1969-02-01, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: PAINTING AND SCULPTURE What makes a copy an original? (1 February 1969)

User activity

Share to:
PAINTING AND SCULPTURE What makes a copy an original? (1 February 1969)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/264043379
Physical Description
  • 989 words
  • article
  • illustration
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • xna, John Haynes and J.F. Archibald, 1969-02-01
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • PAINTING AND SCULPTURE What makes a copy an original? (1 February 1969)
Appears In
  • The bulletin., v.091, no.4638, 1969-02-01 (ISSN: 0007-4039)
Other Contributors
  • By ELWYN LYNN
Published
  • xna, John Haynes and J.F. Archibald, 1969-02-01
Physical Description
  • 989 words
  • article
  • illustration
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Series
Part Of
  • The bulletin.
  • Vol. 091 No. 4638 (1 Feb 1969)
  • John Ryan Comic Collection (Specific issues).
Subjects
Summary
  • PAINTING AND SCULPTURE What makes a copy an original? By ELWYN LYNN THE REVIVAL of printmaking with accompanying new technological processes cesses that permit large and accurate editions has raised acutely the question of the differences between original prints (called original multiples by some) and reproductions. Charles Bannon’s Paddington Print Studio, of which more later, employs processes that come close to those used in reproduction, but every stage is supervised vised by the artist, and modifications are made to the original work as the artist sees the possibilities of the process. cess. Editions Alecto of London was the first firm, in 1960, to see the necessity for a print revival and advertises tises that it makes prints and multiples by every known process, and includes in its artists Alan Davie, Jim Dine, David Hockney, and Claes Oldenburg. Marlborough Graphics, which began in 1964, might have had notions that the print was the poor man’s art gallery or might be a means of persuading young buyers to invest later in more expensive works, but their artists, who include some of the most noted, usually produce prints that are not mere copies of what they do in their major paintings. ings. “Studio International” lists over 40 galleries in England with prints as one of their particular concerns. These galleries leries range from the Bear Lane, in Oxford, under Nick Waterlow a critic in Sydney five years ago with prices from $2O to $9O, to the Leicester with its December graphic show, and prices from $4O to $2OOO (there might be a Bonnard or Vuillard), and the Redfern, under another one-time Sydney critic, Tatlock Miller, with the largest collection of prints in London, ranging from $2O to $2OOO. There are other printmakers such as London Graphic and the Curwen Gallery, lery, which, like the others, pursue one tradition: prints are limited to about 70 and many are less. A famous name like Miro might do a run of 150 (each $450), and a less famous name, Lucebert, bert, has done an edition of 101 for Marlborough, but that was because they came in a set of 31 prints of the days in January, and seven for the days of the week. . There are galleries which politely ignore the print as minor and unoriginal and, while “Arts Review” and “Studio A silk-screen print of Francis Lymburner’s Dancer Resting”, the sixteenth in an edition of 100 from the Paddington Print Studio A lithographic print of Victor Pasmore’s “Points of Contact No. 3” from an edition by Marlborough Graphics which was limited to 70 International” run regular articles on graphics, and “Art in America” has had a special article, other magazines such as “Art and Artists,” Art International,” and “Art News” either ignore graphics or give them no special status. But the fact is that prints are big business, even if the Australian public has been slow to accept them; Melbourne’s Crossley Gallery, which has shown along with Australians some magnificent Japanese printmakers, has only just begun to feel the public’s appreciation. Traditional practice has been to limit the edition of a print to about 70, not because scarcity promotes a higher price, but because changes in the run begin to defy the artist’s intentions. However, two new factors have entered the situation: runs can now be made in the thousands, and Andy Warhol believes that this could happen to all art forms; Lichtenstein has a run of 280 at $25 each, sold by a “respectable” gallery, but greater, runs of the popartists’ artists’ prints have kept busy the mailorder order sections of large New York department stores. It seems clear that the uniqueness of an aesthetic object is under considerable siderable fire, and one can hardly argue the issue here, but it is clear enough that the arts are not “democratised” by the dispersal of thousands of “multiple originals,” and one suspects that some prints are conceived of as appealing to a wider audience or creating ating a larger market and that the wider audience as an expansion of the few connoisseurs does not really exist. That the large edition has been by pop-artists and has appealed to people conditioned by the visual massmedia media rather than to those familiar with art outside the book-reproduction and the college lecturer’s slides is significant. nificant. Yet, there are some worrisome some examples; we now appreciate “mass-produced,” unsupervised art nouveau hoarding-posters, and though Denise Rene’s editions of kinetic artists may look the same, in performance the replicas can, within limits, behave differently. What really worries traditional printmakers, makers, like Roy Dalgarno, who runs a print studio in Bombay and is currently rently in Australia, is that some prints are not being rendered first on the stone, zinc plate, or silk screen, but are made from works in another media; Charles Bannon, who has done reproductions ductions of Lymburner, Cedric Flower, and Milgate, and has aroused the interest terest of Strachan, James, Olsen, Morrow, row, David Boyd, and Blackman, claims that the re-rendering of a completed pleted work, like Lymbumer’s Dancer Resting, with inevitable changes from the original, creates a new, even if very similar, work of art. By using Colorgraph graph sensitised paper and carbon arc lamps, he teaches artists what can be done, step by step; the artists, who supervise every screen and the “pulls,” seem satisfied that their originals remain so and the multiples are new, repeated works of art. Paris’ famous Moulot print-masters might shudder, as do others, that prints can depend upon mechanical “accidents,” dents,” but their methods are not so dissimilar from those of the “reproducers.” ducers.” Certainly, while the theorists must struggle with aesthetic criteria, the public needs more information on what a “print” is; meanwhile 40 lithographs graphs by the Italian Corrado Cagli are on their way to the Perth Festival. If he visits Australia, as is likely, he may be surprised to find our appreciation tion in its infancy.
Terms of Use
  • In Copyright
Language
  • English
Identifier
  • AP7 (LC)

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

Other suppliers

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment