Information about Trove user: zeps

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,819,383
2 noelwoodhouse 3,918,703
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,321,384
5 Rhonda.M 3,135,228
...
222 BainaMasquelier 228,988
223 Whitten 225,495
224 Brian.Buckley 225,432
225 zeps 224,486
226 rjaffrey 223,618
227 Lemp 221,677

224,486 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2019 2,486
September 2019 1,296
August 2019 1,123
July 2019 1,250
June 2019 1,707
May 2019 1,244
April 2019 2,011
March 2019 504
February 2019 281
January 2019 2,158
December 2018 1,700
November 2018 1,231
September 2018 2
April 2018 405
March 2018 1,202
February 2018 569
January 2018 3,212
December 2017 4,004
November 2017 5,673
October 2017 3,000
September 2017 5,000
August 2017 2,002
May 2017 5,000
April 2017 5,001
March 2017 7,001
February 2017 5,965
January 2017 4,551
December 2016 1,619
November 2016 7,200
October 2016 4,277
September 2016 5,458
August 2016 5,070
July 2016 2,117
June 2016 2,931
May 2016 4,000
February 2016 10,000
January 2016 3,479
December 2015 5,599
November 2015 567
September 2015 1,172
August 2015 1,409
July 2015 4,865
June 2015 12,888
May 2015 841
April 2015 316
March 2015 7,017
February 2015 5,114
January 2015 1,560
November 2014 5,270
October 2014 3,210
September 2014 8,516
July 2014 10,062
June 2014 5,493
May 2014 13,731
April 2014 3,203
March 2014 4,394
February 2014 4,333
January 2014 109
November 2013 727
October 2013 3,288
September 2013 5,073

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,819,181
2 noelwoodhouse 3,918,703
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,321,363
5 Rhonda.M 3,135,215
...
220 Whitten 225,495
221 Brian.Buckley 225,432
222 BainaMasquelier 225,024
223 zeps 224,467
224 mollyzmum 224,330
225 rjaffrey 223,618

224,467 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2019 2,486
September 2019 1,296
August 2019 1,123
July 2019 1,250
June 2019 1,707
May 2019 1,244
April 2019 2,011
March 2019 504
February 2019 281
January 2019 2,158
December 2018 1,700
November 2018 1,231
September 2018 2
April 2018 405
March 2018 1,202
February 2018 569
January 2018 3,212
December 2017 4,004
November 2017 5,673
October 2017 3,000
September 2017 5,000
August 2017 2,002
May 2017 5,000
April 2017 5,001
March 2017 7,001
February 2017 5,965
January 2017 4,551
December 2016 1,619
November 2016 7,200
October 2016 4,277
September 2016 5,458
August 2016 5,070
July 2016 2,117
June 2016 2,912
May 2016 4,000
February 2016 10,000
January 2016 3,479
December 2015 5,599
November 2015 567
September 2015 1,172
August 2015 1,409
July 2015 4,865
June 2015 12,888
May 2015 841
April 2015 316
March 2015 7,017
February 2015 5,114
January 2015 1,560
November 2014 5,270
October 2014 3,210
September 2014 8,516
July 2014 10,062
June 2014 5,493
May 2014 13,731
April 2014 3,203
March 2014 4,394
February 2014 4,333
January 2014 109
November 2013 727
October 2013 3,288
September 2013 5,073

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 314,433
2 PhilThomas 133,599
3 mickbrook 110,583
4 murds5 61,555
5 GeoffMMutton 51,424
...
1268 SWKRR 19
1269 TMN1 19
1270 vcosta 19
1271 zeps 19
1272 Anifrangipani 18
1273 bchugg 18

19 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

June 2016 19


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
HONOR BADGE Diggers Way of Thanking Friends (Article), The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Friday 17 December 1926 [Issue No.15,470] page 2 2019-10-31 23:57 NEW SOUTH WALES: Mr George Soar, Dr.
1\ C. Stcvr.UMui, Colonel Kenneth Mackay, Mr
S. Campbell, Mr Larp, Mrs Gcngo. Mr W. J.
Cochrane, MI«a E. E. Campbell.
VICTORIA: Mr T. Truihhle, Mr II. J. Sheohan,
Sir Nicholas Lockycr, Mr John Clayton, Mr
K. Morlariy. Mr A. L. Royce. Mr J. M. Utiles-
Pic, Mr W. A. Gibson, Mr W. Mclver, Mr ».
11. Kwar Mr Hugh J. Word, .and Mr Gccrcc
SOUTH AUSTRALIA: MUs M. Morryatt, Mr
R. W. Bennett, Miss F. Clesgett, Mra J. Buttery,
Mrs Harold Davfcs, Mr W. J. Sowden, Mr 0
McKwnn, Mr F. Mills, Mr J. It. Hughes, Mr B.
Limn, Mr S. A. G. Miller, Mr C. 1\ U. McCann,
Mrs Bagot,
WEST AUSTRALIA: Mr R. E. Buih, Mr
David Donaldsou, Mr W. 11. Mnckic, Mrs Curie
Stnvth, Miss Mnrv Mrarcs, Mr W. Watson, Mr
G. McLeod, Colonel Hadley, Sir Frank Slather,
Sir l)an Dwyer.
TASMANIA: Dr. J Ramsay, Sirs A. C. Jen
kins, Mr W. McUujru, Mr L. Brlononski. Mr
Jtobt. Nottlefoht, Mr John Calvin, Mr John
Shield, Mrs II. Field Marth, Mt O. Jl. llookway.
Certificates of Merit have also been- awarded
Sit ii.vcll SUne Employes' War Relief Fund,
the Red CroNi Voluntary Slolor Corps, and die
Soldiers' Welcome Committee. Perth.
NEW SOUTH WALES : Mr George Searl, Dr.
F. C. Stevenson, Colonel Kenneth Mackay, Mr.
S. Campbell, Mr. Earp, Mrs. Genge, Mr. W. J.
Cochrane, Miss E. E. Campbell.
VICTORIA : Mr. T. Trumble, Mr. M. J. Sheehan,
Sir Nicholas Lockyer, Mr. John Clayton, Mr.
K. Moriarty, Mr. A. L. Royce, Mr J. M. Gilles-
pie, Mr. W. A. Gibson, Mr. W. Mclver, Mr. H.
B. Zwar Mr. Hugh J. Ward, and Mr George
SOUTH AUSTRALIA : Miss M. Marryatt, Mr.
R. W. Bennett, Miss F. Cleggett, Mrs. J. Buttery,
Mrs. Harold Davies, Mr. W. J. Sowden, Mr. G.
McKwan, Mr. F. Mills, Mr J. B. Hughes, Mr. B.
Lunn, Mr. S. A. G. Miller, Mr. C. F G. McCann,
Mrs. Bagot.
WEST AUSTRALIA : Mr. R. E. Bush, Mr.
David Donaldson, Mr. W. H. Mackie, Mrs. Curle
Smyth, Miss Mary Meares, Mr. W. Watson, Mr.
G. McLeod, Colonel Hadley, Sir Frank Mather,
Mr. Dan Dwyer.
TASMANIA : Dr. J Ramsay, Mrs. A. C. Jen-
kins, Mr. W. McHugo, Mr. L. Briononski, Mr.
Robt. Nettlefold, Mr. John Calvin, Mr. John
Shield, Mrs. H. Field Marsh, Mr. C. H. Hookway.
Certificates of Merit have also been awarded
Mt. Lyell Mine Employes' War Relief Fund,
the Red Cross Voluntary Motor Corps, and the
Soldiers' Welcome Committee, Perth.
HONOR BADGE Diggers Way of Thanking Friends (Article), The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Friday 17 December 1926 [Issue No.15,470] page 2 2019-10-31 23:44 Tho Koturncd Sailors nnd Soldiers
Imperial Lcaguo has a kind ol
Victoria Cross of Peace. It 1
mi lienor badge, and aceom pantos
a ccrtltlcuto which tho League
awards to those citizens' who, not
cilglblo for membership, have, uover
theless, done good servlco in tho
soldiers' cauHO. Not moro than two
aro awarded In any ono Stato ln a
year. Tho wording of tho certificate
is:—
"Tho Federal
Exccutlvo of tho
nnd Soldiers' Im
Australia pre
sents this certi
ficnto to
for honorary, nn-
Hciusii service,
and assistance rendered to mombors
of tho Lcaguo nnd tho dopondants of
in the great World Wur. With this
certificate Is given tho nssuranco that
tho liolder 1ms tho confidence and
gratitude of the Lcaguo, and !h hereby
Tho present holders of tho certifi
cate nro—
QUEENSLAND: Mr a Jl. Richardson, Mr A.
J. Crowthcr, Mr It. C. Ramsay, Mr C. K. White,
Mr t\ U. Lam. Mr Joseph Allen, Mr Maurice
Baldwin, the late Mr V. J. T. C. Maync.
The Returned Sailors and Soldiers
Imperial League has a kind of
Victoria Cross of Peace. It is
an honor badge, and accompanies
a certificate which th League
awards to those citizens who, not
eilgible for membership, have, never-
theless, done good service in the
soldiers' cause. Not more than two
are awarded in any one State in a
year. The wording of the certificate
is : —
"The Federal
Executlive of th
and Soldiers' Im-
Australia pre-
sents this certi-
ficate to ............
for honorary, un-
selfish service,
and assistance rendered to members
of the League and the dependants of
in the great World War. With this
certificate is given the assurance that
the holder has the confidence and
gratitude of the League, and is hereby
The present holders of the certifi-
cate are —
QUEENSLAND : Mr. S. H. Richardson, Mr. A.
J. Crowther, Mr. R. C. Ramsay, Mr. C. K. White,
Mr. F. C. Lea. Mr. Joseph Allen, Mr. Maurice
Baldwin, the late Mr. V. J. T. C. Mayne.
LOCAL & GENERAL. Wounded. (Article), Cootamundra Herald (NSW : 1877 - 1954), Friday 25 May 1917 page 2 2019-10-30 17:30 LOCAL & OENEBAL.
Worrf lms been received from the
Defence' Dcpar'ltacnt that: Pic. J.
!?', Moylnn, .of Ur'awlin, lips' bei.-i-.
wounded in France. It is ? twelve
months since the hero left' Australia.
the luto Mr. andMrs. T. Moylnn; The
cable htntl-d that' Pie. Moylan is in
hospital in Knghind. But we hoi-o
life wounds are not serjops.
c The' llrst M'rics of the socials- was
held iusl. nighl, in. the Town Hall.
Over 511 couples attended. Thit evening
was' vcr-- pleaHiuitiy^spi'nt at dancing
Hndcuebre. Tip music fur the danc
ing was supplied by Missca Fitzger
ald, Lewis, Jlaher, Chambers, and To
beiv an-l M'r. Rui*rt Kerr. ? Tim
euchre, tonti.'at resulted: Ladies,
Miss Jean Jenkins; Gents, Sergeant
Stuti'lilmry (who donated it back to
I lie houpilal). 'fju- boobies wcro, Mrs.
KlliH and Mr. Lover. '
The supper was provided J-y ladiea
of (he '(own and district. .' , .,
On tho Hustings. '.'.''''
TUvra i« ?'» ''groyi'mg' fecliiig. muoiig
the members of the Ratepayers' As
sociation that tho views o£ candi
dates nhould ho heard prior to Ihc
i.allot for . selection next Wednesday
night'. ? -In. consequence, tho Assembly
Room at- (he Town Hall .ytw] Jhia
uioriiiiig' engaged for next Monday
night,, when all ihe eandidatcs^arcin
nte'd'-tp' ispeaj£.pDa:answcr g'ubsljon'o,
. And-1 the 'Cootamundrn Herald'
wilrie delivettd or mailed till tfco
end of the current qunrt«r, Jnno 30;
«A'.to Stplcmbar 30; or 10/6 till the
cud of the year.
Sir,— Permit me ll- Coitradict the
Gratifying Information in your lender
would have paid. No Snbsidy is paid
to be paid until uftcr the war Further
would not save nnytuing on the other
by £58 per anum. Where liie certifi
cate Inspector aru employed tilt' board
Formly assisted Corporations tn tho
Inspectors where lo be whouly engag
ed in health work only. I am inform
into tHiis matter, when the Late in
spector Jfr. Owner Resigned and de
cided tn appoint an unccrtillc-atcd In
whirh position srpt'ratly is £2/15/
wcekly
Micro is nn old saying mid a Irue one
that it is u dirty bird that befouls it
own nc*t-. and Headers of the hcralu
would do well lo ask themselves whea
thcr the straps of Misleading and er
ronous information extending I'roui
thp Fertile and biuiMd brain of the
editor arc attached by a severe desire
to promote Ihc best interest uf Coota
despito the fact that the Stutitics
Show our health Return nrc of liie
lightest whilst our death Rate is oiie
of the lowest in N. S: Wales
or are merely the outcome his pursonal
and spleen against Mr. Clear and the'
Alderman uru being used to belittle
tho action uf the present council. for
to Replace the present Alderman/by
lies of his Own. , ? .... ;. :
also it is wispercd Uiat the Editor
aforesaid TOiilst taking. suehJ, a', deep
interest in Council- maltersJhadJhot,
even the Gumj)tion.to,have ijis name
put on tlio Municipal Roll iarid lately
Editors who delibertelyjstraycd from
the Narrow path of \Munieipal:Triith;i
fulness lire a greater publie riicnuncq
than the much vaunted straying stuck
nuisance and should substanticate (be,
figures of- the number 'of straying
stock by publicating affeedavitts' to
Verify uuaginary.C87.alledgcd to^avii
been countedduring jfarelr 'and' ^ April
.r'.' ,'.«... i; -Yours Truly
' ' ' ? ?. ?' vE.B;,SU)EI3pTT6M
Cycle Racing. .',. .:?,??...': ;.:;,:
'Tlie fourth; heat of the' Drcniiiih'
Gold Medal was ? contcstcd-^o'ver a
course of D miles' on ;theV\YaUondbocn;
rond on Wednesday. Conditions wer,o
not. very favorable, and thefrund was
very heavy. V Ncver,t!ielcss there; Svero
12 starters on the mark. ? ' Tlie first '
six men to leave the starting' post'
were very unfortunate nt Kirigstone
to get through the traffic.'; In the
got amongst tlie riders, purely'ny ac
cident, but it'gftvc S: very, bad' im
the competitors were very unfortjun
atc to meet with'sueh difficulties the
together. Joe. Spii'er who jumped to
tho front lind held his position, fol
lowed by Price and Barnes, won by u
'fly;pg cyclist,' Mr. Joe Spicer, who
rode from scratch, must bo congratu
lated on his splendid* performance:'
having secured first .and fastest time.
' Results:. Joe Spicer, 1; O.Price2;
G. Barnes, 3. v : ;':' '
tioing into Action. : ;
Letters were received from Licul.
Harold Pntfcrson this inbrniiig. AVhen '
writing h'e.waB i leady to, gointo iic
lion nt any minute. They were in i
close touch -vyith (he ciieriij'.thcn.,ire
says tho.Jdays were not fob; hot, 'arid
the nights rather on Uic- cool side, es
pucially with only a wiiteriirooff sheet
and biscuit! Since being promotcd
lio had n chance of gelling a littlo
better food, but he hits been oiiu uf
enough for. Ilieiu. was quite good
enough for him.,
' 'The Life Horoaf tor.' '
Tho Rev. Nonniin Gardner will,,
next Sunday night, start a course of ?
sermons on tho above' subject, uli
Christ Church. '' .'
Libel Action. : .
which ono of our neighbours, Mr. A
Bennull, ppiprietor and pulihulipr of
(he Junei) 'Soullierji Cmsn,' is the
defendant. Messrs Clark nnd Co.,
merchants, are claiming from him thu
sum of £050 for alleged Uhcl and de
f.uiiatioa eunlained in n pariigrai-h''
ap|H.aring in his pap^r in November
of last year. The ease for the defend
«anl is being handled in Sydney by ?
J[r. Reginald Sullivan, a well known
services of Mr. Blnekctt, K.C., mid
Mr. Ferguson, barrisler-ut-Iaw, uri
behalf of Mr. Bennett. There are,
many peculiar {enures in connection,
with tin) ciise, it) which much interest
is boiiig (iikuii. i$vt'ii llip puntTy:
pressman puts up ' tight (jcoaBionally.
Tho Rpv. (Sydney Fjvnnti will lin-';
?-(ill thu honour roll at Jho 1'renbytor
an Church on'- Sunday night. Mrs.t
Simon is to-sla'g.a solo..
LOCAL & GENERAL.
Word has been received from the
Defence Department that Pte. J.
F. Moylan, of Brawlin, has been
wounded in France. It is twelve
months since the hero left Australia.
the late Mr. and Mrs. T. Moylan. The
cable stated that Pte. Moylan is in
hospital in England. But we hope
the wounds are not serious.
The first series of the socials was
held last night, in the Town Hall.
Over 50 couples attended. The evening
was very pleasantly spent at dancing
and euchre. The music for the danc-
ing was supplied by Misses Fitzger-
ald, Lewis, Maher, Chambers, and To-
ben and Mr. Rupert Kerr. The
euchre contest resulted : Ladies,
Miss Jean Jenkins ; Gents, Sergeant
Stutchbury (who donated it back to
the hospital). The boobies were Mrs.
Ellis and Mr. Laver.
The supper was provided by ladies
of the town and district.
On the Hustings.
There is a growing feeling among
the members of the Ratepayers' As-
sociation that the views of candi-
dates should be heard prior to the
ballot for selection next Wednesday
night. In consequence, the Assembly
Room at the Town Hall was this
morning engaged for next Monday
night, when all the candidates are in-
vited to speak and answer quaestions.
Send 1/6,
And the ''Cootamundra Herald''
will delivered or mailed till the
end of the current quarter, June 30 ;
6/-to September 30 ; or 10/6 till the
end of the year.
Sir, — Permit me to Contradict the
Gratifying Information in your leader
would have paid. No Subsidy is paid
to be paid until after the war Further
would not save anything on the other
by £58 per anum. Where the certifi-
cate Inspector are employed the board
Formly assisted Corporations to the
Inspectors where to be whoely engag-
ed in health work only. I am inform-
into this matter, when the Late in-
spector Mr. Owner Resigned and de-
cided to appoint an uncertificated In-
which position seperatly is £2/15/
weekly
there is an old saying and a true one
that it is a dirty bird that befouls it
own nest, and Readers of the herald
would do well to ask themselves whea-
ther the scraps of Misleading and er-
ronous information extending from
the Fertile and biaised brain of the
editor are attached by a severe desire
to promote the best interest of Coota
despite the fact that the Statitics
Show our health Return are of the
lightest whilst our death Rate is one
of the lowest in N. S. Wales
or are merely the outcome his personal
and spleen against Mr. Clear and the
Alderman are being used to belittle
the action of the present council for
to Replace the present Alderman by
lies of his Own.
also it is wispered that the Editor
aforesaid Whilst taking such a deep
interest in Council matters had not
even the Gumption to have his name
put on the Municipal Roll and lately
Editors who delibertely strayed from
the Narrow path of Municipal Truth-
fulness are a greater public menance
than the much vaunted straying stock
nuisance and should substanticate the
figures of the number of straying
stock by publicating affeedavitts to
Verify imaginary 687alledged to have
been counted during March and April.
Yours Truly
E.B. SIDEBOTTOM
The fourth heat of the Drennan
Gold Medal was contested over a
course of 9 miles on the Wallendbeen
road on Wednesday. Conditions were
not very favorable, and the road was
very heavy. Nevertheless there were
12 starters on the mark. The first
six men to leave the starting post
were very unfortunate at Kingstone
to get through the traffic. In the
got amongst the riders, purely by ac-
cident, but it gave a very bad im-
the competitors were very unfortun-
ate to meet with such difficulties the
together. Joe Spicer who jumped to
the front and held his position, fol-
lowed by Price and Barnes, won by a
''flying cyclist,'' Mr. Joe Spicer, who
rode from scratch, must be congratu-
lated on his splendid performance
having secured first and fastest time.
Results : Joe Spicer, 1 ; O. Price 2 ;
Going into Action.
Letters were received from Lieut.
Harold Paterson this morning. When
writing he was ready to go into ac-
tion at any minute. They were in
close touch with the enemy then. He
says the days were not so hot, and
the nights rather on the cool side, es-
pecially with only a waterproof sheet
and biscuit ! Since being promoted
he had a chance of getting a little
better food, but he has been one of
enough for them was quite good
enough for him.
''The Life Hereafter.''
The Rev. Norman Gardner will,
next Sunday night, start a course of
sermons on the above subject, at
Christ Church.
Libel Action.
which one of our neighbours, Mr. A
Bennett, proprietor and publisher of
the Junee ''Southern Cross,'' is the
defendant. Messrs Clark and Co.,
merchants, are claiming from him the
sum of £650 for alleged libel and de-
famation contained in a paragraph
appearing in his paper in November
of last year. The case for the defend-
ant is being handled in Sydney by
Mr. Reginald Sullivan, a well known
services of Mr. Blackett, K.C., and
Mr. Ferguson, barrister-at-Iaw, on
behalf of Mr. Bennett. There are
many peculiar features in connection
with the case, in which much interest
is being taken. Even the country
pressman puts up a fight occasionally.
The Rev. Sydney Evans will un-
veil the honour roll at the Presbyter-
ian Church on Sunday night. Mrs.
Simon is to sing a solo.
RABUL. (Formerly German New Guines.) NATIVE CUSTOMS. (Article), Bairnsdale Advertiser and Tambo and Omeo Chronicle (Vic. : 1882 - 1918), Saturday 20 November 1915 [Issue No.5207] page 2 2019-10-30 15:25 The "boys" and the "Marys"' are hold-
when they start to put In a few ba-
bay. He was beng sent back. I no-
Sed what was it ? One boy belong other
while some ''Marys" engaged int the work
The "boys" and the "Marys" are hold-
when they start to put in a few ba-
bay. He was being sent back. I no-
ed what was it ? "One boy belong other
while some ''Marys" engaged in the work
RABUL. (Formerly German New Guines.) NATIVE CUSTOMS. (Article), Bairnsdale Advertiser and Tambo and Omeo Chronicle (Vic. : 1882 - 1918), Saturday 20 November 1915 [Issue No.5207] page 2 2019-10-30 15:15 NATIVE CUSTOMS. ,
(By Pie. Mount, formerly of Buluhnmal)
The "boys" and the "Marys"' are lilt .
ing another big dance to-morrow. ':They
from sunset to inidnight for weeks past,
and we shall all. e glad when it ia'Ovtr.,
if only to be free of the dreadful dir
feathers are in great request at thers&
functions, fnd to-morrow all the fouwl
of the place will be tailless. The birds musi
have had some premonition of what wouli
happen to them if they remained, for It
is noticed that they have all left the il.
land. The dance on this occasion ~ce.
long Jo the missionary," and all the songr
to be sung will be those having a re
ference to the missionary and the church.,
I went to church one Sunday morn.
service. A "call to arms" was sounded,
their legs crossed. The. "boys" sit on
one side and the- "Marys" on the other.
wearing the gayest-colored lava-la-as of
which I'hey can possess themselves, and
with flowers stuck In their hair. A chair
very little' use of them. All the congrega
I entered and sat down they rose to theic
feet In a body and came forward to
together three times each week for prac'
in Olippsland lose all conceit. Music seems
Chewing betel nut or smoking Is carefully
abstained from in church. The congre
gation listened very attentively to the pres
cher, who appeared to me 4o be eminent
as I spid, before the close of the service,
-I hbad- nobt-tU benefit of bearing any com
ments on the sermon from the congrega.
Once a native hears a tune he cars
give him to eat?" they sometimes ask.
parts is his mouth. One of our men hap
day in the presence of some of the na
tives. 'Never in all my life did I see
When not chewing betel nut, the na
tives are smoking. They use rtay pipes,
in the bowl, and which hold a good sup.
At about eght years of age the boys
time in play until they are about IS,
when they start to put In a few ba.
nanas and cocoanuts of their Own, so that
duo to the fact that a wife costs £50 in
native money. That sum, it must be ad
money is distributed all round. i haIve
seen rolls of thls natire money, as large
almost as drayv wheels, containing man)*
wives hase to do, most of the work, and
\jith the natives. Wlhcn a man hassaved
the water and buld a square platform, in
the centre of \which :'e \~il plac~ a long
pole, about -2 or 30) feet high. This
will be decorated with Ilossers and kavers,
and will be a public proclamation to any.
one passing by of hIis intenticn to marry.
If he residcs in!and, the pros?xctive bride.
se\veral strings w ill be connected. These
will be decorated with floe\ers, co'ocanut
the parties taking each other for hts
funerals. The first was that A a boy,
whto belonged to the other s:de of the
bay. He \ vas beng sent back. I io·
ticed a lot of nati\es on the lach l natch
ing a cance containing to bo\s. I ask.
Sed ,,hat was it? ' One boy btiong otter
other s:de." I \was watching the disap
pearing canoe myself by this time. There'
was something spread out on the:c oit
rigger. This object was mnaking rtl -
ments-making \vain att mpts to sit up.
" That boy," I said, " i.s not dead." 'Ite
plenty dead," repled a native nest tle.
1 " When in hle lie tinishi." The cantoe
was not long away, and when it canme
y back it was minus the dvingi boy, so
d he musi have been dead enough to bury.
TiThe second funeral was that of another
boy. There was no doubt \whatever in
n this case that death had rea'ly taken place.
whle some ' Marys " engaged int the worke
of digginrg a grave. There did not ap.
pear to be any sorrowing relati\ts or
trends present among the nati\rs assetm
bled, al of whom had attended, as a
h matter of fact, to share its the distribu
Tj tion of the dead boy's money. So lile
mooches on."
NATIVE CUSTOMS.
(By Pte. Mount, formerly of Bulumwaal)
The "boys" and the "Marys"' are hold-
ing another big dance to-morrow. They
from sunset to midnight for weeks past,
and we shall all be glad when it is over,
if only to be free of the dreadful din
feathers are in great request at these
functions, and to-morrow all the fowls
of the place will be tailless. The birds must
have had some premonition of what would
happen to them if they remained, for it
is noticed that they have all left the is-
land. The dance on this occasion be-
long to the missionary, and all the songs
to be sung will be those having a re-
ference to the missionary and the church.
I went to church one Sunday morn-
service. A "call to arms" was sounded,
their legs crossed. The "boys" sit on
one side and the "Marys" on the other.
wearing the gayest-colored lava-lavas of
which they can possess themselves, and
with flowers stuck in their hair. A chair
very little use of them. All the congrega-
I entered and sat down they rose to their
feet in a body and came forward to
together three times each week for prac-
in Gippsland lose all conceit. Music seems
Chewing betel nut or smoking is carefully
abstained from in church. The congre-
gation listened very attentively to the prea-
cher, who appeared to me to be eminent-
as I said, before the close of the service,
I had not the benefit of bearing any com-
ments on the sermon from the congrega-
Once a native hears a tune he can
give him to eat ?" they sometimes ask.
parts is his mouth. One of our men hap-
day in the presence of some of the na-
tives. Never in all my life did I see
When not chewing betel nut, the na-
tives are smoking. They use clay pipes,
in the bowl, and which hold a good sup-
At about eight years of age the boys
time in play until they are about 18,
when they start to put In a few ba-
nanas and cocoanuts of their own, so that
due to the fact that a wife costs £50 in
native money. That sum, it must be ad-
money is distributed all round. I have
seen rolls of this native money, as large
almost as dray wheels, containing many
wives have to do most of the work, and
with the natives. When a man has saved
the water and build a square platform, in
the centre of which he will place a long
pole, about 20 or 30 feet high. This
will be decorated with flowers and leaves,
and will be a public proclamation to any
one passing by of his intention to marry.
If he resides inland, the prospective bride-
will be decorated with flowers, cocoanut
the parties taking each other for hus-
funerals. The first was that of a boy,
who belonged to the other side of the
bay. He was beng sent back. I no-
ticed a lot of natives on the beach watch-
ing a canoe containing two boys. I ask-
Sed what was it ? One boy belong other
other side." I was watching the disap-
pearing canoe myself by this time. There
was something spread out on the out-
rigger. This object was making move-
ments — making vain attempts to sit up.
"That boy," I said, "is not dead." ''He
plenty dead," replied a native next me.
"When in hole he finish." The canoe
was not long away, and when it came
back it was minus the dying boy, so
he must have been dead enough to bury.
The second funeral was that of another
boy. There was no doubt whatever in
this case that death had really taken place.
while some ''Marys" engaged int the work
of digging a grave. There did not ap-
pear to be any sorrowing relatives or
friends present among the natives assem-
bled, all of whom had attended, as a
matter of fact, to share its the distribu-
tion of the dead boy's money. "So he
marches on."
"SO LONG, JIM". (Article), The Cobargo Chronicle (NSW : 1898 - 1944), Saturday 15 June 1918 [Issue No.911] page 2 2019-10-29 22:01 werej farewelling the fifth oftheMot
ueys and the fifteenth volunteer from
houie, and what vera we doing in re
shillings from our plenty to assist th%
of other countries invaded by the Ger
for our soldiers than any other coun
allowed them to go without murmur
ing. He would ask Pte. Motbcy to
therri, and that their sacrifice was urg
ing those at borne to make additional
sacrifice for the benefit of their defend
he believed the same course was fol
lowed here. The speaker® could point
the road to duty, however, by impress
menace to the flag offreedom.
to the programme of formally farewell
laughed while a speaker was convey
who were in khaki If some of those
was the least important part of the pro
time. Did they realise what Jim Mot
ise that it wa§ brave men like him who
made it possible for them to have gath
and the slavery under the Germans be
quest who were standing between Aus
Australia should have the highest re
who were defending them from degrad
presented the Cobiugo District War
Medal to Pte. Motbey. Mr- Lou
Goldman expressed his hisch regard for
guest with a wristlet watch, the audi
Pte. Chambers, - in responding fori,;"N
comrade,»said none of these sendofn
were laughing matters. Jim was go
in? to face all the scientific devices for
the taking of human life on tbie battle
field. He Was like some of die young
fellows present once.' fie laughed)
were farewelling the fifth of the Mot-
beys and the fifteenth volunteer from
home, and what were we doing in re-
shillings from our plenty to assist the
of other countries invaded by the Ger-
for our soldiers than any other coun-
allowed them to go without murmur-
ing. He would ask Pte. Motbey to
them, and that their sacrifice was urg-
ing those at horne to make additional
sacrifice for the benefit of their defend-
he believed the same course was fol-
lowed here. The speakers could point
the road to duty, however, by impress-
menace to the flag of freedom.
to the programme of formally farewell-
laughed while a speaker was convey-
who were in khaki. If some of those
was the least important part of the pro-
time. Did they realise what Jim Mot-
ise that it was brave men like him who
made it possible for them to have gath-
and the slavery under the Germans be-
guest who were standing between Aus-
Australia should have the highest re-
who were defending them from degrad-
presented the Cobargo District War
Medal to Pte. Motbey. Mr. Lou
Goldman expressed his high regard for
guest with a wristlet watch, the audi-
Pte. Chambers, in responding for his
comrade, said none of these sendoffs
were laughing matters. Jim was go-
ing to face all the scientific devices for
the taking of human life on the battle-
field. He was like some of the young
fellows present once. He laughed,
"SO LONG, JIM". (Article), The Cobargo Chronicle (NSW : 1898 - 1944), Saturday 15 June 1918 [Issue No.911] page 2 2019-10-29 19:41 At Wandella on Monday »
recurd crowd assembled in the locnl
Imll to faro«ell Pte. Jim Motbsy, (he
third uoii of Mr. and Mrs. J C. Mot
bey to don kltakt, and tbc fiftb Mot
bey from this sent re to join the colors.
The guest is itnmeniily popular m
Wandella and Cobargo, being n g<mr|
sport and thetypc of young fetto* »f
which tho district is justly pMiuri,
And a family which is doin i so nincti
111 the defence of Australia is deserving
from Cobargo in largo numbers, and
also from Yourie, Digmuns and Quaa
ma. When Mr. Bobt. Spcnco took
the chair, and the soldier guest was es*
Ptes. Tom Mead I Bermagui], and W,
Chambers (Cobargo) occupied scats of
honor on the platform with Pte. Mot
bey and the tatter's parents. The pro
cccdings opened With the singing of
the National Anthem
The chairman, in an excellent ad
Motbpy and the days of pioneering ia
was assisted by stalwart sons. Tho
grandsons saw in the peaceful and pro
of their heritage, and to ensuro as tar
as they could that the fruits of put
labors, Hod the comfort and prosperity
wrung from the busb, would not be lost
offered such possibilities to uioa
uot afraid to work, and a measure of
freedom unheard of in any other laud,
In wiying that ho was proud to be on
tbo platform with Pte. Motbey, lie was
only the mourhpiece for the whole dis
triot; and to their guest's comrades on
he offered a warm welcome to Wan
della, and the thanks of tbo commtin- *
the heartbs and homes of all present.
An apology was made for the ab>
Jack Tni'Hnton.
At Wandella on Monday night a
record crowd assembled in the local
hall to farewell Pte. Jim Motbey, the
third son of Mr. and Mrs. J C. Mot-
bey to don khaki, and the fifth Mot-
bey from this centre to join the colors.
The guest is immensely popular in
Wandella and Cobargo, being a good
sport and the type of young fellow of
which the district is justly proud.
And a family which is doing so much
in the defence of Australia is deserving
from Cobargo in large numbers, and
also from Yourie, Digmans and Quaa-
ma. When Mr. Robt. Spence took
the chair, and the soldier guest was es-
Ptes. Tom Mead (Bermagui), and W.
Chambers (Cobargo) occupied seats of
honor on the platform with Pte. Mot-
bey and the latter's parents. The pro-
ceedings opened with the singing of
the National Anthem.
The chairman, in an excellent ad-
Motbey and the days of pioneering in
was assisted by stalwart sons. The
grandsons saw in the peaceful and pro-
of their heritage, and to ensure as far
as they could that the fruits of past
labors, and the comfort and prosperity
wrung from the bush, would not be lost
offered such possibilities to men
not afraid to work, and a measure of
freedom unheard of in any other land,
In saying that he was proud to be on
the platform with Pte. Motbey, he was
only the mouthpiece for the whole dis-
trit; and to their guest's comrades on
he offered a warm welcome to Wan-
della, and the thanks of the commun-
the hearts and homes of all present.
An apology was made for the ab-
Jack Tarlinton.
Across the Seas. CROWTHER SOLDIER'S DIARY. (Article), Young Witness (NSW : 1915 - 1923), Friday 15 December 1916 page 4 2019-10-29 19:29 town. Ail the -hotels wero closed.
The trams are the same as Durban-,
cabs. It Is rathor a dear town to
bur anything; they BeenHo have a sot
on lire Australians. Some of tho
troops til at called there played up a
tot find spoilt it for -them that came
after them. There are a -lot of nig
gers about. and I toad a good
look round the town; wo saw somo
fair buildings. Tlio itext day we went
town; tho sross In some parts of tho
road "was nearly nlno inches' long; it
was spring there then. Somo of tlio
cemented In on live top. Wo arrived
back at the wharf at eleven. iTJiere
wero some hawkers Belling ostrich
feathers; if I had been coming back I
should ihavo bought somo. Wo -pull
ed out Irom >tho -wharf at 12 and into
tho hart)or and stayed thero till four
Chat was ©optefmbor 21st. After
leaving Capetown", tho wator was
lordly and smooth, hardly a rock
In old WUIahiro and continued so for
tho rest of tho voyage. Wo have a
gun in tho etora now; then had a few
overboard one day. Classing tlio
line Ito'ther Noptuno paid us a visit;
you will seo tho account of it in. tlio
littlo paper I am sending you; It
should roach you as soon as thlg, let
t tor. Wo arrived at St. Vincent
Capo VertJo on* October 4Uj, at oloven
and there Is not much to soo; groat
hills rountf, -with a'ot a trace of a troo
ar grass on thorn; -it 1s a Portugueso
port. Wo did not go right up#to t!he
wharf, but anchored out ia tho har
the ship; most of them aro stripped!
nakod and if you throw monoy over J
Into tho wator they will divo for it [
l.nd nearty always they got it; ihoy can j
swim like fltfi and eeom as much I
fit homo la tho water as out of • «lt. I
(Ehey woro also selling postcards,
Rceda and coral nocklaces and shells. I
green orangos, fancy bags' made of I
seeds and coral necklncog and shells.
Thoro woro a <dozon or moro other I
steamers anchored about. Including a|
cruisor. Wo took somo coal in and
(steamed out at bIx o'clock. Wo are
now in tho danger £ono and all lights
aro put out and au» armed guard tvU1i
loolc out for submarines. Thoro has
been botwecn four and flvo hundred
in "tho hospital ainco leaving Sydney
Including 100 cases of mump3, 25
wero put off at Fromantle and 30 at
Durban lor elckness. I often boo
a lot of flying Ush; they Iooli Ilko
little birds getting along over tho
•water. I got a good viow of two
largo sharks one day; they looked
just lilco a largo gohanna with Its
tail cut off swimming Just under tho
surface of .tho water. Octobor 9th,
The order came out to-day for all to
wear iUo belts and eloep In them nt
night October 10th. I had tbo bad
luck to got tho mumps j only a slight
attach, so om In tbe hospital, Oct.
,11 "Wo havo a torpedo dostroyor on
cacli sldo of u& now to look for Gor
man submarines. October 12. Ar«
rlvod at Dovonport, England, at 2
lovely and green-. Threo large bar
gca enmo out and took tho troops off;
thoy aro going to Salisbury Plain.
Wo wero talcon away la a little punt
that rocked so that It nearly made ufl
all floa-slck. Thero are about Hfty
of us In a hospital at Plymouth ■with
tho mumps; wo aro not allowed out
sldo tho yard, hut -wo aro treated well
thoro aro a lot °' nlce.nursoe. . The
sua doos not shino much, but 1j
showing to-day; I suppose because It
(s Sunday, Thl» Is 15th OctoTjtr,
town. Ail the hotels were closed.
The trams are the same as Durban,
cabs. It is rather a dear town to
buy anything ; they seem to have a set
on the Australians. Some of the
troops that called there played up a
lot find spoilt it for them that came
after them. There are a lot of nig-
gers about, and I had a good
look round the town ; we saw some
fair buildings. The next day we went
town; the grass in some parts of the
road was nearly nine inches long ; it
was spring there then. Some of the
cemented in on the top. We arrived
back at the wharf at eleven. There
were some hawkers selling ostrich
feathers ; if I had been coming back I
should have bought some. We pull-
ed out from the wharf at 12 and into
the harbor and stayed there till four ;
that was September 21st. After
leaving Capetown, the water was
lovely and smooth, hardly a rock
in old WilIshire and continued so for
the rest of the voyage. We have a
gun in the stern now ; then had a few
overboard one day. Crossing the
line Father Neptune paid us a visit ;
you will see the account of it in the
little paper I am sending you ; it
should reach you as soon as this let-
ter. We arrived at St. Vincent's
Cape Verde on October 4th, at eleven
and there is not much to see ; great
hills round, with not a trace of a tree
or grass on them ; it is a Portuguese
port. We did not go right up to the
wharf, but anchored out in the har-
the ship ; most of them are stripped
naked and if you throw money over
into the water they will dive for it
and nearly always they got it ; they can
swim like fish and seem as much
at home in the water as out of it.
They were also selling postcards,
seeds and coral necklaces and shells,
green oranges, fancy bags made of
seeds and coral necklaces and shells.
There were a dozen or more other
steamers anchored about, including a|
cruiser. We took some coal in and
steamed out at six o'clock. We are
now in the danger zone and all lights
are put out and an armed guard with
look out for submarines. There has
been between four and five hundred
in the hospital since leaving Sydney
including 100 cases of mumps, 25
were put off at Fremantle and 30 at
Durban for sickness. I often see
a lot of flying fish; they Iook Iike
little birds getting along over the
water. I got a good view of two
large sharks one day ; they looked
just like a large gohanna with its
tail cut off swimming just under the
surface of the water. October 9th.
the order came out to-day for all to
wear life belts and sleep in them at
night. October 10th. I had the bad
luck to get the mumps ; only a slight
attack, so am in the hospital. Oct.
11. "We have a torpedo destroyer on
each side of us now to look for Ger-
man submarines. October 12. Ar-
rived at Devonport, England, at 2
lovely and green. Three large bar-
ges came out and took the troops off;
they are going to Salisbury Plain.
We wer taken away in a little punt
that rocked so that it nearly made us
all sea-sick. There are about fifty
of us in a hospital at Plymouth with
the mumps ; we are not allowed out-
side the yard, but we are treated well
there are a lot of nice nurses. The
sun does not shine much, but is
showing to-day ; I suppose because it
is Sunday. This is 15th October.
Across the Seas. CROWTHER SOLDIER'S DIARY. (Article), Young Witness (NSW : 1915 - 1923), Friday 15 December 1916 page 4 2019-10-29 18:57 Across the 8eas.
•Pte. N. It. "Wildman, lato or Crow
fchcr,'writes:—
Just a fow linos to uct. you know
I am fltUl Id the land of tbo living.' I.
will tell you a bit about Durban. ; We
arrived at About 2 p.m. en Septem
ber 14th. The pilot "boat camovotu
and took la to the harbor. There
wore about & doa'oa or moro large
boats anchored hero and these Includ
ing two moro troopships, eno of
(English Tommleo and another of
Queenslanders. Wo anchored to
two buoys for tho rest of tho day
and aJght 1a the harhor. Tho yellow
flag was run up on tho mast, that la
to eay thero la -sickness on hoard..
About seven next morales tvo pulled
orer to tho wharf Tor the purpose of
loading coa.1. At eleven -wo all mar
ched up tho town; It felt nlco I can
tell you to/cci tho around under ones
feet affaln, aftor 'being eo long on tho
wator. Tho first thing I noticed on
one eido of tho street was about forty
rickshaw hoys waiting for passengers
They aro hard cases to look at with
horns on tholr head and no hoots on
with their legs and feet painted. Three
pence or elxponco a milo is as much
as they aro allowed, but If you don't
look out thoy will chargo you two or
threo*'bob" for a fow hundred yards.
I had a rido in ono; It Is just Hko ft
light atilky with rubber tyres; thoy get
nlong at a fair pace; it Is nothing for
them to run a couplo of miles with
two or three Ja the rickshaw. Wc
marched up to tho Town. Hall where
wo were allowod to break off. It is
a flno building; hotter than tho Syd
ney iTown Hall. Thero -was a free
concert on< in it that night. I went
to it; tho hall was crowded and the
glrla gavo each of tho soldiers a pac
ket of cigarettes. Tho trams and
zoo were iroo to 119. Tho tranir> are
doublo dockcrff, quite different to the
Sydnoy trams, only run by electricity
Just tho samo. I took -what they call
the round trip Ja the train, a distanco
of a"bont three mi|03. Tho scenery
is lovely. The privato houses havo
loroly gardens round them. I went
to the zoo and had a look at it; tlicrc
amongst them a fine Hon and lioness
There aro such a -lot of "blacks, Kaffirs
Bad Zulus. I should eay two thirds
of tho population aro colored; ;they do
all the laboring -work; two or three
bob & day Is all they get for the
hardest worts. Thoy soom a very
Dice Jot of peoplo in Durban; and did
all thoy could to mako our short stay
pleasan-t. Tho noxt day our com
pany. Iras on duty, so I only got "up
tho town, for a couple of hours, but
had a good old tlmo. Tho next day
. was Sunday and :ttg. -were on'y allowed
in 6hore for* church parade, as vje
were -to more away from tho -whaf-f
at twolro. Thero is a long hfl
thickly covered with scrub at tho -back
Af the Trharf; they say thero aro a lot
of monkeys in it Someono in ono of
the other battalions brought ono on
wo steamed out after having spent a
rory enjoyable time at 'Durban? Be
oould "be seen* a good deal of the' time
it was moat hilly. "Wo passed -where
tho WarataTi was supposed to have
been mocked and encountered "some
rough -weather for a day. - Wo -saw tho
Capo of Good- Hope; it Is quito pict
uresque tho scenery, great mountains
rising straight up trom tho .water
without a tree on thorn. The next
wo camo to was ■Capo Town. There
Is what thoy call tho Ta"blo Mount
rising straight up behind •uic- town i
and Devils 'Peak and tho Twelve Ap-1
oatiesr. *We arrived in tho harbor |
at two and got up to tho wharf at four
that evening. We wore allowed on
share from -seven till eleven that
night; it la about a milo from the
wharf to the principal «part of tho
Across the Seas.
Pte. N. R. Wildman, lat of Crow-
ther, writes : —
Just a few lines to let. you know
I am still in the land of the living. I
will tell you a bit about Durban. We
arrived at about 2 p.m. on Septem-
ber 14th. The pilot boat came out
and took us to the harbor. There
were about a dozen or more large
boats anchored here and these include-
ing two more troopships, one of
English Tommies and another of
Queenslanders. We anchored to
two buoys for the rest of the day
and night in the harbor. The yellow
flag was run up on the mast, that is
to say there is sickness on board.
About seven next morning we pulled
over to the wharf for the purpose of
loading coal. At eleven we all mar-
ched up the town ; it felt nice I can
tell you to feel the ground under ones
feet again, after being so long on the
water. The first thing I noticed on
one side of the street was about forty
rickshaw boys waiting for passengers.
They are hard cases to look at with
horns on their head and no boots on
with their legs and feet painted. Three-
pence or sixpence a mile is as much
as they are allowed, but if you don't
look out they will charge you two or
three ''bob" for a few hundred yards.
I had a ride in one ; it is just like a
light sulky with rubber tyres ; they get
along at a fair pace ; it is nothing for
them to run a couple of miles with
two or three in the rickshaw. We
marched up to the Town Hall where
we were allowed to break off. It is
a fine building ; better than the Syd-
ney Town Hall. Theroe was a free
concert on in it that night. I went
to it ; the hall was crowded and the
girls gave each of the soldiers a pac-
ket of cigarettes. The trams and
zoo were free to us. The trams are
double deckers, quite different to the
Sydney trams, only run by electricity
just the same. I took what they call
the round trip in the train, a distance
of bout three miles. The scenery
is lovely. The private houses have
lovely gardens round them. I went
to the zoo and had a look at it ; there
amongst them a fine lion and lioness.
There are such a lot of blacks, Kaffirs
and Zulus. I should say two-thirds
of the population are colored ; they do
all the laboring work; two or three
bob a day is all they get for the
hardest work. They seem a very
nice lot of people in Durban ; and did
all they could to make our short stay
pleasant. The noxt day our com-
pany was on duty, so I only got up
the town for a couple of hours, but
had a good old time. The next day
was Sunday and we were only allowed
on shore for church parade, as we
were to more away from the wharf
at twelve. There is a long hill
thickly covered with scrub at the back
of the wharf ; they say there are a lot
of monkeys in it. Someone in one of
the other battalions brought one on
we steamed out after having spent a
very enjoyable time at Durban. Be-
could be seen a good deal of the time
it was most hilly. We passed where
the Waratah was supposed to have
been wrecked and encountered some
rough weather for a day. We saw the
Cape of Good Hope; it Is quite pict-
uresque the scenery, great mountains
rising straight up from the water
without a tree on them. The next
we came to was Cape Town. There
is what they call the Table Mount
rising straight up behind the town
and Devils Peak and the Twelve Ap-
ostles. We arrived in the harbor
at two and got up to the wharf at four
that evening. We were allowed on
shore from seven till eleven that
night ; it is about a mile from the
wharf to the principal part of the
War Notes. (Article), The Richmond River Herald and Northern Districts Advertiser (NSW : 1886 - 1942), Friday 21 June 1918 [Issue No.2062] page 5 2019-10-29 18:31 Mr..G. A. Cross, of Coraki, Pte. E. Cross
line, '' he Aussies were rushed up into
to take a spell Fritz gets through some
Mr.G. A. Cross, of Coraki, Pte. E. Cross
line, the Aussies were rushed up into
to take a spell Fritz gets through some-

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.