1925-07-15, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Sydney Theatres Week Commencing July 11th. (15 July 1925)

User activity

Share to:
Sydney Theatres Week Commencing July 11th. (15 July 1925)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/258673775
Physical Description
  • 3373 words
  • article
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • xna, Everyones Ltd., 1925-07-15
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Sydney Theatres Week Commencing July 11th. (15 July 1925)
Appears In
  • Everyones., v.4, no.280, 1925-07-15
Published
  • xna, Everyones Ltd., 1925-07-15
Physical Description
  • 3373 words
  • article
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Part Of
  • Everyones.
  • Vol.4 No.280 (15 July 1925)
Subjects
Summary
  • Sydney Theatres Week Commencing July 11th. Her MAJESTY’S.—The second week of "The Street Singer’’ sees business ness very satisfactory indeed, considering sidering that the weather has been very bleak and it is one of the quiet times of the year. Gladys Moncrieff has achieved another success in this production, and with Claude Flemming, Arthur Stigant. Noel Leylaml . Leslie Holland and others, give some of the best work in a long and meritorious career. This musical play is produced by George A. Highland. Criterion.—Pauline Frederick is the vogue, with the result that “Spring (’leaning” is doing the biggest business ness in this city at present. To secure a comfortable seat one needs to book days in advance, and it is a customary sight to see even the alley-ways well sprinkled with chairs in order to accommodate commodate all those who are desirous of seeing the show. "Spring Cleaning” is described as a play that thrills, amuses and enthralls. It certainly lives up to that description. Palace. —Phillip Lytton certainly picked a winner In “Cappy Ricks,” Peter B. Kyne's comedy, which has been running for several weeks here to very big success. Ward Lyons, in the central role, is just the ideal character ter Kyne no doubt had in mind when he wrote the story. A supporting cast of popular players are seen in this very legitimate success. Royal.—The Lauder season comes to a finish next week. For the current programme, the knighted comedian has changed several of his numbers, all of them meeting with approval. S.ots may come and go, but there has never yet been an entertainer, of the kind, whose thoroughness has been within ken of that possessed by Sir aHrry. The rest of the bill is identical with that of the opening show. Guy Bates Post is listed as the next attraction. He will present "The Masquerader.” in which he was so emphatically successful ful same years ago at the Palace. Grand Opera House. — Something new. novel, and decidedly entertaining is to be found in the Hugh ,T. Ward musical comedy, "Little Jessie James.” with Dorothy Brunton in the title role. It says something nowadays for a production tion to show us something different, and there are several things in this piece which are entirely away from those already given us. The piece looks like having a long run. Tivoli. —Most original in manner and method is Milton Hayes, dignified English lish vaudeville entertainer, novelist and poet, whose first Australian appearance ance here last Saturday lifted the bill from mediocrity to high-class. The stage is most artistically set, a la drawing room, and Hayes, in ordinary street attire of immaculate style, begins gins his routine with a song anent bachelor days. He follows with a remarkable markable dissertation on politics, after which he deals with newspaper advertisements; tisements; these are all treated in very humorous manner. Responding to repeated peated calls, Hayes proves he is no seeker after “curtains,” for he contented ed his auditors with two brief numbers instead of a speech. The success of the newcomer’s work is due to the hopelessly-mixed ly-mixed manner in which he deals with his political and advertising matter. ter. He had his audience in one continual tinual outburst of merriment during this portion of his show. Likewise he held them in rapt attention in his more seirous presentations. Milton Hayes is so entirely removed from the orthodox that comparison seems impossible. He should be a biff drawcard dnrinff his season. Another newcomer is "Traps," a six years-old drummer, neatly attired tired in naval uniform. He is presented ed by his father who sinffs (?) in affffresively American accent, a number which refers to the boy's remarkable ability, after which the pair indulge in a little cross-talk of an artificial character. acter. Traps’ work consists of rattling a kettle drum, whilst banging a side drum (with a foot arrangement), and cymbals. It is one discordant turn. Whilst the boy is attractive and a passable performer, the offering leaves much to be desired. The bill also in eludes the Alton Sisters, clever wire performers: a comedian and dancer (unprograramed) ; Hoker and Seaward, dancers: Leeardo Bros., lazy bakers: The Royal Squadron Syncopators; Jay Whidden (newcomer) a tricky violinist, pianiste and singer, who was very successful: cessful: and the Celebrity Players (3) in a sketch which is a triumph for that sterling actor. Reg Wyckham. Fuller Theatre. —A very entertaining bill this week. It is all-vaudeville, and much appreciated by the regular patron of variety. Farrell and Massey, who open the show, are dancers of an orthodox order; they prepare the audience for the good things to come, of which Paul Wharton and Co. are amongst the best on offer. The work of this combination was, for some time, a feature with Wirth’s Circus. It is just as successful on the vaudeville stage. Linn Smith’s Jazz Band, back after an absence of some months, is another other clean-up. Estelle Rose, who is no stranger to this city, is again here: this time there is a sprinkling of new business ness amongst the old: as on previous occasions, this dainty entertainer is the goods. Fuller’s Eleven Wonders, apparently parently changed a little in the personnel. sonnel. are responsible for a whirlwind acrobatic act that is so fast as to almost most dazzle the eye. Morris and Cowley. ley. newemoers from England, are two young fellows whose patter, much of it new. is greatly appreciated : they are a very welcome acquisition to the bill. Milner and Story present a talking offering very freely punctuated with "blue” material. Alex Kellaway, a very excellent light-comedy man, is most successful in song numbers; and Victoria toria and Frank, equilibrists. put across an act which for daintiness and finish is as good as the best seen here for some time. “Maritana” was presented by the new Sydney Choral Society at the Town Hall last Saturday evening, the attendance tendance being most encouraging, whilst the performance was meritorious. ous. Mr. William Asprey was conductor. ductor. and the principals were Madame Goosens-Viceroy. Miss Phillipa Alston, and the Messrs. Harold Hickey, Richard T. McLelland, and Bert Howe. The choral work was particularly effective, but a better cohesion in the work of the instrumentalists might have been anticipated. ticipated. All the well-known numbers were delightfully received by those present, sent, and “Maritana” looks like being worthy of another presentation in the near future, by which time the orchestral tral section will be more an fait with the work. “Toby” Barton returned from Hobart last week, after a brief managerial season. son. He reiterates the statements of so many theatrical managements to the effect that Tasmania is the graveyard of many theatrical aspirations. Adelaide Week Ending 10th July, 1025. wriRTH’S CIRCUS finished on Satur- W day night, and have now embarked barked upon their tour of the country towns in the north till they reach Port Augusta. From there they will go on to Perth. Recently one of the younger members of the trapeze act came in for a heavy fall. J. C. Williamson's New Comic Opera Company will open In ‘Whirled Into Happiness” at the Royal next Saturday. The company will be headed by Maude Fane, Blake Adams, Winnie Collins. Cecil Kellaway, etc. Will Lea ha# been appearing at the country theatres. Theatre Royal.—J. D. O’Hara is terminating minating his season in "Laughter of Fools,” a clever comedy delightfully acted by J.D. and his supporting members. bers. Business has been fairly good. Majestic Theatre. —John Moore, Scottish tish vocalist, is a decided success; Jenny Roy, a nifty danseuse and vocalist. ist. is also popular. Holdovers include Harry Taft, amusing story-teller and siffleur (now in his third week), Charlie lie Sherman, clever entertainer at the piano; and Frank Gorman and Elsie Sylvaney in the sketch, ";Wedded Bliss.” Stiffy and Mo appear as “Lords” this week, and maintain their popularity in decisive fashion. Mike Connors and Queenle Paul, and other members of the company, add to the entertainment of the piece. The Campbell Boys are enjoying a successful season at West’s Olypmia. Leyman Bros, (probably a local act) in "The Knotty Problem,” an acrobatic turn, are at the York Theatre. Prince of Wales Theatre.—William Anderson’s company in "The King of Crime.” Members of this company comprise George Cross. Guy Hastings. Brian Ewart, Rutland Beckett, William liam Ralston, Barry Locke, Darcy Kelway, way, Harold Yorke. Muriel Dale. Millie Carlton. Leslie Adrienne, Lucy Adair, Harry Anderson and Rodney Gainsford. Mr, Jack Frost, stage manager of the • Majestic, has left on his annual holidays days to Sydney. Humphrey Bishop, who has been playing in the West, spent a couple of days here prior to going on to the Eastern States. Harry Leeds Warns Artists Against Visiting the Philli pines THE folloAving communication was » received this week from Harry Leeds (Leeds and Le Marr), and is replete plete in interest. A warning is given to those vaudevillians who may be anticipating ticipating a trip to the Phillipines. imaging that country to be one of milk and honey. In view of the fact that Leeds and Le Mar have travelled that territory more than any other Australian tralian act, during a period of several years, Mr. Leeds’ opinion must be accepted cepted in a very generous sense. S.S. “Elberfield,” At Sea Manila-Salgon, May 24th, 1925. Dear Bveryonea, Here we are again on our way to Singapore, where we expect to stay for some time. We just played an engagement ment at the Lyric Theatre for Frank (roulette, and did fairly well, but Manila is not what it was a few years ago: there was a time when an act could get a decent salary, but now you lucky if you can get expenses. Yon would be doing well in advising ing artists not to go to Manila. I suppose pose I will get myself in bad with the managers there, but my sympathy is with the artists who come East. If we were dependent on theatre work out this way, we would have starved to death long ago. Of Course, this does not apply to India, as an act can always ways make money there. The Lee White Company just finished a week at the Opera House, and played to pretty good business; the show is a good one, and .although they were there in the off season, I think they were satisfied with the result. Gus McNaughton left the show and has returned turned to England; to me he is the best comedian I have ever seen, and you know I have seen some in my time. I was sorry to hear my late partner, Maizie Posner, died of smallpox in Calcutta cutta a few weeks ago; this is only hearsay, but it came from a very reliable liable quarter. I sincerely hope it is not true; however, I will make further ther enquiries and let you know later. If you know of any acts coming out this way, give them our address and we may be able to advise them in their movements, as the East is a peculiar place, and if you start wrong it is hard to make a do of it. The Madeline Rossiter show just finished ished an engagement in Shanghai, where they had excellent results. I will be interested in a show out this way in the near future, and we will both take an active part, but mine will be in front of the footlights, as I am tired of greasepaint and wigs, although though we take an engagement when it is offered. I suppose you have seen Sam Rowley, ley, as he left Manila last week. He is an Australian who is very popular in the Phillipines, and will always be welcomed back. It is quite possible Trix (Mrs. Leeds, will take a trip to Sydney very soon on business for me. We are doing well ou this way, and will stay a while, as we both like the country. I am pretty sure James McGrath, Ltd., will be the big managers out this way, and take the place of Morris Bandman, who for years controlled the Eastern theatres. I will be in Singapore some time in the import and export business, as I have a fairly good connection in this line. Trixie joins me in all good wishes to you and yours, and we hope to hear from you often, so drop a little line whenever you have time. We are, As of old, LEEDS and LE MAR. (H. Leeds) C/​o Thomas Cook and Son, Singapore. Cable address: Harjoe, Singapore. Jazz Band in “Little Jessie James” A DECIDED innovation in musical comedy production is the presence of a jazz band in place of the usual orchestra in "Little Jessie James." Whilst the captious critic may be disinclined inclined to view such a move witli favor, it is very obvious that this new idea has met with success. The combination of players includes Jimmie Elkins and six members of his original orchestra, augmented by other jazz players w T ho have been with Mr. Elkins for some considerable time. It is pleasing to note that the combination tion is entirely Australian ( and is the result of some three years’ assidious attention to the public demand for jazz music played on intilligent lines and providing harmony and rhythm of a first-class order. Mr. Elkins, who is in his early twenties, is the pianist of the company. He is known most favorably in New South Wales and Victoria, and in the last-mentioned State the band played for 28 weeks at Hoyts, Melbourne, and at the termination of this engagement, Mr. Elkins was the recipient of a very fine letter of commendation from the management. Critics pronounce the Jimmie Elkins orchestra to be one of the finest jazz combinations in this country. Although very proud of the acheivement in “Little Jessie James,” Mr. Elkins pays tribute to W. Hamilton Webber, the musical conductor, who was, to a very great extent, tent, instrumental in bringing the players ers to their present high state of perfection. fection. Walter Weems still lobs up in bigtime time American vaudeville. On his last showing in this country, Walter by no means gave us of his best. Perth Week Ending 10th July, 1925. ROY'AL. —Ed. Warrington’s “Frivolities," ties," headed by Claude Dampier and the Megan Bros. This week’s novelty is “Chinatown Nights,” billed as an Oriental pantomime. The show goes with a swing, being a good mixture ture of vocalism, sketches and comedy, find the whole mixture is apparently to the liking of Perth audiences, Luxor, —Jones and Raines present, their popular piano act and score nicely ly : Desmond and Jansen (llth week), still going strong; likewise Connolly and Shaw, Peter Brooks, and Campbell and Wise. The Paulasto Boys present ‘‘The Paper Hangers,” and the entire company appear in “A Day in Madrid,” a bright closing offering. Assembly Hall. —The Repertory Club present “Lilies of the Field.” Mr. J. Rowe, the producer, late of the Gertrude trude Elliott company, scores as Barnaby Haddon, and Miss May Wells gives a splendid performance as the Puritan maiden. Others in the cast include clude K. George, R. Solomon, B. Herbert. bert. Mrs. Bainc. Miss M. Ferguson. Miss McCullogh, Miss F. Besley, and Miss M. Hodges. Sam Stern and Jack Owens are appearing pearing at the Alexandria Theatre, Victoria toria Park. “Nothing but the Truth” will be staged at His Majesty’s Theatre on Friday day next. Brisbane Week Ending July 10th. CREMORNE,— Colin Crane’s “Town Topics” are brighter than ever. The personnel is as last week. The show is brightened by the work of the ballet, under the direction of Arline Patterson. Empire.—J. E. Sutton, Billy Bell and Doris, Paul Warton and Co., Arthur Aldridge, Slavin and Thompson, and George Ward’s snappy revue, “Off Brodaway,” are the features of this week’s bill. Ward, Daisy Yates. Le Blac and Chase are very popular with the tabloid show. His Majesty’s.—Guy Bates Post opened ed to capacity last Saturday, when he presented “The Masquerader,” with which his name is so familiarly associated. Royal.—Allan Wilkie and his company pany are presenting “The Rivals” to big business. Jack Davidson, otherwise known as “Host Holbrook.” is now touring the North of Queensland. He speaks highly ly of the many showmen he has met during his itinerary. Wee Georgie Wood has had a most enthusiastic reception at the Wintergarden garden Theatre. His work has been a revelation. Coleman’s Pantomime includes Will Rollow, Cass and Bowmont, Joe Rocks, Grace Quine and others. Phillip Eytton is presenting his No. 2 show to big success up north. The George Sorlie Dramatic Company, after big business at Bundaberg, is going ing still further north. This combination tion is very highly spoken of. Lionel Walsh’s “Little Nellie Kelly” company did well at Rockhampton carnival. nival. A strong company and good presentation were responsible for an excellent state of business. Sole’s Circus open at Maryborough next week. The D. B. O’Connor company, presenting senting big-name productions with a small but clever combination of players. ers. is still playing Queensland show and other dates. Mildred Bell and Rosa Horwitz recently cently gave a recital at the Albert Hall; it was well supported. The Sistine Soloists have been doing excellently at the Exhibition Hall. They visit Gympie this week. Newcastle. July llth. STRAND.— “Super Speed,’’ and “Marriage riage in Transit.” Maggie Foster (violinist) is proving a great attraction. tion. Betts’ Royal.—“One Way Street.” Billy Maloney and his “Scandals” are appearing twice daily. Hayden and Navard also scoring nicely. Lyric. — “The Thundering Herd,” which is proving a big attraction at this house; and “So Long Letty.” Inion. —“The Iron Man,” “Wolves of the Range,” and “The Gaiety Girl.” Hamilton and Broadmeadow. —“Miss Bluebeard,” and “Into the Net.” Victoria.—“The Midnight Frolics” are still drawing remarkable business. Clem Dawe and Eric Edgley are again a big success. The principal sketches include “At the Zoo,” “A Russian Revolution,” “Seeing a Show,” and “The Tube Station.” Alfred O’Shea, Australian tenor, is to appear at the Central Hall on Wednesday day next. Wee Georgie Wood should pack Ted Betts’ popular house during his three nights’ season in Newcastle. This clever performer opens on Tuesdaj’. .Maggie Foster is proving a popular attraction at the Strand. Mr. Bone, of the Union Pictures, is opening Sunday nights. The attraction last Sunday was “The Castle of Dreams.” Broken Hill Week Ending llth July. CRYSTAL THEATRE.—O'Donnell and Ray's second production, “A Night in Chinatown,” now playing to big business. Bert Ray is registering big laughs, with Hazel Nutt a popular favorite; specialties by Mountain and Gladys, and Graham and Manning supply variety ; song numbers by Hope Mullane, Margie Ramage, and Arthur Elliott, supported by ballet. Next production, duction, “Snapshots.” Skating Rink.—Record entries were received for the forthcoming racing carnival, extending over Broken Hill Cup Week. •Johnson’s Pictures.—“The Turmoil,” starring George Hackathorne; and “The Female,” with Betty Compsou; Shirley Mason in “The Scarlet Honey-1 moon,” and Jack Hoxie in “Western Wallop.” Leonard's Pictureland.—“A Thief in Paradise,” with Doris Kenyon; and “The Mailman,” featuring Ralph Lewis; “Our Gang” comedy; “Three Wise Fools," and “One Glorious Night.” Harry Evans (late Hurl-Evans revue) writes from London, June 3rd:—“Am recovered in health since I last wrote you, but have retired from the theatrical trical profession to engage in bookmaking making business; so far it has been good. The climate here is terrible, particularly ticularly after such a good time in Australia, and after I make as much money as Sol Green I will be out there again. Have been with Fred Keeley quite a lot since he arrived here. The act of Keeley and Aldous opened at Greenwich and did famously. These performers will be at Mile End next week. The Hippodrome show, with Madge Elliott, finishes next Saturday; it was a glorious production, but, in my opinion, lacked comedy. I think it is the first failure that the management has ever had at this house. Not being a performer at present, accounts for the paucity of news. Maybe will be able to do better at a later period. Give my regards to the boys down under.” Jock McKay, born 1884, has been working -continuously since his return to England.
Terms of Use
Language
  • English
Identifier
  • 791.4305 (DDC)

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment