1887-09-10, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: The Case of William Roy. (10 September 1887)

User activity

Share to:
The Case of William Roy. (10 September 1887)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/258231882
Physical Description
  • 3722 words
  • article
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • xna, John Haynes and J.F. Archibald, 1887-09-10
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • The Case of William Roy. (10 September 1887)
Appears In
  • The bulletin., v.8, no.397, 1887-09-10 (ISSN: 0007-4039)
Published
  • xna, John Haynes and J.F. Archibald, 1887-09-10
Physical Description
  • 3722 words
  • article
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Series
Part Of
  • The bulletin.
  • Vol. 8 No. 397 (10 Sep 1887)
  • John Ryan Comic Collection (Specific issues).
Subjects
Summary
  • The Case of William Roy. The Bulletin has so far acknowledged subscriptions tions to the amount of £63 9s. 3d. received by it on behalf of William Roy, the soldier who now lies blind and paralysed in Parramatta Asylum. As already stated, Roy wears the distinguished conduct medal, awarded him for his gallant conduct duct at Rorke’s Drift, where, though at the time an invalid, he rushed through the flames during the fight to save the sick from the burning hospital. tal. He subsequently received from the hands of the Queen, an autograph Bible, and his portrait is to be seen in the celebrated painting by De Neuville ville now in the New South Wales National Gallery. The unfortunate man, who, since his admission to the wretched asylum that is now his home, has. according to the report of the gentlemen men appointed to enquire into the management of the N.S.W. Government charities, been treated with wanton neglect and cruelty, is in a hopeless condition of health, and will, while he lingers, be utterly dependent on the good offices of those who may wish to make a substantial protest against the hollow-hearted system which, while it spends lavishly to commemorate triumphs .gained chiefly at the cost and never for the benefit of the class from which the common soldier is drawn, callously lously permits a brave private to die in misery. The Bulletin hopes to collect a considerable sum for Roy, and undertakes to see that he is directly benefited by its expenditure. The following ing additional donations are now thankfully acknowledged:— F. R. Macpheraon, 103. Collected by J. Wealands and Alex. Paul—Joseph Wealands, Is ; James E. Wealand, Is. ; George, Is. ; Fred, Is.; A. Paul, 2a. 6d.: J. Jepson, 2s. 6d,; H Nolan, la.; M Conuell, 2a ; L. S., 55.; the son of a soldier, £1 la. ; Unknown, 2s. 6d.; J. T. and J. Toohey, Esq. (Standard Br°wery), £5. Peais Ferry Subscriptions to The Bulletin Fund for 'William Roy, Collected by P. H. Kelly:—P. H. Kelly. 5s ;C. Dominick, 5a.; C. Ferguasou, 03. ; Friend, 53.; J. B. Wi'son, 5a.: E. Hayward, 3a. ; F. Henderson, 3s ; J. Matthews, 2s. 6d.; W. M'Cree, 2s. 6d. : H. Gallagher, 2s. 6d.; G. Chisholm, 2a. 6d.; J. Mettan, 2a' Gi. ; R. Smith, 2*. 61 : W. G. O. 2s 6d. ; J. Isles, 2s. 6d. ; J. Cornwall, 2s. 61 ; J. Welsh, 2s. 6d. ; J. Munro, 2s. 6d. ; G. Pemberton, 2s. 6d. ; A. Johnson, 2a.; R. Douglas, 2s. ; F. Williamson, 2s. ; P. Matthews, 2s. ; W. Mooney, 2s. ; A. Davidson, 2j. ; J. Harding, 2s. ; R. BrennaD, 2?. ; W. H. Hancock, 2s. ; W. Dick, 2s : T. Cotton, 23. ; H. La Brise, Is. ; J. Brennan, Is. ; H. RohaD, Is. ; A. McKye, ss. ; B. Murphy, 55.; 1 Leoland, 2s. ; J. McFarland, 2’. ; J. Fitzsimmons, simmons, 2s. ; E. J. Weine, 2s. 6d. ; A. Brimner, Is. ; J. Thomson, Is. : W. Wilson, Is. ; E Hobson, Is. ; J. Baker, Is. ; U. Bate, Is. ; W. Dow, Is. ; G. Thomson, Is. ; W. Brown, Is : C. Kafto, Is. ; J. T. Bradford, Is. ; R Goodman, man, Is. : L. McLennon, Is. ; A. Hutchinson, Is ; E. Miller, Is ; R. Smith, Is. ; Amigo, Is ; A. Gurney, Is.; C. Johnson, 2s.—Total to date, £6 4s. 61 J. R. Robert-on, £1 ; Georg# Hargrave, £1; Linlithgow, ss; Steamer “Cintra,” collected by W. A Martin, £9 10*. 3d ; R. Davies, ss. “ Why is Parkes like the moon ?” Because cause he never shines except with a borrowed light ? Mr. Grresley Lukin, says a Rockhampton paper, has made arrangements for the transport of chilled meat from Central Queensland to Sydney ney and Melbourne. A sturdy but somewhat ungrammatical correspondent sends us this poser :—“ Has travelling ling Police Magistrates the power to make J.P.s, because wherever the P.M. gets free quarters the host is soon made a J.P.— Publican.” Justice in England appears to have one of her ej e 3 bunged up. An ex-Mayor of Stockton has been sentenced to twelve months’ hard labour for embezzling £ll,OOO. A young feilow who pleaded guilty to s eating two small sums from letters got five years penal servitude. We are in receipt of the first number of the Spectator, a new weekly published at Manly under the joint editorship of Messrs. Harold W. H. Stephen and our talented friend, Joseph O’Byrne. The Spectator contains a lot of excel* lent reading, including a set of verses by Mr. O’Byrne, who, we may whisper, is identical with no less a personage than the “E. Lowe” who from time to time has contributed so much real poetry to this paper. A batch of Gippsland fishermen have been arrested for illegal netting in Lake Tyers, the fish of which are preserved in ‘the interests of the blacks. Among the degenerate successors of Andrew and Peter were two members of the Harmy, presumably poaching for the Loard. A wily D. purchased the full rig of a Harmy ‘ oaptirg,” and collared his men in the middle of a bogus Hallelujah meeting. To such base uses may the blesied uniform be brought. The municipal deadlock at Roma (Q ) has ended. The mayor, in his capacity as a tradesman man and a citizen was legally punished for Sunday transgressions against the law of the realm, and his virtuous brother aldermen thereupon refused to be associated wi- h one who had brought such dire disgrace on the high office. At this juncture someone suggested that the ratepayers’ opinion should be obtained. This was done, and the free and independent declared their confidence in his worship b 7 a majority of sixteen votes. The mayor is now puzzied whether to resign or net. He is not quite certain about the interpretation of that vote. The Victorian Assembly is thinkirg cf wasting some more public money in ventilating the House. A few hundreds are voted for ventilation tilation every year, but all experiments have been unsuccessful up to now. The members can ventilate tilate their opinions right enough, while they themselves sit and perspire in an atmosphere of jobbery. The manager of the Victorian Atmospheric Refrigerating Company claims that his patent system would keep the carcases cases of members fresh and sweet through an all night sitting. It he gets the ventilation contraot we hope he won't freeze Victoria’s hopes and pride and sell ’em by the pound. The origin of the Hawaiian revolution has been bottomed at last. Our dear old friend, Osmond Day, the howler, late of Sydney Domain, has been causing trouble in the sea-girt kingdom of Queen Kapiolani He started in business over there as a lecturer and a loyalist to King Kalakana, kana, and when he had borrowed 300 dollars from the king and given him an I O U. for tte amount, the pair fell out and Osmond attacked the poor old potentate in his bitterest Inner Domain invective, alleging that his Majesty was “be spotted with snuff, besotted with gin, and possessed of no more brains than a galvanised frog.” Then old KalaJ kaua, whose wife was doing the grand among the Jubilee royalties in London, sent a flag of truce and a bag of money to induce the Sydney revolutionist tionist to return to his stump in the City of the Beautiful Harbour, but the offer, so Day says, was rejected with contumely. Then with a red handkerchief and an armed crowd Day stormed the palace gates, on the outside of which he halted and harangued his sans culottes under the electric light. A more respectable party that had been waiting for something to turn up j umped his claim, took possession of the Government, and squashed the revolution, and the ex-Domain orator was once more sat upon, not, however, until he had cost the worll something in cablegrams grams and startl-d h-r sable Majesty out of England, The Decadence of “ Religion " A correspondent of a Sydney newspaper draw attention to the data supplied by the New South Wales Statistical Department under the head o: “ Attendance at Church." The figures show tha while the population of the colony in 188(5 had in creased 141,222 as compared with the population in 1883, the number of persons attending church had decreased in the same period by 19,800 ! The Protestant denomirations had suffered a lcs3 in attendance to the number of no fewer than 21,472 the Homan Catholics reducing the gross loss by an increase of 1672. It would appear from the figures that the Romanists are hardly maintaining their ground, while the Church of England, Pres byterians, Weeley ans, Baptists, and Congregational ists are all rapidly losing their hold on the people We are disposed to regard the facts here disclosed as a healthy sigh. The people are evidently outgrowing growing the intellectual condition which underlies lies more than half the mischief that oppresses mankind. They are perceiving with constantly increasing clearness that dealers in theology and religion, in all ages and all countries, produce one great result, whatever smaller ones their operations tions yield. In the past they have caused endless bloodshed, and even in these days of their decay they contrive to keep alive a vast sentiment of hatred between sections of the human race. They pit nation against nation, and divide every community munity imo which they .manage to push themselves selves into more or lesi bitterly hostile camps. A correspondent at Auburn, near Parramatta, writes to the effect that that locality was comparable to Goldsmith's “loveliest village of the plain” until ihe parsons invaded it “ Now,” he declares, “ ihe residents are engaged in endless quarrels as to the relative merits of Parson Colvin and Pan on O’Connor, and where formerly all wa3 amity and goodwill, nothing save enmity and hatred, dividing even families, is to be found. It would b 9 better,” he irreverently adds, “ if some enterprising publicans would buy up the churches and convert them into drinkshops." shops." Without goiDg eo far as that, we certainly tainly think the public interests would be subserved served if a few of the religious edifices in Sydney were transformed into music-talk-. Dicant music never yet did man harm ; but the most notable outcome, political and social, of the teachings vouchsafed by a majority of the parsons extant is assuredly bad in every point of view. The data furnished by the statistician prove that the people generally are not blind to the facts stated. They are rapidly leaving the parsons in the lurch, and going in for rational and humanising recreations on the day of rest. If Parkes only waits a few jears, he will doubtless be able to buy up St.'Andrew’s Cathedral, reredos and all, and thus secure a first-rate and centrally located National Dead-house on cheap principlep. Haynes’ Triumphs! The misrepresentations of the Freetrade papers of New South Wales have been amusingly illustrated by their record of the wanderings—wanderings is a good word, by the way—of Mud J. Haynes. According to these journals, the tour of this roaring ing renegade and “ denominational savage ” has been one series of triumphs from Lithgow to Dubbo, and from Newcastle to Glen Innes. The local papers, however, put an entirely different complexion on the matter. No one doubts that the fanatical members of the L O.L. and that section of the community who are aroused to enthusiasm when they see a clown grin through a horss’s collar, have applauded Jack, but the more sober and intelligent gent portion of the public appear to have given him the cold shoulder. Though Haynes had for a long time boasted of Ills intention to smash the Protectionists into atoms, he was knocked out in the first round at Lithgow by Caulfield, the Boy Politician. AtOraDge he m et wit h similar tre a t men t, for the Liberal tells us that the B.P. “brought Haynes, after his servile adulation of the Premier, face to face with a scathing and abusive paragraph-resurrected graph-resurrected by The Bulletin— written by Hay'nes against Parkes only a couple of years ago, and those amongst the audience who were capable of reflection had a somewhat restless night after hearing what the lecturer once thought of their political demigod.” At Bathurst the Record tells us that “ Haynes’ audience consisted of 25 men and four boys,” yet this was telegraphed as a tremendous triumph for Freetrade trade ! This paper has a very poor opinion of Haynes, whom it describes thusly: “As a speaker, Haynes is a dead failure. His voice is as wretched as his brains. His gestures are low and vulgar.” At Dubbo about 150 persons assembled in the street to hear Haynes, and he got an exceedingly warm reception from them, though in the telegram the dit-approbation was said to have been shown at David Buchanan On the latter pointing out the mendacious charac ter of the telegrams to the editor of a Sydne daily, he was naively told : “ Oh, it must he true Mr Haynes sent it himself." This lets the ca out of the bag, and plainly shows that Haynes so-called triumph exists but in the very live! imagination of the sender of the telegrams. Governor Carington, Bishop Barry, and othe newchum authorities are perpetually talking t or at the Australian people touching the surpris iug loyalty prevalent in the colonies. According to these gentry the Australians are filled with un bounded love and admiration for, not alone th throne and person of our Gracious Sovereign Lady, but also for England and everything Eng lisb. There is some truth in the latter doctrine The people here do esteem and respect the English who fought for and realised liberty of though ; and speech—for the English who would tolerate no form of Government that wai not essentially self-government. But what Australian can enter tain a feeling other tban disgust and contempt for the England of to-day, which refuses autonomy to the Irish, and puts down public meetings of that people by force of arms! If the proceedings at Ennis last Sunday express, in any considerable measure, the current opinion of England, then we say with confidence that Austr tr ilians, to a man, will instinctively repudiate that country’s right to he regarded otherwise than with loathing. But we do not for a moment suppose pose that the high handed measures taken by Salisbury and his gang of fossils have the approval proval of any Englishman outside of the narrow minority that has for years struggled hard to foster a reactionary sentiment among the people. The people of England cannot sympathise with government by bayonet and truncheon ; and it is certain as anything in the future can be that whenever the ballot-boxes are passed round again the people of England will drive the Tories cwm-Unionists from power, and into the outer darkness from whence they came. And the sooner the British people have a say in the matter the better for the well-being of the nation. That great principle of freetrade which tends to fix wages all the world over, according to the scale paid In the cheapest country on earth is getting Into full BWing in these colonies. At a meeting of South Australian stockholders, a few days ago, it was resolved that, as shearing costs only 6s. per hundred in Mexico, a fraction less in South America where it is performed by women, and—thanks to the cheapness of the half-nakec Caffre— ss. per hundred at the Cape of Gooc. Hope, it is now time to make a great reduction in the rates paid in Australia, and if the white shearers should object to this measure, it is pro posed to form an association and import Caffres to do the work. Of course the Australian shearer will object. The dull, ignorant, suj erstitious, unclean Mexican mongrel may work, if he pleases, for just enough to buy gaudy clothes and dit t in a land of extraordinary cheapness, but that is no reason why the Cornstalk should ; and the Caffre, lower and cheaper still, also dirtier, oilier, and more ignorant even than the Mexican, may also follow his own bent. Hat according to Freetrade doctrines, the fact that these far-away strangers are willing to labour for a pittance is sufficient reason why the Australian should do likewise. According to the doctrines of grasping, bnralised selff-hness, because the Caffre is low the Australian tralian must go down to his level, and if some lower, cheaper, meaner savage should afterwards be disovered, the Caffre and the Australian tralian will alike be expected to descend to his standard. The proposal to import African shearers is only another step in this process of levelling downwards, and unices every white working man in Australia will boycott alike the employers of black labour, the ships that carry on this new slave trade, and the shipowners who lend their vessels to such a traffic, a time will come when human scum from the end of the earth will be imported into Australia, and their direct competition will force wages down to the vanishing point of cheapness. To a certain class of capitalists talists the fact that some naked barbarian can live for a given sum is sufficient reason why a white [man should do the same, and on such men as these, legal force is the only argument which is not thrown away. The white workmen of Australia, seeing that a great fight with coloured labour looms ahead, are anxious to have the row over, and are perfectly willing that the first gun of the struggle shall be fired by those British capitalists and their agents —we will not say squatters—who wou’d import to this country cheap nigger shearers, even as Parkes imported cheap nigger compositors in the long ago. One year the Caffre chews up a lineregiment regiment or two of beardless British boys led to the slaughter by a set of “aristocratic ” noodles satirically termed military commanders ; a year or two afterwards the same Caffre is turned loose in Australia to reduce to obedience the recalcitrant bushman who wants to be paid for his labour. This, dear friends, is a glimpse of the working of Imnerial Federation. We sincerely hope the Caffre shearers will come along. When they do, they will be bundled into the Paoific together with our brother subject the lerer from Hongkong kong and our brother subject the rabbit-legged coolie from the ‘ b ightest jewel in the British crown.” And then we shall have done with the subject for ever. + Haynes, as a political economist, is rather a failure. In his Freetrade paper, Haynes’ Weekly, he once said : “It should be noted that the employment of women, boys, and girls is one of the results of the American Protectionist system Every human agency is pressed into the work of production. Yet Freetraders are always inveighing e gainst Protection because it ever results in over production tion and consequent want of employment. According cording to the man from Mudgee, employment ployment in Protectionist countries is of so flourishing ishing a character (hat there are not enough workmen to meet its demand. Women and children are compelled to fall to, and “every human agency is pressed into the work of production.” tion.” It isn’t like that in N S.W. with her 6000 unemployed. A permanent institution—The deficit of the Sydney Freetrade Association. Messrs. Moses Moss and Co., of Sydney, have spent over £50,000 in advertising Wolfe’s schnapps. We have received the following answers to our conundrum, “ Why is the Evening News like a liar?' 1 Mr. A, Foozlebery, “ Bacause it always wa3 C.M 6., “Benuse it cin’fc help it. Mr. Orpheus Kadoovah, “Because it pays.” Mr. Jonadab Fluffem, “ Because it s the policy of the paper. Mr. Geo. Porgie, “Because it is a Freetrade ergap.” Mr. G. Honey, “Because it’s inspired by Abigail. ' Mr. A. V. Aqubone, The Archep, Petersham (-bridge), “Because it is built that way.” Mr. Ring Ncsewise, “ Because some ot the editing is done by the printei’s devil.” A ll these answers are incorrect. The correct answer should b», Because it is.” The administrative capacity of Frawncis Habigle can never be questioned by any who have noticed the marvellous skill with which the erstwhile while political scandal-monger has shielded that marvel of official incompetency, Inspector M‘Kenzie. zie. In March last nothing less than Mr. M Kenzie’s head on a charger was required by a rageously mournful public, who blamed him for alleged gross negligence, and laughed at his famous explosion-of■ dynamite theory, which so far has never found a supporter on the earth below, or in the coalmines that are under the earth. But by delays and dodgery, Frawncis has rescued his darling Inspector from the lions of public opinion and unless Melville breaks out again there does not seem to be the least probability that the worthy official will have to part company with his billet. And this reminds us that the Court of Equity has not yet published its judgment in that suit, which, if he won it, was to cost the dynamise ™ is P° si ' loD - A man with rhe luck of Mr. M Kenzie may laugh at the thunderbolts of tne gods. Sitting down to rest on a tram-track when the murderous midnight motor abounds is mildly dangerous, but it is perfect safety compared to riding m a coach which carries a Parkesian Minister from one “ bingie-buster ” to another. Ihat none of the members of the Cabinet have yet strewn the roadside with cold meat and gore is only to be explained on the assumption that the elderly patron of their crowd, in accordance with ms usual practice, “ takes care of his own ” The Hon. Frawncis was bolted with for miles by a usually quiet team of Silverton horses, the gentle mokes being overcome with madness at the thought of their being employed to transport such a politician. Then the Hon. Sutherland got caosh.zed sh.zed over Oxford Hill in an entirely un accountable able kind of mannersh, and the Hon. Inglis discovered covered that chicken, sodawater, and a severe shaking are apt to become a trinity of evils What sort of unaccountable accident will happen to Parkes on his next visit to the country we cannot undertake to prophesy, but as it seems a part of the Ministerial policy to make coach accidents a means of cheap advertising, his country tours can hardly ELSm a 8 “ ispitohedoutoa heap of blue metal somewhere.
Terms of Use
Language
  • English
Identifier
  • AP7 (LC)

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

Other suppliers

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment