1894-04-30, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: JEWISH MISSIONARY INTELLIGENCE AND MONTHLY RECORD OF THE LONDON SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIANITY AMONGST THE JEWS APRIL, 1894. (30 April 1894) London Society for Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jews.

User activity

Share to:
JEWISH MISSIONARY INTELLIGENCE AND MONTHLY RECORD OF THE LONDON SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIANITY AMONGST THE JEWS APRIL, 1894. (30 April 1894)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/264010210
Physical Description
  • 12293 words
  • article
  • illustration
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • enk, London Society for Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jews, 1894-04-30
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • JEWISH MISSIONARY INTELLIGENCE AND MONTHLY RECORD OF THE LONDON SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIANITY AMONGST THE JEWS APRIL, 1894. (30 April 1894)
Appears In
  • Jewish missionary intelligence., no.April 1894, 1894-04-30, p.1
Author
  • London Society for Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jews.
Published
  • enk, London Society for Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jews, 1894-04-30
Physical Description
  • 12293 words
  • article
  • illustration
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Part Of
  • Jewish missionary intelligence.
  • April 1894
Subjects
Summary
  • JEWISH MISSIONARY INTELLIGENCE AND MONTHLY RECORD OF THE LONDON SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIANITY AMONGST THE JEWS APRIL, 1894. BY THE WAY. . . ~ —— following are the arrangements for iSQ HHa the 86th Anniversary of the Society next The Annual Sermon will be preached on Thursday, May 3, by His Grace, the Archbishop of Dublin, in St. Paul’s Church, Onslow Square, S.W. This day being Ascension Donj, Divine Service will be held in the morning (instead of in the evening as in other years), and will commence at 11 o’clock. After the sermon the Holy Communion will be administered. (We especially draw our friends’ attention to the above-mentioned alteration in the hour of service). The Annual Breakfast will be held in Exeter Hall on Friday morning, May 4, at nine o’clock, when an address will be given as usual. The Annual Meeting will follow at 11 a.m., under the presidency of Sir John H. Kennaway, M.P., and will be addressed by R. Williams, Esq., the Rev. Dr. Bruce, late of Persia; the Rev. J. Segall, Missionary at Damascus; and other friends. * * * The Quarterly Prayer Meeting will be held in the Society’s House, 16, Lincoln’s Inn Fields, on Tuesday, April 24, at half-past 3 o’clock. Friends are cordially invited to be present. * * * The contemplated conference between Mr. J. M. Flad, the Superintendent of the Abyssinian Mission, and the native agents, has been arranged. Mr. Flad left Kornthal on March 3, to meet them at Monkullo, on the frontiers of the country, where they had already arrived. The Committee have given very careful consideration ation to the revised plans for building the New Mission Hospital at Jerusalem, and it is hoped the work will be commenced very shortly. The estimated cost of erection is £lO,OOO. * * * The Rev. J. C. Crighton-Ginsburg sends the following interesting particulars of the baptism of a Jew at Constantinople, on February 11th : “ Haim applied for Christian instruction in December, ber, 1890 He came again the following January with his uncle, a man much respected, learned, and holding a Government position, who, after discussion of the Messianic controversy, declared himself convinced vinced ; but left, saying, the time might soon come when he would confess publicly what he believed to be the truth. H., his nephew, now began a regular course of instruction, which to his regret was interrupted rupted first by illness and afterwards by a call from Bulgaria. In the course of last summer, accompanied panied by a young friend, he came again, desirous to resume his instruction, and to be baptized. H. advanced vanced rapidly in the knowledge of the Scriptures, the Spirit of God helping him. He came regularly to my rooms at Galata, and a fortnight before his baptism daily to Ortakeuy. Anxious as he was for baptism he wanted the sacred rite performed privately; but gradually overcame his timidity, which he quite understood was want of faith. When the day for his public confession was fixed, I told him my esteem for his uncle demanded that he should be duly informed of the intended rite. H., too, saw the propriety of my advice, and promised to inform him. On the morning of his baptism, to the question whether he had informed his uncle, sister, and family, he replied, “ I had not the courage to say anything. But when my uncle saw me in my Sabbath clothes, he said, *lt is Sunday today, day, where are you going ? * ‘To Ortakeuy, to be baptized,’ I replied; ‘ Que Dieu vous Wnisse, Chacun selon ses idees,’ was his salutation.’ ” H. was thus happily, and with the consent of his friends, received as a member of Christ’s flock. D THE PROGRESS OF CHRISTIANITY AMONGST THE JEWS. P romote Christianity among the Jews * s object for which the Society exists. Its aim is to disseminate the truths of the Gospel among all classes of the Jewish race, and to induce them to appropriate the benefits it is capable of conferring, both for time and eternity. It is not merely aggressive —seeking only to combat directly the errors of Judaism. This is done far more effectually by the Jews themselves, both in the press and in the pulpit. We have to kindle the light, and the darkness will flee of itself, and this is what we strive to do. But is there any evidence of the actual fulfilment of the Mission? Are the Jews, as a body, brought perceptibly nearer to the kingdom of Christ? They ceitainly aie, if one may judge from the admissions, made in sorrow, by leading Jews, as to the superiority of Christianity over Judaism, in the hold it has upon the hearts and minds of its professors. In a tone of deep sadness, the Jewish Chronicle, dated August 4, 1893, contrasted the thousands of worshippers crowding the churches and chapels with the deserted synagogues. “ That love for the sanctuary,” it says, “ which burned in Jewish breasts in times of yore, that passionate yearning foi God s courts, which inspired the Jewish Psalter and Prayer-book, is extinguished, or, at least, burns fearfully low. To see the Metropolitan Tabernacle congregation rising as one man to join in the hymns, and' to listen to the mighty volume of sound pealing forth from six thousand throats, is an expei ience which cannot but make a very deep impression upon a visitor. One feels that this is, indeed, praise and thanksgiving, such as the Psalmist of Israel would have loved to join in.” Such is the language of a leading Jew, speaking to the whole Jewish community, and he tells them, that, as a leligious body they are deficient in spirituality. In othei voids, Judaism has lost the power of creating and sustaining a sense of religion. “ Amidst the grimness of East end misery,” said a popular Rabbi in a synagogue pulpit, “ the Christian worker goes from door to door, lighting up the darkest places with the lamp of spiritual comfort. Let the attempt be made by a Jew to speak of religion and of God, even to those, who are held to be the backbone of conforming Judaism—let him show them the hand of God in the lot of man, and the duty of men to seek in their souls the greatest content the world has to give (the italics are ours), and the Jewish clergyman is mistaken for a Christian, or n conversionist, or is j 1 treated as a visionary, and in many cases his very sanity is doubted. And in this respect, the West is little, if anything, better than the East.” Heie,then,is a clear and outspoken acknowledgment, in the Jewish press and pulpit, of the absence of all spirituality, or of religion in its true sense, in Judaism, as contrasted with the vigorous vitality of Christianity. Is not this a mighty stride in advance? What are a few baptisms of Jews compared to this wonderful awaking of the Jewish masses to a deep sense of their religious needs ? A little more patient continuance ance of prayerful and judicious effort cannot fail to convince them that, what gives Christianity its great superiority is not its organizations, or its modes of working, but the possession of a life principle, which Judaism, with all its external assimilation to the church, has not, and never can have. It is easy for a clever artist to produce the most perfect imitation of the human form; but not all the skill in the world can endow it with living energy. There can be no life, no spirituality, no enthusiasm ; whereas Jews are told again and again, “ religion does not depend upon a book,” and that every one may form what conception ception he pleases of it. Nor is the advance made by the Jews, as a body, merely one in theory, or in a negative direction. 1 hat the truths of the Gospel are winning their way to the hearts of many is equally attested by the Jews themselves, and more particularly by a leader in the organ of Jewish orthodoxy. He “ does not care,” he says, to dwell too much on this point, having no wish to give the conversionists a handle for exaggerated statements.” But there is no need to add to his words ; they are quite enough for our purpose. “It is a fact, he says, “ the truth of which cannot be contradicted, that there are many Jewish children, who possess more knowledge of the New Testament—• the reading of which forms part of the daily routine in the church schools and in most proprietary middle - class schools—than they do of the Old Testament.” And yet the parents cannot but know, how deep and ineffaceable are the impressions such instruction is pioducing upon the tender and receptive hearts of their children, who may be ultimately led, and be the means of leading others, into the fold of Christ. It is this i ejection, suggested, moreover, by personal expei ience of a similar kind, which cheers and sustains the Society’s Missionaries under mental depression in their daily rounds among the Jews. On such occasions, it happens sometimes, that children are asked with pleasurable anticipations by their parents to recite the “ songs ” they have learned at the church schools, which it is part of the Missionaries task to recommend to them. And very delightful it is to listen, as these dear little ones—children of strictly orthodox Jews—sing sweetly some good Gospel hymns. In other directions also recognition of the beneficent influences 'of Christianity is now and then expressed by individual Jews ; and on one occasion in particular, it was all the more cheeringly called forth, by the exhibition of the old virulent enmity, which is not by any means extinct. During a visit to a town in the north of England, Mr. L. P. Samson happened to be grossly insulted by an Israelite of the old school. But as he stood there, bowing his head beneath the storm of abuse, another Israelite, the owner of a large clothing establishment, came upon the scene and administered a severe reprimand to the offender. “ I wish,” he added, “ I were rich enough to employ such men to preach the Gbspel to the Jews.” And, as a further ther proof of his sympathy, he spent eight shillings on the spot in the purchase of Missionary publications. It was in a tone of sadness, that he subsequently observed, with reference to the mayor of his town, “ Would to God, I were as sure of going to heaven, as I am of his going there. Ah ! were the life of every professing fessing Christian like that of the mayor, a neverceasing ceasing demonstration of the power of the Gospel over the heart, Jewish evangelization would proceed more rapidly, and we should hear less of want of success from those very people, who are, in a large measure, responsible for it, . Th * Jewish Siiechita.—A charge of cruelty has recently been brought against a priest and a layman of the Jewish persuasion at the Aberdeen Police court, for having slaughtered sino ll0 E k acc ? rdlD g to the Jewish method, and judgment has since been given in favour of the accused, in connection ith the question a letter appeared in the Times of October Jewist/​ni H hl °r I th6 l Wnter ’o, ‘‘ M * D » F - R - S ->” condemned the in n h t ° f i S ? Ught l er - Thls Bub J ect engaged our attention m December last, when, after a careful review of the Tvln f q , ue ? tl ° n ’ we concluded that a blow on the head, properly executed, is the most immediate and painless form of death E J? h b * animals; but at the same time we were bound to tb ® duration of consciousness after the infliction of the wound must be so short as to render the term “torture” quite inapplicable to the Jewish method. In the letter already referred of blood a win ha V - aD ammal Whlch dies in Hve minutes from loss it 3 d v r ! t r , etam consciousness for three.” If this is meant DersTsts in o - hre , e mi , nut l s 18 th , e length of time that consciousness comnelled fn a 8 sla ! lghtered b ? the Jewish method, we are tin“off of fb? ke e^ Cept ;?“ tO , the abatement. The sudden cuttheVorv theVorv -a j Up piy °i blood to the brain, in conjunction with cannot fail to of from tbat or £ an > are processes which th in fbr 1 to - P * du< ? e 1088 of consciousness in considerably less the“S m fact, within a third of that time. Two of arßumenbhat r“' S ,T de ‘V" fctter are ™f“ted V the that « h ! USt been adduced, while a third, to the effect severe de 6 Pt }> m °*, a cut 18 not momentary, but continues in h° r at . east . tbree minutes,” is not applicable to a as fn our on?/​- &​ mBtruraent > BUcb as is used by the Jews, n'ritish MJcTJmXr* ™ h * ™ rod is P 2 MISSIONARY JOURNEY TO PERSIA. now give an account in Mr. Noroll ah’s 11R V J ' own wo, ‘d s fh e secon J Missionary journey which he made last year—to Dauletabad, Isfahan, Khonsar, Gulpaigan, paigan, Kumain, Sultanabad, Burujird, Nihavend and Tuisirkan:— “ This journey lasted for forty-one days, and was undertaken with the view of visiting 11.1. H. Prince Zil Es Sultan, in order to get permission from him for my return to Isfahan. I went to Isfahan via the Bakhtyary road. There are two roads between Hamadan and Isfahan—the Bakhtyary road and the Main Caravan road. The following are the stages:— Ist. FAR- I I MI- Bakhtyary Road. Hamadan to sakhs miles MoUlis nutes Mangaby .. .. .. 3 12 6 Dauletabad .. .. 6 24 9 Perry .. .. ..! 4 16 6 Astaneh .1 7 28 10 Imam Zadeh Hasem .. 4 16 6 Ali Godarz .. .. ..! 6 24 9 Cham an Sultan .. . 3 12 4 30 Dom i Kamar.. .. 5 20 8 30 Namagird (Armenian village) 3 12 4 30 Razveh .. .. ..3 12 4 30 Bodon .. .. ..! 6 24 Kohan .. .. ..3 12 4 30 Najaf Abad .. .. .. i 3 12 4 Isfahan .. .. .. I 5 20 ! 6 ! 30 Total .. .. 61 244 91 2nd. fah- Mi- Main Caravan Road. Hamadan to sAKiisj MILES ~ouks nutes Mangaby .. .. . 3 12 6 Dauletabad .. .. .. 4 26 9 Perry . .. . 4 16 6 Hassar .. .. . 4j]6|6 Amarat .. .. ..5 20 6 30 Khoi am Abad .. .. 3 12 5 Kumain .. .. ~ 6 24 8 Ghooghe . .. 6 24 8 Dor .. .. 7 28 9 30 Deh Hagh .. .. 6 24 8 Chaleh Siah .. .. 9 36 10 30 Isfahan .. .. 7 28 9 30 Total .. 66 ; 264 92 ' 1 “ t left Hamadan on Saturday, August 12, reaching Dauletabad on Sunday, August 13th, at 11 a.m. “ Dauletabad is the capital of the province of Malayer, and has a population of 25,000 Mohammedans medans and 50 Jews, having four houses and 15 shops. The Jews have no proper place of worship. 1 hey have rented a room in an inn, where they have placed one scroll of the law, and where they attend only once on Saturdays for prayer. Twenty-six of these Jews have no family, and live in the same caravanserai vanserai (inn) where I put up. On the day of my arrival, T saw them all gathered on the terrace of the inn, and talking together. At 8 p.m. I went up the terrace, and passed two hours with them, proclaiming claiming Christ Jesus and Him crucified. “ On Monday, 14, I tarried at Dauletabad, visiting two Jewish houses, in one of which I met with a Jew from Burujird whom I knew at Tehran. He asked MAP OP PERSIA. me to pay the Jews of Burujird a visit. I promised to go there on my wav back. The Jews of Dauletabad are rich, and meet with no persecution, owing to the kindness of the Governor, who is the son of a perverted Jew. They are physicians and druggists, and are much respected by the Mohammedans. "lhe pioducts of Dauletabad consist of gum and raisins. The latter are bought by the Armenians of Hamadan and Tabreez, who export it to Russia. The women occupy their time in weaving carpets, iecei\ ing veiy small pay. I hey work from sunrise to sunset and get Is. Gd. a week. The people of Malayer are tall, fair, hard-working, and kind to strangers. “ I started from Dauletabad on Tuesday, the 15th, at one o’clock in the morning, and arrived at Astaneh on Wednesday, at 8 a.m. I had a gathering of 25 Persians, who came to converse with me on religion. They asked me to give them an account of our faith and religion, and so I spoke and proved to them from the Bible that Jesus is the Saviour of the world, and that by Him alone we can have access to God. Our conversation lasted for an hour and a half. “ Astaneh is a large district of Kazaz province, comprising 17 large villages, and is under the Governor of Irak. They pay 1,000 tomans a year to the Imperial treasury. Wheat and barley are exported to other parts of Persia. It has three saint houses, respected and honoured by the faithful Moslems. On Thursday, the 1/​th, I arrived at Imam Zadeh Hasem, wheie I met with two Gulpaigan Jews, whom I took to my lodging, passing three hours with them. One was a physician, and the other his druggist. gist. During our conversation the physician asked me, ‘ What do th e Christians say about Jesus of Nazareth ?' I replied, ‘Christians believe that Jesus is the promised Messiah, the son of David, of the seed of Abraham, in whom all the families of the earth were to receive blessing. He appeared before the destruction tion of the second temple, and “ was wounded for our transgressions and bruised for our iniquities : the chastisement of our peace was upon Him and with His stripes we are healed.” “ Physician : ‘ Has the King Messiah come ? ’ I : ‘Yes, He came about 1,900 years ago.’ P.: ‘Why then do our rabbis not tell us anything about His appearance ? ’ I: ‘On account of the hardness of their hearts they have kept, and still keep, the Jewish nation in darkness.’ P. : May God have mercy upon us and forgive our sins.’ I: ‘lf you offer your prayers through Jesus, the promised Messiah, God will hear you.’ “ On-Thursday, the 24th, I arrived at the camp of H.I.H. the Prince Zil Es Sultan, at Hadji Abad, 30 miles from Isfahan. I had an audience ence of his highness, who was very hospitable, pitable, and gave me permission mission to stay at Isfahan. han. “ On Friday, August 25th, I reached Julfa (Isfahan), han), and put THE king’s SQUAKE, ISFAHAN. up with the Rev. H. Carless, of the C. M. Society, and was very glad to see the proselytes again. “ On Monday, the 28th, I went to Jubareh (Jewish quarter) and found Joseph Elyahu at the Depot. When the Jews of Isfahan heard of my return they appealed to the Chief Mohammedan priest to have me expelled again. The priest thereupon wrote to the Deputy-Governor of Isfahan and asked him to expel me, because I should do much harm to the Jews and Mohammedans of Isfahan. “On Wednesday, after morning prayers, Mr. Carless’ servant informed me that the Governor’s servants had come to Julfa to seize me. I called the farashes into my room and asked them what they wanted of me. They replied that by the order of the Deptfty-Governor, they had come to arrest me and to take me to town. I went thither and saw the ; Deputy-Governor, who addressed me thus : ‘ Mirza Norollah, why do you trouble the Jews ? What have have you got to do with them ? They have com-1 -1 plained against you to the Mollah, who has written to me about you. Come to-morrow to Divan Khaneh and your matter will be settled.’ “ I went to Julfa and presented the case to the British consul, who kindly wrote the following note to the British Agent:— ‘ Go to-morrow to Divan | Khaneh with Mr. Norollah, and if they ask you why you have come with him, say that he is an agent of a British Society, and that you have come there that no injustice may be done to him.’ “ Accordingly the Agent accompanied me the following ing day to Divan Khaneh where we met the Deputy- Governor and the representative tative of the chief priest. The Mollah then told me, ‘The Jews have complained plained against you, saying that you are a Babi, therefore,youmust fore,youmust not stay here.’ However, through the kindness of the British Agent, every thing passed off quietly, and I returned to Julfa, remaining till Tuesday, September the sth, when I mounted my horse with the idea of returning to Hamadan. “ I arrived at Khonsar on Saturday, the 9th, and took lodging at an inn. In 1890 I had visited Khonsar and passed a few days there. The Jews remembered me. A few came and asked for Bibles and Haphtorahs. torahs. I visited the Jewish quarter on the day of my arrival and went to the house of a Jew, with wham I conversed on the Atonement of Christ, in the presence of other Jews and Jewesses. Our discussion lasted for two hours. “ I rested on the Lord’s Day, received the Jews in my lodging and conversed with them. “ The Jews of Khonsar number about 40 families of 200 persons, having two synagogues. They are much persecuted, and most of them are poor. They work very hard to earn their daily bread. A few are physicians of repute and make a great deal of money by their profession. “ On Monday I left Khonsar for Gulpaigan, where I passed the whole day in the Jewish quarter. This was my second visit to Gulpaigan, and the Jews on hearing of my arrival came to see me. Being the Jewish New Year, all the Jews of Gulpaigan, who were in the other villages, had come home to pass the fast with their families, so that I had a good chance of seeing those whom I had not seen on my previous visit. I availed myself of this opportunity, and visited as many of them as I could in one day. The Bab religion has taken a deep root amongst the Jews of Gulpaigan, and even the rabbi has become a Babi. My subject ject of conversation with the Jews of this place was : ‘Forgivenessof sins through thG blood of the Lamb of God who taketh away the sin of the world.’ “On Tuesday, the 12th, I reached Kumain, passing the whole day there. It is the capital of the province vince of Kamareh, with a Jewish population of 25 persons. Towards sunset I sent for the Jews to come to me. I then held a regular gular service, and preached that the Messiah has come, and that Jesus is He. The Jews did not discuss the subject. They heard my sermon, and with a glad heart said good-bye and left. I reached Sultanabad on Thursday, the 17th. It is the capital of the province of Irak, and one of the nicest cities of Persia. The streets and bazaars are built stiaight and paiallel to each other. The population consists of about 35,000 persons, including twentyfive five to thirty Jews who have come from Kashan and Hamadan to trade with the Persians. The Jews all live in an inn, and have arranged one room there for prayers. I visited the inn on the day of my A PERSIAN GATEWAY. arrival and passed a few hours with them. They were very kind and hospitable, and wanted to keep me there for the night. “At Senijar, a village near Sultanabad, is a Jewish colony of one hundred families, who are welltreated treated by the Persians. The export trade of Sultanabad abad consists of carpets and raisins. There are two European firms in Sultanabad, both exporting carpets to Europe. The carpets are all prepared by the women, who receive very little pay. The best carpets of Persia are made here and in the villages round about. I passed only one day here and started for Burujird at 4 a.m. on Friday, day, 15th, where I arrived on Sunday, the 17th, at seven in the morning. Burujird rujird is regarded as the capital of the Bakhtyarv country, though sometimes the Governors make Khoram Abad their capital. Burujird has high walls and gates, with four different ent quarters. The population tion consists of from 25,000 to 30,000 Persians, with 500 Jews, having 49 houses, 23 shops, one large synagogue, gogue, and one public bath. The Persians do not permit mit Christians to live amongst them, so when any European or Armenian happens to come there the Mollah makes inquiries about him. Opium, gum, and raisins are the chief articles of export. After a few hours’ rest I went to the Jewish quarter and entered the house of a Jew whom I had met at Dauletabad. I found my friend at home, and when the Jews heard of my arrival many of them came to see me, and I passed three hours with them. I also visited many Jewish shops and the synagogue. “ I started the same day for Nihavend, where I arrived on Monday, the 18th, at 9 a.m. I went to the Jewish inn to find a lodging there, but when the Jews heard J was a Missionary they refused to give me one. It took me an hour before I could find a room in a Mohammedan house near the Jewish quarter. At 4 p.m. I went to the Jewish quarter and entered a house, where I met the Chief Rabbi and the elders of the Jewish community, with whom I held a conversation about the Day of Atonement. I was there till 10.30 p.m., when I came home. Nihavend has a Jewish population of 800 persons with two large synagogues. Many of them are physicians and very influential. The Jews of Nihavend, like those of Dauletabid, have no persecution, cution, because the Governor of the latter place governs Nihavend as well, and he is of Jewish A GROUP OF BAKHTYARIS. origin, so that he shows the greatest kindness to the Jews. “ About two years since the totnb of * Chedorlaomer King of Elam ’ was found at Nihavend. When the Shah went there a year and half ago he had the tomb examined, and took to Tehran the covering of the tomb, a large stone with inscription, which proved to be the real tomb of that King. The Jews believe that the tomb of the prophet f Hosea, the son of Beeri,’ is situated about 10 miles to the north of Nihavend, and it is a place of pilgrimage for them. At this time of the year (Day of Atonement) many Jews resort thither. “I- left Nihavend on the 18th of September, reaching Tuisirkan on the 19th at noon, and engaged lodgings iii the Jewish inn. According to Jewish belief the tomb of another prophet is at this place. They say that the prophet Habakkuk is buried there, but there is no ground for this belief. The Jews of Hamadan have collected money to repair the tomb and to make a room near there. “ Many Jews of Tuisirkan have become perverts to the religion of Bab, and it is very strange how this religion has taken a deep root amongst the Jews in the places which I visited. Ido hope that God will soon convince them of their errors and make Christ known to them. I stayed here for one day, when I returned to Hamadan, where I arrived on Wednesday, the 20th September.” We give a map of Persia showing the places visited by Mr. Norollah during the last five years. JERUSALEM NOTES. Tr— ~ jj To the deep regret < „ Tjl f: of the Committee 1 and workers ' n Miss Louisa J. Barlee the great changes ■ which have taken 111 j —;=​• =​i placo around Je-1;:: -1;:: . ilffil rusalem during II;I■w-Si'dilSftSil!! this p eriod |L~ " ; .X -j| «. The city and its population have increased creased : innumerable houses have been built outside the city walls, and new colonies formed. Rows of new houses are to be seen in places where, when I first came, I used to pick wild flowers among the rocks and stones; and from a few families visited my Jewish acquaintances can scarcely now be counted, though scittered far and wide. ‘Progress’ is written on everything. thing. The Jaffa Railway, now an established thing, ceases to be an object of wonder to the native population ; new lines will soon be open in other parts of the country ; a boat now crosses the Dead Sea, and lately, I received a letter from Kerak in Moab, where postal communication with this city has been established. Formerly we had to' wait three or four months for the chance of some camel-driver coming over with merchandize. In Jerusalem itself civilization has made rapid strides; carriages of every description are now plying to and fro on the different new roads. There were none when I came but the few rough vehicles that carried passengers to and from Jaffa. Every necessary is now obtainable, to say nothing of many luxuries. “ Missionaries, too, are multiplied. The C. M. Society are taking up work and sending agents all over Palestine, and our own Society has increased its staff. It would seem that the Lord’s time to favour Zion is at hand ; but what we now long to see is progress in the advance of Christ’s Kingdom in this His favoured land, and that on Moslem and Jew the true light should shine, that blind eyes may be opened and deaf ears unstopped. stopped. This God’s Spirit alone can do; may He pour it on the workers and the work ! ‘ ‘ As one draws near to the close of a period of service in the vineyard of the Lord, and especially in this His holy city, one cannot but feel cast down and humiliated, and the thoughts will arise, ‘ Had I been more faithful, more might have been accomplished.’ plished.’ One can only lay it all in deep contrition at the Master’s feet, and ask that where and when the seed has been sown in faith, and according to His will, He will not let it be void.” Miss E. G. Birks, in speaking of a Jewish famfly which she visits nearly every Sabbath, says : “The wan is a baker, and has to stay at home till after midday to give his neighbours their hot dinners. The Jewish customs in this respect are very curious. They think it a deadly sin to strike a match, or put wood on the fire on the Sabbath, far worse than telling a lie, or cursing their children. I mentioned this to my Hebrew teacher one day, who is a very intelligent man, as a proof of the superstition of the women, and, to my surprise, he said the same—lying was not punished with death, Sabbathbreaking breaking was. But the Jews wish for a hot dinner on the Sabbath as much as any English working-man, so the bakers’ ovens are made very hot on Friday evening, and all the people bring their dinners in earthen jars and put them in before the Sabbath begins. The oven is shut and not opened again till after the synagogue service next morning, about 9 a.m. Then to get their dinners they must get round the law, to bear no burden on the Sabbath. This law is said not to apply within the city gates, but a strict Jew will not carry a book, a parasol, or even a handkerchief beyond the walls. More than half the Jews live outside, so to get their dinners they have a convenient fiction ; they put a string round a group of houses, including the oven, and say that makes it a walled city. So a Jewish baker who wants to oblige his customers has a busy time on the Sabbath morning. This man will not take dinners out after 10 a.m., but they may fetch them till noon. He is very ignorant, but observes his own religion as far as he knows it, and wishes he knew more. He can read Hebrew without understanding it, and cannot read anything else, and he thinks it a duty to read the Psalms, so we translate a Hebrew Psalm into Spanish in the intervals of his customers, and he is very grateful, and I get many opportunities to speak of Christ.” Jewish Colonies in the Lanh of Israel. According to the newest intelligence from Dr. Dalmin, of Leipzig, the Colonies are the following : A. —Near Jaffa: 1 Mikvah Israel 240 Hectare 178 inhabitants. 2 Rishon l’Zion 594 „ 266 ~ 3 Nachalet Reuben 135 ~ 64 ~ 4 Rehoboth 950 „ 119 ~ 5 Mizkareth Baiteh 700 ~ 150 ~ 6 Gederah 280 ~ 89 ~ 7 Bar Tobeah 630 ~ 20 8 Pethach Tikvah 1300 „ 350 ~ B. —Near Safed: 1 Rosh Pineh 720 „ 370 „ ( 2 ’Ain Zeitun 430 ~ 20 ) „ \ 3 Mahanaim 470 „ _ ,| ] one colony. 4 Geshur Hayordan 200 ~ 20 ~ 5 Mishmar Hayordan 200 „ 88 ” 6 Yesood Hamaalah 216 ~ 96 ~ In addition to the above the following lands have been acquired by Israelites in Galilee: — Meroon 80 Hectars Kefr Sebt 1350 „ Phram 450 „ El Kheit 734 „ B’emek Yezreel 1450 ~ Hattin 90 „ Sagra 360 „ Methulah 1000 „ B. —Near Mount Carmel:— 1 Zikron Yakoob 2116 Hectars 600 inhabitants. 2 El Huderah L'OOO ~ C. —Beyond Jordan : A society in Paris has purchased Krefah, 11,700 Hectars: Bozrah andGergus, 2,000 Hectars ; Hen Seach and Betema, 7,000 Hectars. Altogether 43,005 Hectars are in possessi >n of Israelites, and there are 2,430 inhabitants in the Colonies, MODERN JEWS ON JESUS OF NAZARETH. The following is from the Review of Reviews for February : — Mr. Jacob Voorsanger, who claims “ without fear of criticism or contradiction” to represent the modern Jewish standpoint, gives' in the January Overland Monthly his “View of Jesus of Nazareth.” “ Christianity is,” he says, “ a system that he fully understands as a religion, but fails to comprehend as a theology.” THE TWO PORTRAITS. He compares the traditional with what he conceives to be the real portrayal of the Christ: — Shorn of all theological attributes, divested of his Greek garments, disrobed and appearing in the strong light of history, the majestic character and figure of the Nazarene are intelligible enough to a Hebrew. The earliest Greek and Roman pictures of the Christ represent him as bare-headed, crowned with the nimbus, enveloped in a long flowing robe, bare foot or sandaled, with a gentle, dreamy face, every line of which is an expression of deep spirituality. Jews do not understand such a representation. tion. It is an expression of Greek thought. The Jewish sculptor, Moses Ezekiel, born at Richmond, Virginia, has had another conception of the Christ. He had chiseled out of the choicest marble the noble figure of a Jewish patriot, strong, sturdy, attired like a Hebrew of the period of the Galilean, —a youth with turbaned head, and a face flashing with genius. That answers more faithfully to the Jewish idea of Jesus. A son of his people, his heart aflame with great intents, his ambition wholly to restore the Law, his dream that of the prophets, to bring the kingdom of Heaven to the children of earth, he preached a millennium to men engaged in quarrels and contentions. If he failed, if his life paid the forfeit, it was the sorrowful consequence of troubled times. But his teachings, as they appear upon the face of his book, not as they are interpreted preted by hair-splitting metaphysicians, his teachings are the genuine echoes of the holy themes propounded by the old prophets. A life led in harmony with such teachings, the same teachings given to Israel in the Law and the prophets, must needs be pure and holy. This much we understand, —why cannot all the world thus read these teachings, and thus, to quote the great words of Sir Moses Montefiore, remove the title page between the Old and the New Testament ? But that time has not yet come. “ THE MOST IMPORTANT JEW WHO EVER LIVED.” In the Jewish Quarterly Review, Mr. C. G. Montefiore, one of the editors, in beginning “ to notice for t .e first time a book dealing with the New Testament ” —an American Unitarian’s sermons on “ Jesus and Modern Life”—remarks : Any critical attempt to determine the true character and teaching of the most important Jew who ever lived—of one who exercised a greater influence upon mankind and civilisation than any other person, whether within the Jewish race or without it—is surely qualified for a notice in a magazine devoted to Jewish history, literature, and religion. A book dealing with the teaching of a Jew whose life and character have been regarded by almost all the best and wisest people who have heard or read of his actions and his woids as the great religious exemplar for every age, is surely d priori , as we might say, worth the attention of Jewish readers. “THE ORIGINALITY OF JESUS.” Mr. Montefiore is “inclined to believe” that in Collecting, developing, and adjusting in true proportion the best elements of religion existing in his time, —“ herein to a great extent lay the originality of Jesus.” I believe . . . that a main principle in the teaching of Jesus was “pure inwardness” . . . and that Jesus, emphasising an aspect of morality which is of abiding and immense value in a marked and original way, has for this alone well-earned his place as one of the great teachers of mankind. It was not new teaching ; but he gave the principle a novel position of importance, and illumined it by his genius. Nevertheless, it is only one aspect of morality. The Rabbis spoke of “ our Father who is in heaven” as well as Jesus. But it does seem to me as if Jesus fixed upon the most tender and intimate term for God current in his time, used it more habitually, and gave it a special nuance of beauty and love. HIS CLAIM TO BE MESSIAH. “ One notable, and as I should be disposed to say, original feature in the teaching of Jesus,” goes on the Jewish editor, is that with regard to sin. “ The sinner and the outcast, age after age, have owed a debt of gratitude to Jesus.” It seems to me, so far, that Mr. Savage is perfectly right in concluding that Jesus supposed himself to be “ The Messiah.” . . . Certainly the claim of Jesus to be the Messiah did not seem to exercise any corrosive or warping influence upon his character. He was not puffed up by vanity or self-assertion or conceit. He remained pure and humble and loving to the last. Mr. Montefiore concludes his review by asking, “ May a purified Christianity and a purified Judaism, each, in friendly rivalry, lay claim to Jesus and his religion ? ” “I am ready xo go.” —Mrs. Sale*; of the London Mission, relates the case of a widow living by herself in a small room, in very poor but clean surroundings. “I have known her as visiting Mission Halls for the past eleven years, and, since she came under my particular notice, I have never lost an opportunity of telling her the story of Jesus and His love. One day when I visited her she expressed a wish to have a Bible, which I at once sent her. Afterwards she became ill, when she told me that she was able to be comforted by the words she had read in the precious Bible, and had, little by little, come to believe that Jesus died for the whole world, and at last found that He died for her. I saw the Bible I had given her lying open on a table by her bedside. The last time I visited her, I found her in bed very weak and scarcely able to breathe. Between gasping sounds she was able to say to me, ‘lf you never see me again on this earth, you may thaufc God that your pleading has not been in vain, for when Jesus calls me, I am ready to go to my home of rest.’ ” The Jews of the Sahara. —The tribe dwelling in the wastes of the Sahara which lays claim to be of __Jewish descent is called Ibn Mazob. In 1854 this tribe made a treaty .with the French agreeing to pay tribute. Their method of government is Republican, and the people arc traders dealing with Asia Minor and even as far as Timbuctoo. They also join as guides the caravans that travel to Morocco, Tunis, Algeria, and Egypt. They own large nerds of camels, this useful animal being tneir chief possession, and their riohes are accordingly estimated by the number of their herd. They are fair in their dealings and love their families. Politically they are divided into two groups, one favoring French ideas, whilst the other desires to give its allegiance to Morocco. Members of the tribes are to be found iu all Bessarabian and Asian markets, and the tribe collectively holds itself responsible for the insolvency of the is his surety. — Jewish World. I THE OLD CLOTHES’ MARKET. THE JEWS OF MOSCOW. ove ty situation and surr oundings as well as delicious climate, is rightlycalled called “ the flower of cities,” and “ the I city of flowers,” Moscow may be termed “the city of churches and gardens,” 4 both of which are oriental in character, j Moscow is considered by the Russians as the holiest city of the Empire, but St. Petersburg has taken the place of Moscow as its capital, and during the reign ©f the Emperor Nicholas, they were put in communication tion by rail. He was evidently anxious that the distance between them should be as short as possible. It is related that he sent for the contractor, and showing him the two cities on the map, he drew a straight line from the one to the other, sayino: bo is the railway to be constructed.” ° Tiie number of churches in Moscow, celebrated for their wealthy and gorgeous decorations, is amazing, scarcely less than 1 (iOO It is a common saying, often heard in parts of Russia near the German frontier, that when you have crossed the Vistula eastward towards Moscow, you are, though nominally still in Europe, really in Asia. This may be an exaggerated gerated statement, but when once in Moscow, all doubt on this score is at an end. Moscow is a truly Asiatic city with some few struggling European elements of civilization. The “ Old Clothes’ Market,” represented sented in the illustration, is a type of every day Moscow life. There you find the Russian peasant, the Russian priest, not much superior to him in intellect and education, the artisan, foreigners from nearly all parts of the world, and principally the Jew in his capacity of middleman, until lately supreme in all transactions between Christians in the holy city as well as elsewhere in Russia. He is, however, fast disappearing from a place considered too sacred to give him shelter, especially since the persecutions commenced there early in 1891, which have driven thousands sands of his brethren from the city. It is at first difficult to understand why the spirit of persecution has been revived against this unhappy race not only at Moscow, but throughout the Russian Empire. However, the policy of the Russian Government becomes intelligible enough, when we consider that the blow fails with crushing effect only upon the poor, who are a burden to the community and unable to bribe the rapacious officials. The wealthy Jewish merchants belonging to the first Guild are allowed to remain, because cause they are a source of revenue to the state. The Government does not compel them to become Christians, as a condition of residence. Many of them from conviction, viction, others from various motives, such as the prospect of advancement for themselves or their children, the intention of marriage with Christians, the conviction that Judaism is out of date, and scores of other reasons, leave the religion of their forefathers fathers and seek baptism. Very few, comparatively speaking, enter the Greek Church, -being repelled by the gross superstitions, idolatry, and complicated ceremonial of that Church so abhorrent to the Jewish mind. The majority become Lutherans or Scale of EnjflishMUea 9 100 800 yxr 090 MAP OP KtrSSIA, SHOWING THE PALE OP JEWISH SETTLEMENT. Calvinists, but the restrictions being very great, and baptism into those Churches forbidden in Russia, except by special permission in every case from the Minister of the Interior (a permission which takes months to obtain), they usually cross the frontier and are baptized out of Russia by Lutheran or Reformed Pastors, returning in due course to their respective places of residence and being recognized as Christians by the authorities. Small Jewish tradespeople take the same course, with this difference, that they are compelled within q certain time to embrace Christianity or to leave the country. To those who might and do remonstrate against such a proceeding, as tending to favour hypocrisy, the Russians reply : “ Never mind about that; the children of baptized Jews will become earnest Christians.” There is something in that on the principle that the end justifies the means. Many of these Jews have gone to England or to America, A POLISH JEW OP THE “PALE OF SETTLEMENT.” to begin life over again; not a few have met with bitter disappointment and have returned to Russia, after having obtained religious instruction and baptism in those countries or in some continental town on the way. It is astonishing how earnest and sincere many of these proselytes become, and how careful they are to provide for their children a sound Christian education. They even do this before embracing Christianity. It is a fact, and a very gratifying one, that an immense proportion of Jewish children in Russia are sent by their parents to Christian schools, where they, of course, imbibe Christian principles, thus effectually preparing the way for the gradual pulling down of the strongholds of Judaism and the absorption of a great part of Israel by the Christian Church. What greater proof can we have among many others of the fact that Jewish prejudices are fast melting away before the glorious advancing banner of the Cross ! Missionary enterprise has done immensely to effect this desirable object. Even the Russian Church is awaking from her long slumber of indifference to Israel’s conversion. What is occurring at Yilna now is a sign of the times : A Jewish proselyte, belonging to the Russian Church, is actually employed in Missionary work amongst the Jews of that town. But to return to Moscow. The Jewish population there, before the persecution began, was from 30,000 to 40,000, the majority belonging to the artisan class. Since 1891 this number has been and is being still considerably reduced by laws compelling Jews of that class to live in the already overcrowded “ Pale of Settlement,” where the struggle for existence is terrible. This “ Pale of Settlement ” is a long, narrow strip of territory stretching almost from the Baltic to the Black Sea, and comprising fifteen provinces, viz., the old Polish provinces of Kovno, Yilna, Grodno, Minsk, Kiev, Podoliaand Volhynia, the Governments (as they are called) of Chernigof, Poltawa, Yekaterinoslief, Vitebsk and Mohilef, Kherson, Bessarabia, and the Crimea. It is marked in vertical shaded lines on the map. In the ten provinces of Russian-Poland Jews have not hitherto been interfered with ; but, if rumours are correct, they are not likely to be left Jong undisturbed. If we are to believe Drumont, the author of La France Juive, this systematic persecution of God’s ancient people is to be regarded, not as a retrograde movement towards the darkness of the Middle Ages, but as an advance in the right direction. He makes use in his book, La France Juive clevant Vopinion, of the following extraordinary language, page 38 : “ Russia, which is preparing for the great destiny in store for her, has done what France did in 1394 and Spain in 1492 ; she has taken against Jews the most rigorous measures. Russia, emerging from barbarism into civilization, takes the most salutary precautions to prevent foreign Jews from residing in her midst to conspire against her.” Since 1886, when these lines were written, and even before that time, persecution has not only affected Jews of foreign nationality in Russia, but of Russian nationality as well Thousands upon thousands have been compelled through successive edicts being levelled against them in Moscow and elsewhere, to leave their homes, either for the “ PalQ of Settlement ” or for foreign countries, CONSTANTINOPLE. BURNING OF SCRIPTURES. Rev. J. B. Crighton-Ginsburg writes : “ People are under the impression that autos-da-fe, or destruction of books by fire, are a thing of the past. It is, indeed, not known among the Algerian or Tunisian Jews, and rarely, if ever, now in Morocco; but in Constantinople, with its boasted civilization, and with a strong element of refined Jews, who would be shocked to have the title of liberal Jews refused to them—yes, in Constantinople those autos-da-fe of the dark ages are still practised. One hardly understands why the Old Testament, which the Jew buys—and the sacred volume entire, or in portions, is annually sold to the Jews by hundreds —why, the self-same book, when presented as a gift becomes unclean ; yet it is a fact, as sad as it is true, to state that for the third time to my knowledge whole cases of Holy Scriptures have been destroyed by fire with a fanaticism and bitterness hardly credible in these days of progress and liberality among the Jews in other countries. Friends in England send from time to time cases of Scriptures to be given away. Now if those were given to the resident Missionaries, with the request not to sell, but to distribute them gratis, we should have been glad of and thankful for such a boon. Copy after copy would then in proper time be distributed, and the grateful recipient would profit by the gift, while the original benefactor would have his object realised, and reason to expect a blessing; but, I regret to say, given, the books are, away in a wholesale sale fashion. The result is disastrous. Those sacred volumes, for which in Uganda the natives hunger and thirst, and for the smallest portion of which the heathen would give a cow or a sheep, yea, everything, to possess, the Jew furiously burns and would not allow one sheet to fly away. Refreshing Days. “In the beginning of this month Dr. H. W. Anderson refreshed the Mission with a friendly visit, he, as well as Dr. G. Wright, formerly of Uganda, who came ten days later, did not begrudge now and then drops of spiritual rain to refresh and revive us. Admiral H. D. Grant, too, gave a hurried address to the children of the Training Home. These ‘ angel ’ visits are much needed when appreciated. Visits. “At the Khan at Galata, enquirers and others called to see me. Among them was N of Ph who several years ago becoming a member of Y. Y. M. A. for reading the Old Testament, studied the Scriptures, and came now to confess Him of whom Moses and the prophets speak. On a later visit N brought his father with him, in the hope that he too might soften down. His hope was more than realised. Certain Messianic passages of Scripture, which he said he knew by heart, without giving them a thought, made such an impression on the old man that he at once yielded, and, almost in the words of Nathaniel, exclaimed, ‘ Rabbi, Thou art the Son of God. Thou art the King of Israel.’ They both anticipate baptism. Connected with the above Association is A. nephew of A a learned, well-to-do, as well as highly respected Jew. A the younger, was an enquirer some years ago. Illness,want of employment, and business arrangements have successively prevented vented him from accomplishing his decision to confess the Saviour publicly. There seems now nothing in the way, and his desire may soon be realised; in fact, his baptism was arranged on Sexagesima Sunday, but he was unfortunately bitten by a dog when on his way to Ortakeuy and had to go to the Hospital. Two Jews, both laid up, have had my particular sympathy. pathy. One of them is S -, a well-bred, intelligent Jew, filling a responsible position, whose wife, also a Jewess, had received a Christian education. When he was ill with intermittent fever, I was invited to pay him a visit. Gentle and polite, he seemed accessible to all I had to say, but was silent when I spoke of Israel’s Physician, who forgiveth all iniquities and healeth all diseases. The second, far advanced in consumption, seemed nearer the kingdom of God. His child was an inmate of the Training Home. His wife was pleased to see me, while the invalid received me as one who could do him good. He took off the covering from his head when I prayed, looked with intense interest at me when I spoke, and entreated me to come again. “ Fruits of Former Labour. —It was a pleasant surprise to see Greenfield and his wife looking as their name signifies—fresh and vigorous. Some two years ago, new from Russia, they weie staiving, physically and spiritually, when their attention was drawn to the Messiah. They crossed again and again the Bosphorus to be initiated into His precepts, but as I was unable to keep them for any length of time they left for Smyrna. Then our Scotch brethren took care of them, instructed and baptized them. They have now returned, contemplating to settle heie, and looking happy in their Christian profession. sion. The number of applications for admission of children to the Training Home was during the month considerable, and so was that from relations to see the inmates. These twofold applications always offer opportunities of speaking of the Messiah, in whose Name the young ones are received, cared for, and trained in the way they should go. Among the j latter came two brothers who, for the first time, heard that the Messiah, for whose advent they piayed three times daily, had already come, and that He is Jesus of Nazareth. They looked at each other in evident surprise, and asked for more information on the subject. “ R > to whom I have already referred as a rebel against the truth, and procrastinating, having been laid on a sick bed and suffering, has at last yielded, saying to her Christian daughter, ‘ I am ready now, and, should it please Israel’s Physician to restore me, I will acknowledge Him as my Redeemer.’ ” The Annual Meeting: in connection with the Manchester and Salford Auxiliary was held in the Religious Institute, on Monday, February 20. R. Phillips, Esq., presided, and the Revs. Hector McNeile, M.A., Vicar of Bredbury, and S. Schor addressed the Meeting, which was a decided advance on former years, the collection lection being £4 6s. B d. The room was well tilled, the following clergymen and laymen being on the platform : G. F. Watts, Esq” Mr. Mayor Wilson ; Revs. T. Wolstencroft, Rector of St. Mary’s] Moston; C. P. Taylor, Curate of Harpurhey; J. W. Consterdine,’ Vicar of St. Thilip’s, Alderley Edge; Edwin Jones, Rector of St. Anne’s, Newton Heath ; D. Ellison, Rector of All Saints’, Manchester; J. Chippendall, Rector of St. Luke’s, Cheetham Hill ; W. H. Finney, Rector of Holy Trinity, Rusholme; T. B. Dixon, icar of St. James’, Ashton-under-Lyne; J. Leighton, < Rector of Harpurhey, Hon. Secretary ; Mr. Hacker, the Society’s i Missionary in Manchester ; and other laymen. i Letters of regret for inability to attend were also received from ] Canon Birley, Rector of St. Philip’s, Hulme; Rev. J. A. N. Hibbert, 1 Rector of Higher Blackley; Rev. A. C. Balkeley, Vicar of £ Andenshaw; Rev. J. S. Brown, Chaplain of the Workhouse, 1 Salford: and Rev. S. D. Rees, Vicar of St. George’s, Pendle- ton. j The report presented contained the following statement: “On 1 the last two Anniversaries your Committee have spoken with c satisfaction and hope of the local work which is carried on in the si Mission Room, 8, Dutton Street, Cheetham. They are happy to say that the'same hopefulness and satisfaction continue. The h meetings in this Mission Room, together with the local Mission- I fj ary s meetings with the Jews in their own houses, constitute one I c< of the strongest recommendations of the Society to friends in our C immediate neighbourhood, j g, l “ Mighty in the Scriptures .” A Memoir of Adolph Saphir , T).D. > % the Gavin Carlyle, M.A. London: John F. Shaw &​ Co. [first notice.] We have much pleasure in reviewing this intensely interesting work—the life of one of the two “ most distinguished trophies of Divine grace” which have been bestowed upon the Free Church of Scotland’s Mission to the Jews in Hungary ; the other, being the late Dr. Edersheim. Dr. Saphir was as the late Dr. Andrew Bonar described him, “ a Hebrew of Hebrews in the best sense.” The author, in quoting Acts xviii. 24 on the title page, “A | certain Jew an eloquent man, and mighty in the Scriptures,” and applying them to Dr. Saphir, has given a most concise and true summary of the life of this eminent servant of God. We can cordially endorse the author’s remarks in his Preface , j that the life of D-r. Saphir was one of remarkable interest, not so | much in its variety of incidents as in its early associations, and in the striking personnel of the man. This is seen in his thorough Jewish type of mind and intellect, intensified by the genius of the Saphir family, in the freshness and originality of his ideas and expressions, and above all, in his spiritual power—his deep insight into the meaning of Scripture and the relations of its different parts. The expression, “ Mighty in the Scriptures,” truly describes him. In his commanding knowledge of the spirit and purport of the various books of the Bible, few preachers of his own or any age approach him. He foreshadows in this what great results may be anticipated from the promised restoration of Israel. Adolph Saphir was born at Pesth in 1832, his father being a merchant and good Hebrew scholar, well known to all the Jews of Hungary. Converted to Christianity in 1843, he was baptized | with his family, Adolph being then in his 12th year. Old Mr. Saphir had everything to lose, but he counted all things but loss for the excellency to be found in Christ. Dr. Smith, one of the Scotch Missionaries at that time, says:—“He was, perhaps, the most learned Jew in Hungary, and held in universal respect for probity and uprightness of character. He was, in truth, a sort of Gamaliel in the nation. He was the bosom friend of the Chief Rabbi, and the most leading and trusted man in every benevolent and useful undertaking. A hundred other conversions could not have produced the same impressions as his,” consequently, we can well believe the author’s statement that the conversion of Mr. Saphir and his family caused a great sensation among the Jews, who knew that as a Jew he had been remarkable for honesty and wisdom, and who could not believe that in becoming a Christian he was a deceiver. The Scriptures were therefore in many Jewish houses with avidity. Christianity became a subject of study and conversation in Jewish families, and the Missionaries found themselves selves too few to overtake the enquirers.” At the age of 12 young Adolph went to Edinburgh to perfect his knowledge of English, and was accompanied by two of his boy friends, Alfred Edersheim and Alexander Tornory, another convert of the Mission, who afterwards became the Free Church’s Missionary to the Jews at Constantinople. Old Mr Saphir was Missionary of the free Church in Re§th from 1852 to 1861, and died in 1864, at the ripe age of 84, rejoicing in God his Saviour. In 1844 Adolph Saphir went to Berlin to prosecute his studies, and remained there till 1848, where he became acquainted with the Rev. Theodore Meyer, now a Missionary of the English Presbyterian 1 hurch in London, with whom he continued in closest friendship to the end of his life. In 1848 Saphir entered Glasgow University to study for the ministry, and subsequently Aberdeen College and the Free Church College, Edinburgh. From the last-named place he wrote a letter to the Rev. Charles Kingsley, thanking him for his writings, and received the following reply, which has since had a wide publicity “For your nation I have a very deep love; first, because so many intimate friends of mine—and in one case a near connection —are Jews; and next, because I believe, as firmly as any modern interpreter of prophecy, that you are still ‘ The Nation,’ and that you have a glorious, as I think a culminating, part to play in the history of the race. Moreover, over, I owe all I have ever said or thought about Christianity tianity as the idea which is to redeem and leaven all human life, ‘ secular ’ as well as ‘ religious,’ to the study of the Old Testament, without which the New is to me unintelligible ; and I cannot love the Hebrew books without out loving the men who wrote them.” In 1853 Saphir worked for three months amongst the Jews in Hamburg, and afterwards wards in the East End of London, and was ordained at Belfast in the Irish Presbyterian byterian Church in 1854 as || a Missionary to the Jews, H and laboured at Hamburg in that capacity for a short time; where he published several pamphlets and tracts, amongst which were “ Werist der Apostat?” (Who is the Apostate?) and Wer ist ein Jude ? (Who is a Jew ?) both of which have been eminently useful. After a time Saphir returned to Scotland, preaching there in a Church placed at his disposal, until he settled at South Shields, and entered on what the author justly calls “his great lifework work as an English preacher.” His ministry there lasted for hve years, when he removed to Greenwich in 1861, and took charge of St. Mark’s Presbyterian Church. Ilis fame had preceded him, and numbers flocked to his ministry, and almost immediately he «gathered round him people of all churches, especially earnest-minded Christians.” One who attended his successful ministry wrote:—“What was the secret of it? a fine intellect? a splendid command of language'? a wide and comprehensive prehensive knowledge of Scripture ? All these he had, and they were blessed gifts of God ; but the secret was, that Jesus was to him first and foremost. He saw Jesus from Genesis to Revelation, and this Jesus became transfigured (at least to ope of his hearers), THE LATE DK. SAPHIE. no longer the abstract mighty Being far away somewhere in heaven ; but the living, loving, exalted, coming Son of man, yet to be glorified and owned in this world, where He is still despised, when all things, natural as well as spiritual, shall own His sway and praise His name.” J Whilst at Greenwich Saphir’s pen was busy, and besides bein- a frequent contributor to Good Words, he wrote The Golden A li C of the Jews, Thoughts on Psalm cxix., and his famous ( hrist and the Scriptures, in which he thus shewed that the New Testament cannot be intelligently understood without using the Old Testament as a kind of dictionary “ The thought of many is, I can read all about Jesus, much better described, more clearly and more fully in the New Testament. I believe this to be erroneous, and in part bordering on superstition. Take the Gospels : how can we understand them without Moses and the Prophets P The very first of Matthew is unintelligible : The book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the Son of David the Son of Abraham. ‘ is David ?—who Abraham ham ? What meaning is there in this genealogy?’ If we want to understand the Gospels, the life and teaching of Jesus, we require the same preparation as Israel enjoyed.” In 1872 Saphir entered upon the pastorate of a church at Notting Hill, where, in 1873—5, he delivered a course of Lectures on the Fpistle to the Hebrews, which attracted great attention. In 1880 he resigned this charge, feeling the strain too gieat; and for six years was the minister of a church in Halkin Street, Belgravia. He gave up the pastorate in 1888 and returned to Notting Hill, where he died in 1891 at the comparatively early age of 59 years, having survived his wife barely four days. We hope to speak of Dr. Saphir’s devotion to his brethren and Missions to them, and to complete our review of this very interesting book in a future number. The Fifteenth Annual Report of the Church Society for Promoting moting Christianity amongst the Jews (New York), is full 0 f evidences of God’s blessing on its endeavours, in the midst of the general unsettlement in Jewish minds. It rightly points out that “ the Jews are rapidly increasing in number, influence and power in our country, and it rests with Christians to decide whether they shall be left to drift away from the religion of their fathers into scepticism, or be brought to acknowledge Jesus as the Messiah.” The Society’s Quarterly Paper, “The Gospel of the Circumcision, cision, is an interesting little magazine. BOOKS RECEIVEd7 The Jews and the Church. By Kev. R. W. Harden. Dublin • John T. Drought. Israel's Redemption. An Advent Study. do The Gospel according to St. Matthew. Illustrated by H A Harper. London: Walters. J The'Annual Meeting of the Episcopal Jews’ Chapel Abrahamic Society[was held in Palestine Place, on Wednesday, February 21. The Palestine Place Branch of the Beehive Association for Israel hopes to have a Sale of Work on June 6th, on behalf of the Hebrew Schools for Boys and Girls in Palestine Place. Will our friends kindly help by sending plain needlework, and small fancy articles to the care of Mrs. Lukyn Williams, 5, Palestine Place, Cambridge Heath, E.? The Anniversary Sermon of the Operative Jewish Converts’ Institution will be preached by the Rev. Henry Brass, M.A., on Thursday, May 10th, in the Episcopal Jews’ Chapel, Palestine Place, Cambridge Heath, E. Divine Service will begin at 7 p.m. Friends are cordially invited to visit the Institution earlier on the same afternoon, and tea will be provided at six o’clock. The Annual Meeting will be held on the following day at 3 o’clock, iu the Council Chamber of Exeter Hall, and the Earl of Roden will preside. In a valuable paper by James Glaisher, Esq., F.R.S., in the January number of the Quarterly Statement of the Palestine SOUTH- EASTERN DISTRICT. Secretary. —Rev. C. S. Painter, M.A., 30, Lansdowne-road, Croydon. late. Place. Serin. or Meet. Collec- tions. Date. Place. Serm. or Meet Collec. tions. 1894. Jan. 28 HAMPSHIRE. Soutlisea, St.Simon.. SS £ s. d. SURREY. SS 1 16 3 Feb. 4 Croydon, St.Matthew Do.Churchlnstitute SS 34 16 4 11 Bentley Winchester .ChristCh. ss SS s M SS 4 7 1 11 1 8 12 M 3 6 2 4 2 0 13 M O 11 3 12 26 do ; 7 6 4 0 18 3 SUSSEX. Jan. 14 SS 2 17 0 Jan. Feb. 8 KENT. Bexley, St. John .... Tunbridge WellsfBee- hive) vt esfgate-on-Sea .. Folkestone,Christ Ch. s M S 10 0 1 14 6 15 Worthing, Christ Ch. Do. Holy Trinity . Do St. George .... SS s ss MM 1 5 0 3 18 9 4 0 6 4 17 3 28 SS 10 13 1 11 18 26 ss SS sss 9 16 5 10 4 7 Feb. 18 Hrighton, Christ Ch. ss ss 26 2 3 4 4 8 SOUTH-WESTERN DISTRICT. Secretory.— Rev, H. H. Ashley Nash, M.A., 20, Sion Hill, Clifton, Bristol. OXFORDSHIRE. 1894 DEVONSHIRE £ «. A. Nov. 14 Hanborough M 1 8 0 Jan. 11 Dunkeswell SSM 2 4 4 SOMERSETSHIRE. GLOUCESTER. Jan. 28 Clevedon ss* 10 15 6 sss 2 19 6 29 Do M 9 16 8 19 Do M 1 1 0 Feb. 18 *iontacute sss 4 2 4 24 Stonehouse .. — RS 3 18 9 Stoke-under Ham... s 0 13 2 2t Bristol St. Werburgh M 1 1 9 19 •lontacute M 1 11 3 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT. Rev. W. W. Pomeroy, M.A., 40, Denning Road Hampstead, N. W. 1894 1 BUCKINGHAM. £ >. d. Feb 16 Highbury, St. John's M 0 14 0 Feb. 23 Penn Wood SS 0 17 8 Hall HERTS. 18 We-t Kensington, St. Mar. S 7 10 0 Jan. 14'Ware, Christ Church ss 4 1 0 Rajswater, St. Matt. SSS 31 4 4 Feb. 4 Hertford, All Saints SS 2 2 0 25 w. Hampstead, Em- SSS' 24 Tolmi rs, St. Mary .. ss l 3 0 manuel M ) 28 Colney Heath M 0 7 3 MIDDLESEX. SURREY. SS M 7 2 0 Chelsea, Park Chapel SS 15 10 0 Feb. 6 Gypsy Hill M 2 17 6 sss 13 2 2 11 \\ . Norwood, St.Paul SSS 27 6 9 M 1 0 0 12 Do M 4 0 3 SM 15 M None. Feb. 13jWest Kensington, St. M 0 13 6 28 Camperdown M None. 1 Mary ANNIVERSARIES OF AUXILIARY ASSOCIATIONS, &​c. Exploration Fund, it is stated that the average annual rainfall at Jerusalem during the last sixteen years has been 5.94 inches greater than in the previous sixteen years. Whether this remarkable fact indicates a change of climate in the Holy Land, or merely that the country has recently been experiencing a season of exceptionally wet years, cannot yet be known, and future observations are looked forward to with very great interest. The average fall of rain on the Mission premises at Jerusalem during the last 32 years has been 25.23 inches, being nearly the same as in London, but very differently distributed; the average number of rainy days in Jerusalem being only 55. “The Great Pestilence,” by the Rev. Dr. Gasquet (Simpkin, Marshall and Co.), tells of the dreadful ravages of the Black Death in England during the years 1348-9. The Black Death, as every reader of history is aware, had most pernicious effects for the Jews of Europe. Henceforward, they were denied the rights of humanity ; they were treated as noxious beasts. The cause of the change in public sentiment was the diabolical suggestion that the Jews of Spain had concocted a poison, had despatched emissaries to place it in various wells, and had thus spread the contagion. Bloody riots resulted from these charges, and thousands of Jews perished. The importance, from this point of view, of the English record, which Dr. Gasquet now gives in a very complete form, lies in this. England suffered severely from the plague, though there were no Jews in this country at the time. As a matter of fact, too, large numbers of Jews fell victims to the pestilence. If fewer Jews died in proportion, the cause was their greater temperance and their superior care of their sick. MIDLAND DISTRICT. Secretary. — Rev. C. Rumfitt, LL.T) ., Cleeve Villas, 47, Ombersley Road, Birmingham. Date. Place. serm or Meet. Coilec - tions. Date. Place. Serm. or Meet 1 Collec- tions. 1894. BEDFORDSHIRE. £ «. d. NOTTINGHAM. Feb 11 Bedford, St. Cuthbert ss 11 11 2 Jan. 7 Nottingham, St. ss 6 16 7 Uoldington .. ss 3 6 4 Nicholas It Bedford, St. Cuthbert M 3 12 0 Do. Holy Trinity .. ss 6 8 6 DERBYSHIRE. SS 10 16 8 Do. 8t. Luke ss 1 15 0 Jan. 21 Feb. H 3 6 0 Feb. 12 Do M 3 io n Derby, All Saints .... 88 13 0 0 ss 6 16 0 12 MM 7 2 9 STAFFORDSHIRE. Wednesbury, St. Paul HEREFORDSHIRE. 7 13 22 s i o o 4 King's Pyon-w-Birley SS8 4 10 6 Wednesbury, St.John Do M M 2 13 6 0 16 1 HUNTINGDON. Jan. 7 8S 2 0 3 WORCESTER. LEICESTERSHIRE. Jan. 14 SS 2rl0 10 Burbage-w-Aston .... Ashby Folville sss 3 2 7 if Do M 2 a 6 88 5 0 0 Dudley M None. NORTHERN DISTRICT. Secretary. — Rev. F. Hewson Wall, LL.D., 29, St. Mary’s, York. 18 , 4 . | YORKSHIRE. | | £. d . Feb 11 Wilton, Kedcar SS 5 11 2 Feb. 4 Brandsby | SS 4 13 6 18 Acomb SS 3 10 0 EASTERN DISTRICT. Secretary. —Rev. J. Stokmont Bell, M.A., 1, Stanley Avenue, Thorpe Road, Norwich. 18 4. CAMBRIDGE. £ t. d. Feb. 4 Brandon Parva SS 2 7 7 Feb. 11 Cambridge.Holy Trin. ss 5 12 2 8 Barnham Broom .... S 0 10 0 Do. St Benet ss 2 16 6 Baconsthorpe M 1 12 0 S 2 5 10 9 M l 5 10 12 M 5 15 4 18 SS 10 8 8 Northwold s 1 7 ii 19 Methwold M 0 1] 6 ESSEX. 20 M 1 lu 2 25 26 27 28 j J J SUFFOLK. M 31 0 s 6 11 ii Felixstowe, St. John White Notley M«r. 1 M 0 10 0 n the Baptist Yoxford ss 3 9 5 ss l 7 9 NORFOLK. Westleton ss 2 4 5 Feb. 1 Burnham Westgate.. M 0 1 10 25 Bonington ss i i> M 0 H 10 Ixworth Thorp s 0 11
Terms of Use
  • In Copyright
Language
  • English

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment