1932-11-02, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: PERSONAL ITEMS (2 November 1932)

User activity

Share to:
PERSONAL ITEMS (2 November 1932)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/258118247
Physical Description
  • 2420 words
  • article
  • illustration
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • xna, John Haynes and J.F. Archibald, 1932-11-02
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • PERSONAL ITEMS (2 November 1932)
Appears In
  • The bulletin., v.53, no.2751, 1932-11-02 (ISSN: 0007-4039)
Published
  • xna, John Haynes and J.F. Archibald, 1932-11-02
Physical Description
  • 2420 words
  • article
  • illustration
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Series
Part Of
  • The bulletin.
  • Vol. 53 No. 2751 (2 Nov 1932)
  • John Ryan Comic Collection (Specific issues).
Subjects
Summary
  • PERSONAL ITEMS Some November birthdays : Bishop Frewer (W. Aust), 49, Bishop McCarthy (Sandhurst), 74, Prof. Skeats (Melb.), 57, and sculptor Paul Montford, 64, on Ist; T. A. White (“Diggers Abroad”), 46, on 4th; J. Maitland Paxton (Syd.), 79, and Dr. Catalan (Abbot of New Norcia), 54, on sth; N.S.W. Senator Massy Greene, 58, on 6th; Prof. Woodhouse (Syd.), 66, and Atlee Hunt (formerly of Federal Public Service), 68, on 7th: knight James Elder (Melb.), 63, Rev. J. W. Grove (Methodist Ladies’ Coll., Melb.), 64, and James Cowan (Boys’ Gram. Sch., Bris.), 77, on 10th; knight Hugh Denison (Syd.), 67, Prof. Cotton (Syd.), 49, and Vic. Govt. Statist A. M. Laughton, 64, on 11th; Samuel Mauger (formerly P.M.G.), 75, on 12th; Dr. Heavey (Vicar Apostolic of Cooktown), 64 on 13th; Rabbi F. L. Cohen, 70, and Dr. J. S. Battye (Perth Public Library), 61, on 14th; Justice Long Innes (N.S.W.), 63, and knight Arthur Rickard (Syd.), 64, on 17th; War Historian Dr. C. E. Bean, 53, and knight pastoralist Norman Kater (N.S.W.), 58, on 18th; ex-Vic. Governor Earl Stradbroke, 70, and Col. Donald Cameron, ex-M.H.R. for Brisbane, 53, on 19th; Major-Gen. G. W. Barber (Director-Gen. of Medical Services), 64, on 20th; Principal Griffith (Congregational Coll, of Vic.), 57, on 21st; Willie Watt (formerly Federal Treasurer), 61, on 23rd; Bishop Ashton (Grafton), 66, on 24th; O. J. Cerutty (Federal Auditor-Gen.), 62, and Col. H. E. Cohen (Vic.), 61, on 25th; Bishop Grans wick (Gippsland), 50, and poet Rod Quinn, 63, on 26th; Kenneth Binns (Federal Parliamentary Librarian), 50, on 28th; Justice Cussen (Vic.), 73, on 29th; N.S.W. Speaker Daniel Levy, 60, and poet Sydney Jephcott, 68, on 30th. Two reminiscences told by Jimmy Thomas. When a railway porter he was given a shilling tip by a young subaltern. The other day he appointed the sometime sub. to a Governorship. Becoming a fireman, he stoked tlie engine of the train which carried the Colonial Secretary of the period (the late Viscount Long) from Swindon to London. Jimmy has lived to' be a Dominions Secretary carried by that same train. Archbishop Kelly, of Sydney, who was 82 in February last, yesterday celebrated the 60th anniversary of his ordination as a priest. His Grace was born in Waterford (Ireland), and was Rector of the Irish College in Rome during the closing ten years of last century. It was at the Eternal City that he was consecrated Coadjutor Archbishop bishop of Sydney; he succeeded the late Cardinal Moran as Archbishop a little over 21 years ago. Walter Nash, who hopped into Tom Wilford’s ford’s seat when the knight became High Commissioner, hails from Birmingham, where he was in business for several years as a manufacturer of bicycles. He arrived in M.L. in 1909 with a group of English manufacturing agencies, and shortly after- wards became a member of the Labor party, lie represented the Dominion at the 1920 International Labor Conference at Geneva, and in 1922 became secretary of the N.Z. L.P. He is strongly anti-LOmmunist, a pillar of the Church of England Men’s Society, and a vice-president of the Institute tute of I acific Relations. Because of illness W. L. Baillieu, now 73, has retired from the directorate of the North Broken Hill. W.L. was honorary leader for the first and second Watt and second Peacock Governments in ' the Upper House. having declined a salaried job. He had previously been Minister of Works and Health under Jack Murray. Sydney lost a shipping identity whose name had become a household word when Captain J. Vine-Hall passed out at 88. Salt was in the Vine-Hall blood; an uncle was in command of the Great Eastern when she laid the first cable between England and America in the ’sixties. The captain was born in Kent, and spent 25 years at sea, rising to be master of the Orient . mailer Chimborazo. He established himself in Sydney ney in 1883 as a marine surveyor, and began a long connection with leading shipping and insurance companies, in the course of which his services were retained by Governments on several Royal Commissions and Courts of Marine Inquiry. He founded the firm of Vine-Hall, Howell and Gibson, and only retired from active work a few years ago. A widow, five sons and two daughters survive vive him; one son was killed on Gallipoli. Harold J. Stewart, who will be headmaster of Wesley, Melbourne, when L. A. Adamson retires next month, is one of the school’s old boys. He has taught at his old school for more than 30 years, and has been actingft ft head on several occasions. Wesley, which was established by the Methodist Church of Victoria in the middle ’sixties, has a fine record of scholarship—due largely in the early years to that brilliant scholar M. H. Irving, who gave up a University professorship ship to take charge. Bill Blackler, just 70, has quickly followed lowed his fellow-sportsman Seth Ferry to the grave. He was a boy when his father founded the Fulham Park stud in S.A., and succeeded to the management of it. He was Master of the Hunt Club long ago, and filled about every possible post on a course for the Adelaide Racing Club. Thomas, Sloane, who died at Young (N.S.W.) last month, was not only a leading ing pastoralist and merino breeder. —he managed aged Moorilla station in the family interests —but an entomologist whose researches had won him a world-wide reputation. He specialised in beetles, especially the Cicendelidw delidw and the Carahidw, and studied them as closely as naturalist H. J. Burrell has studied the platypus. Some of Sloane’s classifications of beetle tribes are regarded as the most careful and valuable in existence, ence, and they kept the compiler in close touch with British and European entomologists. gists. He did a lot of travelling in pursuit of his hobby, and his knowledge was always at the disposal of others. _ Douglas McKay, who is to return to Adelaide aide Children’s Hospital as superintendent, has been getting three years’ invaluable experience in London, Edinburgh and Manchester. chester. He is a fine all-round athlete; was a Sheffield Shield cricketer before he left, and lias played for Scotland. Viscount Byng, who has been appointed a field-marshal, started his army life as a cavalryman in the Tenth Hussars, and saw close on 40 years of active service. Australians tralians will recall him as commanding the Suvla area on Gallipoli at the end of 1915, and in France later he took over the Canadian dian Army Corps. In 1917 he was given command of the Third Army, and was responsible sponsible for the unheralded tank attack at Cambrai. After the war Byng (who had been granted £30,000 by Parliament for his services) was Governor-General of Canada, and in 1928 was appointed Commissioner of the London Metropolitan Police, a job from which he retired last year. Hugh Wright, Mitchell Librarian since the opening in 1909, commenced a year's furlough last month and thereafter retires. Born in Sheffield, England, 64 years ago he is an Australian by a half-century’s adoption. He has always taken a keen interest in the early days of Sydney, and will retain his editorship of the Historical Society’s magazine. zine. He founded the Australian branch of the British Astronomical Society, and is sec. of the National Rose Society. Field-Marshal Paul Methuen, whose death in England at 87 is announced, was a typical British regular of the old Eton and Guards school. Of an old Wiltshire family, he first smelt powder with' Garnet Wolseley in the 1873 Ashanti campaign ; he was once more with Wolseley in Egypt in 1882, and he took part in the Bechuanaland expedition a couple of years later. In the Boer war he commanded the first division of the first Army corps which was detailed by Buller to relieve Kimberley. He won three hard-fought actions at Belmont, Grasspan pan and Modder River and was shatteringly repulsed at Magersfontein by Cronje. Later, he had his flying column cut to pieces by Delarey, being himself wounded and captured. tured. Delarey sent his injured enemy many miles over the veldt under escort to a British hospital. Always rather favored by the gods, Methuen held many high commands in the piping days of peace that followed, his last being Governor and C. in C. at Malta. A fine personality, persona grata to all sorts and conditions of men in the service and out of it. Jim McCarter, whose novel, “Pan’s Clan,” has just been published privately in Sydney, is one of the “World’s” bright young men. Born at Rutherglen (Vic.), he went jackerooing rooing and stock-droving in N. S. Wales and in Queensland worked as horse-breaker, professional fessional fiddler, drover, boundary-rider, overseer, seer, mining engineer and windmill expert. He began to make a whole-time job of journalism about eight years ago on the Melbourne “Herald,” subsequently editing the Forbes “Advocate” and the Bathurst “Times.” “Pan’s Clan” deals mostly with the Outback the author knows so well. T. P. Derham, partner in the legal firm of Moule, Hamilton and Derham, who died in Melbourne last week at 85, was admitted to practice 53 years ago. One son, Frank, is a lawyer; another, A.P., is a doctor; two daughters married meds, and a third, Enid, is lecturer in English at Melb. Uni. Herbert Middleton Hawkins, honorary Minister assisting Jack Dunningham to run the N. S. Wales Department of Labor and Industry, has an unenviable job at present. Dunningham has entrusted him with most of the work in connection with the dole, and some of the recipients are causing a d ea l of trouble. In the Northern coalfields and a few Sydney industrial suburbs the more militant tant unemployed, incited by Communist agitators, have made bonfires of the new dole question-forms. Like all honest citizens the benevolent Hawkins must be puzzled at the workless making such a fuss over the Government’s ernment’s attempt to stamp out the fraud that has been robbing deserving citizens. The Minister was born in London in the ’seventies, ties, but for nearly 40 years has lived in Sydney. He is managing director of H. W. Horning and Co.. Ltd., president of the Federated Ideal Estate Institutes of Australia, tralia, past president of the N.S.W. Ideal Estate Institute, and a member of the Federal Valuation Board. He has always been a keen social worker. The United Charities ties Fund, which has handed out £140,000 amongst Sydney metropolitan charities, has him for its managing treasurer, and he also looks after the cash-box for the Waverley War Memorial Hospital and the Central Methodist Mission. The Bavin Government put him in charge of a committee which did a lot of good work finding jobs for the unemployed ployed ; and he is still continuing his efforts in that direction. Prominent among those who said “How do you do?” to the English cricketers when they arrived in Adelaide early this week was B. V. Scrymgour, the G.O.M. of South Australian lian cricket. This veteran has just completed pleted 40 years’ association with the game in that State, and to mark the occasion there is to be hung a life-size picture of him in the pavilion of Adelaide Oval. He first became a member of the committee of the S.A. Cricket Association in 1892 —the year the Sheffield Shield contests began, and at a time when George Giffen and Jack Lyons were at the top of their form—as a delegate of the Adelaide club. Since then lie has filled practically every important position S.A. cricket has to offer, including hon. treasurer, trustee and chairman of the ground and finance committees, and in 1928, on the death of Harold Fisher, he became president of the association. Since 1914 he has been a member of the Australian Board of Control, of which body he has been chairman. Colonel H. K. D. Macartney, whose sudden death at 52 is reported from Brisbane, was born on a Central Queensland station. A son of one of the State’s pastoral pioneers, he was a grandson of the late Dean Macartney, ney, of Melbourne, and a cousin of Edward Macartney, late Agent-General for Queensland. land. He made soldiering his profession, joining the Australian permanent forces, and went to the Great War as C.O. of the Ist. Battery R.A.A., ending up. as commander mander of the 3rd. Artillery Brigade and winning the D.S.O. and C.M.G. A Sydney resident, he was in Brisbane on a health tour when the end came. Judge Moule, of Vic. County Court, who from his perch denounced as “pure anarchy” any combination to defy the law relating to creditors’ rights, represented Brighton in the Leg. Assembly from 1894 to 1900. Williams, the brother-Judge whom Moule consulted on a point of law in the case wherein he made this caustic comment, had also a glimpse of law-making. He was a member for St. Kilda in 1901-02. J. N. D. Campbell, dead in Brisbane recently, was for many years in the Papuan Civil Service, retiring in 1920, when A.It.M. at Losuia in the Trobriands. He was born in Sydney in 1860, and prior to joining the Papuan service had been on the staff of the G.P.O. in that city. Matthew Jasprizza, just dead at Young (N.S.W.), was the son of Nicholas Jasprizza, prizza, a Dalmatian, who pioneered the fruit-growing industry in those parts. Cherries were his specialty; and the son carried on the good work, being one of the first to export his fruit to Maoriland and even sending a trial shipment to China. Celebrated his 100th birthday, in Adelaide, aide, George Brown, a quiet citizen with only one oustanding feature, a determined mined attendance at Parliament. After he had been in his accustomed place in the “gallery” for nearly 40 years, the members of the Assembly gave him a gold-mounted stick and a luncheon-party. Colin Courtice, Queensland’s latest Rhodes scholar, comes of a family wellknown known in the sugar country. After taking a leading part in A.W.U. affairs for years Ben and Fred Courtice went on sugar land in the Woongarra area and have done well there. Turning old union energies to public service they have become closely identified tified with local government, hospital management agement and the like. Fred was one of the batch of “suicide M.’sL.C.” appointed by Labor after the referendum that went in favor of the Legislative Council. WALTER NASH, Maoriland M.P. HAROLD STEWART, Melbourne Wesley’s new head. H. M. HAWKINS, N.S.W. Minuter in charge of the Dole. B. N. SCRYMGOIJR, G.O.M. of S. A. cricket.
Terms of Use
Language
  • English
Identifier
  • AP7 (LC)

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

Other suppliers

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment