Waltz : the return of Galatea / composed by H.R.H. the Duke of Edinburgh Alfred, Prince of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, Duke of Edinburgh

User activity

Share to:
Creator
Alfred, Prince of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, Duke of Edinburgh
Subjects
Waltzes.; Australian; Galatea (Ship)
Bookmark
https://trove.nla.gov.au/work/156931296
Work ID
156931296

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Specific versions/editions of this work have also been tagged

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

2 user comments or reviews for this work

Add a comment


public:Australharmony
2020-02-11 07:47:06.0

[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (13 March 1869), 9

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13184077

JUST PUBLISHED, by permission of H R.H. THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH,
A NEW WALTZ, entitled "THE RETURN OF THE GALATEA," with correct photograph of H.M.S. Galatea, in Sydney.
J. H. ANDERSON and CO., 360, George-street.
THE Latest Musical Novelty, Prince Alfred's New WALTZ, elegantly îllustrated. Anderson's, George-st.

public:Australharmony
2020-02-11 07:51:13.0

"A NEW WALTZ BY PRINCE ALFRED", The Sydney Morning Herald (13 March 1869), 6
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13184054
 
His Royal Highness, on the occasion of his last visit to Sydney, permitted the publication of a waltz composed by himself, an unpretentious morceau, but exceedingly melodious. The return to Sydney of the Duke is made the subject of another composition of the same kind, also by His Royal Highness, enitled "The Return of the Galatea," - this has been published with the permission of the royal captain, by Mr. J. H. Anderson of George-street. That our royal visitor delights in the "divine art" is beyond question, and without descending to obsequiousness, we may regard it as an honor to the colony that he has given to the public the result of a few quiet hours of musical study. The "Return Waltz" is simple in construction, melody rather than brilliance being the object sought. The introduction is from a well-known air. The waltz, divided into three parts, with a finale, is soft, in the style known by musicians as cantabile, easy of performance, and well-marked time for dancing. The title page contains an admirable photograph of the Galatea, and is elegantly printed.

Show comments and reviews from Amazon users