657 Pte. J. Hough, Inf.; 2070 Sgt. C. Howard, Inf.; 1387 Pte. H. G. Hudson, Inf.; 1243 Pte. J. P. Huggard, Inf.; 1024 Sgt. R. R. T. Humphries, Inf.; 5361 Pte. A. J. Hunt, Inf.; 2332 L.-Cpl. G. M. Hunt, Inf.; 3510 Pte. F. H. Hunter, A.M.C.; 4216 L.-Cpl. H. G. Huxtable, M.G. Corps; 8173 Cpl. A. Ibbotson, Inf.; 2833 L.-Cpl. H. N. Ingamells, Inf.; 1321 Pte. J. Inglis, Inf.; 5034 Pte. W. R. Irving, Inf.; 3152 Pte. F. J. Jackson, Inf.; 2167 Pte. A. S. Jacobs, Inf.; 952 Dvr. H. E. Jacobs, Inf.; 3327 Pte. C. James, Inf.; 3254 Pte. T. James, Inf.; 13956 L.-Cpl. W. J. S. James, A.M.C.; 3294 L.-Cpl. (T.-Cpl.) G. Jamieson, Inf.; 5673 Pte. H. T. Jelbart, Inf.; 4527 Pte. R. E. Jenkins, Inf.; 1707 Cpl. F. L. Johnson, Inf.; 2165 L.-Cpl. W. Johnson, Inf.; 5131 Pte. W. Johnson, Inf.; 7564 L.-Cpl. J. A. Johnston, Inf.; 2680 Pte. D. S. Jones, Inf.; 141 Cpl. L. R. Jones, Inf.; 313 Sgt. M. O. Jones, A.M.C.; 2586 Pte. W. Jones, Inf.; 3802 W. J. Jones, Inf.; 2691 Pte. W. R. Keating, Inf.; 5646 Cpl. H. C. Keck, B.; 1742 Pte. D. W. Kenworthy, Inf.; 4834 Pte. M. Kerin, Inf.; 6046 L.-Cpl. A. C. Kilby, InfN; 390 Pte. W. Kilner, Inf.; 7112 L.-Cpl. T. G. King, E.; 5886 a Pte. W. King, Inf.; 3329 Pte. N. W. Kingston, Inf., 1854 Pte. R. E. Kirkwood, Inf.; 3502 Pte. Y. Knudson, Inf.; 2281 L.-Cpl. S. H. Krantz, Inf.; 465 L.-Cpl. H. Lahiff, Inf.; 2387 Gnr. R. Lambert, F.A.; 3354 L.-Cpl. H. F. Lampard, A.M.C.; 3088 Pte. S. B. Langton, M.G. Corps; 2905 L.-Cpl. F. Lawrie, Inf.; 2187 Sgt. T. C. Leathey, Inf.; 31083 Gnr. R. Lecchi, F.A.; 604 Cpl. J. Leighton, Inf.; 6807 Pte. P. Le Neven, Inf.; 7499 Sgt. B. D. Lillie, Inf.; 4076 Pte. C. L. G. Lloyd, Inf.; 3277 Dvr. C. D. G. Love, A.S.C.; 270 Pte. G. S. Lowe, Inf.; 3343 Cpl. C. G. Lutton, Inf.; 1677 a Pte. F. W. Lythgo, Inf.; 2441 Gnr. A. J. Lyttle, F.A.; 2700 Pte. A. W. Mackay, Inf.; 5394 Sgt. G. P. R. Manners, Inf.; 22041 Cpl. (T.-Sgt.) H. C. Marker, F.A.; 2143 Cpl. P. Maroney, Inf.; 17666 Pte. R. J. Marriner, A.M.C.; 1876 Pte. J. C. Martin, Inf.; 5913 L.-Cpl. P. Martindale, Inf.: 2893 Sgt. C. H. Masters, Inf.; 3847 Cpl. F. R. Mather, Inf.; 778 Pte. S. Matthews, Inf.; 4183 Cpl. J. T. McAllan, Inf.; 1247 Pte. G. R. McCubbin, M.G. Corps; 7048 L.-Cpl. A. L. McDonald, Inf.; 2177 Cpl. J. G. McDonald, M.G. Corps; 1507 Pte. L. McDougall, Inf.;; 4255 L.-Cpl. R. R. McKay, Inf.; 9611 Pte. R. E*McLaren, A.M.C.; 5416 Pte. A. J. McLarty, Inf.; 4253 Pte. E. A. McLauchlan, Inf.; 9052 Pte. R. G. McLaughlin, A.M.C.; 1237 Sgt. D. Mc- Lennan, Inf.; 868 Bomdr. (T.-Cpl.) G. T. Mc- Lennan, M.T.M. By.; 4574 Pte. P. McMahon, Inf.; 2693 Pte. W. Meadows, Inf.; 12020 Pte. A. R. Mealey, A.M.C.; 280 Pte. A. M. Merrin, Inf.; 3863 Pte. W. L. Miles, Inf.; 2404 Cpl. F. Miller, Inf.; 2188 L.-Cpl. H. M. Miller, Inf.; 5404 Pte. J. R. Mitchell, Inf.; 686 Sgt. O. H. Monk, Inf.; 5442 Pte. H. L. Montgomerie, Inf.
  • War Honours for the A.I.F. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the following Award to the undermentioned Officers and Warrant Officers in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field:? The Military Cross. Lieut. Thomas Walter Bain Roberts, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion tion to duty during an attack. When his platoon was held up by an enemy machinegun gun post he brought his Lewis gun into action, and with four men worked round the flank, rushing the post and capturing eleven prisoners. He displayed great courage age and good leadership throughout. 2nd Lieut. John Murray Rohan, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. He led his platoon brilliantly to his objective under most difficult conditions, and personally bombed an enemy machinegun gun emplacement, killing several of the crew and capturing five prisoners and two guns. It was due to his marked courage and initiative that his company was able to advance without suffering heavy casualties from machine-gun fire. Lieut. Byron John Ross, F.A.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. With the forward infantry during an attack he got earliest information, and was of the greatest use. In charge of the officers? patrol, he sent back valuable reports to the infantry. Throughout he carried out his duties in a fearless manner. Lieut. Percy Lionel Russell, M.M., Engrs.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. He was out day and night for seventy-two hours during heavy hostile area shoots, maintaining lines between group headquarters quarters and the group?s twelve batteries. His untiring efforts enabled the artillery to give the closest support to the infantry during their final assembly and ultimate successful advance. Lieut. Wilfred Drew Sharland, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He led his platoon with great dash during an attack. With one N.C.O. he crept forward and an enemy post, capturing a machine-gun and seven prisoners. soners. He set a fine example of courage and determination. Lieut. Clive Stewart Smith, F.A.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. As the commander of an advanced section of guns he ensured the closest and most effective support to the infantry with whom his section was working. ing. His cool courage under heavy fire set a fine example to his men at a critical period. Lieut. John Grant Smith, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry during an attack. His company commander having become a casualty, he assumed command and took his objective, together with three machineguns guns and a number of prisoners. Later, in command of a company, he captured five machine-guns and seventy prisoners. By his courage and fine leadership he contributed buted largely to the success of the battalion. Lieut. Richard Graham Smith, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When in charge of a fighting patrol he attacked an enemy post, capturing the two machine-guns and killing the garrison. After reaching his objective he withdrew his men most ably under heavy fire, making full use of the captured guns. He set a fine example of courage and good leadership. Lieut. Ernest McKenzie Stevenson, Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty while acting as battalion scout officer. He located an enemy machine-gun post, and, with one N.C.0., rushed it and captured the gun and forty-two prisoners. He did splendidly, and his courage and enterprise had a most inspiring effect on all under his command. Lieut. Thomas Dunlop Stevenson, Pnr. Bn.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion tion to duty. He completed a sap which had been commenced the previous night, taking over the work at short notice. He successfully taped out the trench, though unable to make any previous reconnaissance, sance, and successfully and rapidly completed pleted the work in spite of the very heavy shelling by the enemy artillery, with comparatively paratively ,few casualties. The success with which this heavy task was accomplished plished was largely due to the able dispositions tions of this officer, and the disregard of danger and energy with which he encouraged aged his working party. Lieut. John Stinson, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry in action. He personally led an attack on an enemy strong point that was enfilading the flank of the battalion. Several of the enemy were killed and ten prisoners and two machine-guns were captured. tured. He set an inspiring example of dash and courage to the men under his command. Lieut. (T./​Capt.) James Sullivan, M.M., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry while commanding a company during an attack. He organised a party of nine men with two Lewis-guns and rushed an enemy machinegun gun nest, capturing two machine-guns and ten prisoners. His marked courage and initiative enabled the flank units to advance. 2nd Lieut. Wesley Hall Taylor, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry in action. He personally rushed a machine-gun post that was holding up our advance and killed two of the team, capturing the remainder with the gun. His courage and initiative throughout the operation were worthy of high praise. Lieut. Edward Thomas, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and good leadership. Having taken command of the company at very short notice, he led his men with great ability in an attack, and captured the first and second lines of enemy trenches, in spite of determined resistance and hand-to-hand bayonet fighting. On reaching the objective, tive, he personally led a patrol forward and drove away the enemy, who were harassing the work of consolidation. His calm and cheerful demeanour had a great effect on his men, who had suffered heavy casualties. Lieut. Frederick Richard Thompson, M.G. Corps.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty while in charge of two Vickers guns during an attack. He pushed his guns forward into a dangerous gap between his brigade and the brigade on the left, and he rushed two machine-gun nests, capturing thirty-five prisoners and six machine-guns. He showed great courage age and initiative. Lieut. (T./​Capt.) Alick David Turnbull, M.M., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry during an advance. He led his platoon with great coolness under heavy fire. On reaching the final objective, he took a patrol well forward and brought valuable information as to the enemy dispositions. His conduct throughout set a splendid example to his men. 2nd Lieut. George Albert Williams, M.G. Corps.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion votion to duty during an attack. He took his gun forward with the attacking infantry and forced two enemy machine-guns to surrender. He reached the final objective at the same time as the infantry, apd brought fire to bear on two parties of the Retreating enemy. Throughout his courage and energy were most marked. Capt. Norman Wilson, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry during an attack. Under most difficult conditions he led his company splendidly, taking his objective and capturing ing many machine-guns and over 200 prisoners. soners. His brilliant success enabled the following battalion to come through, and was largely due to his personal courage and leadership. Capt. William George Wilson, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and initiative. He led his company forward during an attack with great judgment and skill under heavy fire. Though there was a gap of several yards between his flank ahd the unit on his left, he pushed on and reached the objective with very small casualties. His courage and splendid example of determination mination materially contributed to the success of the operation. Lieut. Harold Goldie Witcombe, Engrs. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty while reconnoitring a road for artillery. lery. Accompanied only by a N.C.O. he rushed a party of twenty of the enemy with a machine-gun, killing two and capturing the remainder and the gun. He then returned turned for his party and made the road good for artillery. He behaved splendidly. Lieut. Clarence Meredith Wrench, Infy. ?ln an operation against an enemy position tion this officer displayed great gallantry and devotion to duty. He led his platoon with great dash and ability and rushed a machine-gun post, killing or taking the occupants prisoners and capturing a machine-gun. He set his men a fine example of courage and determination. The following are among the Decorations tions and medals awarded by the Allied Powers at various dates to the British Forces for distinguished services rendered during the course of the campaign:? His Majesty the King has given unrestricted restricted permission in all cases to wear the Decorations and medals in question. Decorations Conferred by His Highness the Snltan of Egypt. (0137/​4179.) Order of the Nile, 2nd Class. Colonel (temporary Brigadier-General) Sir Robert Murray Mccheyne Anderson, K. Australian Imperial Force. Order of the Nile, 3rd Class. Colonel (temporary Brigadier-General) William Grant, D.5.0., 11th Australian Light Horse Regiment. Lieutenant-Colonel George Macleay Macarthur arthur Onslow, D.5.0., commanding 7th Australian Light Horse Regiment. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of the Military Medal for bravery in the Field to the undermentioned Non-Commissioned Officers and Men : \ _ The Military Medal. 1910 Sgt. G. Abraham, Inf. ; 4450 Pte. S. G. Beal, Inf, ; 3905 Tpr. W. A. Bell, L. ; 1067 Pte. E. B. Bridge, Inf. ; 4153 Pte. W. J. Burke, Inf. ; 230 Cpl. C. C. J. Christoffersen, L.H.R. ; 1408 Sgt. J. H. Coppin, Inf. ; 3105 Cpl. C. C. Dedman, Inf. ; 1237 Tpr. F. Elliott, L.H.R. ; 5359 Pte. G. V. Evans, Inf. ; 1880 Sgt. R. H. Hart, Inf. ; 2613 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) R. Hedley, Inf. ; 757 c Pte. J. Hickey, Inf. ; 351 Cpl. D. Howell, Inf. ; 2654 Pte. P. A. Hughes, Inf. ; 1680 Cpl. J. R. Keith, Inf. ; 3764 Pte. H. H, Kempe, Inf. ; 1280 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) C. H. Kerry, Inf. ; 2627 Sgt. G. S. Mclnnes, Inf. ; 586 Cpl. (T./​Sgt.) G. C. McKinnon, M.G. Corps ; 3188 Cpl. C. A. Newton, Inf. ; 349 Sgt. E. H. Parkinson, F.A. ; 6576 Pte. J. P. Parminter, Inf. ; 3876 Pte. G. W. Porter, Inf. ; 3214 Pte. (L.-Cpl.) W. Reidy, Inf. ; 1038 Sgt. D. K. Robertson, Inf. ; 3157 Pte. A. E. Rostron, Inf. ; 6320 Pte. F. H. Scott, Inf. ; 1942 Cpl. W. Scott, L.H.R. ; 195 Cpl. J. H. Taggart, L.H.R. ; 967 Pte. W. H. Thomas, Inf. ; 3267 Cpl. J. A. Tyler, Inf. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of the Distinguished tinguished Conduct Medal to the undermentioned mentioned : Distinguished Conduct Medal. No. 3 Sgt. J. H. Langley, Arm. Car Sec. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When in charge of a Lewis gun section he twice stampeded enemy machinegun gun sections, enfiladed a trench, causing many casualties, and dispersed several enemy digging parties. He captured a machine-gun, killing some of the gunners and putting the rest to flight. He showed marked skill throughout. 6590 L.*Cpl. (T./​Cpl.) A. D. Leighton, Infy.?He was reconnoitring the enemy?s position with a patrol and attacked an enemy post, which he captured, taking seven prisoners and killing two of the garrison. rison. Later, he was severely wounded leading a party against an enemy machinegun gun position. The courage and dash of this N.C.O. were conspicuous, and he led his men with great determination. No. 7806 W./​O. A. S. Murray, A.I.F.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. For a prolonged period this warrant officer was engaged on surveying the area between the lines, repeatedly working under machine-gun fire and sniping. In order not to attract attention he usually worked alone his plan table and instruments. Owing to his energy and coolness he has mapped a piece of country accurately, and his work has been most valuable. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of the Victoria Cross to : Victoria Cross. Lieut. William Donovan Joynt, A.I.F. ? For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty during the attack on Herleville Wood, near Chuignes, Peronne, on 23rd August, 1918. His company commander having been killed early in the advance, he immediately took charge of the company, which he led with courage and skill. On approaching Herleville Wdod the troops of the leading battalion, which his battalion was supporting, ing, suffered very heavy casualties and were much shaken. Lieut. Joynt, grasping the situation, rushed forward under very heavy machine-gun and artillery fire, collected and reorganised the remnant of the battalion, and kept under cover pending the arrival of his own company. He then made a personal sonal reconnaissance and found that the fire from the wood was checking the whole advance and causing heavy casualties to troops on his flanks. Dashing out in front of his men, he inspired and led a magnificent ficent frontal bayonet attack on the wood. The enemy were staggered by this sudden onslaught, and a very critical situation was saved. Later, at Plateau Wood, this very gallant officer again with a small party of volunteers teers rendered invaluable service, and after severe hand-to-hand fighting turned a stubborn born defence into an abject surrender. His valour and determination was conspicuous spicuous throughout, and he continued to do magnificent work until badly wounded by a shell. Distinguished Service Order. Capt. Alexander George Campbell, Inf.? For conspicuous gallantry and resource. He led his company in an attack against a strong enemy position, captured and consolidated solidated all his objectives, and by his skilful leadership enabled the battalion on his flank to continue the advance when they were held up by the enemy. In a later attack, though he was badly wounded, he continued to lead his men until he collapsed. He set a splendid example of courage and determination. Col. (T./​Brig.=​Gen.) Charles Frederick Cox, C.8., C.M.G., Comdg. Ist A.L.H. Bde. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion tion to duty. His quickness in realising the situation, and organising a counterattack, attack, resulted in the recapture of a position tion before the enemy had time to consolidate. date. He also captured about 150 prisoners who were attacking a small post in a neighbouring bluff, and then re-adjusted his line before supports could arrive to support the enemy storm troops. Maj. Archie Dick, 3rd A.L.H.R. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When the enemy attacked in overwhelming force his tenacity in holding on to two posts under his command was largely responsible for their repulse-with heavy casualties. The exact information which he sent back enabled the batteries to bring accurate fire on the enemy. ? Maj. Frank Valentine Weir, Ist A.L.H.R. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. With great dash he worked his squadron in a counter-attack, driving the enemy back and forcing them under fire of machine-guns. This led to the whole of the enemy who had captured the position being captured.
  • War Honours for the A.I.F. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the following Award to the undermentioned Officers and Warrant Officers in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field: ? The Military Cross. Lieut. Lionel Cosgrove, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. With 70 men he completed a sap 130 yards long, of considerable width and depth, between our old front line and a newly captured tured enemy trench. The work was conducted ducted under heavy shelling and machinegun gun fire, and completed in an hour and a half from the time he placed his working party on their task, when the second wave left our trenches. His personal example and disregard of danger largely contributed to the success and rapidity with which the work was accomplished. Capt. William Ellis Cox, F.A.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when commanding his battery. Coming under very heavy fire from two enemy field guns, he brought a section into action and knocked them out. His prompt initiative relieved a very critical situation, and helped considerably towards the success of the operation. Lieut. Clayton Edginton Davis, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry and good leadership. ship. He dealt with a group of enemy strong points during an attack with great skill. He was untiring in his efforts and encouraged his men during the work of consolidation under heavy machine-gun and rifle fire, from an unprotected flank, and, when the enemy counter-attacked, they were crushed by the Lewis .gun fire which he personally superintended. His example of determination and resource was of the utmost value. Lieut. Oliver Provan Davidson, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. Though early wounded, he led his platoon with great dash and rushed an enemy post, killing three of the enemy and capturing two and a machine-gun. After reaching his objective, he collapsed from loss of blood. His courage and devotion to duty had a great effect on his men. Rev. William Devine, 8.A., 8.D., Chaplains? lains? Service.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He followed closely up with an advance, assisting the wounded, and after the objective was captured, he remained with the front line troops under heavy artillery fire. Later, during an enemy bombing attack, he went out and brought in a wounded man. He behaved splendidly. Lieut. Rupert Frederick Arding Downes, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion tion to duty. He led his platoon with great determination during an attack, capturing the objective, and passing 300 yards beyond it. He eventually withdrew from this advanced vanced position (as it interfered with our protective barrage) after having repelled an enemy counter-attack with great loss. When'his company commander was ? missing,? ing,? he took command and reorganised the defence. He set a splendid example of determination and resource. Lieut. Evelyn Maxwell Hinton Farqu* harson, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. Though early wounded in the neck he led his platoon with great dash to bis objective, and remained on duty until he had made his position secure. His pluck and devotion to duty inspired all under his command. Lieut. Thomas Malcolm Grant, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. As Intelligence Officer he led the battalion through dense fog from the first to the second forming-up position. He then went forward and carried out a daring reconnaissance naissance under heavy machine-gun fire. During the advance he practically singlehanded handed rushed a machine-gun, capturing ten prisoners, and later rallied and led forward the flanking battalion. He set a splendid example of cool daring and initiative. tive. Lieut. Harold George Hackworthy, M.G. Corps.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion votion to duty. He maintained close liaison with the infantry during an advance, and when they were held up he brought into action his own four guns, besides two other Vickers? guns and a Hotchkiss, and silenced the enemy machine-gun fire, enabling abling the infantry to continue their advance. He did fine work. Lieut. Robert George Hamilton, Infy.? For conspicuous gallantry in action. He led his platoon in an attack with remarkable able dash, and personally captured an enemy machine-gun and its team, who were holding up our advance. When the objective tive was reached, he took command, as the company commander was wounded, and completed the consolidation. His example was felt throughout the whole company, and he materially contributed to the success of the operation, Lieut. William Harrison, M.M.?For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. Noticing that a company was being held up, he dashed over, collected a few men, and charged the enemy strong post, himself killing eight. Later, when commanding a company in an attack, he took a Lewis gun, after the team had been killed, out in front by himself, and shot down a number of the retreating enemy. He showed splendid courage and rendered very valuable able service. 2nd Lient. Percy Andrew Hunter, Engrs. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. He helped very materially in getting the guns of the heavy artillery into action in their new positions by making reconnaissances of forward roads and repairing them. When a number of ammunition lorries came under heavy fire, and two received direct hits, he, by his fine example and able management, caused the road to be cleared and traffic to be quickly continued. Lieut. Harry Jones, F.A. ?For conspicuous ous gallantry and devotion to duty as liaison officer with the infantry. He went forward to ascertain the exact location of machinegun gun positions holding up the infantry. Though wounded, he located the guns and got the information through to the artillery. He showed great pluck and determination. Lieut. James John Benedict Kinkead, I.C.C. ?For conspicuous gallantry jn action. He commanded an advanced exposed posed post under continuous shell fire for six days, during which time he set a splendid example of gallantry and determination mination to his men. On another occasion he coveitd the retirement of the battalion with his section, remaining behind in an isolated position and finally withdrawing his section under heavy barrage with great courage and skill. Capt. Frank Leslie Brinks, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and good leadership. He personally led his platoon in a flank attack on a nest of enemy machine-guns that was holding up our attack. He accounted for the whole garrison and captured tured all the guns. His coolness and courage throughout the action were very conspicuous, and greatly encouraged his men. Lieut. William John Lambden, Infy,? For conspicuous gallantry and good leadership. ship. He captured an enemy strong point with its garrison and a machine-gun, thus permitting our advance to proceed. He led his men with great dash. Later on, he took command of the company when the commander mander was a casualty, and directed the operations until a senior officer appeared. His dash and determination greatly inspired his men. ' Lieut. Richard Valentine Lathlean, Infy. ?For conspicuous gallantry and initiative in reorganising and directing parties of his company in thick fog during an attack, and later in supervising and consolidating the position won. He personally rushed a machine-gun and killed or captured the crew. He did very fine work. Lieut. John Bett Lawson, Infy.?For conspicuous spicuous gallantry in action. He led his platoon most ably, and during the advance he mounted a Tank and entered a wood, mopping up a dug-out and taking seventy p isoners. His determination to reach the S', S^vt"p^T?fn aU - spicuoni gallantry daring an attack 1 " C He led his company with great skill and deter- mination, despite the fact that he was almost totally incapacitated by gas. He SC H o ; an h attack - three of � for three more while making a reconnais- sance in front of his post. After gaining his objective he established touch with the flanks. He set a fine example of cool de- termination and courage. Capt. Algernon George Rowley Lilford, A.M.C.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He remained at his post under gas shell and H.E. bombardment which exploded gas shells near by His cool example and energy caused the success- ful evacuation of patients and saved many lives. Lieut. Alexander Bruce Littler, Engrs.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to ? duty during an attack. Under heavy fire he wen, forward beyond the front line to ascertain the eariest opportunity for wiring the front line, after a position bad been captured. His reports were of the greatest value in enabling transport and wiring stores to be dumped at their destination f?or g rd ve dfi ear,y r ges,he � pera - tions. He did fine work. Lieut. Arthur Hugh Mahon, F.A.-For conspicuous, gallantry as forward observa- ?on. . nng an attack - He accom- pamed the infantry in the advance, and succeeded in establishing and maintaining te ephonic communication with his battery. 1 oae ? me he daringly pushed forward well in advance of the infantry to observe. He successfully fired on .several targets, great y helping the advance, and sent back much valuable information. Capt. Donald Walter McCredie, A.M.C. -For conspicuous gallantry during an advance. His battalion was practically iso- ated or two days, during which he tended wounded under fire. He continually crossed machine-gun swept spaces, after stretcher- bearers had been shot down, to attend wounded. Throughout he showed untiring energy and devotion to duty, and by his fine conduct saved many lives. Licit Norman James McGuire, M.M., Infy.-For conspicuous gallantry during an advance. When the company on h.s right rTund ft 1 y Z' rT* J 1 round to the threatened flank threw a bomb and silenced the gun and captured the crew. At the final objective, when he was leading a patrol forward, he assisted in capturing a gun which was hindering consolidation. He set a very fine example �' COUrage and d " e ? i "a.io? '� Ms m?n - L,e "'- H ?B h Wils �? McKemle, M.Q. an fnJb F � r onSp . lCU^ us gantry during a\a 6 Vplunt?ered and personally and skilfull y engaged the enemy infantry, ? Wh " h ? Capt> John Frederick McNaught, Infy.? For cons Picuous gallantry and good leader- sk * p> directed advance of his com- pany under the direct fire of snipers and machine-guns with a disregard of danger and skill which wer e admired by all ranks. He P ersonall y. with the assistance of two men ? captured two enemy machine-guns and their crews > and thus materially assisted our advance. He was eventually wound ed while supervising the consolida- don ? wken tke hnal objective was captured. His example was splendid. Lieut. Jack Stephen Mehan, Fd. Arty. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Under heavy e?e?y shelling iron, a 15 c.m. battery he went alone In,o'Th" ammunition pit and extinguished a fire which had been started in the ammunition and camouflage. His courageous action no, only saved the guns and a large quan- tity of ammunition, but also prevented the r as . umin ? - w?uid have given the enemy valuable indications of intentions. Lieut. Alan Morton, F.A.-For conspicu- ous gallantry and devotion to duty. He repeatedly patrolled and mended a telephone line under continuous shell fire ; he also collected material and constructed a ladder from which he could observe enemy move- ments and send back valuable information, enabling fire to be brought on important targets. He showed great resource and initiative. ' Lieut. Edwyn John Mountain, Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. He-led his platoon brilliantly, and with four men he captured three machine-guns, totalling one officer and twenty other ranks. Later, he captured an officer and twenty- two men ; and in consolidating the final objective he rendered very great assistance in reorganising his company. Throughout he showed splendid courage and determina- tion. Capt. John Aubrey Nunn, Pnr. Bn.-For conspicuous gallantry and ability during an St T\ He SUCCCeded in repaiHng 3 r � ad under heavy fire, and so allowing the artil- lery to be, brought into action. It was mainly due to his energy and example that an important piece of work was completed. Lieut. Michael Joseph O?Brien, MG Corps.?For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. He adva?ce/​wift with an infantry battalion, and under heavy fire placed them in position and inflicted heavy casualties. Throughout he did valu2nd 2nd Lieut. Walter Leonard O?Connor, *25 ?�? f.T? TT* ? 0 ? h P* 3 * o ?? h � took a rifi J from his runner, , , the oftcer . and, directing one of his WI . S g ? ns onto the party, repelled the * ? 3ter ?. the advance he went Under keavy m achme-gun fire to the assistanCe anCe �J j ll5 c � mpany commander, who was wounded, and got severely wounded him* * f ampl f to J his ? en - J**? F ? ncis Ernest Pennington, D.C.M., ty cons Ptcuous gallantry while �> mman ding a p i atoon during an attack, , lscovenn f> a . P atry the enemy in a house in front of his post, he went forward, fT?* 1 Tit?' dnd y cover of Lewis-gun house rushed it andTraM* "it '" to u l^Tt ? S s P resourceful- Lieut Leslie Marten Plover T?, i: *��� ga durTug? an "aUack A fter ? ?!? , . g .? k> loThTn, occupied an the trench col^ niei J ce *� enfilade rrtd :: :. n sr; the gun and killed the crew Lieut. Charles Ha Stewart p o , e Infy.-For conspicuous gallantry when in charge of a platoon during an attack. He led a party and successfully attacked a strong enemy post, capturing sixty-one prisoners, soners, four machine-guns and a minenwerfer. werfer. By his courage and promptitude he cleared up a difficult situation. Later in the fight he rushed a machine-gun, killing ing two of the crew with his revolver and capturing the gun. He did splendidly. Lieut. Joseph James Raphael Punch, F.A.-For conspicuous gallantry and devotion tion to duty when in charge of a section in close support of the advancing infantry. He passed the infantry at the second objective, and advanced with the cavalry and tanks, coming into action within 200 yards of the final objective, where he engaged enemy machine-guns and infantry in the open. He did splendid work. Lieut. Norman Qu F . A .? For con . spicuous gallantry and devotion to duty, When his battery in close support of the infantry came und *r very severe fire at close range, he showed cool courage while clearing ing the casualties and reorganising the teams. His timely service was of great value to the battery.
  • War Honours for the A.I.F. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the following awards to the undermentioned Officers in recognition tion of their gallantry and devotion to duty in \he Field : Awarded a Bar to the Distinguished Service Order. Capt. Walter John Clare Duncan, D.5.0., M.C., A.I.F. ?For conspicuous gallantry throughout the operations south-west of Bouchavesnes on 31st August, 1918. He commanded his company brilliantly, and in face of strong opposition and heavy fire captured some two hundred prisoners, ten machine-guns, and four trench mortars. Throughout the whole operation he displayed played wonderful dash and courage, and by his fine leadership succeeded against seemingly ingly overwhelming odds. (D.S.O. gazetted 26th July, 1918.) Lt.*Col. John Wesley Mitchell, D.5.0., A.I.F. ?For conspicuous gallantry during the taking of Rosi&​res Station and the village of Lihons on the 9th and 11th August, 1918. When his battalion had suffered heavy casualties he personally went forward, and, under heavy fire, reorganised organised his line. Again, after his battalion lion had taken Lihons, where the situation was obscure, he again went forward, and did the same under withering machine-gun fire. His fine leadership and coolness under fire were largely responsible for the success achieved by his battalion. (D.S.O. gazetted Ist January, 1918.) Maj. (T./​Lieut.=​Col.) Cecil Duncan Sasse, D.5.0., A.I.F. ?For conspicuous gallantry in the attack on Chuignolles and Chuignes on 23rd August, 1918. In face of exceedingly ingly heavy fire he brought his battalion through to the final objective with extraordinary ordinary few casualties, and succeeded in capturing several hundred prisoners and some field guns. He then advanced an additional mile, captured Fontaine les Gappy, and skilfully protected his new position. tion. The brilliant success of his battalion was due to his splendid leadership. (D.S.O. gazetted 29th October, 1915.) Bertie Vandeleiir Stacy, D.5.0., A.I.F. ?For conspicuous gallantry in the attack on Chuignolles and Chuignes on 23rd August, 1918. He established his headquarters close behind the fighting troops, and in spite of heavy shell fire exercised valuable control during the progress gress of the fight. By personal reconnaissance sance he was able to directs the fire of the heavy artillery upon numerous field guns and machine-guns, which were causlhg casualties. Also, by organising the fire of Vickers and Lewis guns upon enemy machine-guns he was able to send on the attack. Upon gaining the set objective he pushed out patrols, which brought back valuable information, enabling the gain to be further exploited. Owing to his splenlid leadership his battalion made an advance of nearly three miles, and captured several hundred prisoners and some machine-guns. (D.S.O. gazetted 4th June, 1917.) Maj. (T./​Lieut.=​Col.) Theodore Frederick Ulrich, D.5.0., Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and leadership in command of his battalion near Herleville Wood on 23rd August, 1918. He kept in close touch with the attack, and controlled their movements under heavy artillery and machine-gun fire. He made the most of his opportunities, quickly grasping the situation, and set a fine example to his men. (D*S.O. gazetted Ist January, 1917.) Lt.=​Col. Percy William Woods, D.5.0., M.C., A.I.F. ?For conspicuous gallantry and able handling of his battalion on Ist and 2nd September, 1918, north of Peronne. The position being obscure after an attack, he went forward personally and consolidated the line under heavy shell and machine-gun fire. The two officers and a runner with him were killed, but he continued his work, and completed consolidation. His courage and devotion to duty greatly inspired his men. (D.S.O. gazetted Ist January, 1918.) Awarded the Distinguished Service Order. Lieut. Daniel Herbert Anthon, M.C., A.I.F. ?On the 30th August, 1918, near Clery-sur-Somme, he advanced at the head of a few men against a strongly-held machine-gun post, which, after bombing, he charged alone, capturing seven men and the gun. He then, by a flanking movement, ment, captured a trench, taking fifty-four prisoners, besides killing and wounding several others. This gallant action allowed the battalion, which had been held up for a long time, to advance. Maj. Cedric Errol Meyer Brodziak, A.M.G.C. ?For conspicuous gallantry near Bray-sur-Somme on 22nd August, 1918. He commanded the flank company of the division in the attack, and in face of strong opposition secured and consolidated his objectives. When the right flank of the division on his left was held up he made good the gaps that occurred, capturing the southern portion of the Happy Valley and the Chalk Pit, and thus assuring the advance of the division on his flank. During the afternoon the enemy broke through, and his left flank was in the air, and the enemy behind him, but he held his position and formed a defensive flank. By his fine initiative and determination he enabled the divisional line to be maintained, and inflicted such casualties that the enemy was forced to withdraw. Maj. William John Brown, L.H.R. ?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on 14th July, 1918, in command of a post near Mussulabeh, which was heavily shelled. The enemy attacked it in strength, but were repulsed. Major Brown, leaving sufficient of his garrison to protect his front, directed the bulk of his machine-gun and rifle fire on to an enemy concentration in Wahi Dhib, and also took their parties attacking Abu Talbut right in reverse, inflicting heavy casualties and demoralising the enemy. Thereby he materially assisted the counter-attack by another cavalry regiment ment later in the morning. Throughout the operations he handled his command with great coolness and judgment. Maj. Donald Dunbar Coutts, A.M.C., attd. A.I.F. ?On the Ist September, 1918, during the attack at Mont St. Quentin, although the R.A.P. was consistently shelled, he attended the wounded almost continuously for fifty-two hours, during five of which he was forced to wear his gas respirator, displaying throughout the greatest courage and devotion to duty. On the day prioi /​ to the attack a shell burst on a dug-out, wounding several men and pressing one down, severely wounded, blocking the entrance. He immediately went forward, regardless of intense shell fire, and succeeded in extricating the man and removing him, over exposed ground, to the rear. Maj. Harold Dunstan Gordon Ferres, M.C., A.I.F. ?For conspicuous gallantry in taking the eastern side of Peronne on 2nd September, 1918. He had to advance to the attack along a narrow causeway swept by enemy fire, and, while personally leading his battalion, was early severely wounded by shell fire. Though suffering much pain from his wound, he reorganised the battalion, which had suffered severe casualties, and launched the attack. The clearing of the enemy from the ramparts and outskirts of Peronne was entirely due to his resolute leadership and courage. A large number of prisoners and fifty machine-guns were captured during this action. Capt. James Lionel Fletcher, M.C., A.I.F. ?During an attack near Mont St. Quentin, on the 2nd September, 1918, an enemy strong point held up the advance. After a daring personal reconnaissance, during which he captured a machine-gun post with three guns, he surrounded and took the strong point, which contained seventeen machine-guns and two trench mortars. He then reorganised his company pany and led the attack on the objective. When the acting commanding officer of the battalion was wounded, he took command of the whole front line, and his fine gallantry lantry and untiring efforts set a wonderful example to all. Capt. William Stanley Hosking, M.C., A.I.F.?In command of a support company during operations on the 2nd September, 1918, at Allaines, north-east of Peronne, he displayed conspicuous gallantry and resource source in attacking a hostile trench which was holding up the advance, capturing it and taking sixty prisoners. After all the company officers except himself and one other had become casualties, he collected the remnants of the companies and advanced with only twenty-eight other ranks against 600 enemy infantry and a direct firing hostile battery. This prevented the enemy reorganising for a counterattack. attack. His courage and fine leadership were most marked. Lieut. Ralph Alec Hunt* Engrs.?For conspicuous gallantry on Bth August, 1918, near Cherisy. With a small party he reconnoitred connoitred and, under machine-gun fire, crossed bridges to the enemy?s side. While examining one of the bridges the sapper whom he took with him was wounded, and he carried this man for 200 yards under fire to a place of safety. After getting his pontoons up to the water side under heavy fire, he furnished an accurate report on the state of the roads and bridges in the neighbourhood bourhood to his officer commanding. His coolness and excellent work under trying circumstances were most praiseworthy. Capt. John Bayley Lane, A.I.F.?For conspicuous gallantry during the attack on Bth August, 1918, east of Villers-Bretonneux, neux, near Amiens. Single-handed he attacked an enemy strong point held by seventeen enemy with a machine-gun, killing ing three of the occupants and capturing the remainder. The following day, near Framerville, after being wounded, he continued tinued to lead his company, and, after gaining his objective, was again wounded, but refused to leave until the position had been made secure. He set a splendid example of courage and devotion to duty. Capt. George Frederick Lowther, M.C., A.I.F. ?For conspicuous gallantry as company pany commander in the advance east of Amiens on Bth and 11th August, 1918. In spite of thick fog and hidden defences, he gained the final objective. The following day he, with a few men, rushed a machinegun gun post, and further captured and consolidated dated fresh ground. On the 11th he, to conform with the advance of another battalion, talion, established posts forming a defensive flank, and, while doing so, rushed, with four men, another enemy post. On being finally ordered to withdraw, he extricated his company from a difficult position with very few casualties, being himself the last to leave. Throughout he showed fine courage and leadership. Maj. William Leslie Marfell, Fd. Arty.? For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on 30th August, 1918, east of Clery. During the whole day, under extremely heavy shell and maohine-gun fire, he personally sonally directed the fire of his battery from the front line, rendering great assistance to the infantry. His tireless energy and cheerfulness fulness during a week?s continuous fighting have set a splendid example to his men, Capt. (T./​Major) William Francis James McCann, M.C., A.I.F.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty near Lihons on 10th August, 1918. After the attack had failed at Crepey Wood, he successfully captured the }>osition with his company in face of very heavy fire; and, when the enemy, in greatly superior numbers, counter-attacked, he held them off, personally ally killing many of the enemy and exposing ing himself freely until reinforcements enabled him to drive off the enemy and reestablish establish his original line. His courage and fine leadership prevented an important position falling into the hands of the enemy. Maj. John Hinwood McDonald, M.C., A.I.F. ?On the 31st August, 1918, during the attack on Mont St. Quentin, he advanced alone against an enemy machinegun gun nest, silencing two guns which were causing casualties, and capturing the crews. On arrival at the objective, he rapidly reorganised organised and consolidated, reconnoitring the whole battalion front under heavy fire. Later, he personally directed a withdrawal in a most skilful manner and under very severe enemy fire, establishing himself in an admirable position with few casualties. Throughout he showed conspicuous gallantry lantry and powers of leadership. Maj. John Joseph Murray, M.C., A.I.F. ?For conspicuous gallantry near Peronne on Ist September, 1918. He led his company pany with great skill and initiative, and cleared the assembly position, thus allowing the remainder of the battalion to take up its position in time for the attack. Later, while advancing under heavy artillery and machine-gun fire, he led his company through two unbroken belts of wire. Finally, under heavy fire, he supervised consolidation of the ground won, and throughout set a fine example of courage and energy to his men. Capt. Lewis Noedl, M.C., Engrs.?For very conspicuous gallantry and devotion under exceptionally heavy fire from the 30th August to Ist September, 1918, during reconnaissances for a construction of bridges across the Somme Canal. By dint of his example and inspiring spirit in face of every kind of difficulty and opposition, and although time after time driven off by heavy shell and machine-gun fire with severe casualties, he carried out his work, and the ultimate success of the operations was greatly due to his coolness, courage and unflagging energy. Capt, Patrick Joseph Francis O?Shea, M.C., A.M.C., attd. Infy.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty near Chuignes on August 23rd, 1918. Keeping up with the advance, he was always in the hottest part of the line, dressing wounded and organising stretcher-bearers. Realising ing that an R.A.P. could not cope with the casualties, he dressed them where they lay and made prisoners carry them back. In many cases he carried men back himself under heavy fire of all descriptions, and working in gas-drenched areas. He had no rest for three days and nights, and did another medical officer?s work as well as his own. Capt. Percy Gilchrist Towl, A.I.F.?For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on the night of the 29th-30th August, 1918, at Clery. In charge of his company of only 28 men with 25 prisoners, he was attacked by some 150 of the enemy, who had at first surrendered. He was surrounded rounded practically, and by fire from front and flanks his party, before he was reinforced forced by other troops at 3 p.m. next day, was reduced to twelve men. His performance ance was a splendid one, and it was due to his determined courage and able leadership that his company, besides holding out, retained tained their prisoners. Major Eric Norman Webb, M.C., Engrs. ?During operations near Peronne from the 29th to 31st August, 1918, he displayed the greatest courage, skill and powers of leadership and organisation in constructing and repairing bridges for crossing the Somme, under continuous shell and machine-gun fire. He also carried out valuable reconnaissances on water supply and roads up to the front line to assist the advance, and throughout this period his untiring efforts and determination contributed buted in a large measure to the success of the operations. Maj. Thomas Williams, Mtd. R.?For conspicuous gallantry during a period up to September 12th, 1918, on the Somme. He worked his patrols in a daring and able manner, keeping divisional headquarters supplied with reliable information. By personal reconnaissances he was able to direct the artillery on to splendid targets with excellent results. His work right through the operations was of a very high order.
Terms of Use
Language
  • English
Identifier
  • 940.40994 (DDC)

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment