1899-01-16, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Obituary. The Late Frederick Yorke Wolseley. (16 January 1899)

User activity

Share to:
Obituary. The Late Frederick Yorke Wolseley. (16 January 1899)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/257896800
Physical Description
  • 795 words
  • article
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • vra, Twopenny, Pearce and Co., 1899-01-16
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Obituary. The Late Frederick Yorke Wolseley. (16 January 1899)
Appears In
  • The Australasian pastoralists' review : a monthly journal and record of all matters affecting the pastoral and landed interests throughout Australasia., v.8, no.11, 1899-01-16, p.110 (ISSN: 0314-7096)
Published
  • vra, Twopenny, Pearce and Co., 1899-01-16
Physical Description
  • 795 words
  • article
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Part Of
  • The Australasian pastoralists' review : a monthly journal and record of all matters affecting the pastoral and landed interests throughout Australasia.
  • Vol. 8 No. 11 (16 January 1899)
Subjects
Summary
  • Obituary. The Late Frederick Yorke Wolseley. The news received by cable last week of the death of Mr. F. Y. Wolseley will be received with deep regret throughout the pastoral world. Few pastoralists had so large a circle of acquaintances amongst their class, and to know Mr. Wolseley was to like him. As the inventor of the shearing machine he occupied in regard to pastoral production a similar position to that held by Arkwright and Watt in relation to cotton spinning and the steam engine. Others had devoted attention to the subject, and spent money time, and thought upon it, but it fell to the lot of Mr, Wolseley to invent and submit to pastoralists the first machine which performed formed the work of shearing more expeditiously and effectively than by hand, and his invention marks the beginning of a new era in the wool industry. Mr. Wolseley, who was born in 1837, in County Dublin, Ireland, was the third son of the late Major Garnet J. Wolseley, of the King’s Own Borderers, and is consequently the brother of Field-Marshal Viscount Wolseley. He was indeed one of a family of soldiers, his father, grandfather, and great grandfather having also been in the army. It was intended that he himself should enter the same profession, and having been offered a commission by reason of his father’s services, he was educated for the army. But hearing at an early age glowing accounts of the life of squatters in Australia, he gave up all idea of a military career, and came to the colonies. His first practical experience of pastoral work was gained in Riverina under the late Mr. Ralston Caldwell, of Thule, one of the pioneer squatters of Victoria, and his own brother-in-law, whose station he afterwards managed. In 1886, however, he commenced squatting upon his own account, and in conjunction with Messrs. Gibbs and Wynne he purchased the Thule and Gobran properties, which the firm held for a number of years. It was at this time that Mr. Wolseley experienced some of the disabilities under which pastoralists toralists labour, and in consequence of a strike of shearers the idea first occurred to him of a machine which would render them independent of skilled labour. In 1874, whilst on shipboard, bound for England, he commenced to crystallise his thoughts by preparing plans and drawings of a machine, and on arrival in London his first invention, in the form of a machine, the motive power of which was derived from clockwork, was tested, but it was a failure. Upon his return the properties held by the firm were disposed of for £240,000 to Dr. Telford, from whom they passed into the hands of the late Sir William Clarke, and Mr. Wolseley purchased a cattle station on the Barwon River. He still continued to work at his pet idea of a sheep-shearing machine however, and in 1877 his second essay was put to the trial. This was a machine worked by an endless rope or cord. The shed of Mr. Lyon, of Ballanee, Victoria, had the distinction of being the first in Australia fitted up with sheep-shearing machines, several of these new ones being in use. They worked well for a time, but, being imperfectly made, they soon broke down, and this idea had also to be given up. During the next ten years Mr. Wolseley made many experiments with electricity, compressed air, and other methods, but it was not till September, in 1887, when he held Europa Station, in New South Wales, that he solved the problem, and the original of the present Wolseley machine was perfected. The first sheep were shorn in the presence of a number of neighbouring pastoralists, and the machine was kept at work till 1500 sheep had been shorn. There were, of course, difficulties at the outset, due partly to the bad workmanship ship in the manufacture of the machines, but these have now been overcome, and it has been proved almost beyond doubt that shearing by machinery is possible with greater celerity, and in a manner superior to that of the old hand shears. During the course of his experiments Mr. Wolseley spent some £20,000, and it is sad to think that, like so many other inventive geniuses, he died a comparatively poor man. For a considerable time past Mr. Wolseley has been an invalid, suffering from internal cancer. He underwent several operations, which gave him some degree of relief, and about five months ago he went to England to consult leading specialists there. Recent private advices indicated that he had apparently improved in health. He wrote cheerfully of his rounds of sight-seeing. Still the news of his death does not come as a surprise. He leaves a widow, but no family.
Terms of Use
Language
  • English

Get this edition

Published in

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

Other suppliers

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment