English, Art work, Map edition: Wotjobaluk: Aboriginal Australians of the Wimmera River System (1974) Allen, Terri G.

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/249938011
Physical Description
  • Manuscript
  • 32pp typescript text; 1p sketch map; Appendix 1 3pp; Appendix 2 2pp; Appendix 3 2 pp; Appendix 4 - 2pp
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Wotjobaluk: Aboriginal Australians of the Wimmera River System (1974)
Creator
  • Allen, Terri G.
Physical Description
  • Manuscript
  • 32pp typescript text; 1p sketch map; Appendix 1 3pp; Appendix 2 2pp; Appendix 3 2 pp; Appendix 4 - 2pp
Part Of
  • MS 001327 (Box 058-12)
  • Royal Historical Society of Victoria Manuscripts Collection
Summary
  • The Wotjobaluk were part of the Kulin nation. The spelling of this name is varied: Wotjobalek, Wudkubalug, Mallegundeet. The current terminology is Wergaia. Alternative names were given for groups or sub-tribes and the area each occupied. In general the area they occupied was inhospitable and water sources unreliable. Violent disruption of tribal life with the arrival of settlers and explorers occurred, although in the early period aboriginal skills were used to help the new comers find water and food and explore the country. (Box 058-12)
  • MS 001327 : information coming from A. W. Howitt and Brough Smith, per Revd Hartmann, Revd Spieseke, and Horatio Ellerman described the culture. Encampments were noted from evidence of oven mounds, detritus and tools. Trading in stone over a wide area was noticeable, mainly along the Wimmera and Yarriambiac rivers. Large corroborees held at Lake Wirrengren are described, myths, dwellings, diet, weapons and tools are listed and named. Later, missions were established to help survivors, in particular the Ebenezer Mission, recorded from its establishment in 1859 to its closure in 1903, the Revd Hagenauer being noted, along with several of the better known aboriginal converts. A table of aboriginal population of the Lake Hindmarsh area by gender and age in 1870 shows the decline. A two page narrative on the death of Sam Moore, a well-known Aborigine is attached. This is a very full account with footnotes, bibliography and appendices. There are four appendices: Appendix 1 Food of Mallee Aboriginal Australians in aboriginal language, English and Latin Appendix 2 Aboriginal place names and meanings - South eastern Australia from Aldo Massola Appendix 3 Ebenezer Mission Station - extracts from notes of early visitors Appendix 4 Reprint of death of Samuel Moore, dated 17.07.1936? from 'Jeparit Leader' Note: This item is part of the Swift Bequest.
Terms of Use
  • All rights reserved
Language
  • English
Identifier
  • oai:ehive.com:objects/​751939

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • VIC (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment