1933-08-29, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: England's Sweetest Romance How John Manners Carried Off His Doll (29 August 1933)

User activity

Share to:
England's Sweetest Romance How John Manners Carried Off His Doll (29 August 1933)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/257678204
Physical Description
  • 1065 words
  • article
  • photo
  • illustration
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • xna, The Bulletin Newspaper, 1933-08-29
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • England's Sweetest Romance How John Manners Carried Off His Doll (29 August 1933)
Appears In
  • The Australian woman's mirror., v.9, no.40, 1933-08-29
Other Contributors
  • By D. E. VERNON-NOTT
Published
  • xna, The Bulletin Newspaper, 1933-08-29
Physical Description
  • 1065 words
  • article
  • photo
  • illustration
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Part Of
  • The Australian woman's mirror.
  • Vol. 9 No. 40 (29 August 1933)
Subjects
Summary
  • England's Sweetest Romance How John Manners Carried Off His Doll By D. E. VERNON-NOTT Pickford did more than anyone one else to make live before the eyes of the world, one which has inspired a charmmg mg play as well as a movie, has become a nursery classic throughout England, has made a Derbyshire manor a place of pilgrimage for lovers, has established a standard woman’s costume for fancy-dress, and has given England a noble family still lamous for the beauty of its women. The story is that of Dorothy Vernon and John Manners, portrayed by Miss Pickford in the silent film “Dorothy Vernon of Haddon don Hall,’’ and in re-telling it I am able to present also a recent picture of the lamous steps at Haddon down which the lovers fled that night of happiness and romance. Dorothy was the second daughter of Sir George Vernon, and when Queen Elizabeth was newly come to the throne of England she and her sister Margaret lived like two happy young princesses amid the flowery terraces and green - velvet lawns of lovely Haddon Hall—still one of the show places of Britain. Sir George kept great state, being very wealthy. Fourscore retainers, we are told, attended upon him and his family at Haddon Hall. A contemporary dwells on “his magnificent manner of living and commendable hospitality.” He was also a rather terrible gentleman, being disposed to be a law unto himself, and on one occasion hunted down and hanged a local murderer, dispensing with any legal formalities, for which highhanded handed act he had to face serious trouble in London. Even in London he was known as The King of the Peak—this title having reference ence to the famous Peak of Derbyshire, the purple tors of which were visible from the immense windows of Haddon Hall, with their stained-glass blazonings. Not the sort of father a young daughter could plead or argue with—which explains subsequent sequent events in Dorothy’s life. Countryside tradition still dwells on Dorothy’s beauty and charm. She must indeed have been a winsome creature to have so entwined her wild-rose personality with the racial memory of her county and of the kingdom. One pictures her as much the same as Mary Pick ford—the same curls, the same smile. She and her sister Margaret would have seen little of London and the Court world, for we are told that Sir George preferred to hold his own Court at Haddon Hall, but that was no hardship. From the windows dows and terrace-walks of the Hall one can look down still on the windings of the River Wye, and on across broad, wellwatered watered meadows to thickly-wooded hills and the wild tors of the Peak. In Spring and Summer the luxuriant grass is enamelled with flowers, and the clear streams teem with fish—lovely English landscape. One of these terrace-walks is still known as Dorothy Vernon’s Walk. Many guests came and went at the Hall, and among them was Sir Thomas Stanley, son of the Earl of Derby, and John Manners, the second son of the Earl of Rutland. With the first of these Margaret began to exchange furtive hand-clasps and quick, smiling whispers, while at the other end of the terrace, with its stone flowerurns, urns, John looked at Dorothy as a man might gaze dumb at a fair miracle. Sir George liked the Earl of Derby’s heir—and patted blushing Margaret’s hand—but he disliked John. No reason is discoverable. John Manners, though a second son, was in every way eligible—but Sir George, as his history indicates, was a law unto himself in this as in dispensing justice. So he forbade Dorothy to see or speak to John —and forbade John to trespass within the Haddon don demesnes. In other words, John Manners was shown the door. As always happens with true love, this only tanned the flame. John had word smuggled secretly to Dorothy that if she would go a-nding down such and such a green path of the surrounding woodlands she would encounter at such and such a spot someone in the garb of a forester— who had something urgent to say to her. Of course, Dorothy, her heart fluttering under her velvet habit, went. . John was the forester—and the urgent message was that he loved her. It does not take much imagination, when the illustration of this story is examined, to picture them standing in that first stolen embrace under the oaks and beeches, with the woodland bluebells bells making a mist of heaven between the great trunks. Again and again they met thus through the fair weather, while up at the Hall the preparations for Margaret’s wedding went on apace. Sister Margaret must have wondered— unless she was in the secret —why Dorothy remained so blithe and subtly smiling, seeing that her lover had been placed under a ban. Came the day of the wedding, with all its gay guests and pageantry, and that night there was a ball. The ballroom, known also as The Long Gallery, looks out on sunken gardens, and from its ante-room a door, still called Dorothy Vernon’s Door, opens on to a flight of stone steps leading to a terrace. Through this door, when the merrymaking was at its height, Dorothy, in her white satin ballgown gown and pearl-looped ruff, slipped with a terrified backward glance—for any alarm raised now would bring bitter and final disaster to true love. The King of the Peak was not to be trifled with. No one saw. Dorothy ran clown the steps, her heart beating as never before, and along the terrace, and from it down further steps into the sunken garden, lit by the glowing windows of the Long Gallery where the bride and bridegroom and their guests danced. One hopes that I'm moon was shining that Summer night. The little white-satin figure flitted across the grass of a further tree-shadowed lawn and down a third flight of stone steps that led to a foot-bridge across a brook that bounded the garden at that point. There beyond the bridge two horses waited in the shadow’s, with a dark-habited young man astride one of them. “John!” (Continued on page 49.) Along the tree-shadowed terrace above and down these steps, still to be seen at Haddon Hall, the Duke of Rutland’s seat in Derbyshire (Eng.), Dorothy Vernon ran to meet her lover, young John Manners.
Terms of Use
Language
  • English
Identifier
  • GT500 (LC)

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment