1947-09-24, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: PERSONAL ITEMS (24 September 1947)

User activity

Share to:
PERSONAL ITEMS (24 September 1947)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/258333921
Physical Description
  • 2319 words
  • article
  • illustration
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • xna, John Haynes and J.F. Archibald, 1947-09-24
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • PERSONAL ITEMS (24 September 1947)
Appears In
  • The bulletin., v.68, no.3528, 1947-09-24 (ISSN: 0007-4039)
Published
  • xna, John Haynes and J.F. Archibald, 1947-09-24
Physical Description
  • 2319 words
  • article
  • illustration
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Series
Part Of
  • The bulletin.
  • Vol. 68 No. 3528 (24 Sep 1947)
  • John Ryan Comic Collection (Specific issues).
Subjects
Summary
  • PERSONAL ITEMS It may have been a linguistic bloomer, confusion with another Victorian Louis or the prophetic mantle falling on him, which made Minister for Agriculture Mc- Kenzie announce at the Melbourne Show’s annual luncheon that he wanted to pay a warm tribute to “the Secretary of the Royal Agricultural Society, Sir Louis Monod.” Monod has been secretary and chief executive of Victoria’s toria’s big shop window for 15 years and through the war years when it was an R.A.A.F. camp. He had the huge job of reconverting it to its peace-time grandeur and will probably have the task of directing ing its urgently-needed complete rebuilding. ing. Bom in Ballarat in 1892, he w r ent into the timber business and then joined the Society as a junior clerk in 1912. He has since worked up through all its official ramifications. He is the editor of the Shorthorn Stud Book, is working on a new publication. The Draught Horse Stud Book of Australia, has organised stud associations all over the State and secretaries and a dozen Vic. branches and a dozen Federal organisations of breeders of pigs, dogs and horses. His wife is the presiding spirit of the homecraft craft section of the Show. Biggest individual hit of the Melbourne Show was not made in the ring or over the sticks, but in the culinary department by Robert Kirkwood, who recently caused consternation in the Wagga district trict by winning a cooking prize against the competition of the local housewives. He has repeated his offence at the Melbourne bourne Showgrounds by carrying off the prize for chutney. Mr. Kirkwood is 77 and didn’t intrude into the kitchen until his wife died when he was 70. He has a love of good food, and his wife had been a good cook, so he had to do something thing about it. He now makes jams which would make any epicure’s gastric juices flow, and is, in addition, a handsome some man with a good figure who, in his well-cut, slightly old-fashioned clothes, looks as if he had stepped out of some Edwardian fashion journal. Charles Eaton, 0.8. E., A.F.C., Australian tralian Consul in Timor, now busy on the U.N.O. inquiry into the Indonesian dispute, was born in London in 1895. He served with the R.F.C. and R.A.F. in the Great War and afterwards linked up with the Imperial Forest Service in India. Coming to Australia he joined the R.A.A.F. in 1925, rose to the rank of group-captain and was familiarly known as “Moth.” Commander of a squadron in Darwin, after the Japs came in he directed 1111 sorties, mainly by Dutch airmen, and for his excellent work was awarded the Cross of Orange of Nassau. During operations over Timor he lost a cap and was presented with another autographed by every pilot of a Beaufighter fighter squadron. When the Yanks arrived in Australia he was in command of the aircraft depot at Wagga. His colleagues will recall “Moth’s” indignation when he contrasted his own limited authority—no amount exceeding £25 could be expended without reference to Air Board with that of his American opposite number who, needing timber, just went to surrounding rounding sawmills, bought £6OOO-worth and paid in cash from a bag carried by his adjutant. Eaton left the R.A.A.F. in 1946 to take his present appointment. Dead at 74 after a long illness John Oliver Feetham, Bishop of North Queensland, land, ruled his diocese for 34 years, a record period in the history of the Anglican can Church. Born in Monmouthshire, the son of a parson, he went, soon after leaving Cambridge, to the London church of St. Simon Zelotes, in Bethnal Green, where he worked as curate for eight years. In 1907 he came to Australia as Principal of the Brotherhood of the Good Shepherd with headquarters at Bathurst (N.S.W.), where he remained until 1913, when he was consecrated Bishop of North Queensland. He identified himself completely' pletely' with the life of the North and was loved and respected throughout his vast diocese. James Boyd, recently appointed by President Truman as director of U.S. Federal Bureau of Mines, is an Australian, tralian, born at Kanowna (W.A.) 43 years ago. He’s! a son of mining engineer Julian Boyd, who was superintendent under “Hail Columbia” Hoover on the W.A. goldfields when James was a toddler. Truman actually nominated Boyd for the job early this year. John L. Lewis objected that the appointment was political, and although a Senate committee mittee approved it the Senate went into recess before it was confirmed. The effect of the President’s renomination is that Boyd can carry on pending the Senate’s approval next year. At present sent he is dean of the Colorado School of Mines. He was in the chair of professor sor of mining geology there until he joined the U.S. Army Engineers in 1941; by the time he was demobbed he was a colonel with a Legion of Merit, earned for work with the U.S. Occupation Forces in Germany. Boyd senior was born in Melbourne, and has managed or advised on mining shows in W.A., Rhodesia, The Rand and Death Valley, California. He went to the U.S.A. after his return from World War One, is consulting sulting mining engineer for many undertakings takings on the Pacific coast and instructor tor in mining at the University of Southern California. Retiring as Tasmanian Auditor- General, Frederick John Batt, who has been with the department since 1890. Twenty years ago he had a hand in the preparation of Tasmania’s case for Commonwealth monwealth assistance, and he has since helped draw up several similar reports. A few years ago he took on the formidable job of ascertaining the capital and replacement values of all State-owned buildings, plant and equipment in the Speck. Earlier on he had an active part in many sports, particularly football, swimming and yachting, and he is president dent of the Tasmanian Regatta Club. The pugnacious jaw and good-natured grin captured here by Heth -should be well-known to all N.S.W. politicians and to others whose business or hobby takes them to the Macquarie-street House of Assembly; they belong to Fred Langley, recently retired as Clerk of the House. Youngest son of the second Bishop of Bendigo. Fred joined the Parliamentary staff in 1904, went away to the First World War with the 38th Battalion and came out of Messines with a mention in dispatches. After demobbing he . was attached for a few months to the House of Commons. In his younger days Langley ley captained the lolanthe football team in the City and Suburban Association and he has always been a great yachting enthusiast; he owned at different times Magic, Meteor and Cutty Sark, all wellknown known on Sydney Harbor. He is now president of Palm Beach Surf Club. In Langley’s recollection, the stormiest period in the N.S.W. Assembly, not even excluding the Lang days, was the latter half of the 22nd Parliament under the Speakership of Henry Willis. Sydney artist George Duncan, whose studio was gutted when a fire burnt out the top floors of the old Bulletin building ing at 214 George-street, is to have his fourth one-man show at the Macquarie Galleries next Wednesday. George was born in Auckland in 1904, and studied in Sydney under Dattilo-Rubbo. From 1933 to 1940 he travelled abroad, painting ing and studying, mainly in England, France, Germany and Spain. He exhibited hibited and was twice hung on the line at the Royal Academy and has been a regular exhibitor with the Royal Oil Painters’ Institute, the Leicester Gallery and at other English art shows. The National Gallery of N.S.W. has samples of his work, his paintings have been bought by the Felton Bequest and he is well represented in many private collections tions in England and Australia. Duncan managed the production and design of murals for the Glasgow exhibition and during the war was engaged on camouflage flage work. Several of his paintings, done during the war, were included in the Allied Works Council Exhibition. Prior made this sketch of Dudley Glass, now on a lecture tour of U.S.A., when the subject was revisiting Australia, tralia, During his stay here he gave several A.B.C. talks on music and his light opera, “The Toymaker of Nuremburg,” burg,” was broadcast by a Melbourne station. Glass has had considerable success cess both as a composer and lyricist. His “Beloved Vagabond” was played in Melbourne bourne and Sydney about 12 years ago with Gladys Moncrieff and Claude Flemming ming in the leads; recently it has been running in London, where a Strauss piece, “A Night in Vienna,” for which he wrote the lyrics in 1945, had a season of 18 months. Glass was born in Adelaide 48 years ago and educated in Melbourne, graduating B.A. at Melbourne Uni. While in America he intends to complete, in collaboration with Madeleine Mason, an opera with a Norwegian folk theme. Dead in Melbourne, at 84, Lieutenant- General James Gordon Legge, C. 8., C.M.G., M.A. Born in London, he was educated at Sydney Grammar and Sydney Uni., was a schoolteacher, a barrister-atlaw, law, and did military service for his country try for 30 years. A veteran of the Boer and 1914-18 wars, he commanded the First and afterwards the Second Division, A.1.F., on Gallipoli and in France. He was Chief of the General Staff in Australia tralia until 1920 and then took command of Duntroon. On his retirement he farmed for 12 years in the Federal Territory. tory. His greatest achievement was on the administrative side of the Australian Army during the organisation of universal versal military training, for which he won Kitchener’s high approval. He published several books on military law and universal versal training which were textbooks. Two sons. Colonel S. F. Legge and E. Legge, survive him. This year’s Smith Memorial Medal, awarded by the Australian Chemical Institute, stitute, goes to Dr. A. Bolliger, Ph.D., A.A.C.L, Director of Research at the Gordon Craig Laboratory at Sydney Uni. The medal commemorates the work of H. G. Smith (1852-1924), Assistant Curator and Chemist in the Technological Museum, Sydney, and is awarded annually for the best contribution to the development of chemical science in Australia. tralia. Hypercritical folk have been saying that Thomas Erskine Cleland’s qualifications tions for the post of Adelaide City Coroner are very similar to those which earned him the job of Chairman of S.A. Betting Control Board; he is neither a racegoer nor a punter and, so far as can be ascertained, has never been a corpse. Only son of Judge Cleland, he was born at Beaumont, near Adelaide, and interrupted his law studies to go to the 1914-18 war, in which he served with the R.F.A., Imperial Forces, bringing ing home a Military Cross and a “mention.” tion.” Called to the Adelaide Bar in 1919, he practised as a barrister and solicitor. He has been chairman of the Betting Board for several years and at 53 keeps himself young with tennis and squash. New York had to wait 276 years for a mayor who could gain election for three consecutive terms; the city will probably have to wait much longer for another chief magistrate as colorful and dynamic as Butch, The Hat, The Little Flower, The Little Stinkweed—to list but a few of the names applied by friends and foes to Fiorello la Guardia, dead at 65 in the city he made his own. Anecdotes of his eccentricities, his flow of vituperation, tion, his habit of switching sides in politics, his childish love of watching fires, his zeal for having a finger in every pie, his unorthodox methods of gaining publicity and his often blatant vulgarity will probably grow with the years, but his name will continue on record as the man who broke Tammany and gave New York good government, cleaned up a graft-ridden police force, built schools and children’s playgrounds and made a start on slum clearance. For these things New Yorkers will probably forgive even his Sunday night morality talks. Australian tralian servicemen whom he entertained in New York thought no end of him. Into the Silence: In Hobart, at 94, George Henry Oakes, in his time sailor, policeman and lighthousekeeper. keeper. He went to sea at 14, and put in a few years with the R.N. before joining the police force. For seven years he was in charge of Hobart water police. He was awarded the Royal Humane Society’s Bronze Medal and certificate for rescuing a child from a .burning building, and while in charge of Macquarie Heads light with his 16-year-old son saved four persons from the wrecked Kawatire. In Renmark (S.A.), at 88, Joseph Mighell Smith, the settlement’s oldest pioneer. Born in England, land, he took up land on Kangaroo Island in 1885 and joined the Chaffeys in Renmark four years later. He was 11 times chairman of the Irrigation Trust. At Taree (N.S.W.), a t 78, Percy Ivens, the only oarsman to win in all classes of his State and Australian championships. Commencing in 1900, he won Victorian champion pairs once, the sculls eight times, the fours three times, the eights twice and the Australian champion eights and sculls twice. Charlie Donald (Vic.) and George Rogers (W.A.) have each won their State champion sculls, pairs, fours and eights and the Australian champion eights, but both were defeated in the Australian champion sculls. v At Newcastle, at 87, Charles Ephraim Dagwell. well. Was founder of the Newcastle Fire Brigades and was a member of a number of voluntary teams of fire-fighters before the permanent service was established. At Sydney, Frank Musson, chemist,, who enjoyed the custom of Vice-Royalty for many years and mixed many a dose of medicine for visiting dignitaries who caught cold in the draughty corridors of Government House. His advice was often sought by chemists in the city on preparations outside the usual run. CLERK OF ASSEMBLY. COMPOSER. CORONER.
Terms of Use
Language
  • English
Identifier
  • AP7 (LC)

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

Other suppliers

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment