1924-06-10, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: NOTES BY THE WAY (10 June 1924)

User activity

Share to:
NOTES BY THE WAY (10 June 1924)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/263082176
Physical Description
  • 3223 words
  • article
  • photo
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • xna, [S.n.], 1924-06-10
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • NOTES BY THE WAY (10 June 1924)
Appears In
  • The Triad : a journal devoted to literacy, pictorial, musical and dramatic art., v.9, no.8, 1924-06-10
Published
  • xna, [S.n.], 1924-06-10
Physical Description
  • 3223 words
  • article
  • photo
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Part Of
  • The Triad : a journal devoted to literacy, pictorial, musical and dramatic art.
  • Vol. 9 No. 8 (10 June 1924)
Subjects
Summary
  • NOTES BY THE WAY “Satire’s my weapon, but I’m too discreet To run a-muck, and tilt at all I meet.” Equal Pay for Equal Work. The remarks following are called forth by “Equal Pay,” a booklet issued by the London Schoolmasters’ Association and now circulating throughout Australasia. lasia. It has been compiled chiefly for the Cloistered Folk, but it provides a basis for a wider discussion than that of the status of male and female teachers. Exactly why the modern woman is so keen on this equality business is beyond yond the Triad’s comprehension. (There is, of course, the very remote possibility of our comprehension being limited in regard to feminine affairs.) Woman’s latest demand seems to be based on a famous axiom things equal to the same thing are equal to one another. CALVIN COOLIDGE. Another American President painted by Howard Chandler Christie, the very nicest of American painters. The average English man’s early life is plastered with memories of Pankhurst hurst riots, indecent screechings, undergraduates, graduates, male and female, fainting their way through the crush of political meetings. ings. Their tenacity has landed the bacon. The women now have the Vote — and surely it tastes of ashes. They have, too, Secondary Education and University training. Almost every girl takes (that’s the word all right) English, lish, History, Latin, French, Mathematics, Science, and at the stated periods for examinations shows an astonishing capacity for the disgorging of the required stuff. Indeed, the sister nowadays. adays. in a family obsessed with the examination-mania, very often puts her brother to shame. Why then, cries the feminist, should the girl he penalized in regard to wages? All that pother comes from the confusion fusion of equality with similarity. The principle of equal pay for equal work has been welcomed by the Trade Unions in the sincere hope that its adoption would mean the total exclusion sion of women from the labour market. Among the industries, the phrase has surely implied Equal Pay for Equal Output. put. Man is not afraid of Woman in any industry where the employer can say with precision that the production of this or that article has cost so much. The evidence furnished by Government officials and the representatives of all the leading industries in Britain is overwhelmingly whelmingly in support of the conclusion that a woman’s output is less than a man’s. But taking the teaching profession as an example where mathematical precision in the measurement of output is perhaps impossible, we still may say definitely that there are teachers who would be cheap at £5,000 a year and others who would be dear at the basic wage. If Equal Pay were granted unconditionally then we should have very soon none but women teachers. And that would mean national disaster. Our schools require quire the male attitude towards life in all its phases. Is there need to stress the point that the adolescent must not have his outlook governed by women teachers? Surely, too, it must be recognized nized that, under the present constitution tion of society, the man has to he regarded garded as the bread-winner, the mainstay of a family, whilst the woman is an individual. dividual. And even the most rabid feminist will admit that wives and mothers are entitled to a standard of comfort higher than that of their unmarried married sisters. The immediate effect of equalizing the salaries of males and females is to make the conditions unequal. The proportion tion of pay for a woman in the New South Wales teaching service is about four-fifths that of a man. Does anyone believe that £4OO a year to a woman is not more attractive than £5OO to a man? And a very decided advanA tage that the female teacher possesses sesses over the male teacher is that, provided the woman passes the necessary examinations for first grade, her successive sive chances of promotion are much more frequent than the man’s. There may be little reason for a difference ference in the pay of bachelor and spinster during the early years of following lowing a profession or calling. But KING TUT. The first and exclusive picture of King Tut-ankh-amen lying in state pending the result of the legal action between the Egyptian Government and Mr. Carter. there should be a very good reason— which the spinsters themselves can supply —why a young man quite early in his career should receive pay higher than that of a young woman. Did we hear some sweet spinster interject something about husbands being out-of-date? Well, well. The argument will have to start all over again. it Superfluous. The net result of women entering into competition with men has been the making ing of millions of women superfluous. Simply, there is no room for them in the present scheme of things. One of the most noteworthy cables published this year was the Sydney Sun Special in which Sir Leo Chiozza Money is quoted as saying, “The female surplus in 1851 was 600,000; it reached 1,400,000 in 1911, and is now 2,100,000... Women increase the number of unmarried women by taking men’s jobs. They are established in medicine, dentistry, law, and in banks. They are everywhere. Some of these women prefer a bachelor existence. The others still expect to take men’s places, thereby lowering the general standard of men’s remuneration, and also lessening ing their chances of finding husbands.” (That last sentence probably expresses Sir Leo's meaning. In the Sun the words published are meaningless.) In the same illuminating cable, a woman writer’s proposed solution of the whole horrible problem is quoted. Every sane Australian will appreciate the clarity of her views:— “Domestic women ,” she writes, “find home life a dull and monotonous round of trivial duties. Professional women find their work strenuous and unsatisfying. Drastic changes must be made if we are to satisfy both the home-keeping and the professional woman. A new ideal of femininity must be built up. It must be frankly recognized that women are different ferent from men .” (To hear the average feminist blathering one would imagine that God created man and ivoman equal in physique and mentality.) “These differences ferences must be recognized as peculiarities ities fitting women for a particular role in life, and not as evidence of inferiority ...Woman, in the future, must be taught psychology instead of logic, and physiology instead of mathematics. She will learn folk lore, biology, and the care of children ren instead of zoology, trigonometry, and Latin. The care of children ivill be put on a more scientific basis, and the educated and intelligent mother bringing brains and knowledge, instead of merely instinct, to her work, will cease to be a domestic drudge, and an inefficient guardian of her children. Women will be employed outside the home. She will be recognized as the ideal nurse and teacher of young children; ren; she will be a healer rather than a scientific physician; and she will be a kindergarten teacher rather than a senior wrangler. Thus the professional ivoman excelling in her oivn particular work, which man cannot do as well as she, will not need to vie with man.” So, then, Feminism is a futile revolt against Nature. And the blame for the existence of Feminism (which really should be called Masculinism) lies at the door of the world's educational authorities. They have insanely imagined that a girl’s education should not be radically different from a boy’s. [We shall be glad to print brief and pointed replies to this note. —Ed., T.]. IT Wanted —A Penn’orth of Ectoplasm. The history of spiritualism is an extended tended proof of the statement that scientists tists are the most gullible people in the world. Since 1848, when spiritualism, in the modern sense of the word, was originated in the land of the wooden nutmeg, scientist after scientist in England, land, France, Germany, and Italy, has been duped by professional frauds known as mediums. Crookes, Wallace, Hyslop. James, Lodge, Lombroso, Schrenk-Notzling, ling, to name but a few scientists, conducted ducted seances in which “fraud had been made impossible.” Yet mediums declared by these scientific gentlemen to be “producers ducers of genuine phenomena” have since been caught red-handed in trickery. The most notorious of all mediums, Eusapia Paladino, the woman who “converted” Sir Oliver Lodge, was eventually fully exposed by Professor Hugo Miinsterberg. Charles Bailey, the great Australian medium dium who for years diddled the faithful, even after exposure succeeded in interesting esting Sir Arthur Conan Doyle when that man of great faith was last in this country. try. Bailey was finally hounded out of the spiritualistic game only last year, when an ordinary newspaper reporter in Sydney was dishonorable enough to flash an electric torch on him at an inconvenient venient moment. Yet the dupes persist in being duped! Most scientists interested in spiritualism ism have attempted, like Sir William Crookes, to protect themselves from ridicule by protesting that “although the phenomena are genuine, they may not have anything to do with departed spirits.” But the mediums themselves know their business better. They are always in close association with professed believers in spiritualism, from whom they extract the fees that make worth while the invention of new tricks. MRS. CALVIN COOLIDGE, Painted by Howard Chandler Christie, tie, the clever gentleman who “does” pretty covers for American magazines. zines. The latest “stunt” of mediums is to produce a stuff called ectoplasm. The ectoplasmic boom started when Schrenk- Notzling published his experiences with a medium called Eva. Her scientific sponsor solemnly announced that ectoplasm plasm had been analysed, and in his book her sponsor enumerates the ingredients (of which albumen is one). Other scientists, tists, however, particularly those who specialised in psycho-therapeutics, rather took the wind out of Schrenk-Not-zling’s sails by pointing out that his “ectoplasm” might very well be merely a secretion from a neurotic girl’s body. Eva’s very special “stunt” was to produce ectoplasmic mic portraits. Her portrait of President Wilson has since been proved by Mr. Joseph McCabe to be not ectoplasmic but a prosaic illustration torn from a periodical! In Paris, recently, Professor Richet experimented perimented with a Polish medium named Kluski. Kluski (or the ectoplasm produced duced through the mediumship of Kluski) made moulds in wax of hands, feet and portions of children’s bodies. Professor Richet and his collaborator, Dr. Geley, both affirm that all possible precautions were taken to prevent fraud. What is the value of their affirmations when distinguished scientists before them, all affirming that fraud was impossible, sible, have since been proved to have been duped? The whole sorry business has reeked of chicanery from its inception; but, in the final analysis, the strongest arguments against mediumistic phenomena are to be found in the persons of the mediums themselves. A slinking crowd of lovers of darkness, most of them neurasthenic, irritable and violently intolerant of the slightest criticism, one by one they have their days of profitable glory, and one by one they are driven with their conjuring juring tricks into the limbo of the discredited. credited. IT The Perfect Prohibitionist. Not in America is he to be found, but here in Australia. He pleaded guilty last month to a charge of sly-grog selling at Banyan, a little place near Innisfail in Queensland. The prosecutor stated in court (amidst the usual loud laughter) that the defendant ant had been one of the principal speakers supporting the prohibition campaign paign in the district. Failing to appreciate ciate the dictum that an original humourist ist should be rewarded for adding to the gaiety of the nation, the magistrate imposed posed a fine of fifty pounds, with costs. Such is the penalty for having a sense of humour. TT A Brave Man’s Speech. On May 19, Mr. W. A. Holman, K.C., delivered an address on the trend of modern journalism to journalists assembled bled in the Royal Colonial Institute, Sydney. How easy would it have been for Mr. Holman to kow-tow to the men of the press if, as is rumoured, he intends tends re-entering politics. Instead of kow-towing, however, he criticized Australian tralian daily journalism in a way that must have made some of his auditors squirm in their seats. “Unless journalists,” ists,” he contended, “were prepared to see that circulation was no business of theirs as a craft, the profession of journalism nalism would go.” The sentence somehow how sounds unfinished. Presumably daily journalism is going somewhere. Where, perhaps Mr. Holman did not care to state specifically. Two other important points made in Mr. Holman’s brave speech were stressed, we may modestly mention, in the May Triad. “Recently,” said the ex-Premier of New South Wales, “there was a howl from a section of the Press because the judge decided that the Polini case should be heard in camera. Were the unhappy relations between husband and wife any concern of the public?” And again, *’A glance at the newspapers of recent date would indicate that the only things Aus- tralians were interested in were sport (particularly children’s sport, because columns were devoted to a school row- ing race), divorce, crime, political scan- dais, and any sex subject.’ All other portions of Mr. Holman’s address, however, are insignificant beside his clear hint that blackmailing is prac- tised by a section of our Press. If that be true, the Federal authorities must quickly undertake the cleansing of Aus- tralian journalism. The Sabbath Racket. Melbourne giggled when the Presbyterian terian Assembly reprimanded Lord Stradbroke broke for entertaining members of the Melba Opera Company at a Sabbath tennis party. All Australia would have laughed appreciatively if the Prebyterian Assembly had reprimanded itself for consistently sistently desecrating the Sabbath. That j s exactly what each and every member G f the Presbyterian Assembly does on every Sunday in the year. How many of them fail to make use of tram, train, or motor on the Sabbath? How many of them fail to eat a hot Sabbath dinner no t prepared by their own lily-white hands? How many of them... But aren’t all these sectaries too funny for serious treatment? This particular body ma de Melbourne giggle; so, much may he forgiven them, yy UR KXI Prime Minister. Sturdy in body and mind, incorruplible, lible, not easily stampeded, with a clear “THE BLUE BIRD.” This photograph depicts a copy of Jakowenko’s famous painting, “There is life everywhere,” as represented by members of the company pany of “The Blue Bird.” The celebrated painting shows a railway truck with prisoners bound for Siberia, with a harmonising contrast: Pigeons, picking up the prisoners’ last few bread crumbs —There is life everywhere! idea of where he is guiding Queensland economically and politically, in speech rather slow and deliberate... That is the impression made on a Triad man when some years ago part of his journalistic istic duties was to motor about Southern Queensland in the wake of Mr. Theodore during a political campaign. Nothing GRACE MOORE. Prima donna of the “Music Box Revue," which will later be seen in Australia. Miss Moore’s other claim to fame is her engagement to Mr. George Biddle, socially famous in Philadelphia. His framed photograph is behind Miss Moore. Aren’t they “Iuverly"? less than a political miracle will prevent him from becoming the next Prime Minister ister of Australia. Will the higher office make of him a second Andrew Fisher? IT Our Voungsters. Grown-ups are advised to look at the Children’s Pages in this issue if only for the doubtful joy of realizing that Children’s Pages as known in the magazines zines of their own day are no longer possible. The lad who wrote the Prize Story (“Nearly Seventeen") has written one of the least sophisticated of the contributions worthy of consideration. The girl who wins the prize for the best poem has written derivative stuff, slightly erotic in flavour (and therefore honest) although she is in her early ’teens. But the majority of the verse contributed buted from the boys and girls in every Australian State ( and New Zealand) revealed vealed clearly that in Australia ( and New Zealand —good Lord, this is becoming monotonous) the dominies don’t know the difference between prose and verse. Cannot you parents, who must he intelligent gent or you would not be reading the Triad, use your influence to force the teachers to teach your British children something of the glory and the beauty and the wonder of rhythm? It is being done, you know. As far back as 1910, the Perse method, introduced into several British schools, provoked children into producing genuine children’s verse. Since that year, the Perse method has been greatly improved upon, and the effect has been that material enough has been produced duced by the bairns to make a startling anthology. If you are one of the hardheaded headed sort who questions the utility of poetry, ask yourself the question, Have I ever been influenced or delighted or persuaded by a glowing speech, written ten or spoken? If the answer is, Yes, then be assured that that speech would never have been made unless its maker had a wisp of the spirit of poetry in his make-up. But we are talking of kiddies’ competitions. The essay form manifestly does not appeal to the average Australian youngster. ster. Most of those received were pretentious tentious and stilted. Be assured, O Triad parents, that if you will give only part of one evening a week to supervising the English of your youngsters, you will be doing them a service that in after years they will thank you for most heartily. The man or woman in modern life who cannot express himself or herself clearly, and at times euphoniously, will oftentimes have cause to curse the parents who were too shortsighted to understand that a decent command of English is the best weapon against the devils of insularity, prejudice, wowserism, mugwumpery, and muddleheadedness. headedness. 11 Verse and Voronoff. A contributor in the April Triad was advised, through the Letter Bag, that the only excuse for writing verse was “a strong impulse to express in rhythmic words a genuine emotion.” That was another way of saying that nineteentwentieths twentieths of the output of contemporary verse should never have been written. Now conies the cabled news of Dr. Voronoff’s experiment with a poet. (I)r. Voronoff, you remember, is the expert who rejuvenates people by grafting monkey-glands on to their tonsils or intestines testines or something). The poet, according cording to the cable, was unable to put pen to paper for six months. He was operated upon by Dr. Voronoff. What was the result? More poetry? A masterpiece piece of emotional expression? No. Of course, you knew the answer would be No; but these rhetorical tricks are very necessary... Six months after the operation tion the poet wrote a play that procured him a fortune. Now', if the poet had written a play there would have been some excuse for Voronoff’s machinations. But a play that procures a fortune for its maker in these days—is sufficient evidence that the man who made such a crime possible is an enemy of society. Down with Voronoff! Else we shall have corrupters of the populace such as Ben Landeck, Arthur Shirley, George Darrell, Scribe, Sardou, Cecil Raleigh. Henry Fletcher, Beaumont Smith and E. Rupert Atkinson perpetuating their deadly work from generation unto generation.
Terms of Use
Language
  • English
Identifier
  • 052 (DDC)

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment