1932-12-23, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: ROY MALING'S MUSIC (23 December 1932) Australasian Radio Relay League.

User activity

Share to:
ROY MALING'S MUSIC (23 December 1932)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/257468317
Physical Description
  • 1450 words
  • article
  • photo
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • xna, Wireless Press., 1932-12-23
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • ROY MALING'S MUSIC (23 December 1932)
Appears In
  • The wireless weekly : the hundred per cent Australian radio journal, v.20, no.26, 1932-12-23
Author
  • Australasian Radio Relay League.
Published
  • xna, Wireless Press., 1932-12-23
Physical Description
  • 1450 words
  • article
  • photo
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Part Of
  • The wireless weekly : the hundred per cent Australian radio journal
  • Vol. 20 No. 26 (23 December 1932)
Subjects
Summary
  • R OY MALING'S MUSIC An interview with the young Australian composer, poser, recntly returned from Europe , a recital of whose music will be heard from 2BL on Thursday. MR. ROY MALING is an Australian, lian, but his main interest is that he left Australia a year ago, and went to Germany. But let us catch up to a year ago; he didn’t take music seriously till eleven years ago, when, at the age of twenty, he showed several attempts to Mr. Alfred fred Hill. Alf. told him to go on, in the well-known manner; he studied at the Conservatorium, and from time to time had his new compositions performed ed by the pleasant musicians down there, the students, the orchestra, the string quartettes. He learned to be a conductor, and conducted at various concerts in Sydney; and he wrote the incidental music to a play about Shakespeare, speare, and when the play was broadcast, cast, he conducted the music. The Ballet Then he got ambitious, and wrote a Ballet; a ballet is music with a story, and you have dancers to act the story without speaking, without singing, and without many clothes, although the last is optional, but it is generally so—you have only to look at a vulgar musicomedy comedy ballet, and, as for Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring”! Still, we don’t know about Mr. Maling’s Ballet; possibly he may have overdressed them, just for a lark. It comes from an old Serbian legend, gend, and is called Roksanda, and goes like this: The King of Venice has twin daughters ters (please do not misunderstand us), and they are more beautiful than the light of day, and almost as charming as Mr. Maling’s music. Oh, yeah? Well, the King of Serbia, with a beard white and reaching well' down to his ankles, hears about these girls, and wants to marry one of them. It is said, by the way, that men who marry twins know what they are doing, and that the other one generally has to look out. You see, the Serbian King had gained wisdom with years. The King of Serbia So the King of Venice sets three tests, ‘that competitive form of marital examination ination so popular in those days, for the King of Serbia to pass, before he attains tains to those felicities with which marriage riage is said to be encumbered. But the King of Serbia is beginning to feel the approach of rheumatism every winter, and considers how impossible it would be, even though he bobbed his beard, for him to perform the necessary feats. What does he do? He calls for volunteers to do the deeds and win the girl for him; and up jumps a shepherd lad, and says, “I am young— allow me!” Now this is where the old King made a big bloomer—he said, “0.K., son; and if you bring home the bacon”—an undesirable way of referring to one’s possible wife—“if you bring home the bacon, you’re on a hundred of the best.” What happens, but what we all foresaw saw —the sheepfarmer falls in love with the girl (was she not lovelier than a chorus girl on a windy day?), wins her, and wants to marry her. This is where the drums must get pretty busy in Mr. Maling’s music; but we have to hurry on. Mr. Maling put all that to music, then he put his music in a suitcase, then he went to Germany to try and get it produced. But the opera, , house people will not be hurried; they have an interesting custom. Ten months of the year, they go hard at it, playing night after night through a carefully and widely planned repertoire. The remaining two months of the year, they consider music which has been sent to them in the hope that if may be performed, formed, and select pieces that they wish to add to their repertoire, and rehearse them. Then they open up again for another other ten months and give each new work a very fair go, indeed. Thousands of Compositions The 8.8. C. is like this, too. They get thousands and thousands of new compositions positions sent to them every year, says Mr. Maling, and they reserve one month (about March) to consider them all. “Of all the new music they receive, from all over the world, they select about 40 compositions each year for inclusion in their repertoire. You have no chance whatever of having a new work performed formed immediately there —and, of course, their practice is quite justifiable. If they were to examine work as it comes in, they would need a special staff; besides; sides; the present method allows them to choose the best of each year’s compositions, positions, and to compare one new work with another.” While he was in England, Mr. Maling showed his Ballet to the Camargo Society, ciety, which is interested in ballets; and Edwin Evans, well known in Sydney, and Montagu Nathan, members of the committee, were very interested; but their orchestra was too small to perform form it. They commissioned Mr. Maling to write them a Ballet, and he is now engaged on a Jazz Ballet for them. He said, “It is no use playing works for large orchestras with small orchestras— ‘symphony orchestras’ of thirty or forty players are valueless. That is the main lesson I have learned abroad. In Australia tralia if would be very difficult to get together a Symphony Orchestra in which all the members are players—or. to keep them together long enough to make a satisfactory musical instrument of them. While I was in Berlin the State Opera House Orchestra was celebrating its fiftieth anniversary—that is some indication of the manner in which symphony orchestras are kept together on the Continent. Syniphonies Impossible “So I concluded that, if it was impossible possible to have an eighty-piece symphony phony orchestra in this country, we should realise and work within our limitations. I believe there is wide scope here for light orchestras of the Continental tinental type, such as the Marek Weber, the Dajos Bela, and the Edith Lorand Orchestras. These have from eight to sixteen excellent and perfectly trained players; they tour the country on contract tract with the moving-picture theatres, and are extremely popular. They never play anything which may not be classed as good music; they play everything from classical music to musical comedy; and they play it perfectly, because every composition is re-orchestrated for the combination which is to perform it. I have formed a small Orchestra of this type, for which I shall orchestrate, and I think it may be quite successful.” Too Much Good Music ! Mr. Maling says that, if anything, there is too much good music on the Continent at present. On the same night you have to choose whether you will hear an orchestra under Furtwangler, or under Kleiber, or a concert by Hubermann. mann. In Germany you hear little but German music (Stravinsky was hissed off the platform); in Prance, you hear scarcely any French music; in London you hear all kinds of music. But Stuttgart gart is least conservative of German cities (they may put on Mr. Maling’s ballet in the coming season); Berlin is very conservative; Munich has the best. productions of Wagner in the world— |. better than Beyreuth, even. ! (A brief description of the music to be played during Mr. Mating’s recital will be found on Page 56. J Mr. Roy Maling “Roksanda,” the Ballet, will not be on at the coming broadcast concert; even the Suite from it, performed at Munich, requires too large an orchestra. But there will be the phantasy for piano and orchestra, in which Mr. Maling will play the piano part, while Mr. Roberts conducts. The main theme is an original Arab melody, and the whole work is to invoke an Arabian atmosphere. Mr. George White will play the violin part of the phantasy for violin and orchestra; an “Introduction and Allegro.” You will also hear the piece for strings, “Sleeping Nicolette,” which was performed in Stuttgart, and you are to think of a beautiful girl sleeping; it is from the old French romance, “Aucassin and Nicolette.” There is another, a “Fable of La Fontaine,” which represents sents no particular fable, but the general eral quaintness of his style; and there is “Homage,” in which the composer pays homage to Wagner, Debussy (who also paid homage in this manner), and to Tschaikowsky, “but without imitating ting their style's.” So you see you have a Romanticist to deal with, a patron of the color and poetry of sound, and we hope that a good time will be had by all.
Terms of Use
Language
  • English

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment