Information about Trove user: zepol23

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 6,013,668
2 noelwoodhouse 4,002,936
3 NeilHamilton 3,492,830
4 DonnaTelfer 3,466,939
5 Rhonda.M 3,432,129
...
9563 JohnBraddock 1,325
9564 OnceUponATime 1,325
9565 yeslek189 1,325
9566 Zepol23 1,325
9567 bradlucas 1,324
9568 LouisePhillips 1,324

1,325 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2020 369
March 2020 784
November 2019 55
November 2016 117

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 6,013,466
2 noelwoodhouse 4,002,936
3 NeilHamilton 3,492,701
4 DonnaTelfer 3,466,913
5 Rhonda.M 3,432,116
...
9550 JohnBraddock 1,325
9551 OnceUponATime 1,325
9552 yeslek189 1,325
9553 Zepol23 1,325
9554 bradlucas 1,324
9555 LouisePhillips 1,324

1,325 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2020 369
March 2020 784
November 2019 55
November 2016 117

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
Sisters of Charity Newly Professed (Article), Catholic Weekly (Sydney, NSW : 1942 - 1954), Thursday 10 September 1942 [Issue No.28] page 5 2020-04-01 11:27 Mary '8 Convent (Sisters of Char
The Eight Eev. Monaignor P. J
by the Eev. Fathers T. Troy,
S.M., and J. E. Morrcau.
The newly-professed Sisters arc:
SJster M. Bode Phibbs (Sydney),
Sister M. Hildogarde Burke (Syd
(Victoria), Sister M. Gemma Mar
Cyril Lalor (Bondigo), Sister M.
Barden (SiBter M. Doniso), Miss
Wencoslaus), Miss Margarot Trot
tor (Sister M. Calllsta), MisB
Joseph), Miss Kathloon Dowd (Sia
ter M. Stophcn), Miss Claire Dale
(Sister M. ElJzaboth), Miss Eoma
Wright (Sistor M. Cyprian).
Mary's Convent (Sisters of Char-
The Right Rev. Monsignor P. J
by the Rev. Fathers T. Troy,
S.M., and J. E. Morreau.
The newly-professed Sisters are:
SJster M. Bede Phibbs (Sydney),
Sister M. Hildegarde Burke (Syd-
(Victoria), Sister M. Gemma Mar-
Cyril Lalor (Bendigo), Sister M.
Barden (Sister M. Denise), Miss
Wenceslaus), Miss Margaret Trot-
tor (Sister M. Callista), Miss
Joseph), Miss Kathleen Dowd (Sis
ter M. Stephen), Miss Claire Dale
(Sister M. Elizabeth), Miss Roma
Wright (Sister M. Cyprian).
The Sisters of Charity, (Article), Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), Thursday 8 April 1920 [Issue No.3708] page 39 2020-04-01 11:24 It will be gratifying and consoling^
? their children to the standard requir
learn that the large building at Ka
The training, for teachers, will em
University and the Diploma of Educa
In our advertisement columns par
ticulars are given of the Training Col
and the good will of all who are inte
tholic education, especially the educa
of Christian education throughout Aus
tralia.''1 Catholio hospitals, too, will
thorough training in the nursing pro
lives to the service of the poor, especi
ally the sick poor in hospitals, infir
It will be gratifying and consoling
their children to the standard requir-
learn that the large building at Ka-
The training, for teachers, will em-
University and the Diploma of Educa-
In our advertisement columns par-
ticulars are given of the Training Col-
and the good will of all who are inte-
tholic education, especially the educa-
of Christian education throughout Aus-
tralia. Catholic hospitals, too, will
thorough training in the nursing pro-
lives to the service of the poor, especi-
ally the sick poor in hospitals, infir-
THE ORDER OF "SISTERS OF CHARITY." (Article), The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), Saturday 18 May 1889 [Issue No.6,003] page 1 2020-04-01 11:20 1936 and 1838, when the cholera broke out
tcoucs of '47.aed?48,)(whan thiiNdirk'clóutts,
-if f,anuuoj«pd, ifeyer ihad «preadt over tue
whole face of the land, when afllictidn-was'

Saughton and the bravest of her sons were
Baily being'Witío/dowti4o-thel¿rave' iii Wiefc,
ten« end tMir hundred», -whew Ueidlatldn
was universal in the oduntry/wild the1 htkrte
ef the niop'e were well nigfi ornshedj with)
adgblsh. As in the 'nay» of old, when;
the stored heart of the Saiiour was bleeding
la GeUisenuneanangelfromGoo?» right band
\i ill (le -i I litil 1 I
camp, to ppmfort H|m sq/p tho darkest hour of
lief; trials, tbp Sitters of Charity in many
I parts of lrol nul, as Angels of Mercy,, from
God, mino to soothe tho sorrows of her dill
dren, lo pour Into1 their broaking heart« the
oil and the wine of tondoroat human sym
puthy.fcf heroic and Unwavering caro and
deletion, i i i
I fn ¿he hoguuiing -¡of the year 1839 a talc,
of sorrow, reached I/cIand from her exiled
ohil^rpn ¡n far away. Australia A ,mocsi;n
ger was dtspalchcdlo Ireland by Australia's
fl st prelate, the apostolic Arobbishop Poid
mt That messenger .was1 the late William
Bofiiard Ullathorne, Bishop of Birmingha-n"
and titular1 Archbishop of Cabïèa-'-tho man
who WOB a pioneer of faith in these Southern
lands-tho msn whoso work «hall over
[ enduroi and whose mdmory shall ivor live in
tho two hemisphere« that mourn hi« death
and pr«y for hw eternal rest , I he mesaage
that he hore to Ireland told of hardships
nnd sufferings buypid comparo inflicted on
tho unhappy; yictitnf/if, tho cruel despotism
of the oonyjot system in Australia, hardships
ar/d süfr<.i'ín¿s that not only'tortured tho
bodies of their victims, liât threatened even
to damn thcir'BOÜls'by robbing them bf their
ancient faith,1 and i ni posing on thelti * form
of'religfon which th«y»bhOrríd The Sisters
of Charity lO'Irelandncoqlil^not' heat/ thati
tale of-sorilowi unmoved., ila (the esme year
five Oiitheir nulabor Moluateered to bid adieu
to the laud they Jo^pd, so well, to follow the
¿uhappy children, of.|ho sofrdiYjUted Gael,
i ,n¡| tu devote t,licir,l(ves to lalleviating their
: nins and soffening, their sorrows in tho
futter lahd of bxllo, 'l'ho goldcp jubileo of
their' arrivai in Australia » as ' ¿olobratcd Oh

»lot ÍJccémbBÍ-Wsl' In'fsydnoy ivith,*.triüch
ídlnp niHI splcndbuf, 1n the presence of dis-'
îfig'iilslioil 'visitors froth far antl'nosr! with a
pi-idccof »huChurch, Australia's lirstCardioalj
at^thèlibad ofailundiwithaapeoial messageofi
longiattUaitienlnaisi ibenediotionl iront iltbo
iu pruno Pontiff, Leo JCIII., to, cheer those
¡ood sisters onward~în their noble work, to
iles«, a,o<Mi"Ucti(y\their/labotirB,,in what; was,
mee indeed theil laud pfoxllo, but in what
s now the homo Mf freedom-a land all
briuht and falr-and-fceautiful-a land of
golden flocco,, of golden harvost, and of
golden ore-a latid of bettor thaii golden pro-
mise to tho. Church of, Christ beneath, the
ÎJoiitHcrn4 Cross ,rft' ffdYild .detain yo'u' too,
ioljg'wprl) I là trabo for"yoli' tho' history of
khe;Slstcrs'df Charity ifa Australia. 'BLsideH,
the'»task is 'unnecessary, theil" carder'W
¡matter, «f'oonteinrlorary 'history With'whloH

hiost ofl you; aro familiar ' Know one Bister oil
Charity ) and you knqw the: entire idrdoc
rrowij, whithi «ho ; takes, her marne. lnThe
inoftoiipf, each, anjl, ill, isr-" tho charity
ö Chr'-tfi &???& »»J' i Tfy> «harny «fc
Pbr'i,WsJ,tirti.*},,ili,'«l.ftuPftl- tri1"«? r""1
to follow Hun, tolKco/mo willing slaves m

lilts' service, add for tho glory pt lils sacred
bkirie. And si that charily M Christ prtusod
BKry Aikenhead lu holy' Ireland ' lang ago,
¡to hhWe'sel/'saorificidg'deeds for God arid
¡for"His poorV'so that «elf-Same charity J of
Oin«! it IB that rule«! and gdverW the life
of every Sister of Charity to-day. What
of our separated brethren testify, whom,
their
»Honiton! , .... ,

MfoY ti' tue1 Divine ,.,.. ~." ,..,.».
MHàne Bpciifc,' foi- whpm1 your hands have
provided, éh'olter oüd a' Uo\ne-shelter from,
ihd'eold'ga^e'of ail «nfrféndiy world, and a1
tiente Where mere thanJ 'mothor'B 'care1 Is
larishdd upon tacmi i Let'ihegcntle'>Sisters;
pfuCbsiuty «peak, whom you havo inspired
ever bo onshrîncd m tenilercst memories te a
past that shall over bo dear io'tis .all
1836 and 1838, when the cholera broke out
cholera. Nor need I refer to the deplorable
scenes of '47 and '48, when the dark clouds
of famine and fever had spread over the
whole face of the land, when affliction was
borne upon the breeze over the hills and the
valleys of Erin, when the fairest of her

daughters and the bravest of her sons were
daily being borne down to the grave in their
tens and their hundreds, when desolation
was universal in the country, and the hearts
of the people were well nigh crushed with
anguish. As in the days of old, when
the sacred heart of the Saviour was vleeding
in Gethsemane an angel from God's right hand

came to comfort Him so in the darkest hour of
her trials, the Sisters of Charity in many
parts of Ireland, as Angels of Mercy from
God, came to soothe the sorrows of her chil-
dren, to pour into their breaking hearts the
oil and wine of tenderest human sym-
pathy, of heroic and unwavering care and
devotion.
In the beginning of the year 1838 a tale
of sorrow reached Ireland from her exiled
children in far-away Australia. A messen-
ger was despatched to Ireland by Australia's
first prelate, the apostolic Archbishop Pold
ing. That messenger was the late William
Bernard Ullathorne, Bishop of Birmingham
and titular Archbishop of Cabaea—the man
who was a pioneer of faith in these Southern
lands —the man whose work shall ever
endure, and whose memory shall ever live in
the two hemispheres that mourn his death
and pray for his eternal rest. The message
that he bore to Ireland told of hardships
and sufferings beyond compare inflicted on
the unhappy victims of the cruel despotism
of the convict system in Australia, hardships
and sufferings that not only tortured the
bodies of their victims, but threatened even
to damn their souls by robbing them of their
ancient faith, and imposing on them a form
of religion which they abhored. The Sisters
of Charity in Ireland could not hear that
tale of sorrow unmoved. In the same year
five of their number volunteered to bid adieu
to the land they loved so well, to follow the
unhappy children of the sea-divided Gael,
and to devote their lives to alleviating their
pains and softening their sorrows in the
bitter land of exile. The golden jubilee of
their arrival in Australia was celebrated on

31st December last in Sydney with much
pomp and splendour, in the presence of dis-
tinguished visitors from far and near, with a
prince of the Church, Australia's first Cardinal
at the head of all and with a special message of
congratulation and benediction from the
Supreme Pontiff Leo XIII., to cheer those
good sisters onward in their noble work, to
bless and fructify their labours, in what was
once indeed their land of exile, but in what
is now the home of freedom—a land all
bright and fair and beautiful —a land of
golden fleece, of golden harvest, and of
golden ore—a land of better than golden pro-
mise to the Church of Christ beneath the
Southern Cross. It would detain you too
long were I to trace for you the history of
the Sisters of Charity in Australia. Besides,
the task is unncessary ; their career is
matter of contemporary history with which

most of you are familiar. Know one Sister of
Charity and you know the entire order
from which she takes her name. The
motto of each and all is—"the charity
of Christ presseth us." The charity of
Christ presseth us to give up all things and
to follow Him, to become willing slaves in

His service, and for the glory of His sacred
name. And as that charity of Christ pressed
Mary Aikenhead in holy Ireland long ago
to noble self sacrificing deeds for God and
for His poor ; so that self-same charity of
Christ it is that raises and governs the life
of every Sister of Charity to-day. What
of our separated brethren testify, whom,
without interfering with their religious
belief, you have cheerd in their day of
sorrow by the magic touch of human sym
pathy. Let the little ones speak, whom,
during 40 years, you have taught to
lisp and to bless the sacred name of
their alms, and let the poor speak, who will

tion to the Divine will. Let the little
orphans speak, for whom your hands have
provided shelter and a home—shelter from
the cold gaze of an unfriendly world, and a
home where more than mother's care is
lavished upon them. Let the gentle Sisters
of Charity speak, whom you have inspired
ever be enshrined in tenderest memories to a
past that shall ever be dear to us all.
THE ORDER OF "SISTERS OF CHARITY." (Article), The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), Saturday 18 May 1889 [Issue No.6,003] page 1 2020-04-01 10:25 in tho Con vont of tho Institute of tho Blessed
Virgih iMaryV8hufcj|»'-fr¿rfi: tlio'vforld and
alone with tiédi ifor a ' period of' three years,'
BliccontiuWd'to 'imbibd'tllP't'rub'-'tplr'it'or'
thoitrdhgidus life»^hd'lleárned1 to) Hviilk1
irt'itha nUighor'1 paths'! of' Christum ''and
roligiou»,'perfection: '< In'''August,1' '1815,'
silo.'returned to Ireland;1 uni! on '15th "pf
Sdpteiiibor,,i¡ni'thdl'samdl year, tho1 Irish'
¡Sisters'of Charity'in tlie pci¡»Ár)s!of (Mary
Augustine Aiken<hcad'atidl"her" com'panioii
wdreiitoiitio seen'for tho'first timd',in the
iiatioh's'diistory ' eiigaacd in' that Snblimc'
arork'of moroy which' has imtriortalfscd
¡thbir memot-y to'the cods of the earth. , ' '
-It is heodloss 'for me 'on this oocasion tp
¡dwell upon thá manner ih wbicli thb order
of the Sisters of Charity, ¿nee established,
jtook'iroot in Irish'soil How from their
small beglaubig iii Ñorbh William street, in
Dublin", they1 Ireirloved to Gardiner street,
¡tlienco spreading throughout the country to
Ïlio western, .wiids, ,of , Gal way, i Mayo , ami
Sligo, to CotK,' Tipperary, Kiikonny and
jWatciford, everywhere bearing the obeering
message of Sympathy add hope tyr1 thé Hick
and Itbe I boor ' Everywhere guthcrirtfe the
littlo lambs of the flock into the wilclo

eomo pastares i ci, isouncL Christian / tenob.
iug,,,ilift natfojo,, glorjed, |in j the oxisT
buco oihongst tnem of those ill angels* of
hiotey," and the highest and best Jn,th,e
land (leoirfed'iVin Honour to sort e thcW
rim« itnwas that they were enabled to
become thq dispensers oí a nation's charity.,
thot|throiigh ¿homifltheiiiaketf worol cldtlirfil
ind tho hungry were fed, tlieiick and tho
Imprisoned wore visited and consoled ;
iho littlo walis *éb.d' strays , warp iroely
laught in theti1 schools, ¿hat tho orphan«,

woro sheltered, and the fallen,.,ones
Ure resdueWfronV-iiffamy ahd>n ' /t'icßaV
not rerertottliolr Uboora in the sad ydais of
I »33 arid 1838MVhen->trie cholera" bloke.dikV
With torriblo virulence in tho drewucd fcítlós
bfCork and/BttblinütWhenUllcyirioVIóulv.

jlaily^viíitodiitho itripkeuliohosC lu I-their
homes, but at tho request of the publie
authorities took, charge .of large hospitals .in
these cities; where!'with1 àripIralleTeff dW£*
lion,' they nnrséd the ÜyV^vIctims'.oi tlio
choloia. Nor need I refer tdïhV dopWAiilo
in the Convent of the Institute of the Blessed
Virgin Mary, shut in from the world and
alone with God for a period of three years
she continued to imbibe the true spirit of
the religious life and learned to walk
in the higher paths of Christian and
religious perfection. In August, 1815
she returned to Ireland, and on the 13th of
September, in the same year, the Irish
Sisters of Charity in the persons of Mary
Augustine Aikenhead and her campanion
were to be seen for the first time in the
nation's history engaged in that sublime
work of mercy which has immortalised
their memory to the ends of the earth.
It is needless for me on this occasion to
dwell upon the manner in which the order
of the Sisters of Charity, once established,
took root in Irish soil. How from their
small beginning in North William-street, in
Dublin, they removed to Gardiner-Stree,
thence spreading throughout the country to
the western wilds of Galway, Mayo and
Sligo, to Cork, Tipperary, Kilkenny and
Waterford, everywhere bearing the cheering
message of sympathy and hope for the sick
and the poor. Everywhere gathering the
little la,bs of the flock into the whole-

some pastures of sound Christian teach-
ing. The nation gloried in the exist-
ence amongst them of those "angles of
mercy," and the highest and best in the
land deemed it an honour to serve them.
Thus it was that they were enabled to
become the dispensers of a nation's charity,
that through them the naked were clothed
and the hungry were fed ; the sick and the
imprisoned were visited and consoled ;
the little waifs and strays were freely
taught in their schools ; that the orphans

were sheltered, and the fallen ones
were rescued from infamy and sin. I need
not refer to their labors in the sad years of
1936 and 1838, when the cholera broke out
with terrible virulence in the croweded cities
of Cork and Dublin when they not only

daily visited the stricken ones in thei
homes, but at the request of the pbulvi
authorities took charge of large hospitals in
these cities, where, with unparalleled devo-
tion, they nursed the dying victioms of the
cholera. Nor need I refer to the deplorable
THE ORDER OF "SISTERS OF CHARITY." (Article), The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), Saturday 18 May 1889 [Issue No.6,003] page 1 2020-04-01 10:16

ihoiits, but ' ¡oil thom on, to tho practice 0/

insbls äftho Gospel, \'And. altlipdgh
.j.i.i'Jt J.«..I_"¡¡ri ÂiA ¡.ii'«. ..MI .n

Oho"cpU¿

Íuu,, OUJIQ , u.uiivdiviiiuv.t,, . ii^iuivjf null,

>ecn honoured' and practised in. the church,
,ronVits¿r1niu.'lie'sulcs thoBubumo maids who
I toro it triumphant^ through-Jim-lost, ugdnics
< boro waru ajnultituUp'whc;' preserved it for
iianyyeaVâ'iu the-wldstóí the world. Tor
boro wore nuns al thcro1 had ' been ascetics
nd, bprmiti,before, tho regular, and pqpujark
insfitlitloris V ih'diiastio'lífa,*" (Monks al (lie!
Vont). Mon teok'asthoir'rnodel ouV^Lord
1 nil Plis Anostlos,.0rtJiqaustere life of tho

' i iptist, while Mary tho spotless', ' and Mag
lalén,itlib (ienitontj wdroHhe "leaders >of,a!
minerous band of epinily followers. About
' ho year 300 A.n. St, Authony, " ttyii Father
. if Monks;"''hagart''his llfd of ' austerity ;
yilila about the «mule Itilnat St. I Syuclctica
lu .

Ího has raised tho standard of tho cr osa J1-w*)'.

ohold religious orders- of men and women
«priiiging up and adprjiing -hor^ .VVhnrovor

Ího iirai'arr'ieea of 'the faith was
ilabfedj ÄTgte«* 'up1 > and' /spread .Its
,rwol¡9t1¡nWii')»A'í .IIWWW *iying;riPh»do

ud shelter to tho nations ; anil the roll
louHtfrders; wluJad/rEcorU^li«« comb dbwh,
o us, wore hut the Ua\WUlA Howers oi tifo '
;huroll's mature growth ; wvro but tho
lateral product of that- spirit of sanctity
that ia within her, True, indued, theao
religious order« do not dOMtttUtej the cssenco
>f theiphurpli, but they aro an integral part
ii Christianity, for,they, i represent iijCln is
tiau Bociqta/ tho practico of tho evangelical
¡counsels. : .,\uM Jnu'l |..ir lii-wj':
.AeipTgutlipf^mipiproiii religious nrdore,
¡whoso loaming und virtues hnvo niven lustre
und biiauty to tho oliureli on eui Hi, tlicro is
jone for which oven tho iufidu) lias shown
Caritas Christi Urget nos. "The Charity
of Christ presseth us." Cor. ii., 5, 14.
My Lord Cardinal, my Lord Archbishop,
Bishops, Very Rev., Reverend, and dear
brethren, —From the beginning of Christianity
the religious life has found a place in the
church's economy. The fervour of the early
Christians did not permit them to rest

satisfied merely with keeping the command-
ments, but led them on to the practice of

the counsels of the Gosepl. And, although
community of religious life did not exist in
those early times, as we find it in our day,


yet, says Montalembert, "Virginity had

been honoured and practised in the church
from its origin. Besides the sublime maids who
bore it triumphant through the last agonies
there were a multitude who preserved it for
many years in the midst of the world. For
there were nuns as there had been ascetica
and hermits before the regular and popular
institutions of monastic life" (Monks of the
West). Men took as their model our Lord
and His Apostles, or the austere life of the

Baptist, while Mary the spotless, and Mag-
dalen, the penitest, were the leaders of a
numerous band of saintly followers. About
the year 300 A.D. St. Anthony, "the Father
of Monks," began his life of austerity ;
while about the same time St. Syncletica
became head of a religious body of women.
From that time onward, through all the
long years of the Church's history, wherever

she has raised the standard of the cross, we

behold religious orders of men and women
springing up and adorning her. Wherever

the mustard seed of the faith was
planted, it grew up and spread its
branches far and wide giving shade

and shelter to the nations ; and the reli-
gious orders, whose record has come down
to us, were but the fruits and flowers of the
church's mature growth ; were but the
natural product of that spirit of sanctity
that is within her. True, indeed, these
religious orders do not constitute the essence
of the church, but they are an integral part
of Christianity, for they represent in Chris-
tian society the practice of the evangelical
counsels.
Among the numerous religious orders,
whose learning and virtues have given lustre
and beauty to the church on earth, there is
one for which even the infidel has shown
THE ORDER OF "SISTERS OF CHARITY." (Article), The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), Saturday 18 May 1889 [Issue No.6,003] page 1 2020-04-01 10:00 reverence, mid .vyhip'vl'OVcu' men of tho

wprld.admit to ¿o one of tho jilo^ic^of ytliO|

lOhristlan commoWcalth-that is thu order
joiitHo SiiCarilbf iCnhfityU I lids.'order, or
institute was first established, iii Fi'.uicc hy
tKoîlgreU $!" Vincent Decani, óvlVtfb

ï^dfMyïi^M^^iloi^ë&^P
to do BOiPttíiJ, iU'.t-IIal horróte/bf tho Igroit
|revolution,tlioy,we^y fprccd¡ to diabaud. In
¡1801, hdwevor, thoy'wcro oncn moro re
established} '»tul contautiód to' ea'rr'y'Ari their
¡works of morey. .Tlieir'IfAnio reached tho

IslieresloI/.IííUindi wh'o're; then1 as to-tlay,

... . _ . .

lud 'charily.
Providentially there «VU'then Hi Dublin an
eccloaiastld'avno^kDOWledke of' the 'labours
of. thodaughW W''StV^üWoi

tóA&¿i.«S.

tioné'WbW Ubini çMrlcd.oii 'with' a'1 View'¿to,
thh'festablWhm'piííof W'branch lip'iiso of tie,
order'I"fromr Ffimdo.'".T«' pVo,np3i!,,''KftW,
ovor, wasfoWd ImpActteanfo', owing to'li«
dillpfeiicCjJQ^tl^o langiuigoa./liata/ice.bptfv»cn,
th'o two couutríos, as, wellas^ór ecclesiiistlcrij5
roasons. It waajtblou,decided to1» establish a
distU)ct|Oi}d ibjlopcnupt order on tho/inodq)
of°tlmt of'St Vinpeni-an order wlioso
members slwuldy buid¡/,th?wsol|Vea,|by the
ordinary'vows"of ' poverty, chastity, and
obedipnjjo, ayil.byu f)irtlier,,vow, of doyqtipg
tho'nisulv'es te fiío^'a'c.ciúc'ojpC.JéíU^ Cliriat in
thó'porBODS of the sick and poor,
.?Mary-Aihenhead wasibprmoolJanOaryinr
1787, within sound of ! the famous " bella,of
Sli»rf)dpofl''flad waniiespenideili fronvono-of|
the oldest and best families in the south'of
Ifçl8ud.,| ,WhJlsfoe,(,chi|d #ho ijras .placed
.._j_. ii.. ip^ro^qf^a^p^tijoijo^iiH,,,^ ftopi,

.-. ,...., .»arpiAtelUp Catholic ,pr»yorsi{t
bu^.s'figjitpw up »ho, ¡was [qbligod 1 to, oom )
%uito,hc»xtethqryProto&tant religion. ,/Itfi
^efl¡fqurtccnt4y,epr,lshe"wft«|l(íft,An,,orpU»ni:
wtí'fiíwfljjHS'cFIl.andiB, bmtlwrf butilWâth.^
fortuna su,ftjaiqnt for hprippsitipiir (¿Mutually¡
tl!pMiuipr,*isianB MitlW outlier ..¡years/gtewji
upop|hqrriand,tfttr tho, age.iOliia'Kieenilsue,,
u1B^?iAiW^oyp.ilJ,TiiiB,jpr«oe«dli»8!(,ioi
those days was not calculated to bl ¡griten
her worIdlyprosppct»,,for the ovil shadows
of(1b«;|wna'l dayp ¡»proyabjtagcriog in thoi
land,-and the-cruel sprit of antipathy to
Ir^kjarMoIth overt ylt bnfBght sbVraWtb'iál
humble adhorents.;i&asbo/gr«w/into uiitur*
years, however^ .Mary'« queenly gracfy groat,
mental culturo and broad Immap sympathies"
Inrel'dowU k11 «höetili'ty "arfa>'Wu88d''rlift'
society to be sought after in the halls of .the,,
grèatjl Title.'and'boûo'ir,'woVè'fi't tmítymV
available'for hs>|fbnt he*r hea'rt'vt'ai'h'ot sW
upon them' ,Tmi«bnrted favourite«/ wfealth;
auilpHde^eltó'wiwj mMèss thé" faVódrjto.tíf
pdvertyiaiie Mmbltíeófférf fag. ''-Id hor'áiill'y,1
walloishe'W«f('teö«->fdlitol''lli''thb'hoWsla'rial
liaan«s'ofi>GodV»forgot«tf"ÍK«rt',J imVyW1
well known! and Well Oéldvtííf Wherevef'1^

Ufo to tho sorWee of 'thd-'pook' sprtliirlHg'oiics
ol.hér/oWnnïtlve'la'hdi Tl.ip Vl*.\fr.

i!atiubpJ)ortilliíéyl,ror.,gtátIfylng4jhe1rTduU>
ablo ambition .now proscnte4 ,ltf "" " "'
andient dity by* 1 " "
having boen i
Archbishbpf'
little ICSB heroic than' herself, Miss Alick
Walsh, re til ed to York Iii liiigluud and there
reverence, and which even men of the

world admit to be one of the glories of the

Christian commonwealth— that is the order
of the Sisters of Charity. This order, or
institute was first established in France by
the great St. Vincent De Paul, over 200

years ago. The number of members in-
creased beyond all expectation and continued
to do so until, in the horrors of the great
revolution they were forced to disband. In
1804, however, they were once more re-
established, and continued to carry on their
works of mercy. Their fame reached the

shores of Ireland, where, then as today,
owing to the poverty and suffering of the
lower classes, an illimitable field opened up
for the exercise of their zeal and charity.

Providentially there was then in Dublin an
ecclesiastic whose knowledge of the labours
of the daughters of St. Vincent enabled
him to appreciate their work, and inspired
him with the idea of having a similar order
established in Dublin. This ecclesiastic was
the Rev. Dr. Murray, who afterwards be-
came coadjutor to the saintly Archbishop
Troy, and who succeeded that prelate in the
See of Dublin in 1823. For a time negoti-


tions were being carried on with a view to
the establishment of a branch house of the
order from France. This proposal, how-
ever was found impracticable owing to the
difference in the languages, distance between
the two countries, as well as for ecclesiastical
reasons. It was then decided to establish a
distinct and independent order on the model
of that of St Vincent— an order whose
members should bind themselves by the
ordinary vows of poverty, chastity, and
obedience, and by a further vow of devoting
themselves to the service of Jesus Christ in
the persons of the sick and poor.
Mary Aikenhead was born on January 19,
1787, within sound of the famous "bells of
Shandon," and was descended from one of
the oldest and best families in the south of
Ireland. Whilst a child she was placed
under the care of a Catholic nurse, from

whom she learned to lisp Catholic prayers ;
but as she grew up she was obliged to con-
form to her father's Protestant religion. In
her fourteenth year she was left an orphan
with two sisters and a brother, but with a
fortune sufficient for her position. Gradually
the impressions of her earlier years grew
upon her, and at the age of sixteen she
became a Catholic. This preceeding in
those days was not calculated to brighten
her worldly prospects, for the evil shadows
of the penal days were yet lingering in the
land, and the cruel spirit of antipathy to
Ireland's faith even yet brought sorrow to its
humble adherents. As she grew into maturer
years, however, Mary's queenly grace, great
mental culture and broad human sympathies
bore down all hostility and caused her
society to be sought after in the halls of the
great. Titled and honours were at this time
available for her, but her heart was not set
upong them. The courted favourite of wealth
and pride, she was no less the favourite of
poverty and humble suffering. In her faily
walks she was to be found in the homes and
haunts of God's forgotten poor, and was
well known and well beloved wherever in
her native city poverty and sorrow were to
be found. Her heart glowed and her eyes
kindled as she read or heard of the daughters
of St. Vincent, and her highest ambition
was that, in some capacity like to theirs, she
might be permitted to consecrate her young

life to the service of the poor sorrowing ones
of her own native land.

An opportunity for gratifying her laud-
able ambition now presented itself in the
ancity city by the Liffey. All preliminaries
having been arranged with Dr. Murray and
Archbishop Troy she, with another but a
little less heroic than herself, Miss Alicia
Walsh, retired to York in England and there
of every Sister of Charity to-day. What
and poor. She was in the vanguard of
memories. And to-day we are priviliged to
Christ their Redeemer. Let the rich
ever bless your name. Let the un-
bright rays of comfort and hope. Let the
love. Let the venerable Archbishop and
you to us so long. And with that
THE ORDER OF "SISTERS OF CHARITY." (Article), The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), Saturday 18 May 1889 [Issue No.6,003] page 1 2020-03-31 19:45 ! lull. Hllfilllllllll nine m Viill ti I", i

flin <ORDER> OF, .i«i SISTERS' OF
I ' ''"' '<"!V-'PHARITF'': >A '"'" ?' '"
1 I .i.liiUI /ilriTTftr _J.Í,"'I JJJMJMIIII . I'ni ,
I ThtfrbllbV/nfi ft"tnc Vrmori' M^UOÙ
the Rev.,i,v'atbor M.,'>Vr Ciltoran.,at,$
JoScph's1 Chu'rolijasf Tuceday'morning 01 ,

UiqocoaBiqn far the o?lobratiqn Ot Uiojpldon

' Allan of \no RéyJMb^cr'Frabqós Javier'
llliiins ¡~, ' », .., ;. it ,'i , ",i/ .,., I
d morely'with' k'oop'ing'tli'o otjpim'audj
pi o very i Sister lof Charity to-day i I What
Pier life ia! has-been witnessed amongst youl
¡hero for more than 40 year« in the person of
(Reverend Mother. M,a.ry \ Xavior Williams,,
jbjic,formçd,ono q( tha^ittl^banu of valiant,
rwoinen whj,, rijqro tpan 50, years ugo, carno,
across tho distant seas to seek out and to
s^hrdTTcsus Christ ui tho persons of. the flick
arid'poor'. ' She 'waa1 in *the ,vanguard of
those I'tyrios rof . true" wdmahhood' who,
educated" in ' all the grace and dul
¡turo! Und' i refinement 'of old-world civil-
isation, 'camen and still i continue to come
iOilafibefore the daughters of fair Australia
godden, treasur.ca of faith and learning, to
¡trauijupfin, tliçso (southern cUmes a genera r
.tion of ¿ruo, womanhood;, to, elevate-,and
(purify| Chat womanhood {n pvory^lofl« and ia
Wory rank of society She, as you, know,
was1 "tho1 fjrsc woman who oversanctifled"
Aiiètraliaif soll1 bV the sacíod vows'of poverty
chastity, óbí-diertce, and devotion to tho sick
arid poor-Hie1 first1 who' Bont'uiS'to heaven
through clear "Australian »kies'thp pure,
inoense iot 'self oblation" ont the altar I of
religion. tWhati A > day of blessing, > and of
joy, and "i promise, that morning 60 yearsi
ago ![,»,day (Jiat shall {or c\or shine pontt
spicppusly op th°, pagps t of (Australian his

,aeied
ahajo in 'cclobratlàg' tho golden jubilee of
that Vnokt auspicious anti happy occasion"
Wfe'nrd hero to'dayj rdvtírerid'mothcr,3'»:1
Prlnoolof the Church, mitred ' heads1 ïrom'
beyond thosoosj oltrgy .fi'OWfar and near j to
rojnioe with lyon (pnityourceingular privi-
lege foficl baring Jit-cdi to »seo iitlto fiftieth
aueiv^csary ot¡ i your, .religious .-profession,
X»Mi »««BJoítí-CPWneevjb-mdKof religious
womS» »ífl «S"1',*?? «.'."li* /Çonwntunl,
îneUtu.twnsjn thisfaiEijsW homoj0f pura..
On June 20,1847, ,tho good s npLowa.bqund
frolu^ydn¿y¡,uotó'MotíÍíer Dogales O-Brion,,
Mbther'jUarV Jatífi1 Cahill,' «ud'yolPto tho'
shorts" of lasmdnla, 'wh'ero'you, fi-cro ro-'
ceivod ^Hd"Welcomed "by the (venerated'
Bishop ¡Willson r anti 'tho'^good Father'
Ilalht Audi-.bwhartniJ has beeui your ' life
mil this leity iofJ> Hobart ldunng iitliesd )40
yuarsi'in Loti the Catholic tomdiumty 4£i this)
ity ,beac.,iWitnüM: t»fday|!,i Lot.oveiil many,
>{~,our:aeñar^tcd brgtlireu, .testifyjfW.hon»,,

JhntV 'kVtíi I -R&eouierY'.-i LoU" the1 'Tieri
spealci'.whol'made.jybu tho1 dispenser of
theiriahtisJiSBvliettbe poor speak, whWilt
orerl bleu j-vour nameii) iLct the snir<
iliappy .prisoner» oft «O year»', ipeak, into
hibean; d,efksowe, pell» you (bave broUghMhe
TtÄ\rW,tf ufl°mfpr^ wi, kop?. Lqti the
PifiR má ,thoi dW«i tf*' rt ff00*8 ?r?e4'
piihyowvown sweet »pint of labour andlof I
love Let ¡the ysoerable j Archbishop and I
tha cUrgy of ,"&!«, dipces>,spi»k of you ton
flay and, ¡of, tbj&orkypu haye dono inthisoijy
for 4Q^eari.t Let tjço voiceof ¡cooli and all bo

liewa to day Then I shall not bo .required,,
U'WruWif noblb deeÄVof Christian1 eluirtty,'
pf'pViccless'laboiite'in the cfinso'ofpoor '
hufmuiity''anä bf -tho bright e\*rhpTo ydu
hivö placed before iii of all'that Was best lu
human nature and ' most'' sanctifying in
Chullan faith i '

I IXOH havo yot another claim upon our re
» crome. Von r we tha representativo t of
tipies andjfrinnds thal) aionownp more, of

gobion chain binding ria to a past that shall
Gladly, therefore, do wo gather around
you1 today1 to rejoice 'with' yon Iii
this i splendid ceremonial/! and' to neild
up to I tho Father of mercical our 'lo
ÍJoura.1 of thanksgiving for having spared
you to j us «on long -, And with that
tliaultBgiying for the ipast shall [ascend
our petition | for your., future ,year» Wp
cannpt _,ooiujoat froin purpolves that m
tho ordinary course of nature IIICBO yparB
nias 1 cannot be vciy many But whatever
length of day» ' tí¿4\on maytyet giant Von
here, may they' bo filled With all peace abil
benediction " May angelí hands sriioothd
year woy towards the home of your eternity,
and may .the divino spouse; whom 50 years
ago you choso as your portion and, inherit
auco,|,whO| was lyour Ijoyand hope in the
bright morning of .youth, and i who, is. now
your stay t and i coipfort ,whpp¡ thq shadow
of, evening, airead) begin to ga(hep around
you, that. divine Bppusp fn \yhoso «orifcq
and for'whoso glory every thought, and
Wird, and' uc/ofr Jours for {¡trWrs.

'yon I
bright home oil His Kuthbrj thdrd to boglad
Îrtdirejoidouwith Uim in lone glorious evor
aitiog Jubilee, ¡\Amah. Inn i ii i

THE ORDER OF "SISTERS OF
CHARITY."

The following is the sermon delivered by
the Rev. Father M. W. Gilleran at St.
Joseph's Church, last Tuesday morning on

the occasion of the celebration of the golden

jubilae of the Rev. Mother Frances Xavier
Williams :—

of every Sister of Charity to-day. What
her life is has been witnessed amongst you
here for more than 40 years is the persion of
Reverend Mother Mary Xavier Williams.
She formed one of that little band of valiant
women who, more than 50 years ago, came
across the distant seas to seek out and to
serve Jesus Christ in the persons of the sick
and poor. She was in the vanguard of
those types of true womanhood who,
educated in all the grace and cul-
ture and refinement of old-world civil-
isation, came and still continue to come
today, before the daughters of fair Australia
golden treasures of faith and learning, to
train up in these southern climes a genera-
tion of true womanhood; to elevate and
purify that womanhood in every class and in
every rank of society. She, as you know,
was the first woman who ever sanctified
Australian soil by the sacred vows of poverty
chastity, obedience, and devotion to the sick
and poor—the first who sent up to heaven
through clear Australian skies the pure
incense of self-oblation on the altar of
religion. What a day of blessing, and of
joy, and of promise, that morning 50 years
ago ! a day that shall for ever shine con-
spicuously on the pages of Australian his-
tory—a day that shall for ever have asso-
ciated with it ten thousand sweet and sacred
memories. And to-day we are priviliged to
share in celebrating the golden jubilee of
that most auspicious and happy occasion.
We are here to-day, reverend mother, a
Prince of the Church, mitred heads from
beyond the seas, clergy from far and near, to
rejoice with you on your singular privi-
lege of having lived to see the fiftieth
anniversary of your religious profession.
You were of the pioneer band of religious
women who came to establish conventual
institutions in this fair island home of ours.
On June 20, 1847, the good ship Louisa, bound
from Sydney, bore Mother De Sales O'Brien
Mother Mary John Cahill, and you to the
shores of Tasmania, where you were re-
ceived and welcomed by the venerated
Bishop Wilson and the good Father
Hall. And what has been your life
in this city of Hobart during these 40
years ? Let the Catholic community of this
city bear witness to-day ! Let even many
of our separated brethren testify, whom,

Christ their Redeemer. Let the rich
speak who made you the dispenser of
their
ever bless your name. Let the un-
happy prisoners of 40 years speak, into
whose darksome cells you have brought the
bright rays of comfort and hope. Let the
sick and the dying speak, at whose bed-
side you have wept and prayed, to bring
them to repentance and to confident resigna-

with your own sweet spirit of labour and of
love. Let the venerable Archbishop and
the clergy of this diocese speak of you to-
day and of the work you have done in this city
for 40 years. Let the voice of each and all be

heard to-day. Then I shall not be required
to speak of noble deeds of Christian charity,
of priceless labours in the cause of poor
humanity and of the bright example you
have placed before us of all that was best in
human nature and most sanctifying in
Christian faith.

You have yet another claim upon our re-
verance. You are the representative of
times and friends that are now no more, of
many great and good who have fallen by your
side in the cause of Christ, and are gone to
their reward. You are the last link in the

golden chain binding us to a past that shall
Gladly, therefore, do we gather around
you to-day to rejoice with you in
this splendid ceremonial, and to send
up to the Father of mercies our Te
Deum of thanksgiving for having spared
you to us so long. And with that
thanksgiving for the past shall ascend
our petition for your future years. We
cannot conceal from ourselves that in
the ordinary course of nature these years
alas ! cannot be very man. But whatever
length of days heaven may yet be grant you
here, may they be filled with all peace and
benediction. May angel hands smoothe
your way towards the home of your eternity,
and may the divine spouse, who 30 years
age you chose as your portion and inherit-
ance, who was your joy and hope in the
bright morning of youth, and who is now
your stay and comfort when the shades
of evening already begin to gather around
you, that divine spouse in whose service
and for whose glory every thought and
word, and act of yours for 50 years
has been expended, may He comfort
you with all the tender mercies of His

Sacred Heart, and at last take you to the
bright home of His Father, there to be glad
and rejoice with Him in one glorious ever-
lasting Jubilee Amen.
Combined Sports SISTERS OF CHARITY SCHOOLS (Article), The Biz (Fairfield, NSW : 1928 - 1972), Wednesday 13 October 1954 page 2 2020-03-31 08:54 Xombined Sports j
SISTEBS OF CHAKJTV
TeD thousaau peojile gathered
at eydnc? Sports Ground last
Sunday. October 10, to .witness the
. Ute schools 01 the Skiers or
, Charity. . ,
Auburn . won the poSnt-scorc.
with AfchfieM second ' Katoomba
th'rd, Iivcrnopl fourth and Con
cord fifth. T
^.?WKcHy. «r Auburn, ran 75 yds.
Combined Sports
SISTERS OF CHARITY
Ten thousand people gathered
at Sydney Sports Ground last
Sunday October 10, to witness the
the schools of the Sisters of
Charity.
Auburn won the point-score,
with Ashfield second, Katoomba
third, Liverpool fourth and Con-
cord fifth.
M Kelly of Auburn ran 75 yds
Advertising (Advertising), Bent's News and New South Wales Advertiser (Sydney, NSW : 1839), Saturday 4 May 1839 [Issue No.160] page 4 2020-03-30 14:00 dFot Young SLabt'ca.
MRS. DAVIS, recently arrived in
receive young Ladies, who will bocare-
| falty educated in the usual acquire-
lnonts and accomplishments. The
; most approved Masters for Languages,
For references. and terms, Mrs. Da
Murphy, and Rov. Mr. I.ovat, Sydney ;
GooJd, Campbell Town ; Rov. Mr.
Rigney, Wollongong ; Rev. Mr. O'lli-
Maitland. ,
For Young Ladies.
Mrs. Davis, recently arrived in
receive young Ladies, who will becare-
fully educated in the usual acquire-
ments and accomplishments. The
most approved Masters for Languages,
For references. and terms, Mrs. Da-
Murphy, and Rev. Mr. I.ovat, Sydney ;
Goold, Campbell Town ; Rev. Mr.
Rigney, Wollongong ; Rev. Mr. O'Ri-
Maitland.
CATHOLIC LADIES' COLLEGE, (GIPPS STREET, EAST MELBOURNE. CONDUCTED BY THE SISTERS OF CHARITY. PATRON: MOST REV. DR. CARR, ARCHBISHOP OF MELBOURNE, (Article), Advocate (Melbourne, Vic. : 1868 - 1954), Saturday 25 January 1902 [Issue No.1722] page 15 2020-03-30 13:55 (tIPPR STREET, EAST
MELBOURNE.
Tbe SiBters of Charity desire to state that the above College 1b now completed, being exceptionally
well equipped with all the modem aoplianoea neoessary for its successful working. The buildings
are commodious and admirably citnated, overlooking the Treasury Gardens and wltnin a few minutes'
walk of trams from all partB of the City and Suburbs. They comprise Study and Mnsio Halls
Studios, Work Booms, and a Cooking Department, Separate Luuoheon Halls and Recreation
Grounds are provided for Senior and Jnnior Girls.
pnpils are prepared for Matriculation, Pharmacy and Musical E laminations (Royal Academy and
Rojal College, London).
A 8enior or Finishing Glass has been instituted for young Ladies who do not wish to present
themselves at publio examinations. They wiil have an opportunity o( incrsasing their knowledge of
the Pine Arts, Literature and Bclenog. Lectures in Phy.iology, Elementary Anatomy, Bick NurBine
and Domestic Hcohomy, will be a spaoial feature. Tjadies whose education has not been completed!
but who drsire to oontinue their studies, or become governesses, may attend this olass and receive
GIPPS STREET, EAST MELBOURNE.
Tbe Sisters of Charity desire to state that the above College is now completed, being exceptionally
well equipped with all the modem appliances necessary for its successful working. The buildings
are commodious and admirably situated, overlooking the Treasury Gardens and wltnin a few minutes'
walk of trams from all parts of the City and Suburbs. They comprise Study and Music Halls,
Studios, Work Rooms, and a Cooking Department, Separate Luncheon Halls and Recreation
Grounds are provided for Senior and Junior Girls.
Pupils are prepared for Matriculation, Pharmacy and Musical Examinations (Royal Academy and
Royal College, London).
A Senior or Finishing Glass has been instituted for young Ladies who do not wish to present
themselves at public examinations. They will have an opportunity of increasing their knowledge of
the Fine Arts, Literature and Science. Lectures in Physiology, Elementary Anatomy, Sick Nursing,
and Domestic Economy, will be a special feature. Ladies whose education has not been completed,
but who desire to continue their studies, or become governesses, may attend this class and receive

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.