1929-06-19, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Melbourne Chatter Buckley's Elizabethan Tea Rooms F[?] C[?] 200[?] [?] Buckley e-Num, [?]ted N[?] (19 June 1929)

User activity

Share to:
Melbourne Chatter Buckley's Elizabethan Tea Rooms F[?] C[?] 200[?] [?] Buckley e-Num, [?]ted N[?] (19 June 1929)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/258106730
Physical Description
  • 3026 words
  • article
  • photo
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • xna, John Haynes and J.F. Archibald, 1929-06-19
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Melbourne Chatter Buckley's Elizabethan Tea Rooms F[?] C[?] 200[?] [?] Buckley e-Num, [?]ted N[?] (19 June 1929)
Appears In
  • The bulletin., v.50, no.2575, 1929-06-19 (ISSN: 0007-4039)
Published
  • xna, John Haynes and J.F. Archibald, 1929-06-19
Physical Description
  • 3026 words
  • article
  • photo
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Series
Part Of
  • The bulletin.
  • Vol. 50 No. 2575 (19 Jun 1929)
  • John Ryan Comic Collection (Specific issues).
Subjects
Summary
  • Melbourne Chatter Buckley's Elizabethan Tea Rooms F[?] C[?] 200[?] [?] Buckley e-Num, [?]ted N[?] Williamstown R. C. put on its winter meeting (known as “the punters’ grave”) on Saturday. A large crowd was present. The racecourse is such a paradise of green lawns, gay flower-beds and picturesque rockeries that the surrounding country looks worse than it is by contrast. Between railway station and entrance are stagnant pools left by the receding tide, and a bridge the planks of which see-saw ominously. The day was perfect, frosty in the morning with a wealth of warm sunshine later, but most womenfolk folk were snugly wrapped and coated. Mrs. J. F. Nagle, wife of the secretary, wore black patterned in fawn and cherry, topped with furs and a fawn felt hat. Mr. and Mrs. E. Rouse, of Sydney, were there; also E. A. Underwood, who has taken the late Norman Falkiner’s place on the committee. Mrs. Underwood accompanied him. Judge Williams, Mayor Luxton, Alderman and Mrs. Stapley, Mrs. Horace Munro (well tailored in cocoa-colored tweed), the Ben Chaffeys and the T. V. Milicas wfire amongst those who enjoyed the sport and the sunshine. shine. The law students led off this season’s faculty hops at St. Kilda Town Hall on Friday night. Prof. K. H. Bailey and liis wife, whose enamel-green gown blended into embroidery of magpie tones, and R. H. Gregory and Mrs. Gregory, who wore bracken-colored ken-colored draperies, were guests of honor. The decorations blended tones of green and amber. Unattached youth had most of the floor. Nora Laver’s white lace and soft covering had a glow of pink beneath ; Margaret garet Picken wore taffeta of forget-me-not blue hue, and Patricia Duigan’s fairness was set off with black lace. Among the garden of girls were Aileen Lemon, Dorothy Lamble, Laura Brennan and Francie Woolcott. The old collegians of Santa Maria College gave their annual dance at the Rex last weex. Hon. sec. Dorothea Hart, a slim miss in saxeblue blue georgette of meandering lengths, was chief mover, and the hop had a patronage of over two hundred. The president. Mrs. 11. Roy Cash, mingled two blues in her filmy handkerchief draperies, and the keeper of the purse, Dorothy Power, was in pillar-box red. Five girls grasped the opportunity of comingout out —Mollie Hart, who had a girdle of rhinestones stones glittering amid her white chiffon; Mollie Carew, in pale green ; Constance Brosnan nan and Lilian Wallace in shell pink; and Mary Oakley, in frills of white georgette. Representatives of kindred ex-students’ associations, ations, including Genazzano and Xavier, were there. The colors of Santa Maria, royal blue, green and gold, circled the table decorations of pink carnations. After the theatre the company was increased by some members of the Pavlova ballet, Elsie Prince and other mummers. Old Fintonians called their friends together for their yearly gyration at old Admiralty House the same evening, Marie Billing, lion, sec., wearing pink and silver. Among her lieutenants were Jean Woods, in delphinium blue, and Mollie Johns, who radiated ated in crimson. The president of the O. F., Miss Hughston, a one-time principal of the school, attended, with some of the present teaching staff. Many pretty frocks were sported at the Loreto Old Girls’ gathering at No. 9. Georgette ette and lace, fashioned on long, slim lines that ended in points about the ankles, with a backward dip, was much favored. Mrs. R. Usher, in powder-blue net, and Miss K. Kenny, whose lavender-colored gown was scattered with chalk beads, were co-organisers isers of the hop. St. Vincent’s Hospital Junior Auxiliary started its charitable career with a dance at Old Admiralty House, better known as Bibron’s. The younger set rolled up in force, with just a sprinkling of matrons. Rose Bullen, in begonia-pink, headed the committee, with Mrs. T. J. Whittham and Lorna Snellgrove as vice-presidents. Hon. sec. Mollie Warden shed radiance in gold tissue, and Monica Gleeson, who counted the shekels, looked Frenchified in pink and blue with scattered sparkle. Mrs. Merson Cooper and Mrs. Guy Bowcher, president and secretary respectively of the senior auxiliary, were there to show appreciation of- the junior’s effort. The staffs of the Barnet Glass Rubber Co.’s warehouse and mills assembled at the Hotel Australia in the financial interest of the Women’s Hospital. Hon. secretaried by Nell Tubb and Evelyn Girling, the evening was pronounced a complete success. The final good-byes to Mr. and Mrs. Herbert bert Brookes were said in the architecturally fine but (in winter) cold and cheerless Wilson son Hall of the Uni. The gathering, which numbered some hundreds, was under the auspices of the Uni. Con., the Lady Northcote cote Orchestra Trust, the Million Shillings Appeal, the Ladies’ Orchestra and the Philharmonic harmonic Society. On the threshold of the hall stood Chancellor MacFarland with extended tended hand, and medico-knight James Barrett, rett, nursing a presentation bouquet for Mrs. Brookes, whose tan-colored frock was wrapped about with silver tissue patterned in a blurred design of blue and pink. Later the two knights sang the praises of the U.S.Ai High Commissioner and his wife, and were echoed by Bernard Heinze and Robert Best. The Phil, choir lifted voices in selections from Elgar’s “King Olaf” and “Banner of St. George,” and the instrumentalists mentalists played works by Massenet and Berlioz. Both guests returned thanks. In the front-row chairs were Mayor and Mayoress Luxton, Mrs. Luxton drawing around her a white-fur collared black velvet coat; the Barrett lady and daughter Cara; Miss Deakin and Mrs. Percy Russell, who had a cheery red gown beneath her fur coat. The Spencer lady, who sported a twinkling hair bandeau above a kolinsky coat; latelykniglited kniglited Dr. Stawell and his wife, the Masson lady, Dr. and Mrs. A. Robertson, Professor A. Gunn’s wife, the rector of Newman, Father Murphy, Mrs. Russell Jackson and her sister Mrs. E. Dyson were amongst others there. Mrs. Herbert Brookes, wrapped ready for her journey abroad, stepped into the Sedon Galleries one day last week to open a show for the benefit of the Permanent Orchestra Fund. It was an exhibition of pictures and statuary donated as art union prizes. Mrs. Harry Emmerton introduced the departing chairwoman, who was given a bunch of early wattle and a posy of violets. Mrs. Arthur Hordern thanked the many painters who had contributed pictures to aid a sister art, and Mrs. E. Dyson expressed the committee’s mittee’s gratitude to Mr. Sedon for lending a portion of his fine gallery. John Longstaff staff has given a still-life study of pomegranates granates and pottery, and Harold Herbert, Arthur Streeton, Blamire Young and Tom Roberts are among the brush-wielders represented. sented. A couple of miniaturists have offered to do the portrait of a prize-winner, and another prize is a valuable violin. Mayor and Mayoress Luxton, Mrs. F. W. Eggleston, ston, Mr. and Mrs. Courtney Dix, Mrs. Fritz Hart, and Mr. and Mrs. Tom Roberts were in the crowd ■at the opening. This is Mrs. Demarquette, professionally known as Madame Joy Macarden, who has come from Europe to teach singing at the Uni. Con. The fair-haired, blue-eyed Dutch lady smiles at you in the role of Elsa in “L olie ngrin,” grin,” in which opera she made her Paris debut in ’23. Her father is attached to a big college in Holland, and she is a 8.A., speaks many languages guages and is an accomplished plished pianist. We are to sample the newcomer’s talent on the 29th, when she will sing excerpts cerpts from “Lohengrin” and “The Flying Dutchman.” Decoration’s gallery houses this week a show of miniatures, water-colors articles of lacquered wood by an English artist, Mrs. Bess Golding. She has been in Australia only a few years, and has attracted the interest of Mrs. Norman Brookes, who opened the exhibition, wearing a mole cape over a powder-blue georgette gown allied to a felt hat of deeper tone. Mrs. Golding was in black satin with Oriental embroidery and a black hat. The Cussen lady, Mrs. Colin Fraser, wearing a brown fur cape, and Mrs. G. G. Henderson were among the first viewers. Pianist Brailowsky was treated to a welcoming coming cup of coffee at the Lyceum rooms by the Music Club. His playing of Beethoven hoven has so pleased our music-lovers that vice-president T. M. Brentnall put forward a plea for an entire Beethoven programme, and Friz Hart, another v.-p., echoed the wish. No musical programme had been arranged, but the Russian visitor begged that he might be allowed to listen to some young Australian tralian students, so Viva Clarke spread her skirts beneath the keyboard and did her best—and a very good best it was—with Chopin and Tschaikowsky. Cora O’Farrell, in peach-pink taffeta, dose-fitting of bodice and very full of skirt, gave her first song recital one night last week. She has a voice of extraordinary range—whether she’s a contralto with an exceptional upper register or a soprano with an unusual allowance of notes below the stave is a matter the critics quarrel over. She was heard in “Ritorna Vincitor” from “Aida,” some classical German lieder and a group of modern lays which included Fritz Hart’s “Dream Wind.” She had a good house and lots of applause, and earned heaps of flowers. Violinist Edouard Lambert and pianist Harold Elvins assisted, and Ida Scott played the accompaniments. Amongst London’s May brides was Penelope lope Gibson Carmichael, who spent some of her childhood's days at Government House when her uncle, then Sir Gibson Carmichael, governed this State. Her husband is Dennis Wheeler, son of the Montague Wheelers. Lady Carmichael gave her niece away, the ceremony being held at St. Mary’s le Bon, Cheapside. The reception was held at Lady Novar’s town house. Both members of the new partnership are qualified architects. To mark the change of name of their second daughter, Bessie, the W. 11. Cumings bade many guests to Menzies’ one day last week. Francis Seymour Vine, of Armadale, was the bridegroom, and the knot was tied at the Grammar School chapel. White satin with encrustations of diamente and pearl, a cascade of Limerick lace veil and a wealth of white orchids made the bridal array, Three ’maids in pastel green mingled two periods in their attire, frocks of modern mode being linked to early-Victorian millinery. linery. Thisis Winifred fred Collins, of the Apple Isle, who comes to us with a creditable ditable reputation tion as an amateur mummer. mer. She has had a lot of experience as a member of the Hobart Rep. Soc., and made her Melbourne bourne debut with our Repertorians pertorians as Anne Sorrell in “The House with the Twisty Windows.” dows.” Lafayette ette made the portrait. A shimmer of shell-pink satin surrounded Margaret Lawrence Clapin when she faced the altar at Grammar School chapel, and a veil of lovely old lace secured with sprays of blossom draped her bouffant skirt of tulle. She is the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. L. Clapin, of South Yarra, and her bridegroom is Wilfred, son of H. L. Heron, general manager of the Commercial Bank of Australia, and the late Mrs. Heron. Chastleton saw the after-rejoicings. Songbird Millie McCormack went to Scots Church one day last week and exchanged matrimonial vows with John Edwards, of Euroa. The bride is an ex-student of Mary Campbell, of the Albert-street Con., and her voice is well known to concert-goers and radio-listeners. She was arrayed in a longtrained trained frock of silvery white and a lace veil. A string of little singing boys paced up the aisle ahead of a procession at Grammar School chapel when an old boy, Dr. George Cornwell Jago, presented himself in the role of bridegroom amongst garlands of white and pink chrysanthemums. Draperies of tulle fell from the mitred hip-yoke of white satin of the gown worn by the bride, Marion, eldest daughter of the E. Wharton Lloyds, of Windsor, and a H'oniton-lace veil floated along the aisle. , Sister Vic., as an attendant, wore a trail of pink roses on a cicada-green ensemble. Amongst the company afterwards entertained at the Wattle was the bridegroom’s groom’s father, C. A. Jago, of Caulfield. Nancy, younger daughter of the late Harry Stokes and of Mrs. Stokes, Toorak, and Norman, a son of the Wilson Camerons of Ivilmore, were married at St. John’s in a setting of Iceland poppies and autumn leaves. Beauty of line and simplicity of design were characteristics of the bride’s deep-ivory satin gown topped by a plain tulle veil that sufficed ficed as train also. Frilled frocks of apricot georgette were worn by her three maids, with felt hats and harmonising shower bouquets. Mrs. Stokes and the bride’s brother, Dr. Lawrence Stokes, entertained a hundred guests afterwards. Before Padre Frank Borland leaves Australia tralia to go missioning in Korea he will call at Sydney to marry Gwen Thomas, of Burwood. His dad, the Rev. Dr. Borland, who has retired from the ministry, is getting ting himself reinstated on the register of authorised splicers so that he may tie this knot. Dr. Julian Smith’s wife poured tea at the Quamby Club for the many bidden to offer congratulation to Dr. Stawell’s life-partner upon her husband’s inclusion in the Birthday honors list. The hostess, who was all in black, had her daughter' Roma as right hand, the bright brunette sporting a smart tweed coat over a figured-silk frock. The Stawell lady had a posy of violets nestling amid black attire. She was accompanied by her not-long-grown-up daughter Elizabeth. The company had a large medical leavening. Deep sorrow was caused by the death of Archbishop Barry. He had come over from Hobart for treatment at a private hospital in East Malvern, close to where his brother Father John Barry, C.M., is stationed. Dr. Barry was a product of All Hallows’, Dublin, lin, which has turned out many famous priests. Apart from his brother John at Malvern, vern, he has three other brothers who are shepherds—Thomas, parish priest of Chatswood wood (N.S.W.) ; David, of Charleville (Ireland) land) ; and Patrick, of St. Mary’s, Mill Hill (London). For nine years before becoming coadjutor to the late Archbishop Delany in Hobart Dr. Barry was parish priest of Cliatswood, wood, and so blazed the track for his brother Tom. Mrs. Laura Archer Palmer, who used the pen-name “Bushwoman,” died a few days ago at her home among the hills of Belgrave. She was the author of “The Bush Honeymoon” moon” and “Racing in the Never-Never,” and contributed numerous articles and short stories to Melbourne periodicals. About two years ago her verses/​' “Kiddyosities,” were broadcast by “Mary Gumleaf” and earned many a chuckle. Mrs. Palmer’s younger brother was the late Ernest O’Ferrall — “Kodak” of The Bulletin. The Housewives’ Association, saying au revoir to Mrs. Herbert Brookes at the Lyceum Club, presented her with a miniature ture laundry set —several wee pegs and a tiny line arranged in a leather case. Mrs. Percy Russell, president of the H.A., in handing over the gift, accompanied it with a posy of violets. The morning gathering was attended by the executive, who wished the guest good luck and a safe return. On her opening night at His Majesty’s, in “Giselle,” when Pavlova tripped against one of the ballet-girls and fell, there were few in the audience who did not feel sorry for the supporting dancer, who seemed to be in for a hot five minutes after the act. But it was all right. The girl went in tears to the star and sobbed her apologies. Pavlova replied earnestly that there was no need for excuses; the stumble was her own fault, and she was lucky in having something soft to fall against. The great dancer is reputed to be a strict disciplinarian, but evidently she doesn’t lack a sense of justice. The Tributary Theatre Players, with Lucy Ahon in command, launched “The Ship,” built by St. John Ervine, at their second appearance. The ladies were able to wear their best bibs and tuckers, and the tiny stage of the Queen’s Hall took on an opulent air at intervals, when the rich Thurlow family of shipbuilding fame had the stage. As a clever old lady of 80 Lucy Ahon was a charming picture in black silk, a furcollared collared satin cape and an ermine-trimmed black straw bonnet. Hettie Feuerman, as the old lady’s daughter-in-law, made her first entrance in a smart checked crepe-de-Chine frock of nutmeg and bois-de-rose, and Mabel Thompson was her nice flapper chick in a soft frilled gown of jacaranda blue. There were flowers for all fair players. H’erold Kyng, the English baritone lately attached to the staff of the Uni. Con., is doing his bit to encourage promising songbirds birds by offering scholarships. Entries close on the 27th, and the secretary of the Con. will divulge the conditions if asked. Minnie Everett, who directs the ballets of the Firm, has just returned from a survey vey of the chief shows of London, Paris and New York. Our latest Naval loan, Captain L. Holbrook, brook, who arrived last week, is one of the R.N.’s senior captains, and his dad is a baronet who owns a group of newspapers in the Old Dart. One-time Bulletin writer Trixie Tracey (Mrs. Carr) died in Melbourne the other day. Born in Vic., she set out on the inky way in her teens. A short time in theatricals was part of her lot, and then she marriecl Howard Carr and went off to England. She returned to Melbourne about six months hgo, when her husband took over the musical directorship at Her Majesty’s. When the Roman Catholics enter into possession of the Queen's Coffee Palace, which is to be converted into a women’s hostel, there will be accommodation for more than 200 boarders. The hostel is to be managed by a number of the Sisters of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul. A small community of these nuns is established in Maitland. An Australian pianist, Paul de Chaumont, has been gathering admirers in Europe, where he has given a series of successful recitals. When the last mail left he was busy in Paris on the music for a French talkie film, “The Voice and its Mistress.”
Terms of Use
Language
  • English
Identifier
  • AP7 (LC)

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

Other suppliers

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment