1931-01-15, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Answers to Correspondents (15 January 1931) Burke, Keast, 1896-1974.

User activity

Share to:
Answers to Correspondents (15 January 1931)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/264323703
Physical Description
  • 1389 words
  • article
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • xna, Baker &​ Rouse, 1931-01-15
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Answers to Correspondents (15 January 1931)
Appears In
  • Australasian photo-review., v.38, no.1, 1931-01-15
Author
  • Burke, Keast, 1896-1974.
Published
  • xna, Baker &​ Rouse, 1931-01-15
Physical Description
  • 1389 words
  • article
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Part Of
  • Australasian photo-review.
  • Vol. 38 No. 1 (15 January 1931)
Subjects
Summary
  • Answers to Correspondents M.G., BRUSH GROVE. —“In Harness” shows a nice pair, but could have done with more exposure. G.W., TAMWORTH. —“A Praying Mantis” looks somewhat dead. Otherwise, of very good technical quality. J.D.G., • —“Puss” is a first-class portrait of a cat, except that the eyes are hidden and, therefore, fore, the head lacks character. J.C., MERBEIN.—“The Water’s Edge” is a very dainty print, carefully turned out. A splendid example of correctly exposed panchromatic work. R.M.C., HAWKS BURN. —“A Landscape” and “Evening Calm” are both nice quality prints and tastefully mounted; lacking in distinction. A.W.8., ORMOND. —“Prunus Blossom” shows exceptionally good technique, though rather formal in arrangement. O T., ALBERT PARK.—“Chang” is a very good cat study, except for the rather artificial surroundings roundings and the strongly patterned background. “The Coast Road” shows excellent technique. N.8.F.. DULWICH HILL. “The Young Anglers”’ is almost a success and would be better without the boy in his Sunday clothes. The other is a very excellent model. Technical work good. . “Reflection,” by a junior, without name and address, shows cattle in water. A fair quality print somewhat stained; should have been taken the horizontal way. V.W., GLENBURNIE. —Two cats on pavement quite fuzzy, while the middle distance and background ground are intensely sharp. Obviously, keener focussing was required. Pet lambs very much better, technically. R.C.G., KILLARA. —“None of Your Tricks!” is a first-class portrait of a kookaburra, though the printing could be considerably improved, as it is inclined to be flat and grey. Otherwise, an excellent lent job. A.L., MARRICKVILLE. —“Tabby” is an exceptionally tionally good portrait of a cat in a somewhat startled pose. Print rather harsh and would be better enlarged on to Austral Pearl Matt to soften the contrast. L.C.W., TAMWORTH. —“Summer Blooms” is a really excellent study, technically, of roses from a first-class negative. Arrangement, however, not very pleasing. Too much top light and the cast shadow should have been avoided. G.S.C.. HOMEBUSH. —Pose of polar bear is very satisfactory in its alertness, but the technical work is not good enough, the head being particularly larly fuzzy and the coat not well rendered. This is inexcusable in all animal work. L.F., NORTH HOBART. “Afternoon” and “Decorative Gums” are rather freakish in treatment. ment. Would probably look better in large size on rough surface paper. The gums, particularly, could have done with considerably more exposure. L.H.L., SUTHERLAND. —“Buttercups” is just too delicate; with the least shade more body would be described as a successful high-keyed print. There is, however, a slight greying of the highlights that kills it. Arrangement of blooms very suitable. J.P.D., MOUNT PLEASANT.—“Nigger” is truly a freak dog and, photographically, quite impossible for competition purposes, though interesting esting as a record. Apparently taken with a large aperture lens, the only portion sharp being the fore part of the face. A.T., BELLEVUE HILL. —Camel’s head is too hopelessly fuzzy and taken from a low viewpoint— nose-on. In all animal work first-class technique is required, keen focussing and full exposure, while such a head as this should be taken in profile—never file—never nose-on. G.W.C., BONDl.—“What’s the Record?” is a very harsh print, probably on an unsuitable paper. Try this on Austral Pearl Matt, or Cream Smooth, and note the difference in the result. Your model’s neck, for instance, is non est, and it is always worth while to have something supporting the head! M.R.J., SANDY BAY.—“Guilty Conscience” is a fair example of table-top photography. While kewpies used to be thought very cute, they have somewhat hackneyed. The best of “Canned Kitten is the title and the line of sharp focus is nearer the camera than the animals. The reverse should, of course, be the case. A-VP., LANGHORNE’S CREEK. Animal subjects of particularly good quality, and we have wondered whether these are all of wild specimens. If so, we would like an article, descriptive of your work, and would hold the photographs for use with this. Perhaps at your convenience you would write fully. W.W., SLBIACO.—“Rover” could have done with considerably more exposure, in order to give better rendering of the eye and the darker portion tion of the hair on the head. Otherwise, a good portrait of a dog. In “Bush Track” the path is not sufficiently well defined and peters out at the left, instead of working into the picture. Could have done with more exposure and rough surface papers are not, as you probably know, eligible for competition. J.L., JANDOWAE.—“Anticipation” is good in parts, the head being particularly so. The body is badly rendered and the coat quite lacking in detail. This is partly due to the flat lighting coming wholly over your shoulder, then the dei i elopment carried too far, or else printing on a quite unsuitable paper. M.A.G., SCOTT’S FLAT. —“Hector” is a firstclass class study of a dog’s head under straining conditions. ditions. It should appeal to the owner, but is not necessarily a competition subject. “Flossy” is a terribly artificial young thing and her coat must entail sitting up half the night putting it in curl papers! Lighting not good, as detail in the back of the coat is lost. E.L.D., KOGARAH.—“The Afternoon Freighter” is much under-exposed. Arrangement fairly successful, cessful, though we would feel inclined to have made it an upright arrangement, as arranged on print returned “On the Edge of the Sandhills” is rather dull and grey. Your prints suggest slight veiling, which probably occurs when enlarging, or developing the enlargement. THORNBURY.—“A Dinkum Aussie” and An Early Bird” are both good studies of a somewhat bedraggled kookaburra. In making photographs of this sort a time should be selected when the bird is in full plumage. This is a simple matter where tame specimens are photographed. Your model s head in “Gwen” has moved, making the upper part and the eyes, particularly, quite fuzzy. Otherwise, technically first-class. wSf M ” . ( JA MAR U — Th anks for your kindly letter, which is much appreciated. “Peter” is rather on the fuzzy side, though arrangement is pleasing and a good portrait of a cat. “After Work” would have been better taken more in profile. Animals’ heads are seldom satisfactory taken nose-on. Most amateurs use lenses of comparatively short focus, and there is invariably distortion under conditions ot this sort. PER T H A'“ A . F , r f ak ’” whil e technically first-class, is hardly suitable for competition purposes, poses, being a class of subject in request by the illustrated newspapers who frequently buy things of this sort. In “Resting” the cow is too close to the camera with the result that the background is sharp, while the figure is quite out of focus. Lighting is flat being wholly from the front, as shown by the shadow of the upper part of your figure. J W.H., LOTA.—“Tramway Curves” and “The Boulders are both of fair technical quality, the last-named being much improved by the omission ot the white mass of stones in “Kureelpa.” “A r orest Scene is not so good and suggests some movement, either in the original negative or the printing. Mounting shows taste, but there is a roughness of the ruling of the lines and the trimming of the prints that you should endeavor to correct. J.A., MENTONE.—The results of your pan. work show distinct improvement, but there appears to be some surface fog. Is your darkroom light perfectly safe ? “Lake Wendouree” is flat and grey, while “Gum Trees” suffers from somewhat the same fault. Pan. work, on the other hand, while giving a good range of tones and retaining the distance particularly, should be full of sparkle, such as you frequently see in some of the movie films, particularly what are known as “western” subjects, where mountains are included. “Poppies and Roses ’ seems as if it could have done with more exposure, the shadows being heavy and lackmg mg in quality, while the Iceland poppies are not rendered as well as they might be, considering the materia! you are using. “Poppies,” made with a K 3 filter, is somewhat better, but unless these blooms were red it is questionable whether a K 3 was necessary. For pictorial purposes too many blooms have been included. Some of the flowers are very nicely rendered, particularly the centre one and that at the apex; the others not so well, as if the lighting were uneven.
Terms of Use
Language
  • English
Identifier
  • 770.5 (DDC)

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment