1968-01-27, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Art Past and Present (27 January 1968)

User activity

Share to:
Art Past and Present (27 January 1968)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/258414916
Physical Description
  • 769 words
  • article
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • xna, John Haynes and J.F. Archibald, 1968-01-27
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Art Past and Present (27 January 1968)
Appears In
  • The bulletin., v.89, no.4586, 1968-01-27 (ISSN: 0007-4039)
Other Contributors
  • By ELWYN LYNN
Published
  • xna, John Haynes and J.F. Archibald, 1968-01-27
Physical Description
  • 769 words
  • article
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Series
Part Of
  • The bulletin.
  • Vol. 89 No. 4586 (27 Jan 1968)
  • John Ryan Comic Collection (Specific issues).
Subjects
Summary
  • Art Past and Present By ELWYN LYNN Dealer’s Choice. Rudy Komon Gallery, lery, Sydney. Weaver Hawkins, Joe Rose. Macquarie quarie Galleries, Sydney. MAYBE it’s the stimulus ,of his prestigious tigious neighbor, Kym Bonython, that has prompted Rudy Komon to unveil his past and present treasures under the unequivocal title Dealer’s Choice. The choice, except for Judy Cassab’s weaving willow-leaves .slicing a still surface, William Wright’s glowing but veiled geometry, and Blackman’s sundrenched drenched and sun-dissolved children, fading in shyness, has .that tentative assurance and contemplative spontaneity taneity that could be taken as signs of vintage-modern, if one could forget Mondrian, Malevich, and Mortensen. Some are certainly vintage-modern; in French’s Burial, that won the 1960 Sulman Prize, the burnished forms march inexorably about the gilded tomb, while the infinitely intricate wan calligraphy dreams over the surface of Fairweather’s 1961 Monastery. Its subtle development and unassertive caution have louder echoes in Molvig’s crumbling, ling, sooty Eden Industrial works of 1961. These, and Kemp’s subdued, severe order, remind us of the melancholic cholic stream in Australian art into which Marmol’s bruised and wrinkled Umbral slides naturally. This art, as a slow, revelatory process of accumulated lated subtleties, is continued in Orban’s Mura, a faded map that once may have shown the way to Paul Klee’s. In Fred Williams’ Upwey the scattered trees don’t cohere through some hidden force, but in Lysterfield they make a hill look like the lonely edge of the world. The more turbulent accumulation of Olsen and Arthur Boyd on this occasion sion makes Williams look pallidly hesi48 tant; Olsen and Boyd have no fear of the muddied, daubed, congested, or confused fused area, neither thinks simple clarity or delicate poise ,a virtue. The two Boyds are thick, swirling, flamboyant works where the figures are no longer veiled transparencies, but writhe with the linear intensities of their background ground briars and woods, the very paint partaking in the metamorphoses of which Franz Philipp has written in his, recent book on Boyd. Olsen’s Harvest is the best cropping he’s done lately: it is a rich, darkly glowing accumulation of swelling shapes, ripe and fecund, with its new, slower movement and density enlivened by a mad, sketchy Lucebert dog. His ten-foot Sydney Sun recalls his celebrated brated ceilings, but there’s less bravura, less dash, and less decorative impulsiveness! ness! It has some kinship with the 1962 Eric Smith Olsen in You Beaut Country, where a deliberated Bonnard fragmentation exploded into reckless action-painting and assaulted the edges of the canvas in the best de Kooning manner. Like Sydney Sun, it swarms, encompasses, and envelops. The unlikely combination of Weaver Hawkins and Joe Rose goes well together gether at Macquarie; Hawkins is all lively, light-hued rhythms and Rose presides over the emergence of bejewelled, jewelled, shattered shapes from the gloom, and, oddly enough, the artists share some Victorian qualities, Rose having a Moreau mystery and Hawkins a fin-de-siecle, detached flaccidity in his blooms and foliage which swarm with a new liberation. No longer so rigid, Hawkins has a new flexibility: there is less of Delaunay’s firmness and an intuitive ease has diminished his intellectual deliberation. Areas formed by leaves and petals flow easily as in some areas of early Cubism for boundaries are no longer final, an effect increased by Hawkins’ use of complementary colors as shadows. Incidentally, cidentally, these lively entertainments underline Hawkins’ concern with the formal rhythms of quite prosaic subjects; jects; like the early Balson, Hinder, Crowley, and Borlase, he has not time for art as metaphysics or symbol. His notions, not at all fashionable, grew out of 1920 s analysis and functionalism and it is not surprising that this present work should have a note of the detachment ment of art nouveau. Joe Rose wants to present the icon emerging, often half-formed, from the gloom; to him Paris is a crimson sun in a sullen sky; other forms, still owing allegiance to abstract expressionism, float like jewel-encrusted ectoplasms in the unknown. Athough he found this a little theatrical, he. seeks a new solidity of form in his charcoals, which have an air of surreal cubism, with a biomorphic morphic swelling here and a melancholic cholic Miro eye there. Rose has a literary imagination, which, when you think of Baziotes, Boyd, and, to a lesser degree, Olsen, is not such an evil thing; his main problem is that his themes waver between grandeur and intimacy and his formal means between the simple and flat areas and clusters of lush paint: Hawkins has his petit theme, but Rose seems to lack one of any urgency or, remembering Fairweather, of quiet dedication.
Terms of Use
  • In Copyright
Language
  • English
Identifier
  • AP7 (LC)

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

Other suppliers

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment