1945-03-01, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: 1700 CHURCHES DEDICATED TO ST. PATRICK. (1 March 1945)

User activity

Share to:
1700 CHURCHES DEDICATED TO ST. PATRICK. (1 March 1945)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/258801140
Physical Description
  • 1053 words
  • article
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • xna, National Library of Australia, 1945-03-01
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • 1700 CHURCHES DEDICATED TO ST. PATRICK. (1 March 1945)
Appears In
  • The Newcastle and Maitland Catholic Sentinel : the official organ of the diocese of Maitland., XIV, no.6, 1945-03-01, p.10 (ISSN: 2206-5466)
Published
  • xna, National Library of Australia, 1945-03-01
Physical Description
  • 1053 words
  • article
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Part Of
  • The Newcastle and Maitland Catholic Sentinel : the official organ of the diocese of Maitland.
  • Vol. XIV No. 6 (1 March, 1945)
Subjects
Summary
  • 1700 CHURCHES DEDICATED TO ST. PATRICK. IRELAND has for long been one of the greatest crusading nations of the Church, sending her missionaries far and wide, and it is because of this that churches dedicated to St. Patrick are so numerous throughout the world. Many zealous Irish priests sent to bring the Light of the Gospel to some pagan tribe placed the tiny church they erected under the patronage of their own national saint. Also in the many countries to which Irish people emigrated in large numbers, and in which they built churches,, this dedication tion is naturally common. Exact figures are difficult to arrive at, but a conservative estimate places the number of churches dedicated to St. Patrick rick at 1,700, including 19 cathedrals. No details are available of non-Catholic dedications cations in the United States, but it is virtually tually certain that St. Patrick was thus honoured by at least some of the patriotic Ulster Protestants who made their home in America. NAMED AFTER SAINT. In Ireland 175 Catholic churches (including cluding 4 cathedrals) and 47 Protestant places of worship (3 of them cathedrals) are named after St. Patrick. In Britain 100 churches (20 non-Catholic) honour Ireland’s patron saint in their dedication, while the figure for the United States is 623 and includes 5 cathedrals. Australia has 206 churches (4 cathedrals) named for St. Patrick, while New Zealand’s total of 47 includes Auckland Cathedral. Canada’s “churches of St. Patrick” number 83 and include a cathedral, but the Irish saint is less popular in the neighbouring State of Newfoundland, which possesses only 4 churches named in his honour. South Africa has 45 including Grahamstown hamstown Cathedral —so named, while, in the East, the figures are:—China and Korea, 5; India, Burma, and Ceylon, 25 (including 2 cathedrals). Other distant lands which help to swell the total are: British West Indies, 9; South America, 5 (3 in Argentina, 1 each in Brazil and Chile), Philippine Islands, 2; Honolulu, 2; and Malta, 1. IN EUROPE. On the Continent of Europe a surprisingly ingly large number of churches dedicated to St. Patrick may be found. Germany possesses no fewer than 160, France has 45, while Belgium and Italy own 30 each. In addition to the figures given above there are 25 Protestant churches dedicated cated to St. Patrick in various parts of the British Empire. Among some of the more noteworthy ecclesiastical edifices dedicated to St. Patrick probably the most unusual is the little church in the veldt-dorp of Matjesfontein, fontein, Cape Province, South Africa. This church, which is a familiar landmark for miles around, was built during the closing years of the last century to the design of a young Irish priest, and is in the shape of a shamrock. The sanctuary and High Altar are placed in the top leaf of the trefoil, the two remaining leaves containing the seating ing accommodation. The “stem” of this architectural shamrock is represented by the centre aisle, while the front exterior elevation is also reminiscent of a shamrock. rock. St. Patrick’s Church, Soho Square, London, don, “parish church” of many Irish people resident in the English metropolis, was built at a time when the district in which it stands was densely populated with Irish, St. Patrick’s still maintains its position as the premier Irish church in London. Twice yearly sermons in Gaelic are preached from its pulpit; on the Sunday nearest St. Patrick’s Day at a service especially arranged by the Ard-Choisde of the London Gaelic League, and again as part of a series of sermons in various European languages preached at Eastertide. tide. In the church and presbytery there are preserved many interesting relics intimately mately associated with Ireland. Several relics of Blessed Oliver Plunket are enshrined shrined in the church, where the standards dards borne by some of the Irish regiments ments in the last and earlier wars were deposited on their disbandment. In the presbytery there is a table, around which Daniel O’Connell and his colleagues sat at the meeting at which it was decided to found the “Dublin Review.’’ In Australia, Melbourne’s St. Patrick’s Cathedral is one of the largest and finest edifices bearing the dedication. The foundation-stone was laid in the time of the first Archbishop, Dr. Goold, a Cork man. DIOCESE OF ARGYLL. Until recently, the diocese of Argyll, in which the saint may well have been born, was the only See in Great Britain which did not possess a church dedicated to St. Patrick. It can no longer claim this doubtful honour, for, in the district of Mallaig, Inverness, there is now a little chapel erected in honour of Ireland’s Patron, where Holy Mass is celebrated by a visiting priest at least once a week. America, too, possessed one diocese — that of Lafayette—which does not number ber among its churches one dedicated to St. Patrick, but as a counterbalance, the United States is the home of the most imposing building anywhere bearing the Saint’s name. NEW YORK. The Cathedral of Saint Patrick, New York City, is the edifice to which I refer, and not only is it the best-known place of worship in any of the new countries, but it ranks as the eleventh largest in the world. Its immense size, combined with its commanding position and architectural beauty make it one of New York’s show buildings. Its outside dimensions, excluding ing the Lady Chapel, which was added to the main building at a later date, are: Length, 398 feet; average breadth, 132 feet, thickness of towers at base, 32 feet. The two great towers are each 330 feet high. The interior measurements are; Length, 370 feet; breadth of nave and choir (including side chapels), 120 feet; length of transept, 140 feet. The main aisle is 140 feet long, its width being 48 feet, and the distance to the roof above it 112 feet; the side aisles are 24 feet wide. The whole exterior, above the basecourse, course, of this colossal building is of white marble. The cathedral stands on an island site bounded by Fifth Avenue, Fiftieth Street, Fourth Avenue, and Fifty-first Street. There is current a widespread, but erroneous, eous, impression that the site was a gift to the church authorities by the city council actually the ground was purchased chased at its full market value in 1810.
Terms of Use
Language
  • English
Identifier
  • 282.09944205 994.42005 (DDC)

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

Other suppliers

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment