1937-01-06, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: PERSONAL ITEMS (6 January 1937)

User activity

Share to:
PERSONAL ITEMS (6 January 1937)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/258286794
Physical Description
  • 1417 words
  • article
  • illustration
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • xna, John Haynes and J.F. Archibald, 1937-01-06
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • PERSONAL ITEMS (6 January 1937)
Appears In
  • The bulletin., v.58, no.2969, 1937-01-06 (ISSN: 0007-4039)
Published
  • xna, John Haynes and J.F. Archibald, 1937-01-06
Physical Description
  • 1417 words
  • article
  • illustration
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Series
Part Of
  • The bulletin.
  • Vol. 58 No. 2969 (6 Jan 1937)
  • John Ryan Comic Collection (Specific issues).
Subjects
Summary
  • PERSONAL ITEMS Grafton Elliot Smith, passed on in England, was one of the most versatile graduates ever produced by Sydney University. versity. Born at Grafton (N.S.W.), he left his native land to do research work at Cambridge and soon was a fellow of its St. John’s College. His bent for archaeology and anthropology took him to Egypt, and he became a world authority on man in the time of the Pharaohs. His distinctions were legion ; the learned societies of most front-rank countries had honored him. He had been Professor of Anatomy successively at the Universities of Manchester and London, and was one of the most voluminous minous of Australian-born scientific writers. Bulletin artist G. K. Townshend, whose characteristic walk and mien are well shown in Horner’s sketch, hailed originally from Maoriland, and studied under Norman Carter and Datillo Rubbo at Sydney Royal Art Society, after preliminary liminary training with Louis Steele in his native city, Auckland. The war stabilised his technique. Attached to the 2nd Field Artillery Brigade, he sketched everything in sight, including Fritz when he could catch him, and the fine portfolio folio he brought home was bought by the Mitchell Library as a national record. Townshend is a fellow of the Sydney Royal Art Society and member of most other Sydney painters’ and etchers’ bodies, and gives some time to teaching art at Sydney Tech. He is Australia’s tralia’s most blue-blooded artist: his father is heir to the seventh Marquess of Townshend. Townshend of Kut was his near relation, and on the female side he has the blood of an ancient English barony that survived into the nineteenth century—Ferrers de Chartley, dating back to 1299. Captain C. C. Worboys, who died in Sydney on the day before New Year's Eve, had the hardest of luck in the war. He was with the engineers on Gallipoli at 19, but was invalided home. Then he became one of Richmond’s most brilliant liant flying cadets, qualifying with high honors for a captaincy, but a fractured spine in an accident on the night before the Armistice spoilt his chances of a full life. Always cheerful, at one stage he became well enough to drive his own car and work in a wheeled chair. He latterly interested himself in politics, and contested a U.A.P. ballot for Ashfield. C. M. Briggs, passed on at 68, was associated with the Brisbane Newspaper Co. for the whole of his working life. He was an inspector of agencies when in 1900, as Briggs himself put it, “a fairy tale happened.” That year W. B. Carmichael, michael, g.m., leaving for U.S.A., quietly called the young man in and told him to take charge. In 1912, when W. R. Topliss resigned the job, Briggs became manager, E. J. Stevens, managing director, and J. J. Knight, who took a greater share of the managerial burden than editors usually ally do, being still in their prime. Becoming coming g.m. in 1921, Briggs remained in control till Melbourne “Herald” interests took the company’s papers over. Though the “Courier” was his life interest, during ing the war he made time to work for over 40 war funds. Back in the ’eighties and early ’nineties he was a star footballer, baller, swimmer, cyclist and rower. Latterly he took to bowls. J. P. L. Thomas, M.P. for the ancient city of Hereford, who is visiting Australia, tralia, is not to be confused with the “Jimmy” Thomas who fell over the Budget. J.P.L. is a Carmarthenshire man who crossed the Welsh border after failing to win a seat in his native territory. tory. At 26 he was not only in the Commons but assistant secretary to Stanley ley Baldwin, whose Bewdley seat is not far from Thomas’s own. Since 1932 he has been Parliamentary Secretary successively cessively to the Dominions and Colonial Ministers. He is now 33. All good Adelaideans will recognise Coventry’s sardonic likeness of R. Burns Cuming, one of the centenary city’s outstanding standing commercial cial men. Cuming, a leading executive of a well-known artificial ficial fertiliser co. which his family controls, is in his spare time a vicepresident president of the Adelaide Chamber of Commerce. The inhabitants of Melbourne Zoo lose a good friend through the retirement ment of Andrew Wilkie, who has been the main figure in the resort’s development velopment for almost as many years as an elephant can remember. member. Wilkie loved the job and brought to it a gift of humor which did much to popularise his work. He knew every creature in the place as an intimate friend and his stories were legion. Some of them have already made a very good book, though he was not responsible for the writing of it. Down on a trip from New Guinea, Captain H. T. Hammond, one of Australia’s tralia’s oldest airmen. His experience began during the war, and he has been mostly in the air ever since. Fritz failing ing to get him, he began barnstorming in N. S. Wales after the scrap. The N.G. gold days gave him a chance to try his luck between Salamaua and Edie Creek. The King’s Medal at Duntroon went this year to Lieutenant G. D. Clark, son of a Digger officer of the 43rd who died at Messines. Clark, born and educated in Adelaide, was first president of the Adelaide Intermediate Legacy Club. A good all-round athlete, playing half a dozen games well, he has specialised at the military college in engineering. Succeeding that long and elegant S. African veteran H. L. Harnett as sergeantat-arms at-arms of the N. S. Wales Assembly is H. Robbins, of the Parliamentary staff, who won the Military Cross at Clery with the 38th and was badly wounded more than once in the war. Robbins, who has been second clerk to the House for 18 years, has not the same physical attributes as Harnett, but in these days chuckings-out are rare. The Bank of N.S.W. loses a good servant vant in W. G. Hull, who, with 42 years’ banking service behind him, had been chief inspector and g.m. of the A.B.C. Bank when the ’Wales took it over during ing the depression. The ’Wales made him inspector and later chief inspector. The surest place to find him henceforth will be in his garden. - Queenslanders scored heavily in recent C.M.F. promotions. Inspector-General J. D. Lavarack belonged to the old Brisbane bane Grammar School cadet corps, which underwent spartan training and twice provided a rifle team to win the Earl of Meath’s Empire Cup against schools of the Empire. E. C. P. Plant, one of two brothers who shot in the successful cessful rifle teams, becomes Director of Military Training. With the 9th Battalion talion he won the D.S.O. and the C. de Guerre and was mentioned five times in dispatches, returning a lieutenantcolonel colonel in his twenties. O. F. Phillips, Warwick-born, becomes a majorgeneral. general. One of the dashing handful of R.A.A. lieutenants who trained Queensland’s land’s meagre forces before the war, he is an A.D.C. to the King and is Q.M.G. and third member of the Military Board. The accession of George VI. has set people recalling that he stuttered badly till treated by an Australian, Lionel Logue. Logue, a South Australian by birth, taught elocution tion in Perth and gave an occasional recital. He had a good following, being ing an amiable, handsome fellow, with a shock of fair hair; but he found his vocation only when he went to London, studied the causes of stammering ing and set up as a healer. A newspaper correspondent has questioned whether he had the then Duke of York as a patient, but the fact is well authenticated, cated, and it brought him heaps of business. J. G. Chidgey, g.m. of the Fresh Food and Ice Co., who collapsed and died on the gangway of the Awatea, was a wellknown known figure in Sydney commerce. Originally he was an accountant with the old-established firm of Yarwood Vane ; then he joined Nestles, and finally rose from the accountant’s job to headship ship of the F.F. and I. Professor E. W. Skeats, off on a year’s leave to U.S.A. and Europe, emigrated to Australia to become professor of geology at Melbourne University in 1904. A decade or so ago he was for two years president of the Professorial Board, and before that Dean of the Faculty of Science. He has written voluminously on Australian formations. G. K. TOWNSHEND. Baron MARKS, of Melbourne. R. BURNS CUMING, of Adelaide.
Terms of Use
Language
  • English
Identifier
  • AP7 (LC)

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

Other suppliers

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment