1934-06-27, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: SPORTING NOTIONS (27 June 1934)

User activity

Share to:
SPORTING NOTIONS (27 June 1934)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/258273848
Physical Description
  • 6199 words
  • article
  • illustration
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • xna, John Haynes and J.F. Archibald, 1934-06-27
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • SPORTING NOTIONS (27 June 1934)
Appears In
  • The bulletin., v.55, no.2837, 1934-06-27 (ISSN: 0007-4039)
Published
  • xna, John Haynes and J.F. Archibald, 1934-06-27
Physical Description
  • 6199 words
  • article
  • illustration
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Series
Part Of
  • The bulletin.
  • Vol. 55 No. 2837 (27 Jun 1934)
  • John Ryan Comic Collection (Specific issues).
Subjects
Summary
  • SPORTING NOTIONS Under the Whip Redditch came into his own again in the Wanda Steeplechase at Caulfield. Fred Hoysted, the trainer, re-enlisted the services of Hynes, and for this former Sydney horseman Redditch gave a fine display, romping home seven lengths in advance of The Cracksman, with Widgiewa giewa a moderate third. For half the journey Redditch was not at his best; brush fences appeared to bother him whenever encountered. But at the postand-railers and-railers and logs opposite the stand he revealed the old vim and brilliance. Taking ing off half a length behind (and between) two leaders, he passed them in the air, skimming the obstacle so closely that his surcingle almost touched it. Thereafter no rival could get near Redditch. Improving on his form at the V.R.C. Birthday meeting, The Cracksman beat the remainder of the field easily enough. He was runner-up to Redditch in. the 1933 G.N., when ip receipt of 2st. Weights on July 14 will favor The Cracksman man to the extent of only 41b. as compared pared with last year, and there is small likelihood of the tables being turned. His victory in the Toolambool Hurdle suggests that Prismatic will take a lot of beating in the G.N.H. This horse cap- Bert; "I see bee-m SKITTLIMG, THEM &​GMKJ '' Geter: '‘’\NHofe clarrie ?■ " Bfßt! ' VJhy Carrie G»RiMMerr, our ; qoog,oe Bo^mu.er.'-', G)ERT :"e>UT HE3 \H THE AS L.B.W, tured the A.J.C. Hurdle of 1933, and in Victoria the Rossendale gelding has done fairly well on the flat. C. T. Godby bought him for J. A. Phillips, the bookmaker. maker. Prismatic smothered the leaders over the last three furlongs of the Toolambool ambool Hurdle, and scored like a champion. pion. Star God came from a long way back to run third, and may have an outside side chance in the National. Oldhome, on whom McMenamin, from Sydney, was having his first ride, was well placed at the turn, but tired. A stable-mate, Prime Seal, surprised by running third. Oldhome has lessened in favor for the National, but he has a lot of pace, is fit and may have been in need of public jumping practice. Hynes expressed disgust gust at the form of Our Comet, who did not tackle the hurdles with confidence. Don Zealley made the same complaint regarding Sarokos. In the National Baanya is called on to concede Prismatic 91b. Admirers of the Tas. candidate believe that he is equal to the task. Baanya is held in such high esteem as a galloper that punters accepted 9 to 4 about him in the Richmond Handicap, despite his 9st. 21b. Soon after the start Baanya’s saddle slipped, and for the rest of the journey Jim Munro practically was out on the withers of his mount; yet Baanya ran third to Hostile and the pacemaker, Eagle Eye. Winner has just had his attention turned to middle-distance events, and McShortodds felt emboldened to lay 16 to 1. Considering sidering the amount of gilt that went west over Baanya he could well afford to do so, but after the race there were the usual grumblings: “Laid my full book,” “Winner was my worst,” and so on. Chelandric, bought for 1400gns. at the Sydney sales in 1933 by C. B. Kellow, let his even-money supporters down with a thud in the second division of the Minook Two-year-old, won by Telford with Handsel, a Brazen colt. Chelandric wasn’t in the humor for galloping. First division resulted in Speech Girl, a daughter ter of Constant Son, scoring by half a head from the Tasmanian crack juvenile, Beaudekin, with Red Ray another halfhead head away. A protest for interference was dismissed. First and second horses are trained by Bert Price, who piloted Flash Jack to victory in a G. N. Steeple, and is a son of D. J. Price. * * * * It’s becoming fashionable in Sydney for horses to run well one week and fail ingloriously at their next outing. Of course, horses are not machines; still, the public would like to see the stewards afford owners and trainers opportunities of advancing reasons for the eccentric displays. Turbine, holder of the seven-furlong record at Randwick, won the A.J.C. June Stakes in an impressive manner. Five days later he finished at the tail of the field in the Botany Handicap. In those races he was piloted by Pratt. In the Dundas Handicap at Rosehill on Saturday day McCai;ten had the mount. Second ond fancy at fives (some backers got sevens), Turbine beat little ‘ Bill Wedgewood wood and the favorite, Persian, pointless. less. There was no inquiry. Backers of Turbine went solidly for his stable-mate, Miss Notava (5 to 1), in the Rosehill June Handicap. Ridden by Pratt, the chestnut mare set up a winning lead turning for home, and the result was not in doubt over the last two furlongs. longs. Mountain View was a poor second, and Regal Star, who proved too much for his small pilot, third. Old Tangible showed dash in the early stages, but Polette and Mayonnaise were failures. Backed from fives to 6 to 4, the Marconigram conigram colt Short Wave, trained by E. D. Lawson, gave Pike an easy ride in the first division of the Juvenile. The owner, Dr. T. S. Kirkland, has hopes G f t hi s fellow developing into a Derby proposition. The bookies scored heavily over the victories of Pavarti in the second ond division and of Cylanta in the Parramatta ramatta Mile. Each started at 20 to 1. s nastoralist V M White hath bco . n . e past °, st Y- J - wplte has a Poising galloper in Sun Haze who cla ™ s Australian Sun as sire The bay gelding (6 to 1) won the second division of the Maiden in good style from Ilfracombe Rogarma. He is trained at Rand- Harry England. The first divislon slon went to Britta, owned by a Camden s P ort sman, T.M. Shell, who won many races with Dalmatic. W. T. Dwyer trains Britta, a three-year-old by Nassau (sire of Ballymena) out of Chat Ever, with staying possibilities. * - * * * Chatham has been handicapped at lOst. 91b. for the Epsom, lOst. lib. for the Caulfield Cup and lOst. 81b. for the Cantala tala Stakes ; and in each case he is entitled titled to every pound. But how many followers of racing would place Winooka within 21b. of him in the Epsom, as the A.J.C. handicapper has done? Even the 51b. between them in the Cantala Stakes seems hard on Winooka, considering his poor American form. Another harshlytreated treated horse is Soft Step, the Queensland land colt, rising four years, who is weighted to carry 9st. in the Melbourne Cup —the same as Limarch, 21b. less than Hall Mark, 71b. less than Rogilla and 101 b. less than Peter Pan. What has Soft Step done to warrant such treatment? Waikare beat him in the Queensland Derby. Attractive-looking doubles at the moment are Whittingham (Bst. 121 b.) or Waikare (Bst. 21b.), and Rogilla (9st. 111 b.) or Topical (Bst. 111 b.) for the Epsom and Metrop. ; Rogilla (9st. 101 b.) or Wheriko (Bst. 71b.), and Peter Pan or Hall Mark for the two Cups. M.Q. (and Rafferty) Rules Walter Browning met his master at Leichhardt in Haban Singh. Said to weigh only 15st. 21b., he seemed stones heavier than Singh (14st. 41b.); all the same, he was tossed about like a medicine-ball until he made the lighter lad submit to a Boston crab in the fourth. Singh, prior to this, had squeezed out of every hold put on him. After winning the fifth from start to finish the Indian picked Browning ing up bodily in the last and slammed his way to a very popular victory. Woodfull’s Men The second Test at Lord’s called a halt on Saturday night with England 440 for the first innings and two Australian wickets down for 192. The Englishmen batted from Friday morning to close on 3 p.m. on Saturday, scoring at the rate of 48 runs to the round of the clock. With just three hours to bat, Australia averaged aged 64 runs per hour. Grimmett and O’Reilly were comparatively harmless. Wall, as usual on this ground, did well, while Chipperfield achieved additional glory by dismissing Sutcliffe, Hammond and Wyatt, a formidable trio. Though Walters, relieved of the captaincy taincy by Wyatt, batted in his best form for 82, England’s first five wickets went for 182, Chipperfield snaring Sutcliffe and Hammond for 3. Then followed a fine stand by Leyland and ’keeper Ames, the Yorkshireman reaching 109 before Wall bowled him, and Ames going on to 120 before McCabe sent him back. The stand saved England from a collapse and tired the bowling sufficiently to allow Verity and the tail-enders to add an invaluable 50 for the last wickets. Ames, by the way, is the first English stumper to reach three figures in a Test. Australia’s best is 74 by Blackham, unless we count in Murdoch, doch, who was taken to England as first Aunt Sally for the 1878 team. His best Test score was 211. Wall, badly backed by his fieldsmen again, nevertheless got through with 4 for 108. Chipperfield’s figures were 3 for 91. Grimmett and O’Reilly each took an expensive wicket. Woodfull opened for Australia with Brown, Ponsford being in bed with ’flu. The pair had 68 up when the skipper was bowled by Bowes for a plodding 22. Brown had been going along in great style, and he and Bradman had the score to 141 when Bradman, who had been going for the bowling from the first, was caught and bowled off a hanging ball from Verity for a sterling 36. McCabe followed, and played out time with Brown. Mac was 24 at stumps and Brown 103, both n.o. Each side dropped several chances, but the fielding was good in other respects. Outstanding was the failure of the English lish fast bowling, which Australians are alleged to dread. Fames was taken off after 43 runs had been knocked off him. Bowes was persevered with, but finished with 1 for 71. Slow left-hander Verity (1-24) looked easily the most dangerous. o Continued on page 37.) Footbrawl Like other promising games this season son Melbourne’s chief scrap on Saturday —Carlton v. St. Kilda on the latter’s ground —proved a dud. Going off with a concerted attack, backed by accurate marking, the Blues swept the Saints into the basket, and kept them there. At the finish, Carlton owned 166 to St. K.’s 108. Davey, Huxtable and Cashman did well for the Blues, and Watson and Penny for the others. Some 30,000 witnessed the rout. Melbourne went out to Footscray and surprised the Tricolors, capturing 91 to ’Scray’s 44. Richmond put it over Hawthorn thorn to the tune of 110 to 81, and Collingwood lingwood similarly dealt with North Melbourne —112 to 86. The best game drew only a meagre 20,000 to Fitzroy, where Essendon matched point for point with the Maroons throughout a fast and exciting scuffle. Fitzroy won on the bell by five points —102 to 97. Three special trainloads of barrackers journeyed to Geelong to hearten up South Melbourne, but found the job too heavy. The loss of Diggins and Reville seems to have put the wind up South. Still, Geelong, as a composite team, is hard to beat at home with Todd, Metherall, Molony, Hickey and Quinn doing their best. A crowd of 14,200 coughed up £350 to see the Pivotonians score 106 points to 77. * * * * Rugby Union matches in Sydney on Saturday did little to reverse positions on the table, but several of the clubs are keeping within striking distance of the semi-finals, only four points separating ing the leading quartet. Randwick defeated Drummoyne at Coogee by 19-3, getting five tries, two converted by Larnach-Jones, to Drummoyne’s moyne’s one. University’s forwards won a hard game against Western Suburbs by 16-10, scoring three tries to two and adding a p.g. to two conversions. Western tern crossed twice, Barnes converting each time. St. George drew with Parramatta, matta, 6-6. Manly had a fairly easy trot against East, 27-15. Northern Suburbs took on Newcastle in the bye, and was just trounced by the coalies, 22-20. * * * * The N.S.W. Rugby Union has shown little enterprise in picking its team to meet Queensland in Sydney this weekend. end. With the All-Blacks looming in the near distance and the need for developing veloping the tons of young talent seen every Saturday, one would have thought a few of the new stars like Richards and Bedford, to name only two, might have been given a gallop. Not so; Ross and Malcolm have both been preferred for the key positions of full- and halfback. back. Both have been great players, but are definitely on the down grade. The omission of Cowper is another bad break, and generally the side is far from reassuring. # * The star turn of the League games was the battle between those ancient adversaries saries South Sydney and Eastern Suburbs at the Sports Ground. Playing a man short most of the time, the Southerners made a gallant fight of it before going down 14-10 ; they had been eight all at half-time. Unbeaten Western Suburbs had an easy run with Balmain, and whanged the wheat-lumpers by 23 to 8. St. George also piled on the points against Newtown, prevailing by 32 to 14. None of the above is a circumstance to what North Sydney did to the University club. At the close of the tragedy the board showed North 46 (10 tries) to 10 (two tries). o Continued on page 37.) Woodfull’s Men Australia carried its first-innings score against the Gentlemen at Lord’s to 230, after six had gone for 164. The invaluable Grimmett again batted well (24). Read (2-61), Holmes (3-31) and Brown (3-45) took the wickets. With 53 runs against them, the Englishmen lishmen did better in the second innings, nings, Walters batting well for 40 and Lyon, of Gloucestershire, having a hearty whack for 67. Holmes (67) and Robins (64) also showed a bold front, and there was 287 on the board when Clay was stumped by Barnett off Grimmett. Wall took 2 for 65, making his total for the match 5 for 114. Grimmett got another four wickets and Ebeling a couple in each innings. Australia made the 235 wanted to win for the loss of two wickets, Barnett (16) and Ebeling (31). Brown and McCabe then got together and defied the bowlers, McCabe flaying them unmercifully for 105 n.o. in as many minutes, his fifth century. Brown collected a neat and quiet 62. Read and Brown took a wicket each. * * * * “Tenth Slip”: Up to the end of the match with the Gentlemen, Australia’s record shows seven wins of the 13 matches played, the others being drawn. Comforting is the evidence that the alleged batting tail is non-existent, all the team, with the exception of Fleetwood-Smith, wood-Smith, having averages of over double figures, while on half a dozen occasions, as in the Gentlemen’s match, the bowlers were called on to put their side in front with their batting, and did. McCabe has taken the limelight Bradman man monopolised in 1930. He has strung up five scores of over 100 in 15 innings and an aggregate of 1136. Most promising mising among the unconsidered batsmen of the team is left-hander Barnett. He has proved himself fit for the best company, pany, and, since he is as good an outfield field as he is a ’keeper, may see a Test match for his batting capacity alone. And O’Reilly and Grimmett, with 56 and 67 wickets thus early on the tour, have done nobly. Wall’s 25 do not suggest that he is up to his 1930 form, though he is always at his best in the big stuff. * * $ * “Statist”: Seventeen individual centuries turies and over scored in the first 13 matches by the Australians in England is quite encouraging, especially as they are shared among seven men. In 1930 only six men topped the three figures during the whole tour. Ebeling, Bromley and Chipperfield, all of whom field close in, the first and third in the slips, have taken nine catches each. McCabe is credited with seven, O’Reilly and Brown with five, Grimmett and Bradman * four, Woodfull and Kippax three, F.-Smith and Wall two, and Darling and Ponsford one. Of the ’keepers, Oldfield has caught 10 and stumped nine, Barnett’s figures being’ eight and nine. sj: H* % :j: “Aigburth”: Larwood’s contract with Notts expires this season. He is likely to find a refuge with the Lancashire League. One interesting question is whether Notts will play the rebel in the county’s match against Australia at Trent Bridge on August 11. It is to be hoped that it will, if only to settle the question of whether he is really a destructive bowler to Australians in England. He He He jjc “Fleet St.”: London “Daily Sketch” is telling a glittering tale of Larwood’s future. A syndicate has been formed to amalgamate the North of England and Midland Leagues and play gate-money cricket. In addition to Larwood, Bradman, man, McCabe and other leading Australian lian and English players are to be roped in to form a galaxy of stars. True or not, it is an old tale. In the early days of the last century Lillywhite and others formed the All England Eleven, which made tours of England before county matches had been organised, playing all and sundry, and against odds if necessary. sary. The money was so good for a bit that other organisations on the same lines sprang up, until dog finally ate dog. * * * * “Amateur Pro.”: Fames, an amateur and a Cambridge man, has told the world how, when he had a job at Leyton in a bank, he was a.w.l. for two days watch- ing the 1930 Australians play his county. Realising that it wasn’t much good going back to the bank after that he resigned, banks being bowelless beggars, and decided cided thereafter “to concentrate on cricket.” It would be interesting to know how the young gentleman lives— he being a public character, the inquiry is quite legitimate—by concentrating on cricket as an amateur. The only refuge writer knows for cricketers who desire to make their living out of the game without being stigmatised as professionals sionals is as secretaries of county clubs. “Wisden” does not mention Fames as secretary of Essex. * * * * “Leyton”: We are threatened with some more cricket frightfulness. London “Daily'Mail” has issued a national appeal for a cricketing song with a chorus to become the cricket national anthem. The prospect is an unpleasant one. Anyone who has been exposed at rowing and other functions to the Eton boating song, bellowed by individuals who have never been within a hundred thousand miles of Eton, and wouldn’t know a Tug from an Oppidan if they saw one, will shudder at the very notion. * * * * “No Ball”: Mailey’s cricket simile representing a smiling ferret waiting at the mouth of a rabbit burrow for its prey (B. 23/​5/​’34) reminds me of something 1 l'ead in the “Australasian” about 35 years ago. The writer was telling of Ernie Jones’s fast bowling, and how one ball hit W. G. Grace in the ribs, with the result that the batsman “glowered through his beard.” Granted that the Old Man had luxuriant whiskers and a not particularly sweet temper, I have never been able to see how he glowered through his beard unless he stood on his head. Footbrawl “Fitzcray”: Victorian football heads are upset at the increasing number of casualties in the game. One sensible theory to account for it is that the excessive sive amount of training, massage, etc., now the fashion with teams, gets the players too finely drawn, with no reserves to combat bat extra strain. That may be said of other games, including cricket. Supertraining, training, massage, electric treatment in nursing homes and kindred fantods were unheard of a few years ago, yet the list of sick and sorry in touring teams was much smaller than to-day. Rugby football ball and even tennis are in the same category gory as regards over-preparation of players. The intensive methods needed to get a man fit to run 100 yards in lOsec. are out of place with athletes required quired to keep bullocking for threequarters quarters of an hour at a stretch. * * * * “Huon”: Victoria still goes gaily on its way of pinching promising Australian Rules footballers from other States. The annual match at Launceston between North and South Tassie was attended by hordes of mysterious folk from over the water, who missed no opportunity -of whispering the most prominent players. Chairman Miller, of the Tassie League, flew off the handle after the match, and said that he had refused a Victorian scout permission to interview one player. In spite of this, the gladiator was furtively tively got at later, and will play in Melbourne bourne next season. Other instances were quoted, and feeling ran so high that the sCouts can be considered lucky that they didn’t have to swim back to the Cabbage Garden. * * -j,-. * “E.S.”: The retirement of S. Milton, the N.S.W. representative Australian Rules player, reminds me that the little chap has a goal-kicking record which even the better-advertised cracks of Victoria and South Australia should find it hard to improve upon. In 16 years’ first-grade football the Eastern Suburbs player has landed 1166 goals. Of these, 151 have been kicked in inter-State matches, and usually against much more formidable sides than the Ma State can muster. “Stand Off”: Sydney will see some first-class Rugby from the end of the month to the last week in August. Queensland will open the campaign with a return match with N.S.W. on June 30 at Sydney Cricket Ground, a second game being played the following Monday at North Sydney Oval. In the two Brisbane bane matches early in the season the States finished level, N.S.W. winning the first 26-23, and the home side the second by 21 to 12. But the big excitement will be the opening match between N.S.W. and the All-Blacks at Sydney C.G. on August 4, followed by another on the Monday, probably at the Showground. The next Saturday sees the first Test between Australia and the visitors at S.C.G., and the tour ends with the second at the same place on August 25. On August 15, 18 and 22 the tourists will play Queensland at Brisbane, an “Australian tralian XV” at the same place, and a match with Newcastle on the way back to Sydney. * * * * The All-Blacks, who make their Sydney ney landfall on July 28, will be bossed this year, not by Billy Wallace, as Was anticipated, but by A. J. Geddes, one of the big chiefs of the game in the Shivery Isles, an ex-holder of the coveted post of president of the N.Z.R.U., and a selector to boot. Unlike many of his contemporaries, the new manager never cut a figure in big football, though a son was in Australia with the 1929 All- Blacks. ¥ H* v 'I“Old “Old Q.”: A notable scoring feat was put up in M.L. Rugby the other day when that great winger Bullock-Douglas, here in 1932, scored 23 of Wanganui’s 26 points in a match with Taranaki, notching five tries and converting four. Against Queensland at Brisbane in 1907, F. C. Fryer, of Canterbury, scored the whole five tries credited to his team and converted one, making the score 17 to 11. * * * * “Losskakkel”: Rugby footballers the world over will note the retirement from big football of Ben Osier, the South African stand-off half. It was not that he was a great player alone, but as skipper of the ’Boks he evolved a tactical tical scheme which made South Africa practically undefeatable, if it did much to destroy the most attractive features of Rugby. His scheme demanded a heavy and powerful pack able to get the ball to him. That done he kicked into touch down the field for a line-out, and the movement was repeated. Near the enemy line Osier either had a drop at goal— and he was a deadly shot—or relied on his big, bustling forwards to break through the opposition for the few yards needed to score a try. * &​ * # “Gate”: The state of armed neutrality between city and country League football ball organisations in N.S.W. (B. 6/​6/​’34) continues. When the country staggered the townies by taking steps to prevent the latter “stealing” country footballers, though they themselves have acquired half the best players in the metropolis by enticing them with jobs, the harborside side crowd hit back. It has been a practice tice of country clubs to ring in Sydney chaps for Sunday matches. Having also played in Sydney on the Saturday, the individual was often returned on the Monday so dilapidated that he was not much use to his club for that week, anyway. way. This is to be stopped, save when an official clearance is granted, and that is going to be as easy to get as ice-cream in Jehannum. * * * * “Stand Off”: Rugby Union football has been making headway in the U.S.A. Cambridge University recently paid a flying visit to the States and played four matches there. As a consequence, an Eastern U.S. Rugby Union has been formed. o Continued on next page.) “I simply loathe playing against a bad loser. Don’t you, Mr. Ropata?” “Dunno. Never play against te loser any kind." The Nineteenth Hole “Divot Digger”: Saturday will see the first of this season’s N.S.W. golf championships, pionships, the foursomes, to be played at Kensington. Holders of the title are Jim Ferrier and G. Thompson, but there are some tough pairs among the opposition, including Fawcett and Bettington. Queensland will be represented for once, the pair being J. N. Radcliffe and S. Francis. Radcliffe is a very high-class player, who has seldom been able to show outside his State, where he has won the open, amateur and foursomes championships, pionships, the last in 1933 in partnership with Francis. * * * =​!' “Oakleigh”: With a view to improving ing its finances, the Victorian Golf Association ciation is revising its constitution, chief feature of this being a new method of levying contributions from affiliated clubs. These will be classified according to membership strength in the country and standing and location in the metropolitan politan area. The old “associate” clubs of Melbourne will pay 2s. 6d. per member ber and Is. 6d. for provincial members. Metropolitan clubs not ranked with these, and within a 30-mile radius from the G.P.0., part up Is. 6d. a member. Country try clubs with 100 members or over will pay three guineas a year, and those with a membership under three figures two guineas. This revenue is to be devoted to establishing a central office, helping along the work of green research, and employing a professional to tour country try clubs and advise on course architecture ture and layout. “Sandringham”: Melbourne stages an annual golf match between teams of professionals fessionals and associate players which might well be imitated elsewhere. This year’s was played at Royal Melbourne between teams of 12 a side, the associates being given a concession of six strokes while playing from the forward tees. The pros, won eight of the singles and all the foursomes. This puts them one up in the series, which began in 1923. “Marino”: Rufus Stewart made a welcome come reappearance in big golf the other day when he won the close championship at Adelaide. Stewart has been handicapped capped by illness during recent years, and practically rose from a sick bed to play. The opposition was strong, including ing McMahon, W. P.ymill and Legh Winser, but Stewart won by 3 strokes, his card for the 36 holes being 145. “Hoylake”: The Oliver Kay-Gaisford pair, who left Maoriland some time ago to clean up the women’s golf championships ships in Britain, have had a very bad spin. The latest news of them is that Miss Kay went down in the Scottish women’s championship played at Berwick. Her opponent was Mrs. Coats. Either the Maorilanders failed to strike form or else the standard of women’s golf in Britain is far higher than ours. On this side of the world Miss Kay was in a class by herself. “Indooroopilly”: Queensland women golfers have been indulging in their annual jamboree, and the entries received ceived in Brisbane, especially from the country, have beaten all previous records. The singles champion last year was Miss Hood, winner for the eighth time, who defended her title this year. Founded in 1922 with three clubs, the union has now 47 on its list. “Britannia Deserta”: The effects of the continued drought in Britain are producing ing conditions not pleasant to contemplate, plate, not the least of them being the damage done to the golf greens. The other day the chairman of the London Water Board roused metropolitan golfers to a wild Cockney fury by threatening to cut down the water supply to the clubs by 10 per cent. He pointed out that forty million gallons a day was used in and about London by golf clubs, this being one-seventh of London s total consumption sumption for all purposes. Racquet and Bawl The Australian Davis Cuppers won through in their semi-final with France, but, as Wellington said of Waterloo, “It was ad- d near thing.” The winning of the doubles meant that only one of the remaining singles had to be taken for victory. This time McGrath went down before Merlin, who seems to have come on into a champion since last season. Crawford, after a start which set the nerves of his supporters on edge, downed Boussus in five sets. The Parisian barrackers rackers gave a shocking exhibition of partisanship. The other semi-final was won by the Czechs, who downed Italy three to two. Our fellows will have to go to Prague to meet them, and they are a tough lot, especially on their home courts. However, the match will not be played until Wimbledon is over —some time before July 16. “Cut Shot”: Wimbledon drew 118 entries for the men’s singles alone, nearly every country in the world being represented. sented. Crawford, who holds the title, is in the top half, which includes Shields and Austin. Perry is in the second half, and with him Von Cramm, Wood and Stefani, who knocked him out of the French championships. In the women’s singles 86 have entered. Helen Jacobs is ranked first. “Top Spin”: The tennis world is undergoing dergoing reconstruction these days. Norman man Brookes has come back with his proposal to create a Davis Cup Pacific zone, with Australia, • Maoriland and South Africa in the south and Japan, China and the Philippines in the north. This project dropped out when first advanced vanced a couple of years ago because South Africa, which really doesn’t belong to the Pacific at all, gave the idea a miss. Italy and Greece also have come along with a proposal for a Mediterranean championship which each country would control in alternate years. The I.T.F. threw out the suggestion with all the emphasis of Demetrius refusing to include clude more than one mollusc in a plate of oyster soup. “C.C.”: They are playing at Wimbledon don on what is practically an English equivalent of the alleged Great Australian lian Desert. The drought which has racked Merrie England has led the average Englishman to sigh for what, as a beverage at least, he has never regarded with any favor previously. As a result, supplies of water for golf, tennis and cricket grounds have been curtailed and Wimbledon courts are like an Australian tralian ant-bed court with a few whiskers on it. Worse than that, a new grub, described as a “leatherjacket,” has started eating the roots of what grass remains. The job of locating these creatures and extracting them individually from the turf with as little damage as possible is a greater problem than who will win the All-England championship. “Queen’s Club”: Helen Wills-Moody, who dropped out of big tennis following on her injury in the American national championships last year, announced the other day that she will try to come back next season. The lady is in London for Wimbledon and the Davis Cup matches, and is to write about them. Recent rulings on the amateur status will make her a professional unless she can plead she is a professional journalist. However, that should be easily fixed, as it has been on so many other occasions. Miscellaneous “Blade Sight”: A fine example of consistency sistency in rifle-shooting must be credited to F. R. Agate, of Edgecliff (N.S.W.) club. In an inter-district match at Anzac range, Agate scored 591 out of a possible 600 at six ranges, from 300 to 900 yards inclusive. “Rickety Kate”: The action of the Australian B.C. in refusing the application tion of Victorian bowlers to be allowed to invite an American team to Melbourne bourne for the centenary shivoo (B. 20/​6/​’34) is a pretty instance of snobbery. bery. True, the International Bowling Board will not grant affiliation to the American B.A. because its players accept cash prizes, but that does not prevent American teams being entertained in Britain and British teams playing in the States. “Hotham”: One sign that General Depresh is retreating is the revival of polo in several of the States where the game has been officially on the peg for some time, Victoria in particular. The Vies, are staging a Centenary Gold Cup. and a team of Maorilanders is already arranging for accommodation for man and beast, while Honolulu is also discussing ing the trip. Queensland and N.S.W. will be there, and South Australia is sending two teams, one of them the Mt. Crawford side. “The Gaffer”: A couple of new track records went up the other day, of course in America, where these things will happen. Cunningham, of Kansas Uni., covered the mile in 4min. 6 7-10 sec., beating Maorilander Lovelock’s world figures of 4min. 7 3-ssec., made in the States some months ago. Eastman, the Olympic half-miler, ran the 880 in lmin. 49 8-10 sec., beating his own best by 1 1-lOsec. Lovelock will be captaining an Oxford-Cambridge team against one from Princeton and Cornell in July, and will have a chance of retrieving his lost laurels. Victoria’s Horsfall will figure among the Britons in the quarter and the long jump. “Spinnaker”: Borrowing a leaf from Melbourne’s book, Sydney yachtsmen are adopting the six-metre class, of which we saw such an attractive specimen as Toogooloowoo gooloowoo II on Port Jackson some time ago. The Melbourne yacht’s plans are to be adopted as the basis for the Sydney craft, one of which is already under construction, struction, while several others are spoken of. The Sydney boats will be modified for local racing by the addition of a coach roof and full cabin fittings so as to permit the use of the craft as a pleasure cruiser as well as a racer. “Kick Starter”: The Isle of Man T.T. races provided another triumph for the Norton machines, which won in two of the three classes. J. Guthrie won the Senior at 78.01 m.p.h. and the Junior at 79.16. The Lightweight went to J. H. Simpson, who rode a Rudge and averaged 70.81 for the 266-mile spin. Much was expected of Stanley Woods, winner of several T.T. races and rated the best road rider in the world. He recently left the Norton team to ride the Husqvarna, a Swedish 348 c.c. twocylinder cylinder job. He had no success, though one of his new firm’s machines, ridden by G. Nott, was third in the Junior event. W. Balgarnie and Keith Horton, of Victoria, toria, represented Australia in the races, but neither caught a place, though the first-named was 13th in a large field. “Freewheel”: The people running the Victorian Centenary Thousand wheelrace race are leaving nothing to chance. Dunlops’ agents in Europe have been combing the chief European cycling countries for riders willing to make the trip and have a shy at the £2500 prizemoney money and the Myer Gold Cup. The route of the race has now been shortened some 40 miles by cutting out a section of the last lap from Sale into Melbourne, making 157 miles and total distance 1069. The chief hurdle to overcome as far as Continental riders are concerned is that the race will be run on a handicap basis. However, there is plenty of money going for backmarkers who make good, and the trouble should be overcome. “Wick”: The Scotsmen of N.S.W.. Highlander and Lowlander alike, are hereby warned to present themselves at Sydney Glaciarium on Monday, July 2. at 2 p.m., to rejoice in the first curling match on record betw'een Victorian and N.S.W. sides. Melbourne already had its club, and a team is bound for Maoriland to play at Dunedin. Heroic efforts of the N.S.W. Highland Society, led by hon. sec. Geo. Morice, have resulted in the assembly of a team of N.S.W. curlers to meet the invaders. “I’ve tried swinging from the shoulder. Would you suggest my swinging a little higher?” “Yairs —try from the neck.”
Terms of Use
Language
  • English
Identifier
  • AP7 (LC)

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

Other suppliers

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment