1933-02-15, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Melbourne Chatter (15 February 1933)

User activity

Share to:
Melbourne Chatter (15 February 1933)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/258119202
Physical Description
  • 3276 words
  • article
  • photo
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • xna, John Haynes and J.F. Archibald, 1933-02-15
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Melbourne Chatter (15 February 1933)
Appears In
  • The bulletin., v.54, no.2766, 1933-02-15 (ISSN: 0007-4039)
Published
  • xna, John Haynes and J.F. Archibald, 1933-02-15
Physical Description
  • 3276 words
  • article
  • photo
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Series
Part Of
  • The bulletin.
  • Vol. 54 No. 2766 (15 Feb 1933)
  • John Ryan Comic Collection (Specific issues).
Subjects
Summary
  • Melbourne Chatter Old girls of Toorak College, Frankston, danced and played bridge at their Alma Mater. There was a great crowd, thanks to the efforts of the organising committee, of which Christina Brown, who sported rubyshaded shaded lace, was president. The hon. secs, of the hop were Mrs. J. G. W. Paxton, whose velvet gown was pale pink: and Margaret Gumming, charming in sunset-pink georgette. Mary Wlieildon and Gwen Thomas took charge of the bridge tables. The three Misses Hamilton, the principals of the college, were all present wearing black. Among the dancers was Mrs. Norman Barrett, whose hydrangeablue blue raiment was lit up by a small cape of shining sequins. For the first time in donkey’s years the Williamstown Racing Club struck a warm, dry day for its summer meeting, Saturday being beautifully fine. The most joyous person on the course was Mrs. A. G. Hunter when her husband’s horse Liberal won the C. F. Orr Stakes, the principal event. She wore pale bine linen topped by a shady primrose-colored straw hat. Mrs. J. J. Liston, wife of the chairman of the club, sported nut brown crepe georgette that had a yoke of ecru, lace, and her large hat was of a darker tone of straw. To gather funds for the furnishing of the new wing of Queen Victoria Hospital, Mrs. Norman Brookes, the president, led off with a game of bridge at her holiday home at Frankston at the week-end. The folk who visited Cliff House for the occasion included the Gullett and Tallis ladies, Mrs. Stuart Murray, Mrs. 11. Grimwadc and Mrs. Harry Emmerton. The weather was on its best behavior, and afternoon-tea was spread in the garden. The hostess’s three daughters, aided by Marie de Bavay, Betty Lawrence and Mrs. David Syme, dispensed the brew. The Semco needlework competition has attracted this year 8000 entries, which came from all over the Commonwealth and Maoriland, land, with contributions from as far afield as Egypt and Samoa. The standard of the work is high, and the judges had a difficult task. Olive Garden, of Castlemaine, won a championship prize of £22 for a white linen supper-cloth adorned with eyelet, Swiss and Richelieu embroidery, a wonderful example of perfect stitchery. The championship in the colored embroidery group went to Mrs. J- B. Smith, of Woodville, South Australia, whose design, brown gumnuts on a background ground of goblin blue, bordering a table centre of old bleached linen, has all the fulness and richness of a good oil painting. Olive Garden also won a first prize in this section with a cloth scattered with nasturtiums. tiums. Mrs. F. Page, of Newcastle, scored with rosy poppies on a black background; and Mrs. Philip Page, also of Newcastle, is a winner with a cloth that is trailed with blue convolvulus. Some superfine tatting iV shown by Miss A. Shaw, of Clayfield, Brisbane, bane, whose table mat has an intricate design like Irish crochet. Full points were gained by Miss E. Gledhill, of Bendigo, with an lnsh crochet tea-cosy; and Mrs. F. Noake. of Camberwell, is second with an original set of dress extras. She lias fashioned in lush crochet in two tones of linen and mastic a dinky little hat, wallet, belt, gloves, a necklace. and a bracelet, amber beads being used in the jewellery. In the juvenile section (under 18), Mavis Christmas, of Launceston, i s winner with a cleverly-embioidered bioidered apron ; and her sister Nancy scores in the “under-16” group. Joan Choate, of loowoqmba (Q.), who is under 11, is a prizewinner. The silver cup for the greatest number of awards scored by oile school is secured by St. Mary’s, Sunbury. Every entry sent in from this seminary got a prize of some description. nr The ™P e ? tj £ Hospital Auxiliary, of which (Vrl'l n J ‘i Tuckfiel(J is president and Mrs. V^ 11 Hell lion, sec., entertained Mrs. Wilfred fred Terrell, a visitor from the U.S A at a tea gathering in the Botanical Gardens. Mrs. Terrell is here with her husband. Dr. lerrell, who practises dentistry in Calitornia tornia and who is giving lectures on tile subject at the Upi. Zinnias, which but a few years ago were the most despised of blooms, have been developed to such an extent that they are now front-rank favorites. They were the blossoms chosen for the bouquets of the attendant maids when Elizabeth, second daughter of the A. J. Staughtons, of Terang, married John, third son of the late G. F Larritt and of Mrs Larritt, of South Yarra. The flowers made a radiance of orange and autumn tones against the amber tulle frocks of Prudence and Judith Staughton, Peggy Essmgton King and Betty Trenchard. Russethued_ hued_ strawberry leaves were mingled with zinnias m their wreaths. Gorgeous satin, Limerick lace, mellowed to a deep ivory tint with age, and a Brussels lace veil of venerable able antiquity graced the pretty bride, whose bouquet and wreath were of frangipanni. Christ Church, South Yarra, was a bower of flowers chiefly white, for the knot-tying. Many Western District folk were present at the after-rejoicings at No. 9. The Methodist Church, Canterbury, was decked in white and gold for the knot-tying of Gwendolyn, elder daughter of the S. A. Cheneys, of Croydon, and Trevor, elder son of Dr. and Mrs. Basil Kilvington. of Copnin Grove, Hawthorn. Mrs. Orwell Gepp was matron of honor, and she and the two ’maids wore cool-looking ninon gowns patterned in white, green and yellow, topped with swathed toques of pale green. The bride’s chalk-white draperies of flat crepe were mingled with lace over which a tulle veil rippled down from a circlet of orange buds. Canon Sutton, assisted by the Rev. A. J. \Vhyte, welded the bonds between the Canon’s youngest daughter, Audrey, and e, rM Ic — Nevill Pullen, of DevonpOrt (Tas.), at trinity Church, Kew. Handed over by her brother, the Rev. E. Sutton, the bride said I will” in a long-sleeved gown of deep ivory-toned angel-skin lace, and carried a large shower bouquet of frangipanni, her tulle veil being affixed to a wreath of handmade made silken blossoms. AilSa Black, of Devonport, port, came across the Strait to join as attendants Mrs. P. M. Buchanan, matronof-honor, of-honor, and Dorothy Coltman, all in lace of jade-green hue, with toques of the same shade. Congratulations to the newly-weds were ottered at a tea party at the Vicarage. There is to be another wedding shortly in the family of knight Robert Best. Margot, the eldest daughter, is to wed Clive, only son of Mr and Mrs. J. E. Stott, of Glenelg (S.A.), early in April. It was stated at the annual recording of the Red Cross Society that there are 16,000 soldiers in military hospitals in Australia, 1000 of these being cot cases. The Acting Prime Minister, J. G. Latham, the chairman of the executive, O. Morrice Williams, and Lud Mayor Smith.wefe among the speakers, and the Isaacs lady presided. Afterwards her Ex. invited all present to partake of afternoon , tea. At a reception to the Rev. Dorothy Wilson at the Independent Church Hall, Mrs. Peter Tait, president of the Congregational Women’s Association, gave greeting with flowers to the visitor, who was attired in dark brown georgette and lace with a large hat. Mrs. I. H. Moss voiced a welcome from the members of the N.C.W. During lulls in the chatter there was singing by Beatrice Oakley and Jean Brunton. This is Matron Ina Laidlaw, who, since the orthopaedic branch of the C h i 1 d r e n’s Hospital was opened at If r a n k s t on three or four years ago, has been in charge of the up-to-date in-« stitutjon. A trainee of the Children’s Hospital, pital, where she was subinatron inatron prior to going to Ifr a n k s t o n, Miss Laidlaw hails from Hamilton, in the Western District. She had two years’ war service in India. While halting in Melbourne on their way to Sydney after a long sojourn in England, architect John Nesbit and his wife were guests of the Lucius Conollys at their South Yarra home. At a tea party many former friends renewed acquaintance with Mrs. Nesbit, who was Joan Devereux of this city. Many people in Melbourne must have wondered dered why in the centre of the beautifullylaid-out laid-out gardens and domain of St. Kilda and Domain roads there should be 20 acres of uncultivated paddock. At last the reclamation clamation of this wilderness has been decided cided upon. It is intended to form it into a park in which flowering gums will be the leading feature. The city council is hopeful of beginning the transformation shortly, and the job will mop up some of the unemployed. Councillor H. Wootton, the leading spirit in this movement, has visions of Melbourne having in the near future an area that will rival London’s Bushy Park. Memories of the days of Brough and Boucicault were revived w r hen the Athene Seyler-Nicholas Hannen Co. gave its opening ing show at the King’s on Saturday night. Seldom has this Page mingled with an audience that left the theatre in such a mood of unanimous approval. “The Breadwinner” winner” has but one setting—a drawing-room with chairs and settee in loose covers of primrose-hued cretonne, patterned in rosy poppies and purple blossoms. The walls are grey-green, the curtains are vivid green velvet, and the carpets are green and black. There is also but one lot of dressing. Athene Seyler wears a flat crepe gown of beige shade with bands of rose-red let in round the shoulders, matching her velvet hat. An elegantly cut dress of royal purple georgette fashioned with a coatee is sported by Margery gery Caldicott, who adds a little black toquecap. cap. A tennis get-up is aired by Charlotte Francis—white silk with a short fitting palegreen green coat, fastened up the front with closely arranged tiny white buttons. Ilermion’e Hannen choses a pale-pink linen for her sports wear. In a house that wasn’t quite full were Mrs. A. Staughton, of Terang, and her daughter Prudence; Mr. and Mrs. Colin Fraser, she in a tippet of ermine that caused gasps of. envy; Mrs. Felix Lloyd in a short tight-fitting coat of white satin : the Robert Rests and daughter Helene; the Percy Blackbourn bourn couple; Mrs. A. V. Kewney; Mr. and Mrs. P. Glass; Dr. and Mrs. Leon Jona; Mr. and Mrs. Cherniavsky, and Mrs. AY. H. Merry. The A B. Chirnsides are homeward bound, and will be welcomed back at a dance to be given by the Aubrey Gibsons early in March. During the Chirnsides’ tour abroad their small daughter has been staying with her grandmother, Mrs. F. Andrew, in Melbourne. Here is a recent Broothom picture of Mrs. Linton, wife of our new Agent-General. The appointme me n t is a popular one and the lady has been inundated dated with congr gr at ulatory messages. She is, like her husb an d, a Maorilander, a daughter of the late Robert ert Bannister, one-time proprietor prietor of the now-e xtinct New Z e aland land “Times.” She is a vicepresident president of the Women’s Hospital, is on the committee of the District Nursing and After-care Association, and is an active worker for the Children’s Hospital. Also she is patroness of the Women’s Welfare fare Committee of the Big Brother movement. ment. . The two boys, Bob, who is studying medicine, and Dick, who is at Geelong College, lege, will complete their education in Britain. The blind boy, Neil Westh, who achieved such outstanding success in the leaving-certificate tificate exam., has been awarded by the Uni. one of its 53 free scholarships, and can now carry out his intention of studying for an Arts degree as preparation for a post on the teaching staff of the R.V.1.8. A gap in the ranks of our doctors has been caused by the passing of Dr. Hilda Rennie, who until a few months ago was in the Bacteriological teriological Department of the Uni., where she was assistant to the late Dr. R. J. Bull. When Dr. Bull was away from Victoria, she had charge, acting as lecturer as well as demonstrator. On the death of Dr. Bull she was offered full control, but ill-health obliged her to refuse the responsibility. When she was a fourth-year medical student dent she married Dr. George Rennie, a Collins-street surgeon, and when he died about 12 years afterwards she continued her studies and gained her degree. She was the daughter of a former inspector of State schools. Lieut.-Surgeon 11. J. Bennett and his bride sailed for England in the Ormonde, the wedding taking place on the day of departure. ture. Mrs. Bennett is Edna, youngest daughter ter of the Henry Fawcetts, of Caulfield. Dr. Bennett is eldest son of the late Maxwell Bennett and of Mrs. Bennett, of Aspendale. Adelaide amenities:— Mrs. Harry Gilbert and her young- people are back at Lefevre-terrace, North Adelaide, after a vacation at Grange. Mrs. George Brookman, with daughters Phyllis and Sybil, has returned from a holiday in Tasmania, to Barton-terrace, North Adelaide. Mrs. Stanley Murray and daughters Alison and Joan are back at Tusmore, after a month at Victor Harbor. Mr. and Mrs. Roy Thomas have returned from Victoria. Mr. T. W. Eyre, formerly 0 f Mauritius, but now of England, arrived by the Mongolia on a visit to Adelaide. The late Mrs. Eyre was Edith Holbrook, of Adelaide, who died at Mauritius some years ago. On the same boat were Mr. and Mrs. Donald Nicholson; the latter before her marriage ■Mis Miss D. M. Adey, of this State—she met and married her husband in London. Mr. Nicholson, who was featured in London musical comedy as Donald Richardson, is going to take up stage work in Melbourne. Tattersall s Racing Club had typical summer weather for its meeting a.t Morphetville, where white sport frocks and wide-brimmed white straw hats were much in evidence. Chairman Flannagan and his wife presided at afternoon tea, the lady in a white and navy patterned georgette and a navy straw hat. Her two daughters, Eileen Flannagan and Mrs. Eugene McLaughlin, both favored white and black; one wore striped crgpe de Chine and the other a figured chiffon. The Moulden lady’s black crepe de Chine was patterned with white, and her wide-brimmed black tagel straw hat was banded with white leaves. A dinner party for 24 of the younger set, followed by a dance at the Maison de Danse, Glenelg, was arranged by Mr. and Mrs. R. F. Harry, 0 f Robeterrace, terrace, Medindie, to celebrate the twenty-first birthday day of their elder daughter, Mary. The dinner was at the Oriental Hotel; later the party motored down to Glenelg. On Wednesday evening a cafe chantant was held in the garden at Orange Grove, Hatton Gardens, the residence of Mr. and Mrs. W. Langdon Parsons, in aid of the funds of the Junior Red Cross. Cynthia Parsons and Flo S'egar carried out the duties of secretaries. Among the attractions were ballets by- Mrs, Lesley Bowman’s pupils. Mostyn Skinner sang. Clem Dawe, with several of the Theatre Royal vaudeville artists, came on to Golden Grove at the conclusion of their show and there was • dancing on the wide balcony. From beside the Swan : Senator Kingsmill and his lady were made much of by the executive committee of the Childrens’ Protection Society. The welcome was in thei McNess Hall, where the president, Rabbi Freedman, spoke with his usual felicity and wit. The secretary, Mrs. Gover, scattered introductions in black satin and lace. The Kingsmill lady wore eau-de-Nil ninon with a dusting of pink blossoms. David Lyle, Thelma Neil, Horace Dean and Edward Black provided music and Miss Maegregor recited. News comes from the Fog of the marriage of Gwendolyn, youngest daughter of the Rev. and Mrs. Bray, to Erie Warr, M.A., Mus. Bac. The lively Gwen, one of Perth’s! most brilliant musicians, has made her mark as a pianist and conductor. She has been studying in the Cold Land. P.L.C.’s principal, Miss J. N. Phemister, is back in her job after a visit to her native Scotland. The returned traveller is keen on domestic science; she says the subject, has a much higher standing on the curriculum of Scottish schoolgirls than it has for their Australian sisters. The Eugene Levinson couple and Mrs. Nairn, of Mount-street, boarded the outward bound Moldavia for a trip to Ceylon. Hilda Drabble, of Nedlands, and Harley Powell have announced their intention of embarking upon a life-partnership. Miss Drabble spent the last year teaching in Orange (N.S.W.). * Irene Dean Williams has adopted aviation as her career, fjhe has the coveted “B” license, and is the only wbman ’planeowner in the State. Tasmanian talk:— The commodore and officers of the Royal Yacht Club issued invitations for a ball to raise the wind for Tassie III —she is to compete in the Forster Cup races on the mainland. The shivoo was held at the Continental and in the club’s - beflagged rooms. Commodore and Mrs. Evans entertained a big official party, including the Claude Coopers, Lt.-Col. and ' Mrs. McColl, Major and Mrs. Williams, Mr. and Mrs. Yates, Miss Williams, Mr. and Mrs. Dudley Smith, Mr. and Mrs. J. Boyes, Dr. H. N. and Miss B. Butler, the Weller Arnolds, Miss Arnold and Mr. G. Bayly. The John Brownlees and Rita Miller came along after their concert. Forty-five society matrons ran a most successful ball at the Continental, when 14 debs, made their bow to the Lieut.-Gov. The young butterflies who emerged from the chrysalis stage were Pat Butler, Joan Chandler, Bessie Crisp, Hetty Crisp, Hazel Crase (Sydney), Dinah Gatehouse, Norah James, Jean Maxwell, Norah Scott-Power, Peggy McGrath, Pat Foote (Launceston) and Elizabeth Mills (Longford). The rooms were hung with Asiatic shawls, and great masses of gladioli and agapanthus in bowls made gay splashes of color. The Lieut.-Gov.’s lady sported green, and waved a big feather fan. Mrs. Dalglish, the Admiral’s wife, was in black lace with a large scarlet flower on the shoulder. The debs, mostly favored the popular ice-white flat crepes. A smart dance was given by Mrs. Thos. Hungerford for her niece, Ailsa Cullen (Sydney). The pretty drawing-room at Hathaway House was cleared for dancing; doorways and long French windows were outlined with masses of blue, mauve, pink and purple blossoms. The electric lights were shaded by umbrella-like frames of wire entirely covered by fuchsias in every shade and variety. The hostess wore a graceful garment of black silk lace with a short coatee of black and gold gauze and georgette. About 70 young folk danced. Supper was set in a marquee on the lawn; the towering English trees and the lovely garden were lit by strings of colored lights. Many naval officers and their wives were among the guests. The Frank Gavan Duffys, with their son, Father Guy Davan Duffy, are holidaying in the S’peck, making Hadley’s their headquarters in Hobart. Mrs. McAulay and Ida MeAulay are home again after their respective visits to Sydney and the Old Country. Mrs. James Forrest is back in the Speck on a visit to her mother, Mrs. Geo Gragg, Launceston. Mrs. Forrest’s home is in Rangoon. The “Back to Latrobe” week brought old residents from various parts of the mainland and all quarters of the island to the pretty little north-western town, where there was a public welcome to all-comers, a concert, a ball and a school celebration. The Gladioli Show in the City Hall seemed no less beautiful than in former years, but growers complained that the wet season had been bad for them.
Terms of Use
Language
  • English
Identifier
  • AP7 (LC)

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

Other suppliers

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment