1923-10-04, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Melbourne Chatter The Occidental Collins St. Melbourne P[?] MISSES MONKE DOVLE Phones Contral 1532, 1533 (4 October 1923)

User activity

Share to:
Melbourne Chatter The Occidental Collins St. Melbourne P[?] MISSES MONKE DOVLE Phones Contral 1532, 1533 (4 October 1923)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/258076175
Physical Description
  • 3127 words
  • article
  • photo
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • xna, John Haynes and J.F. Archibald, 1923-10-04
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Melbourne Chatter The Occidental Collins St. Melbourne P[?] MISSES MONKE DOVLE Phones Contral 1532, 1533 (4 October 1923)
Appears In
  • The bulletin., v.44, no.2277, 1923-10-04 (ISSN: 0007-4039)
Published
  • xna, John Haynes and J.F. Archibald, 1923-10-04
Physical Description
  • 3127 words
  • article
  • photo
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Series
Part Of
  • The bulletin.
  • Vol. 44 No. 2277 (4 Oct 1923)
  • John Ryan Comic Collection (Specific issues).
Subjects
Summary
  • Melbourne Chatter The Occidental Collins St. Melbourne P[?] MISSES MONKE DOVLE Phones Contral 1532, 1533 Melbourne’s Lost Dogs growled when Mrs. Frank Clarke sent out cards for a whirl for the night of their benefit ball, but there was a louder snarl against some of the best-known people on the ball committee for joining the opposition trots. Luckily the crowd roiled up in force to the ticketoffice office and saved the threatened frost, was a well-staged affair, for which chief credit goes to the Montgomery sisters and Maud Harvie, Mrs. Arthur Payne and headmaster master Adamson. Gertrude Dix, in floating black crepe panellings, and partnered by L. Quinn, ran away with the fox-trotting awards. Quinn, an English importation now earning his crust on the Herald, has made a habit of jazz prize-winning, no matter with what partner. Irene Vanbrugh, convoyed voyed by C. Hallard, blew in 20 minutes before the witching hour, looking particularly larly nice in crgpe draperies of tender green, with green and gold swathing her wellpcised pcised head. She simply radiated cheerfulness, ness, and soon showed that she was on intimate mate terms with all the latest, dance-steps. A bouquet of wild flowers was awarded her by the committee, who also handed posies to the Montgomery sisters. They, by the way, are tripping across seas next month after seeing the younger sister’s horse, Marigold, gold, do his dash, at Flemington. Mrs. Payne was all a-glitter in crystal tulle, and Miss Harvie a symphony in palest grey. Gertrude Campbell Hogg’s stately beauty shone out from a priceless setting of rare old lace with trailing back folds of satin brocade When she exchanged vows with the Percy Austins’ eldest hope on Saturday afternoon. The 200-year-old mesh had been lent by Mabel Lilley, who had further loaned her great-grandmother’s gold posy-holder to contain tain the bridal forget-me-nots. The brocaded caded train had originally backed the wedding ding finery of the bridegroom’s mother, and the rich Limerick lace which veiled her golden head was lent by another family intimate, mate, Mrs. Francis. Sister Edith, as bridesmaid, maid, organdied in Spring-like green, which frothed wmitely in the upper deckings; and she had her fair head tucked into a black picture-hat. The Rev. Pelham Chase, as an old friend of the family, helped All Saints’ vicar Jones to adjust the knot. All the young things twittered with excitement when the bride fluttered down the aisle with an unexpected string of pearls rivalling the whiteness of her neck; the bridegroom had hung them there during the register-signing interval. Subsequently cake and confetti were handed out at the Campbell Hoggs’ St. Kilda residence. With a pretence of seriousness, a daily suggested Melba for the Agent-Generalship. The notion was not original; Tommy Bent, when Premier, said that as Nellie Mitchell wasn’t available at under £25,000 a year, it had been decided to continue Taverner in the job. One feature of the Melbourne Show this year has been a model of a bush home. The standing committee of the New Settlers’ League has sponsored it, and members have been on hand to talk with any new settlers who turn up to inspect. The model cottage shows many “home” devices that the pioneering women in Australia have used. The most important item of all is, of course, the national kerosene-tin. The household use of this shiny container is marvellous. Every kind of dish, bucket, scoop and flower-pot can be hammered out of it—even whole houses, while kerosene-tin chimneys are dotted all over Outback. Generally speaking, this year’s Show has been intensely practical; and, in spite of some shocking weather, the total attendance for the nine days reached the 300,000 mark of the previous year. Apart from the tricks of the storm in the Show’s early days, the only sensation provided was the discovery that as good a way as any to color the few white feathers that will creep into the black leghorn’s tail is to dip them in tar. At any rate, the birds that were treated with blacklead lead failed to live up to their disguise, and more than one prize card had to be removed from a pen. The Lauchlan Mackinnon dame passed out the other day at Crediton (Eng.), where the Argus knight has leased the Devonshire homestead of the late Redvers Buller. Her loss will be a cruel blow to him, as his impaired paired health had been her first consideration for some years past. The poor lady had just written to say the invalid was finding the Devonshire air the best tonic he had yet tried. She was a Miss Bundoch, and was the adopted daughter of Lauchlan’s late uncle (the first Argus Mackinnon), whose wife was her aunt. The two Mackinnon daughters are there to comfort their father, and his only son is contemplating a trip across seas early next year. Aimee Shackell and cousin Sunday Baillieu lieu budded attractively at a picturesque ballparty, party, staged by their respective mothers at the Shackell homestead, Yailima, in the farend end of Toorak. Little Aimee suggested an ode to Spring in her pinky tulle flouncings enmeshing rose petals, and cousin Sunday was a fairy princess with her slim elegance enfolded in silver lace belted with brilliants between narrow lines of green. Mrs. Shackell hostessed handsomely in inky satin, brightened ened with jetted effects, while Mrs. Baillieu lieu wore an alluring smile above bronzebeaded beaded drapings, which were poised at the waist with many-colored flowers. Mrs. Shackell, the elder, also black-satined, came to see grand-daughter Aimee enrolled as a grown-up. A whole platoon of Baillieus joined in the revel, and S’Arthur Robinson and his wife brought daughter Nancy. Mrs. Frank Clarke danced in green silk, which started somewhat late in the shoulder regions. Mrs. Charlie Lyon radiated in pink brocade, and Mrs. Leslie MacPherson looked stunning in misty black. The Louis Nelkin pair, who trotted off next day for the Sydney race carnival; Guy Madden and his little wife, who now threatens to outrun her husband in plumpness; ness; Mrs. Jack Baillieu, who is convoying niece Aimee Shackell to Sydney for the social whirl; Mrs. Eric Harrison, in mauve drapings ings ; the Rupert Downes pair; Keith Murdoch doch and Tommy Cochran —all were active in the dance-arena. The youthful Malcolm Maslin pair are not dissembling their pride in their parental dignity. The son is the first male Maslin of his generation. His first outing was to •see Auntie Peggie Mills, who is spending six months in bed because of a bruised bone in her spine. Later on he will be taken up to the Maslin acreage in the Ma State, where he will be reared among the gum-trees. The infant is a great-grandson of the late Col. Tom Price on the distaff side of the house. The Zacutti dame was responsible for the jazz evening which enlivened Austral Salon circles the other night, when the crowd whirled for the Japanese relief fund. The interior of the Salon was a blaze of the club colorings—blue and gold—but the blue had been left out of the supper decorations. Gertrude Summefhayes made herself responsible sponsible for the lilting one-step music. The organiser, all black-velveted, brought daughter ter Alva, who was flounced in raven georgette. gette. Mrs. Quinnell beamed appreciation above moonbeam effects on a black backing. The Fordyce Wheeler pair have broadcasted casted invitations for the marriage of daughter ter Brenda and William Bates at Toorak St. John’s on November 1. Here is a photo of Gwen Barringer, the South Australian water-colorist whose recent Melbourne show was frequently hidden three-deep, and whose pictures in the Society of Artists’ exhibition in Sydney got a pat on the back from The Bulletin the other day. Mrs. Barringer ringer started to draw at the Adelaide School of Design, sign, and after becoming thoroughly acquainted quainted with a box of colors worked for some months under Hans Heysen. The influe nee of Heysen is visible ible in some of her gutnscapes, in which she often reveals the same lyric enjoyment of a perfect day; but in the presentation sentation of studies of industrial energy she is asserting herself in a new field and is producing strangely thrilling symphonies of muscle and iron. She has painted considerably in N. S. Wales, but all her best out-door work has been done in the Mount Lofty ranges, and, later, on the Onkaparinga River, where her husband has a snug nest. The crowds and the weather smiled on the Alfred Hospital fete in the hospital grounds on Friday and Saturday, and £9OOO is expected to rattle into the institution’s money-box. The Irvine dame, in brown tailorings and a blue-ribboned hat, spoke the opening blessing, and later made a tour of inspection under convoy of ex-Senator George Fairbairn and hospital sec. Macdougall. dougall. Every suburb did its bit for the cause, and the ’Varsity meds. ran a jazz palais. The flower sector, promoted by Mrs. Ntorman Hamilton, of Brighton, was attached tached to the Toorak effort, which included the raffling of a linen-stocked cabinet. The Barry Thompson and James Angus matrons staged a gorgeously-dressed Egyptian revue in the adjacent drill-room, under the direction tion of Albert Harris; and Dolly Castles Finn, Dolly Stewart, Cecil Parkes, Mrs. Ed. Dyson, Pat Dunlop, Norman Lee and others provided pleasing song intervals. A whole lot of tourists will regret the rec®Dt c®Dt Passing at Cheltenham Benevolent Home of Pat McVeigh, who probably knew more concerning the mountainous country beyond Warburton than any other living person. In 4 , < l t l ys of the Sold rushes to Wood’s Point and Matlock he built a hotel about 20 miles from n arburton on the track to Wood’s Point, but for many years now it has catered mainly tor tourists engaged in the walk from Warburton burton to VValhalla. McVeigh retired from business on the death of his wife a few years ago, but continued to live in the locality. This is how Langham’s camera saw Miss Rosalie Virtue, a little bundle of nervous force, physical energy and organising power, who is the Education Department’s supervisor visor ot physical training. Under her guidance the kiddies of 2000 schools exercise cise and dance their way to health with no thought of the fact, so painfully fully driven home in the o 1 d physicaljerks jerks system, that they are curing themselves selves of curvature vature of the spine or housemaid’s maid’s knee. During the Prince’s visit she ran the big show on t h e M.O.C. ground, and when Halsey dragged him away to a bigwigs’ function, Edward P. protested to the little organiserin-chief in-chief : “Oh ! I do want to stay with you and see these jolly little kiddies go on with their dancing.” And he meant it, too. Last year she fixed up the training of the thousands sands of girls for the big stunt at the great Jubilee Exhibition. How she runs things from the Murray to the sea is a mystery, but she seems to get through with a laugh and a wave of her capable little hand. Mrs. Henry Rosenthal helped the Queen Vic. Hospital appeal with an afternoon of cards, tea and song in her roomy Toorak reception parlors. It was a topping affair, and the brightness of the musical fare provided vided by the J.C.W. firm almost made one blink. George Kensington was in command of the constellation in the drawing-room sector, tor, and manager George Smith buzzed round to see that all went well. Little Josie Melville ville sang a couple of “Sally” duets with Herbert Browne; Hughie Steyne and Cecil Bradley also gathered in whips of applause; but chief musical honors were scored by Neville Towne’s tenor. Later on the crowd surged down the ballroom to hear Ada Reeve in. a couple of numbers. The Norman Brookes and Cleve Kidd matrons added to the returns with a flower-laden kiosk in the hall, while Mrs. McCallum Neil and Mrs. Marriott were actively engaged in the raffle section,; and there were squads of girl-helps on duty at all angles. An attractive trio of youthful Rosenthal daughters lent the family butler and his underlings aid in passing ing the tebcakes. The eldest sister, Elva, who is packing for a Colombo trip, radiated in striped silk, bibbed with white net; Olive was in sprigged muslin, and little Margot fluttered like a buttercup in yellow. Their mother draped her beautiful figure in silk of Paisley colorings under a black picture hat effectively backed with an immense blue plume. The name of the next Gaud Mayor will have to be announced next week, but it couldn’t be identified at the Agricultural Show. It was concealed under an alias . If you asked a knowing old alderman which of his partners in gastronomy was going to wear the chain of hoffis he would answer, “Touchango” or “Hardtosay,” neither of which is a proper name within the meaning of the Act. Why these city fathers should so furiously rage together (in secret) concerning cerning the election of a Gaud Mayor is supposed posed to be a question with a knighthood in it. One of the candidates is likely to be so keen on getting the precious titular distinction tinction that a terrible backstairs struggle is inevitable. That accounts for betting on the result. Mabel Sharpe, whose capture by Chinese bandits was reported a few days ago, is well known in Melbourne and Sydney, where she has many friends. She is a native <ot Westralia, but went to China some years ago with the C.1.M., and has been stationed in various places, including the province of Ho- Nan and Shanghai. The Queen’s Hall sheltered the farewell lecital of Dallas Fraser, the English girl ’celloist, who is returning to her homeland after some musically active months in this city. An interesting programme, with a Yalentini sonata as its weightiest number, showed the usual latter-day avoidance of popular items. Miss Fraser, who has fine interpretative intelligence and a facile tech nique, plays with a pleasing sincerity which clears the pitfalls of tricky effects; but her music is lacking in the temperamental assertiveness tiveness necessary to stir one’s emotions —un- less one simply compels the stirring. In an unaccompanied bracket of Bach trifles one sensed an original strain which, if it finally materialises, should carry Dallas Fraser to the top. Rita Hope supplied a sympathetic piano backing. Dan White, founder of the Chamber of Manufactures, handed in his checks at St. Vincent’s Hospital last week. He was 27 when he arrived from Roscrea, Tipperary, 62 years ago. He worked as a journeyman for seven years, and then, with a capital of a couple of hundred, founded a coachbuilding business in Swanston-street. He prospered, but lost everything in the land-boom period. Then Jimmy Moore, the timber-man, came to the rescue, and Dan, like a burnt-out settler, began afresh. He did very well, too, and bubbled as genially as ever. The Albert Miller widow has landed back from a brief survey of America, where she was joined by her daughter and granddaughter, daughter, Mrs. Alan Currie and Joyce Russell. sell. They had been tripping in England, and were among the Australians who bobbed to Royalty at the Spring season Courts. Che Russell damsel was to have stayed oversea sea for a time, but the illness of stepfather George Blackwood brought her hurrying back. William Burrell, one of our finest accompanists, panists, has been suffering from an injured hand for some weeks, and is now tortured by the fear of having his career marred by the loss of a thumb. As he earns his crust as an organist he will be faced with disaster indeed if the surgeon’s knife has to be called out. Mrs. Harry Payne fed a big feminine gathering on tea, cake and chatter the other afternoon at her Toorak place, where a big potted tree of white wistaria provided the chief decorative triumph. Mrs. Payne hostessed in dove-grey hangings, gladdened dened with beads, and daughter Ella’s smile arose over cloudy blue, circled midway with many colors. Everyone who is anyone was there, of course. A little gossip from Adelaide: — Lady Bridges (his Ex.’s sister, Miss Philippa Bridges, and Mr. Winser with her) turned up to hear Prof. A. T. Strong lecture on “Beowulf” for the Victoria League. Prof. Mitchell, from the chair, gave the League a pat .on the back for being the first local body to turn the public’s attention to early English literature. The last mail steamer returned to the Dudley Haywards their son lan, fresh from a few years at Cambridge. Other South Australians homeward bound are the Owen Smyths, whose widowed daughter and her two children are coming with them. The family plans flo make its home on this side of the equator. A (clear £640 goes to the two homes at Walker - ville and the Girls’ Home at Mitcham from the one-day fete that Mrs. Ernest Good and Mrs. Wyllie organised a week or so ago. Helen Scott Young was married the other day to Whitford, son of the C. H. AVinnalls, of North Adelaide, aide, at the St. Peter’s College chapel. The bride discarded the orthodox white for primrose georgette and marocain, with a film of lace at the armholes and an enviable lace veil. Her sister Margaret bridesmaided in mauve and silver. Toasts were drunk afterwards at the Scott Youngs’ house at St. Peter’s. A dozen or so youngish bloods who have been at English public schools were hosts at a bail' in the Osborne Hall a few nights ago, and their guests included a fair sprinkling of the older set. The Kidman dame was in grey; Mrs. A. E. Tolley relieved white brocaded crepe de Chine with a black ostrich feather fan and long jet ear-rings; and among other smart frockings were Mrs. H. C. Nott’s pink and gold tissue veiling lace, Mm Way Campbell’s fuchsiatoned toned georgettes, and Miss Heather Macdonald’s soft gown of almond green. The ’Varsity Dance Club had its last frolic of the season the same night at the Elder Hall, and the revellers included half the Senate and professorial staff and all the younger brains of the highbrow institution. /​ Japanese Button Day was a flatfish affair judged by war-time standards; but the Mayoress and her helpers paid in over £7OO a t the close of the day. Miss Philippa Bridges, who has been paying a brief visit to her gubernatorial brother, heads for New Guinea when she says good-bye to us. Mrs. G. E. Bruce (best known as Mary Grant Bruce), who has been lazing on our Sputh. Coast for a week or so, broke the journey back to the wilds of her native Gippsland with a week-end in this village.
Terms of Use
Language
  • English
Identifier
  • AP7 (LC)

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

Other suppliers

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment