1903-12-31, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: The Races of Mankind and their For= (nation of Nations. (31 December 1903) Royal Anthropological Society of Australasia.

User activity

Share to:
The Races of Mankind and their For= (nation of Nations. (31 December 1903)
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/257414233
Physical Description
  • 1491 words
  • article
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Published
  • xna, G. Watson, 1903-12-31
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • The Races of Mankind and their For=​ (nation of Nations. (31 December 1903)
Appears In
  • Science of man and journal of the Royal Anthropological Society of Australasia., v.6, no.11, 1903-12-31
Author
  • Royal Anthropological Society of Australasia.
Published
  • xna, G. Watson, 1903-12-31
Physical Description
  • 1491 words
  • article
  • Journals
  • Magazines
Part Of
  • Science of man and journal of the Royal Anthropological Society of Australasia.
  • Vol. 6 No. 11 (31 December 1903)
Subjects
Summary
  • The Races of Mankind and their For=​ (nation of Nations. In the Eocene age of the Tertiary period, iod, the common ancestors of what after ter became various kinds of mammals had come into existence by the prolonged longed developments and evolutions of the lower types of living beings ; and then continuing to advance by further developments of tissues, and organs, so that by the Miocene age there existed isted in several continents the genera and species of many mammals, and among others, the natural order, with its genera and species of primates ; these have left for studies their fossilised ised remains, or their bones, in the deposits of that age in many countries. Leaving all others for the present and directing our attention to the ancestors tors of mankind, we find in the Pliocene cene age deposits or strata , in various countries the relics of both the higher apes, and the lower men, then men, had reached such evolutions, and developments, velopments, that their several remains when found, show the different race types, which had extended over widely extended lands. Then the several cold and hot succeeding ages of the Quaternary period, drove about, over Asia, Africa, and Europe the different races of men whose various forms of palaeolithic chipped stone implements as well as their skulls, and other bones help us to trace them in their wanderings, ings, as the glaciers and ice sheets, drove them from the north to the south, and again in the reverse directions tions ; as the cold and then the hot ages succeeded each other, until at length the eccentricity the earth’s orbit, and the great elevations and depressions pressions of the continent and island, masses of land had subsided and the recent period of geologists was ushered ered in and continued in which epoch we find the skuils, and other remains with the neolithic forms of the implements ments they then made and used, these are widely scattered over each of the continents and we are thus enabled to trace their migrations and their settlements, ments, by not only their different types of skulls and bones of their bodies, ies, but also by their peculiar implements, ments, ornaments, and utensils, evidences ences of the improvements of the various ious races continued until what are known as the pre-historic, and the historic toric ages were established. The three first formed nation* were those in India, dia, Babylonia and Egypt, and from these colonies went off and formed other nations, which were established for shorter or longer times, under their own conditions of civilization. The Kish, the Kengi, the Sumerian, the Akkadian and the Shemitic kingdoms doms were established in Mesopotamia. These having discovered or obtained tained the mode of writing, have left inscriptions for the decipherment and translations of scholars ; thus making known some of their histories, to a certain extent, but of course limited by the inscriptions recovered. In the Kile valley from Meru (or Meroe) to the delta of the valley, settlements were formed by the intruders, who were Libyans, or Hamites, from Northern ern Africa ; and also by Osiris and his followers coming across Arabia from Mesopotannia, these intruders drove out the older Negroid inhabitants they found there in the Nile valley ; and each of these invaders brought with them, their own arts, cultures and other things they remained in the settlements they made, during what in the mythologies are called the reigns of the Gods and the demi-gods; which continued tinued until Mena had managed to conquer the peoples in the upper, and in the lower Nile valley, and converted verted them into a united Egypt. Thus commenced what are known as the regular historical dynasties; as opposed to the pre-historic peoples, whose graves and remains are now being discovered, and the names in Hieroglyphics, Professor sor Sayce, : Morgan and others, are reading of their kings. The Kings found show, that at their time, the peoples were as civilised as long afterwards ; the Mastaba tombs, and the temples they built, proved what expert architects and builders there then were in Egypt, or in 5,000 B C and they were then in frequent communication with Arabia, Mesopotamia, tamia, and India. The Shemites while in High-Asia were nomadic pastoral - ists and drove their flocks and herds by the Caucasus into Armenia, and from there into Syria and thence to Mesopotamia where they learned the of settled town life and took up their residence in Southern Babylonia lonia or Chaldea, and they intermarried with the Akkadians and the Sumer erer people, and the half-caste children spoke their Shemitic mother’s language, age, which is called in the early inscriptions scriptions the Woman’s speech. By about 4000 B C these Shemites were seizing political power, and by 8,800 B,C. Sharrukin a King of these people was the King of Babylonia, lonia, and after fifty years his son Naram-Sin, reigned after him. The foundations, and the temples, which they constructed to Bel, are now being discovered, and contain their tablet inscriptions, which tell of their conquests in Elam or Persia, and in Syria to the Mediterranean ranean and to the Isle of Cyprus, where their seals and inscriptions have been also found and read. With varying fortunes the Shemites retained their hold on Babylonia more or less successfully until 2,800 B. C. when Hammurabi conquered and became King of Babylonia. Kinevah and Asshur, two Shemitie colonies of Assyria syria were then founded and attained to greater power than the Kingdom dom from which they originated. Through the frequent invasions of Elam, and neighbouring countries, several people were caused to migrate among which were the ancestors of the Chinese who passed from their orignal home in Bactria to the banks of the Hoang-ho where they settled themselves selves among the aboriginal inhabitants, ants, and after some centuries were strong enough to elect Huang-ti as their King, and continued to advance, while increasing in numbers and influence, under their several Kings, until they had conquered all that is now called China, and many of the neighbouring countries, as Manchura, chura, Mongolia and Thibet. As the Chinese became strong enough they sent colonies into the Korea, and into the islands of Japan, then filled with the Ainoes. The state of war and unrest in upper Asia caused the migration ration of the Kheta (or Hittites) who settled in Syria, and the Etruscans who afterwards 'settled in Italy, and the lonians who settled themselves in parts of Asia-Minor and round the Eegian sea coasts. These helped to occupy the Troas, Mycenae, Tyriens and Crete, the ruins in which places, are now revealing to the explorers, so many valuable facts concerning these nations. The Cimmerians coming into conflict, with the Assyrians, ans, were driven by them into Europe along the Banubian Valley sending off colonies of their tribes into to the countries on either sides of this valley ; those of them entering Italy were attacked and conquered by the Homans; and then, in scattered parties, ies, passed into different parts of Europe. ope. Some writers have believed, that some Aryan race, extended from India to Northern Europe, but all this is proved to be erronious, the nearest approach to any people like this, were those tribes of diverse origins, who were located along the river Volga ; and who from there followed their flocks and herds into various countries and showed by their speeches, the ef. fects, by their words, of their former proximity and intercourse, with the neighbouring tribes of their settlements ments along the banks of the Volga. One of the colonies, or offshoots, from Babylonia, were a people who occupied the Bahrien Isles, and the shores of the Persian Gulf, these were called in different languages Punt, Pioni, Phoeni, Phoenikes, Phoenicians, all which names meant the red people, or the people who were dwellers under the Red-Palm or in Palm lands (the date palm). When historians first write of them, they were navigating the Persian Gulf, with their head-quarters on the Isles of Tyros rnd Arados, they being energetic navigators, and bartering ering traders, over the Indian Ocean, the Red Sea, and into the Mediterranean, ranean, dealing with all the people they encountered, and establishing trading posts and settlements in each country from Caphtor near Egypt, to Tyre, Sidon, and other places near the shores of Syria, among the Canaanites who were of racial relationship. These Phoenicians continued to extend their trading voyages, from the shores round the Indian Ocean to the Mediterranean ean countries and outside these to Great Britain for Tin and the Baltic for Timber and other things. Wher Bronze was made from copper and tir the trading of these voyagers spread i abroad into many countries, and thei dealings in spices, gold ornaments, tex tile fabrics, incence, made such thing widely known and desired. Thes voyagers and traders continued to ex tend their operations, until they wer overcome by the Greeks, and the settlements destroyed.
Terms of Use
Language
  • English

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • ACT (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...

This single location in Australian Capital Territory:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Trove Digital Library. Open to the public Article; Journal or magazine article English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment