1844, English, Book edition: Locke's essays [electronic resource] : an essay concerning human understanding ; and, A treatise on the conduct of the understanding / by john Locke ; complete in 1 volume with the author's last additions and corrections. Locke, John, 1632-1704.

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/229738651
Physical Description
  • 524 p. ; cm.
Published
  • Philadelphia : James Kay, Jr. &​ Bro., 1844.
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Locke's essays : an essay concerning human understanding ; and, A treatise on the conduct of the understanding /​ by john Locke ; complete in 1 volume with the author's last additions and corrections.
Also Titled
  • Essay concerning human understanding
  • Treatise on the conduct of the understanding
Author
  • Locke, John, 1632-1704.
Other Authors
  • APA PsycBOOKS.
Published
  • Philadelphia : James Kay, Jr. &​ Bro., 1844.
Medium
  • [electronic resource]
Content Types
  • text
Carrier Types
  • online resource
Physical Description
  • 524 p. ; cm.
Subjects
Summary
  • "I here put into thy hands, what has been the diversion of some of my idle and heavy hours: if it has the good luck to prove so of any of thine, and thou hast but half so much pleasure in reading, as I had in writing it, thou wilt as little think thy money, as I do my pains, ill bestowed. Mistake not this for a commendation of my work; nor conclude, because I was pleased with the doing of it, that therefore I am fondly taken with it now it is done. He that hawks at larks and sparrows, has no less sport, though a much less considerable quarry, than he that flies at nobler game: and he is little acquainted with the subject of this treatise, the understanding, who does not know, that as it is the most elevated faculty of the soul, so it is employed with a greater and more constant delight than any of the other. Its searches after truth are a sort of hawking and hunting, wherein the very pursuit makes a great part of the pleasure. Every step the mind takes in its progress towards knowledge, makes some discovery, which is not only new, but the best too, for the time at least. For the understanding, like the eye, judging of objects only by its own sight, cannot but be pleased with what it discovers, having less regret for what has escaped it, because it is unknown. Thus he who has raised himself above the alms-basket, and, not content to live lazily on scraps of begged opinions, sets his own thoughts on work, to find and follow truth, will (whatever he lights on) not miss the hunter's satisfaction; every moment of his pursuit will reward his pains with some delight, and' he will have reason to think his time not ill spent, even when he cannot much boast of any great acquisition"--Publicity materials. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved).
Notes
  • Title from e-book title screen (viewed June 1, 2010).
  • Electronic access only.
  • Access limited to Bar-ilan registered users.
Language
  • English
Libraries Australia ID
Contributed by
Libraries Australia

Get this edition

Other links

None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

Found at these bookshops

Searching - please wait...

You also may like to try some of these bookshops, which may or may not sell this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment