2014, English, Thesis edition: Magical techniques and implements present in Graeco-Egyptian magical papyri, Byzantine Greek Solomonic manuscripts and European grimoires: transmission, continuity and commonality (the technology of Solomonic magic) Skinner, Stephen

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/206921442
Physical Description
  • thesis
Published
  • 2014
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Magical techniques and implements present in Graeco-Egyptian magical papyri, Byzantine Greek Solomonic manuscripts and European grimoires: transmission, continuity and commonality (the technology of Solomonic magic)
Author
  • Skinner, Stephen
Other Contributors
  • University of Newcastle. Faculty of Education &​ Arts, School of Humanities and Social Science
Published
  • 2014
Physical Description
  • thesis
Subjects
Summary
  • Research Doctorate - Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
  • This thesis identifies the transmission, continuity and common elements of magical techniques and implements present in magicians’ handbooks, from the Graeco-Egyptian magical papyri (2nd century BCE – 5th century CE) via the Byzantine Greek Solomonic manuscripts (6th century – 16th century), to European Latin and English Solomonic grimoires (13th century – 19th century). The evolution of magical techniques is traced from one period to another, using the papyri, manuscripts and printed editions of handbooks actually written, used or owned by magicians, rather than the literature about them. In this way magic is treated like any evolving technology, where a surprising degree of continuity and commonality has been found, stretching over periods up to two thousand years. There is no intention to examine social, political, economic or religious issues, or the reaction to magicians of their surrounding lay community, or to assess the effectiveness of these techniques, purely an intention to identify the commonality, continuity and transmission of their techniques and equipment. The nature of the blending of Egyptian, Greek and Jewish magical techniques, equipment and nomina magica in Alexandria in the first five centuries of the Common Era is discussed, and the Graeco-Egyptian magical papyri are analysed from the point of view of methods, materia and intended outcome, with a detailed breakdown of sources and rite types. The commonality between these methods and ingredients so established, and their reappearance in the Byzantine Greek Hygromanteia and related texts is demonstrated, with an analysis of why some methods persisted and others faded away. The migration of these methods and nomina magica from the Greek Solomōnikē to the Latin grimoires, particularly the Clavicula Salomonis, is analysed on a technique by technique basis, with illustrative passages drawn from vernacular Solomonic manuscripts like the Key of Solomon and the Lemegeton. Areas of discontinuity are evaluated, and the sources of material from other sources, such as the pentacles of the Key of Solomon, ascertained and identified.
Terms of Use
  • Copyright 2014 Stephen Skinner
Language
  • English
Related Resource
  • University of Newcastle Research Higher Degree Thesis
Identifier
  • oai:nova.newcastle.edu.au:uon:13943

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • NSW (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment