1915-09-15, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: LONDON NEWS AND DOINGS. (15 September 1915) Burke, Keast, 1896-1974.

User activity

Share to:
LONDON NEWS AND DOINGS. (15 September 1915)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/257903679
Physical Description
  • 2402 words
  • article
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • xna, Baker &​ Rouse, 1915-09-15
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • LONDON NEWS AND DOINGS. (15 September 1915)
Appears In
  • Australasian photo-review., v.22, no.9, 1915-09-15
Author
  • Burke, Keast, 1896-1974.
Other Contributors
  • By REV. F. C. LAMBERT M.A., F.R.P.S.
Published
  • xna, Baker &​ Rouse, 1915-09-15
Physical Description
  • 2402 words
  • article
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Part Of
  • Australasian photo-review.
  • Vol. 22 No. 9 (15 September 1915)
Subjects
Summary
  • LONDON NEWS AND DOINGS. By REV. F. C. LAMBERT M.A., F.R.P.S. (Special London Correspondent for the ” Australasian Photo Review.” Records of Belgium, The Royal Institute of British Architects is doing a most laudable work in endeavouring ing to collect photographs, drawings, etc., of buildings in Belgium. Many of these buildings have, within the last vear, been partially or totally destroyed, yet it is highly desirable that every n*:eans should be taken to preserve loving records, whether the future sees them restored or not. Belgium has hitherto been one of the favourite happy hunting grounds for the tourist photographer; grapher; consequently there must exist a large number of negatives showing buildings, ings, large and small. A considerable number ber of these views doubtless are unique, and all the more interesting in consequence. The fact that many of the places depicted are not very well known adds rather than detracts from their value in this connection. Readers having prints of any buildings should present sent copies forthwith to the above society, whose address is 9 Conduit-street, London Photographic Business. It is a welcome sign of the times that photography, both as a business and a hobby, continues to attract a good deal of attention.’ Soon after the war commenced, it was confidently fidently prophesied that photographers would cease to exist in a very short time. Those firms who are engaged in the making or sale of apparatus and materials have supplied a creditable proportion of their employees ployees to the colours, and in consequence many of these business houses are shorthanded. handed. Yet I may mention one little bit of first hand news which came under my notice a few days ago—viz., that one of the largest of the London firms interested in the sale of apparatus and materials is opening an additional branch. This certainly does not indicate the approaching extinction of the photographer et hoc genus omne. On the other hand, there is a decided shortage in the supply of certain materials, due in the main to difficulty of obtaining certain raw materials, paper, glass, etc. Prices of Materials We who buy and use photographic materials in contradictinction to those who make a living by making and selling these things to us. are naturallv disinclined to welcome a rise in prices. But I have it on pretty good authority that the dealers and manufacturers would be glad to exchange present high prices and conditions for those ruling a year of more ago. The dealers’ difficulty is to get certain materials at all. A leading chemist in North London told me that he had on order 28 lbs. of Hypo at nearly sixpence per lb., and had been kept waiting for some weeks for delivery. We users who are inclined to grumble sometimes times at prices being “up” must not imagine tne trouble is all on our side. When one comes to think of matters quietly, the wonder der is that we are able to get several of our materials in common use at the present ? nCe ‘u /​ ear a &​° only thinkable use tor old half and whole plate glass negatives was in connection with cucumber frames and so forth. Now glasses of these and larger sizes are worth cleaning and recoatmg. coatmg. Forthcoming Exhibitions. That the R.P.S. and London Salon are both holding their summer or autumn annual nual shows very much in the usual way are significant signs of the times. The R.P.S. show, in the Royal Society of British Artists’ Galleries, Sufifolk-street, Haymarket, ket, runs from August 3 to October 2, where the conditions of entry are very much as usual. The Salon runs from Septer.ber 18 to October 16 in their accustomed gallery, viz., Royal Society of Painters in Water Colour, 5a Pall Mall. The last day for receiving ceiving exhibits is September 7th. ' On this occasion a change of some considerable importance portance is being made, viz., pictures submitted mitted are to be unframed, but mav be mounted at the option of the artist 'The Society will provide mounts in three sizes, 15 x 12, 20 x 16, 25 x 20. Accepted pictures will be shown under glass. The plan of doing away with glass and frames during transit greatly reduces cost (of frames, carriage, riage, packing), etc., and also very greatly reduces risk of damage to pictures in transit. It is a piece of commonsense policy, which may well be imitated by others organising exhibitions. Pyro Stained Fingers, In theory or according to the text books, there is no necessity for pyro stained negatives tives or fingers. If one uses a decent quality of soda sulphite in suitable Quantity, and does not keep this too long made up in solution, there need be no worry about pyro stained negatives. But stained fingers may come from the use of a developer which gives us stain-free negatives unless some simple precautions be taken. We may prevent vent stains forming bv the use of acid sulphite phite solution. Thus it is convenient to keep on the sink a one-pound white earthenware jam-pot containing a solution, into w r hich the fingers mav be dipped after each time they have been in the pyro solution. There is no need for accurate weighing or measuring ing in preparing this finger dip Put about 2 teaspoonsful of crystal soda sulphite into the 1 lb. jam-pot, and add water to fill it about two-thirds full. Then add about 20-30 drops of hydrochloric or sulnhuric acid, or, say, a small teaspoonful of citric acid— whichever may be most convenient. Celluloid Varnish for Negatives. The current issue of the British Journal of Photography (July °th), contains a short modest paragraph dealing in a simple and practical manner with the important tonic of applying a waterproof varnish to a negative. First of all the negative film must be thoroughly dry, otherwise any absorbed sorbed moisture it may contain will be sealed up, as it were, by the waterproof varnish nish about to be applied. To prevent moisture ture being absorbed by the edges of the gelatine film, one must remove from the supporting glass a narrow strip of the gelatine tine film. The varnish to be used is a solution tion of celluloid. This should be of a glycerine consistency and apnlied with sufficient ficient generosity. The plate is put to dry— after varnishing—in a horizontal position, suitably protected from dust. Celluloid varnish nish may easily be prepared from old celluloid loid films. Their gelatine coating is first removed by hot water and a nail brush, then dried and cut up in small snippets, put into a well-corked bottle, and well covered with amyl acetate and shaken up frequently. Celluloid is also soluble in acetone, ether, or alcohol. Collodlochloride Printing. In the current issue of Knowledge, Mr. Edgar Senior contributes an admirably practical tical article on the making of prints on collodio-chloride papers, pointing out that by this process we can get visible effects nearer to those of platinotype or carbon than we can with most other papers. For the benefit of those readers who may not have easy access to the abovenamed journal, I cull the following hints in brevissinw :—Handle the paper as little as possible, as finger touches may lead to red spots. It is better to tone after fixin" within a few days, as the coating ing (of collodion) gets horny and liable to crack. A fairly vigorous contrast negative is required. Print fully, i.e., until the highest lights are tinted and shadows bronzed. One may tone with gold only for warm tints, or with gold and then with platinum for cooler colours. Before toning, the must be well washed, i.e., for 15 minutes in 6 or 8 changes of water. To prevent curling use only just enough water to cover the prints, and put them face down in the dish. Gold-toning bath.—Water, io oz.; Borax, 32 grs.; Gold Chloride, 1 gr.. Platinum Toning Bath. —Water, 2\ oz.; Phosphoric Acid (Sp. gr. 1.12), ii drms.: Potas. Chloroplatinite, 15 gr. Of this stock solution take 15 minims to each oz. of water. After this (acid) bath the prints, must again be well washed for a quarter hour in 6 or 8 changes before fixing in water, 20 oz., Hypo 3 oz., where they may remain a quarter hour, and then be very thoroughly washed. So far the instructions are simple and sufficient, but my own experience of this beautiful printing process is that the one difficulty is the judging of the exact tone (or tones) in the one or two toning baths, so as finally to arrive at the desired colour in the finished dry print. I quite agree with the author of this article that practice, i.e., experience alone can guide us in this matter. For gold toning only the matter is fairly simple after one or two trials. The difficulty culty is knowing how far to carry gold toning ing when this has to be followed by the platinum bath. The beginner is pretty certain tain to overdo the gold toning at first. For warm black, gold toning should be only long enough to show a ver - slight change of colour. For cold blacks, gold toning, the shadows should show a tendency to blue or violet. Personally, I have never succeeded in getting ting an absolute platinum black by this process, cess, but one can get remarkably close to it. By the way, perhaps one should mention that the print requires well washing, 10-15 minutes between the two toning baths. It is bad economy to try and save up for future use either toning baths which have once been used. Photo-micrography. This special line of photographic work is steadily gaining ground on all sides. The Photomicrographic Society, which was started some 3 or 4 years ago by a handful of modest enthusiasts, has now a membership ship roll of just upon ico members. Some of these are far away from the parent home, viz.. Egypt, Australia, India, etc. In this year’s Lantern Slide Competition for all the affiliated societies the one plaque for scientific tific was won by Mr. J E. Barnard, this year's President of the P.-M.S., with a slide of Typhoid flagella. Also it is gratifying fying to note that no less than 20 slides among those specially selected by the judges are by various members of this society i.e., just about half the total number of “selected.” I am informed by the Hon. Sec. of the P.-M.S. that their collective entry in the competition obtained the “maximum possible” sible” number of marks at the hands of the judging committee. This society now issues its own journal of proceedings twice each session, so that foreign members are kept in close touch with our doings. The Hon. Sec. is J. G. Bradburv, 1 Hogarth Hill, Finchleyroad, road, Hendon, London N.W., who is particularly ticularly anxious to extend the courtesies of the society to anv colonials visiting London during session (October to May), who may be interested in photo-micrography. We have already had the pleasure of welcoming one or two Australian visitors, Plate Troubles, etc. If mv memory serves me faithfully I made a brief reference in these pages to an important lecture at the R.P.S. in May last by Mr. Olaf Bloch on the subject of plate troubles. I am now able to refer readers to a report in extenso of this verv useful and interesting communication, which now appears pears in the official journal of the R.P.S. to. 219, June, ’l5). Among the many points of interest one may mention that verv curious differences due to abrasion before and after exposure, etc. These are tabulated in detail and an illustration is given. In this connection tion perhaps I might say that defects in the making of negatives have always interested me greatly. 1 have collected a number of curious examples which have h clued in various ways in the elucidation of some of the puzzles whicli lie in wait for the beginner. ginner. I should like to add that when such curiosities are handed round among “objects of interest at meeting they often are the means of bringing to light other bits of personal experiences, which frequently are helpful all round. My advice in general is not to throw away any negative showing a defect until its cause has been tracked with a high degree of certainty. These defective fective plates are often very useful for experimental perimental work, and also at times they give one good suggestions in various ways. Advisory Committees. The R.P.C. has a number of small advisory visory committees which serve effectively for expediting many matters in a simple manner. Of course we all recognise that procedure suitable for a society of a thousand sand members is not immediately applicable But stm*th y ° f PCrhapS °, nly numbers But still the mouse may learn lessons from fee® ic n nne Amo,lg „ th u RPS - sub-committees, tees, as one may call them, are several whose function is to suggest or advise the larger Councn as regards subjects and leeturlrs ike.> to be of service to members generally Photography is now applied to such a large number of subjects, processes, etc, that no one- person can reasonably be expected to have more than a nodding acquaintance with, many of them; while the specialist often has insufficient available time for his own particular ticular line of work. Not infrequently it of P twn S r 116 Sam - e P erson is a member oi two different societies A and B. He may hear a lecture or meet an expert at A nf 0 J Sq . Ulte ß Unk u own t 0 his fellow members Offer to \ ‘ He - ,S th " S in a Position to otter to the executive of society B a useiinlnn iinlnn as i tO . the lnv ' tation of a previously unknown lecturer. This is a very simple and crude example of how members of advisory visory committees may act; but it mav serve to show how the Hon. Sec. etc. mav be greatly helped when worried or anxious A he of , a session’s programme. 1 might add that the R.P.S. advisory committees mittees are wisely limited to three' members bers for each sub-section. These iildude such regions of work as: Natural History Chemistry and Optics, Pictorial Photograp'hy grap'hy Colour Work. Photo-mechanical Work, Photo-micrography.
Terms of Use
Language
  • English
Identifier
  • 770.5 (DDC)

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment