Information about Trove user: tsn99

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,853,198
2 noelwoodhouse 3,927,775
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,372,336
5 Rhonda.M 3,194,756
...
4996 johnBFH 3,910
4997 annaki 3,903
4998 tjstewart 3,903
4999 tsn99 3,903
5000 Ritaboris 3,902
5001 allycat88 3,900

3,903 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

November 2019 1,944
October 2019 1,959

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,852,996
2 noelwoodhouse 3,927,775
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,372,315
5 Rhonda.M 3,194,743
...
4990 johnBFH 3,910
4991 annaki 3,903
4992 tjstewart 3,903
4993 tsn99 3,903
4994 Ritaboris 3,902
4995 DaveBennetts70 3,899

3,903 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

November 2019 1,944
October 2019 1,959

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
Fauna and Flora Protection. TO THE EDITOR OF THE AGE. (Article), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Saturday 5 August 1933 [Issue No.24,435] page 6 2019-11-06 22:01 15/7/33) that a special appeal should he
made to women for their help .in the pro-
I letters Convince me of three things: —
I 1. Tho interest of both men and women
2. That many .women are ready to
and sympathy with ull living things tint
should develop into u deep and lusting
love of the flora and fauna of our coun
Mr. (,'roJI has offered to bring m.v let
League of Youth when if is formed. We
cull safely leave that matter in his sym
pathetic hands. In. -the meantime
I would . suggest that all women
, «.v .titvLOTitu, nuutiiei' MlUbilClb,
aunts, big sisters or women with
out tics, should form groups for general
discussion . of the subject with the idea
governing council of the L. of Y._ We
want .the help of all women who have,
children of pre-school years. We especi
women and girls in offices and shops, uni
versity or schools, students or teachers:
for wo believe that- they .are -destined to
play a. big part in. this movement. The
modern, girl is generous of her time and
service where her sympathy is. touched.
Girls who Jove hiking -should be one of
our. chief, maiiistnys, for they have oppor
fortunate ones. ...
We want,. too,.'the aid of the mothers'
clubs connected .with the schools, which
have already done sueli ..fine patriotic
work. We . arc, I think, in agreement
that, if women are to ak\ little children
over- the iirst fences of nature study they
inffst themselves have some knowledge of
tho subject. Ways -and' means, must be
found' to enlighten , us ail in the' swiftest
and most pleasant possible manner. It lias
been ' suggested ' that women's nnture
circles should -be formed— the' members to
meet monthly., in hulls or private homes.
urged to exhibit or chut about some
thing she had . discovered, cither ' 011 11
The aid of garden-loving women is es
woman is at heart a natin-c-lover, though
most of.' us would Bliy nt the . title of
naturalist. Yet a naturalist is 110 other
of observation. . The smallest garden will
provide a budding naturalist with inter
esting studies. '
material for study .especially in city, and
realise the economic importance of co
operation.: Why not' co-operate in ail iiir
teresting hobby, each one sharing the ma
terial and the knowledge 'she has gained
with sister-women. If nature cireleo are
formed, I nm sure that well-seasoned
might he made to women whose scientific
achievements are wcll-lcno'wn — university
women and others. We have many womiin
fie., who might lie 111c need to give popu
can win their sympathy - our desired end
from some great-hearted person woind-
mako these lecture hours red-letter ones,
epidiascope to (lie various centres.
I should like to dispel n quite general
her home has time to sLudy nature; tlinl
long wn Iks and field work arc essential
to such study. I nm not jesting -when
kitchen window will provide the liousc-
aiEtkcr, with a vast field. A few seeds on
a fjauerr, covered .with woLt moss, vill
tench her tho secrets of germination. A
hunch of trailer's twigs (street tree pnm:
lnjrs, will give hur endless delight ns
she watches fn tlieir breaking buds for
the coining of spring. In a glass of clear
.water a willow- twig will open her eyes
to the marvels oi root-development. I
could give n hundred, a thousand do'ight-
. ful n.spcets of nature which might ihuti
he studied ns she goes about her house
hold duties — to watch all' of which would
tell her children the names of (lowers and
\Vhy bother about names at all. Why not
to love wli.it they see. They will pick
up the names later if they wish to do so;
Teach them to pause and listen to -the
songs of birds; to wonder why a ronin-
rednrenst drops to the ground like a fall
ing leaf; to see beauty in the diamond1
hum? snare of a mother-spider— all un
forgettable things when seen with wide',
Another busv mother writes that she is
sympathetic, hut hesitates to lake on
more "work." Jf nature study is to bo
with the writer than it would he unfair
then no matter bow busy she may be 1
think she. will manage to devote a few
minutes ot her day to sonic phase ol
Tho hand that rocks the cradle rule
the .world. Though the. mode; n mother
does little eradle-rocking, few would care
most men will concede that she rtdes the
world to-dny as supremely as in the oast.
Tn her influence over little children dur
ing the first six- years of their liven she
has power to make or mar tlic men a.ul
women of to-morrow. Let us band to
gether and tench each other how best to
use part, of this great gift to secure n
much-needed protection for our (bra and
Thus, in the years to come, as tliey
country highways, or the vast, hird-
hnuntcd forests that, have sprung up 'ou
once devastated lands, our children's, chil
dren will be able to say with all the -wide
of a boy in his sohlicr-fathcr, "My mothe:
destruction." >
I fear that T have- trespassed much
arc already achieved when they are well
begun. I think the success of- the League
of Youth is nfisured.— Yours. &e..
TCI J IT 1 1 COLEMAN. ,
15/7/33) that a special appeal should be
made to women for their help in the pro-
letters convince me of three things: —
1. The interest of both men and women
2. That many women are ready to
and sympathy with all living things that
should develop into a deep and lasting
love of the flora and fauna of our coun-
Mr. CrolI has offered to bring my let-
League of Youth when it is formed. We
can safely leave that matter in his sym-
pathetic hands. In the meantime
I would suggest that all women
who are interested, whether mothers,
aunts, big sisters or women with-
out ties, should form groups for general
discussion of the subject with the idea
governing council of the L. of Y. We
want the help of all women who have,
children of pre-school years. We especi-
women and girls in offices and shops, uni-
versity or schools, students or teachers;
for we believe that they are destined to
play a big part in this movement. The
modern girl is generous of her time and
service where her sympathy is touched.
Girls who love hiking should be one of
our chief mainstays, for they have oppor-
fortunate ones.
We want, too, the aid of the mothers'
clubs connected with the schools, which
have already done such fine patriotic
work. We are, I think, in agreement
that, if women are to aid little children
over the first fences of nature study they
must themselves have some knowledge of
the subject. Ways and means must be
found to enlighten us all in the swiftest
and most pleasant possible manner. It has
been suggested that women's nature
circles should be formed— the members to
meet monthly in halls or private homes.
urged to exhibit or chat about some
thing she had discovered, either on a
The aid of garden-loving women is es-
woman is at heart a nature-lover, though
most of us would shy at the title of
naturalist. Yet a naturalist is no other
of observation. The smallest garden will
provide a budding naturalist with inter-
esting studies.
material for study especially in city and
realise the economic importance of co-
operation. Why not co-operate in an in-
teresting hobby, each one sharing the ma-
terial and the knowledge she has gained
with sister-women. If nature circles are
formed, I am sure that well-seasoned
might be made to women whose scientific
achievements are well-known — university
women and others. We have many woman
&c., who might be induced to give popu-
can win their sympathy our desired end
from some great-hearted person would
make these lecture hours red-letter ones,
epidiascope to the various centres.
I should like to dispel a quite general
her home has time to study nature; that
long waIks and field work are essential
to such study. I am not jesting when
kitchen window will provide the house-
mother with a vast field. A few seeds on
a saucer, covered with moist moss, will
teach her the secrets of germination. A
bunch of leafless twigs (street tree prun-
ings, will give her endless delight as
she watches in their breaking buds for
the coming of spring. In a glass of clear
to the marvels of root-development. I
could give a hundred, a thousand delight-
ful aspcets of nature which might thus
be studied as she goes about her house-
hold duties — to watch all of which would
tell her children the names of flowers and
Why bother about names at all. Why not
to love what they see. They will pick
up the names later if they wish to do so.
Teach them to pause and listen to the
songs of birds; to wonder why a robin-
redbreast drops to the ground like a fall-
ing leaf; to see beauty in the diamond-
hung snare of a mother-spider— all un-
forgettable things when seen with wide,
Another busy mother writes that she is
sympathetic, but hesitates to take on
more "work." If nature study is to be
with the writer than it would be unfair
then no matter how busy she may be I
think she will manage to devote a few
minutes ot her day to some phase of
The hand that rocks the cradle rules
the world. Though the modern mother
does little cradle-rocking, few would care
most men will concede that she rules the
world to-day as supremely as in the past.
In her influence over little children dur-
ing the first six years of their lives she
has power to make or mar the men and
women of to-morrow. Let us band to-
gether and teach each other how best to
use part of this great gift to secure a
much-needed protection for our flora and
Thus, in the years to come, as they
country highways, or the vast, bird-
haunted forests that, have sprung up on
once devastated lands, our children's chil-
dren will be able to say with all the pride
of a boy in his soldier-father, "My mother
destruction."
I fear that I have trespassed much
are already achieved when they are well
begun. I think the success of the League
of Youth is assured.— Yours. &c..
EDITH COLEMAN.
HUMOR IN NATURE Fish Oddities in Australian Waters Fathers as Nursemaids (Article), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Saturday 18 March 1933 [Issue No.24,316] page 6 2019-11-06 21:35 | HUMOR IN NATURE S
B — —
I Fish Oddities _
I in Australian __
i Waters
__ - .- Fathers I
as I
Nursemaids 1
[?]
plant and animal worlds of what lie can
only interpret as Nature's senso of
humor- She can at times he comical-
even frivolous. Is there nr. thing more
comical than the .beady, upturned, eye of
a duck- or more frivolous than the wind
fishes she Would seem occasionally to have
taken the bit between the teclli, to in
dulge in a series of caprices w hicb to
From time immemorial nearly all malo
The duties of nurse maul, the nurture and
carp of offspring, have been the preroga
tive of moaners, who are especially
to nurse and defend tlicm in the teeth ol
nil dangers, occasionally, alas, from the
unbridled appetite of a paternal pnrcnt.
she be abnormal, finds her greatest happi
trust m her.
In certain frogs and fishes Nature ha
essayed a new custom, or is it the sur
vivhl of an order of things older than
Here she hns turned tho tables with a
least, scemB grimly ludicrous, for, though
mothers may rejcl at tunes, few would
carc to reverse the natural order, hav ing,
confessed that everything points to effici
ency in the few fatliefs on whom the du
ties' of motherhood have so ruthlessly been
thrust. Sohio of them are able to incubate
eggs imposed upon them by an cmanci
patcd mother, and to care for and defend
the offspring when : they appear. Occa
sionally these outraged fnthcrs find it
necessary to safeguard the babies.- from
the eggs, has -no further interest in them
except as a delectable .liors d ceuvre. ,
Nursing faLhois have various -.ways of
an American toad literally swallows: the
chamber under bis throat, where the baby
eggs . wound'ribout bis legs aiid must; per
force, visit ponds and p.obls ip order to
appear. A salamander, father, too, is
thus adorned With string of eggs, '-and
has the' doubtful privilege of- guarding
them from the cainnibal toother w)io pro-
duccd them. , ,, '.. . .
In: the. fish world' the matter is even
more serious for nurse maid / fathers. Tha
pugnacious little stickleback; /who knowB|
the trials arid troubles . 'of ) a multiplicity j
of wives, is greatly impose'd iipoii by them
all tinnided", lie criiisfructB bis delightful
underwater ne'st, vvliile-' his lazy -Hadics
merely look on, arid lie must actually! drive
them into.the snug retreat to deposit their
eggs.' Soinctiriies, be it' told, ' bo / is ' a
.veritable cave-man fisli, ' and must club
Mrs. Stickleback' into submission.. She
has . her revenge /later, when, he is loft
to guard her 'eggs while she swims away to
indulge" in whatever, pastime- takes, the
"place of; croquet' or; "bridge ' jpiajtiee m her
ivntery world..;' ; '.
Even' more pathetic is the' position of
a father catfish', Who carries' in his mouth
from 50 to 100 eggs an ! irich 1 in diameter.
Not until the yoinigsters ' can -support
a meal with any enjoyment: If lie ShoulU
temporarily eject 'his '-family -.while ; he
tak'fcs a snack lie' must :nll': the tiino be
on guard against "those numerous enemies
wliicli make the rearing' of ' families a
hazardous undertaking- in /those watery
spaces. As bis nursing ' duties last for ton
long weeks,- he becomes- much emaciated,
or pciliapa dies pf starvation.; 'Mother-
fish are' known to brood 'eggs and babies
in the tobuth.'-'but somehow the duty
upon a father.' One fancies that in- these
instances paternal; selflessness -has reached
the pinnacle of:; perfection .'until one re
members what "one "lins Seen -of: the domes-
lie relations of "other small fish which
frequent Australian: seas.-
net'shrimps-fbr bait. find-in thcir-cntches
small snnkejiko fish three or four; inches
iii length;' beautiful little members of the
pipefish family, whose marital . customs
are no better adapted -to an equalisation
of the duties of parenthood. -Here again
we liavc, according' to human standards,
TheSo- curious fish, with their pipe-like
mouths, are not uncommon, so ' do not
fail to examine: a few, and read for your
self a story- of supreme self-abnegation in
fathers. In some of tho queer creatures
narrow furrow, on the, under surface of
the base of the tail. TheBe are- the father
males a- slight ridge only is apparent, but
as the mating season . approaches , .it be
Whatever may have been the joys of bis
bachelor days, from tbis moment life be
comes a serious business for the' father
pipefish. He has, become an incubator
for the eggs of his .lady, .who after the
him . with a poucliful of potential pipe
fish to . care for..
That , lie does I113 duty faithfully was
evident in a number of specimens .which
Snowy River, .nt Mario. IMaced in a glass
of clear water, they 'enabled ine to wit-
np» one. oi the strangest happenings 111
Nature's wido realm — the birth of a baby-
pipefish from tho brood poucli of its
tho pouch was honeycombed, like tripe,
with dozens of small colli), and in each
cell an embrvo pipefish, with great black
sac- Later much movement could ho seen,
bubble-like swellings, appeared in tbc
middle of tho pouch, and instantly out
squirmed -first one, then another wee pipe
than" thin silver streaks, tiny phantom
fish, in which the large dark ej-es ' were
startlingly prominent. Except for a vvrith-
iiig, lashing motion of tho tail they;, swam
through the water like boys' kites mount;
ing into 'the sky. The dark-eyed head was
tho kite, while; at the extreme tip- o£;the
tail was a toinute ; .fanlike fin, vyhich
doubtless acted as a rudder, propelling ,arid
steering tho transparent creature ; to,. tlie
tpp of the small world into Which "itiliad
so lately been born. It needed-, only/a
magnifying glass to' show , that in spite
of. the absence: of pigment each tiny fish;
apparition was' a perfect pipefisli;' - soiiie
day, perchance, .to swell' the. ranks,. of out;
.Ancestral characteristics, are of tori very
apparent in the extremely young;;: Tli'e
transparent pipe-fish,;: as ; it leaves: its
father's poucli, /bears also a . strong re
semblance, to another. group, /of' .curious
fish os, - the eea-Uorscs, wluch str.ingely
enough , - are- 'said to , bo descended from
pipe-fish. It .is probable that bqllVgroups
may b-;. traced, to a coriimon/ ancestor.,. ,'
Under natural -conditions,., among : his
beloved pastures of sea grass, the 'pipe
fish" is well camouflaged. Indeed it' is
very difficult to' dissociate .him from
the weeds in the nets of the fisheriueii,
so, closely does ho resemble -a .blade; of
sea grass. My specimens did not '"live
long,, for I had Only fresh water in which
to piacc them when they were brought
to me; but tlicy are beautifully . pre
served- in a weak formalin solution, nn-l
I linvo only to view tliem, through .; the
clear glass of the flask, to visualise' oricc
To see the tail of a fish used to per;
feeiion as -a 'hand, liko.tho euilqd tail
of an opossum, one' must cxnmino some
of the pipe-fish's armored veli/tiiins, .' the
the duties of nurse iriaid devolve upon
tlie father. They are not uncommon in
sea-ivrack along the coasts, resisting Btrong
weed in a doublo coil 1 Tlie sea-horse
is indeed a queer fish. With the . head
worm, ho secma to have come from
another world. Specimens are- frequent
piovcmcnts may be studied jn a jar of
sea water. Unlike the pipe-fish, tho sea
horse swimB spirally, in an almost ver
manner that makes one giddy .to watch.
At other times ho remains almost . mo
with only liis fins in motion. : The one
illustrated was , left by a waVe on the
sands ot i'hillip Island.' It was kept-
until something larger could lie foiiud. It,
too, is preserved - in formalin solution,
with a larger one taken in tho nets- at
Xowhaven. They make interesting me
of Dreams." -- , , ,-
In tho little cmrasscd sea-hotse we
have another nursing fnthcr. wh Me wife,
lifo herself. A near relation of the sea
horse is the leafy sea-dragon. He la even
more difficult to discover than his cou
sin, for, besides being ot the same cclor
as tho weeds he frequents, he liaB leafy,
weed-like appendages attacbed in pairs
to., bis body. : Tlie sea/dragon ' retains its
color when dried. and is, even- then, if
interest The, one , sketched lias; been in
the possession , of tlie writer for years,
arid ' has beep much lidriiirpii,' though' on
one oeeasion it was . derisively iikened to
father who takes complete' ' charge of
eggs and babieis, arid cradles' tliein in a
capacious pouch. Such;." excellent purse
maids /.these fathers make that one is
forced to the conclusion that', the domi-
nriiit;male cxcolsi cveri ;in th'dse walks of
life regarded ps the special doinain of
ilie; female, whether as cook; dress maker
or iiurse iniiiL ' . -, ;
| HUMOR IN NATURE

Fish Oddities
in Australian
Waters
Fathers
as
BY E.C.
plant and animal worlds of what he can
only interpret as Nature's sense of
humor. She can at times he comical—
even frivolous. Is there anything more
comical than the beady, upturned, eye of
a duck or more frivolous than the wind
fishes she would seem occasionally to have
taken the bit between the teeth, to in-
dulge in a series of caprices which to
From time immemorial nearly all male
The duties of nurse maid, the nurture and
care of offspring, have been the preroga-
tive of mothers, who are especially
to nurse and defend them in the teeth of
all dangers, occasionally, alas, from the
unbridled appetite of a paternal parent.
she be abnormal, finds her greatest happi-
trust in her.
In certain frogs and fishes Nature has
essayed a new custom, or is it the sur-
vival of an order of things older than
Here she has turned the tables with a
least, seems grimly ludicrous, for, though
mothers may rebel at times, few would
care to reverse the natural order, having,
confessed that everything points to effici-
ency in the few fathers on whom the du-
ties of motherhood have so ruthlessly been
thrust. Some of them are able to incubate
eggs imposed upon them by an emanci-
pated mother, and to care for and defend
the offspring when they appear. Occa-
sionally these outraged fathers find it
necessary to safeguard the babies from
the eggs, has no further interest in them
except as a delectable hors d'ceuvre.
Nursing fathers have various ways of
an American toad literally swallows the
chamber under his throat, where the baby
eggs wound about his legs and must, per-
force, visit ponds and pools in order to
appear. A salamander father, too, is
thus adorned With string of eggs, and
has the doubtful privilege of guarding
them from the cannibal mother who pro-
duced them.
In the fish world the matter is even
more serious for nurse maid fathers. The
pugnacious little stickleback. who knows
the trials and troubles of ) a multiplicity
of wives, is greatly imposed upon by them
all. Unaided, he constructs his delightful
under-water nest, while his lazy ladies
merely look on, and he must actually drive
them into the snug retreat to deposit their
eggs. Sometimes, he is told, he is a
veritable cave-man fish, and must club
Mrs. Stickleback into submission. She
has her revenge later, when, he is left
to guard her eggs while she swims away to
indulge in whatever, pastime takes, the
place of croquet or bridge parties in her
watery world.
Even more pathetic is the position of
a father catfish, Who carries in his mouth
from 50 to 100 eggs an inch in diameter.
Not until the youngsters can support
a meal with any enjoyment. If he should
temporarily eject his family while he
takes a snack he must all the time be
on guard against those numerous enemies
which make the rearing of families a
hazardous undertaking in these watery
spaces. As his nursing duties last for ten
long weeks, he becomes much emaciated,
or perhaps dies of starvation. Mother-
fish are known to brood eggs and babies
in the mouth, but somehow the duty
upon a father. One fancies that in these
instances paternal selflessness has reached
the pinnacle of perfection until one re-
members what one has seen of the domes-
tic relations of other small fish which
frequent Australian seas.
net shrimps for bait find in their catches
small snake-like fish three or four inches
in length, beautiful little members of the
pipefish family, whose marital customs
are no better adapted to an equalisation
of the duties of parenthood. Here again
we have, according to human standards,
These curious fish, with their pipe-like
mouths, are not uncommon, so do not
fail to examine a few, and read for your
self a story of supreme self-abnegation in
fathers. In some of the queer creatures
narrow furrow, on the under surface of
the base of the tail. These are the father
males a slight ridge only is apparent, but
as the mating season approaches it be-
Whatever may have been the joys of his
bachelor days, from this moment life be-
comes a serious business for the father
pipefish. He has become an incubator
for the eggs of his lady, who after the
him with a pouchful of potential pipe-
fish to care for.
That he does his duty faithfully was
evident in a number of specimens which
Snowy River, at Marlo. Placed in a glass
of clear water, they enabled me to wit-
ness one of the strangest happenings in
Nature's wide realm — the birth of a baby-
pipefish from tho brood pouch of its
the pouch was honeycombed, like tripe,
with dozens of small cells, and in each
cell an embryo pipefish, with great black
sac. Later much movement could be seen,
bubble-like swellings, appeared in the
middle of the pouch, and instantly out
squirmed first one, then another wee pipe-
than thin silver streaks, tiny phantom
fish, in which the large dark eyes were
startlingly prominent. Except for a writh-
ing, lashing motion of the tail they swam
through the water like boys' kites mount-
ing into the sky. The dark-eyed head was
the kite, while at the extreme tip of the
tail was a minute fanlike fin, which
doubtless acted as a rudder, propelling and
steering the transparent creature to the
top of the small world into which it had
so lately been born. It needed only a
magnifying glass to show that in spite
of the absence of pigment each tiny fish-
apparition was a perfect pipefish, some
day, perchance, to swell the ranks of out-
Ancestral characteristics, are often very
apparent in the extremely young. Th'e
transparent pipe-fish, as it leaves its
father's pouch, bears also a strong re-
semblance, to another group of curious
fishes, the sea-horses, which strangely
enough, are said to be descended from
pipe-fish. It is probable that both groups
may be traced to a common ancestor.
Under natural conditions, among his
beloved pastures of sea grass, the pipe-
fish is well camouflaged. Indeed it is
very difficult to dissociate him from
the weeds in the nets of the fishermen,
so closely does he resemble a blade of
sea grass. My specimens did not live
long, for I had only fresh water in which
to place them when they were brought
to me; but they are beautifully pre-
served in a weak formalin solution, and
I have only to view them, through the
clear glass of the flask, to visualise once
To see the tail of a fish used to per-
feeiion as a hand, like the curled tail
of an opossum, one must examine some
of the pipe-fish's armored relations, the
the duties of nurse maid devolve upon
the father. They are not uncommon in
sea-wrack along the coasts, resisting strong
weed in a double coil ! The sea-horse
is indeed a queer fish. With the head
worm, he seems to have come from
another world. Specimens are frequent-
movements may be studied in a jar of
sea water. Unlike the pipe-fish, the sea
horse swims spirally, in an almost ver-
manner that makes one giddy to watch.
At other times he remains almost mo-
with only his fins in motion. The one
illustrated was left by a wave on the
sands ot Phillip Island. It was kept
until something larger could be found. It,
too, is preserved in formalin solution,
with a larger one taken in the nets at
Newhaven. They make interesting me-
of Dreams."
In the little cuirassed sea-hotse we
have another nursing father, whose wife,
life herself. A near relation of the sea-
horse is the leafy sea-dragon. He is even
more difficult to discover than his cou-
sin, for, besides being of the same cclor
as the weeds he frequents, he has leafy,
weed-like appendages attached in pairs
to his body. The sea-dragon retains its
color when dried, and is, even then, if
interest. The one sketched has been in
the possession of the writer for years,
and has been much admired, though on
one occasion it was derisively iikened to
father who takes complete charge of
eggs and babies, and cradles them in a
capacious pouch. Such excellent nurse
maids these fathers make that one is
forced to the conclusion that the domi-
nant male excels, even in those walks of
life regarded as the special domain of
the female, whether as cook, dress maker
or nurse maid.
Here's a Clever Australian One of Nature's Master Weavers at Work (Article), The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Saturday 14 January 1933 [Issue No.17,370] page 17 2019-11-06 20:42 manship — rivalling even the skill. shown by the spider in the building
of its iv'eb. '
thc nettle. Do not be too hard on
thc little fellow! Those stinging hairs
are his only Weapon of defence against
Sparc a little time to watch his
brown cgg-likc cocoons found in hun
finish. One holds the tiny thing .in
ono's hand to marvel that the faV
inch-long caterpillar could weave him
no visible means of 'exit for his
sijken cradle, thfere are few who would
care to. challenge his title of master-
weaver." .
Seeing Is believing. Place a few of
leaves in1 a box covered with a sheet,
of glass, and follow thc fashioning of
appearance wins approval, for the?
spite of his strange shape. Thc vivid
green of his fat body tones perfectly1,
with the $reen of the gum leaves. The '
yellow . stinging hairs, protruded only
touches of' sunlight.
Hitherto, like 'most caterpillars, he
feasting royally on thc leaves of his:
of his youth must end: now comes the
He ceases to cat, and wanders about
In a sluggish, apparently aimless
manner, usually on thc rough bark
of a tree. His action, though. Is by
every movement, as he. investigates
every crack and crcvico, choosing as
most important stage in. his life. Hav
ing 'chosen 'a spot to his liking, he
.lies very still, -as if asleep, for long
hours at- a .-time.
\» ; - .'
TT1THERTO it has not been easy to
- discover which Is head and which
: Is tail. How however, a shiny,
' ' '
thc fat body. It moves back and forth
in what seems, a purposeless- manner.
It needs only a hand-lens to show; that,
net. .
praise. It' is surely
inch-long larva: but,
underside of ills
most. He con weave
just as well in tills
position, and thc
ovcr body is en
shaped, transparent net, througti which
- deed his. body appears now io be
shrinks and now thc tail. . . .
thin, white rubber, and is soft to thc
touch. Only by a shadowy, undulat
ing movement, or an occasional wrink
as thc weaver changes his position,
the touch, tor he has now varnished the
hours more it is complete, and thc
Wc understand now thc purpose of
those long, greedy orgies' on thc gum
since, was a sluggish caterpillar, pro
TLTERE in this snug retreat he lies
sect-encmy or a sharp-eyed bird. Had
he left transparent his cgg-likc cocoon,
Even his wings . and legs are furry,
and thc great,, black eyes are promi
nent. As one sees thc limp wings
stretch to their ' inch-wide expanse,
thc bark of a tree of exactly her own
color,, so that it is some time before
wc rediscover her. She rests with
wings ' flat, and appears to be part of
thc caterpillar made thc neat, circu
lar lid to . his cradle— thc door which,
os a -moth, he will only need to push,
on; but tho framework of a perfect
with just the right tools for his pur
regard the work of insects as un
Most of us can .cite many examples
In , support of this theory. But the
In removing a .. rccentlv finished
cocoon from the side of thc box to
which It adheres, a small circular hole
l pne might suppose that, the work
silk is exhausted: that his wont must
ceuse mechanically. No so. He im
mediately sets to work, and in ten.
i minutes the hole Is. covered; with a
fine network of silk; -in -ten minutes
hours the damage is fully repaired— .
almost Invisibly! In this cusc the
larva was able to meet an altogether :
unexpected emergency, and < the extra
work could hordly come under the
designation of mechanical action. .
Fcrhapa .no other Australian insect
repays one so fully lor a little time
spent in observing its habits. - Gather
up Some; of tho urown ' cocoons., and -
watch for yourself the wonderful ful-.
. Cocoohs of-thc'JVIot/i . "
Larua of Cup Moth
manship — rivalling even the skill shown by the spider in the building
of its web.
the nettle. Do not be too hard on
the little fellow! Those stinging hairs
are his only weapon of defence against
Spare a little time to watch his
brown egg-like cocoons found in hun-
finish. One holds the tiny thing in
one's hand to marvel that the fat,
inch-long caterpillar could weave him-
no visible means of exit for his
silken cradle, thfere are few who would
care to challenge his title of master-
weaver.
Seeing is believing. Place a few of
leaves in a box covered with a sheet,
of glass, and follow the fashioning of
appearance wins approval, for the
spite of his strange shape. The vivid
green of his fat body tones perfectly
with the green of the gum leaves. The
yellow stinging hairs, protruded only
touches of sunlight.
Hitherto, like most caterpillars, he
feasting royally on the leaves of his
of his youth must end; now comes the
He ceases to eat, and wanders about
in a sluggish, apparently aimless
manner, usually on the rough bark
of a tree. His action, though, is by
every movement, as he investigates
every crack and crevice, choosing as
most important stage in his life. Hav-
ing chosen a spot to his liking, he
lies very still, as if asleep, for long
hours at a time.
* * * *
HITHERTO it has not been easy to
discover which is head and which
is tail. Now however, a shiny,
the fat body. It moves back and forth
in what seems, a purposeless manner.
It needs only a hand-lens to show that,
net.
praise. It is surely
inch-long larva; but,
underside of his
most. He can weave
just as well in this
position, and the
over body is en-
shaped, transparent net, through which
deed his body appears now to be
shrinks and now the tail.
thin, white rubber, and is soft to the
touch. Only by a shadowy, undulat-
ing movement, or an occasional wrink-
as the weaver changes his position,
the touch, for he has now varnished the
hours more it is complete, and the
We understand now the purpose of
those long, greedy orgies on the gum
since, was a sluggish caterpillar, pro-
HERE in this snug retreat he lies
sect-enemy or a sharp-eyed bird. Had
he left transparent his egg-like cocoon,
Even his wings and legs are furry,
and the great, black eyes are promi-
nent. As one sees the limp wings
stretch to their inch-wide expanse,
the bark of a tree of exactly her own
color, so that it is some time before
we rediscover her. She rests with
wings flat, and appears to be part of
the caterpillar made the neat, circu-
lar lid to his cradle— the door which,
as a moth, he will only need to push,
on; but the framework of a perfect
with just the right tools for his pur-
regard the work of insects as un-
Most of us can cite many examples
in support of this theory. But the
In removing a recently finished
cocoon from the side of the box to
which it adheres, a small circular hole
One might suppose that, the work
silk is exhausted: that his work must
cease mechanically. No so. He im-
mediately sets to work, and in ten
minutes the hole is covered with a
fine network of silk; in ten minutes
hours the damage is fully repaired—
almost invisibly! In this case the
larva was able to meet an altogether
unexpected emergency, and the extra
work could hardly come under the
Perhaps no other Australian insect
repays one so fully for a little time
spent in observing its habits. Gather
up some of the brown cocoons., and
filment of a small green caterpillar-life.
Cocoons of-the Moth
Larva of Cup Moth
MAN MADE RIVERS (Article), The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Saturday 28 May 1932 [Issue No.17,171] page 18 2019-11-06 20:19 «mbe Pivris
[?]
but it has transformed thou
sands of acres of land into in
JjESS thnn 50 years ago scientific ir
rigation was Introduced Into Aus
take a bird's-eve view of certain ir-
rigated areas, and see froth above the
. network of channels that veins the
land in silver or blue, carrying fer
tilising hili-waters to thirsty crops
A visit to the Goulburo weir and
Waranga reservoir, the largest arti
Goulburn Valley. Today that coun
ucrrs, formerly fit only for grazing,
have been transformed into agricul
tural und pastoral lunds of surpassing
One learns from the farmer that irri
gation in thirsty lands has certain ad
water may bo supplied or withheld at
cntiroly under nis control. It is com
that, . where river
irrigation, the sedi
ment held In sus
- posited.
Many of -the
channels arc beau
deed. they are
without capricious- -
but where man-
i„ 0 roisses' the real river music,
.u ? gurgle over submerged
& „ '9T tweet , voice, of meander,
!>r ttmama; but the song
2L c wind in die reeds that skirt the
."l the lesser waterways ;,
evtr o delight, and there are al
birds cattle and floating watcr-
Q3HE Goulburn weir, which Is only a
. few miles fryrn. Nagambie and Mur-
chison, is ono of the wondeis of our |
Slate, and has become the Mecca of |
many holldaymakors. It is an imprcs- a
sive sight, even in summer, to see the |
volume of water which pours, with I
deafening clamor, over the great con- |
crete wall to form a series of splendid K
waterfalls. But in times of winter 1
flood, when the Goulburn .Is swollen
rush of waters is terrible, but mug- -
nificent. .
An immense sheet of water, dammca
idea of the thousands of tons of pre
flooded tho country on cither bank be
floods of the Murray. High put of the
wide expanse are the stark rcmaiiw
of hundreds of trees whidi died when
the penl-up waters enveloped them—
to the liver of. forests a mournful
These man-made rivers not onW
land; Uicy have given him other in- I
terests that arc some mpcr»ihon (
fior his comparative isolation. Where I
so much water is provided birds ru®
haunts of cormorants; black son
white . ibis, herons and swans; white,
like restless spirits, swallows, hi
dusky hordes, skim their surfaces, on
two occasions; recently, the rore muss-
duck was seen— said to be ono or Au«»
tralia's most rdmarkable birds. Tnl
male has a Strange, pouch-like ap
pendage under his bill. The fcmalf
lucks this ornament . t '.
MAN-MADE RIVERS
by Edith Coleman
but it has transformed thou-
sands of acres of land into in-
LESS than 50 years ago scientific ir-
rigation was introduced into Aus-
take a bird's-eye view of certain ir-
rigated areas, and see from above the
network of channels that veins the
land in silver or blue, carrying fer-
tilising hill-waters to thirsty crops
A visit to the Goulburn weir and
Waranga reservoir, the largest arti-
Goulburn Valley. Today that coun-
acres, formerly fit only for grazing,
have been transformed into agricul-
tural und pastoral lands of surpassing
One learns from the farmer that irri-
gation in thirsty lands has certain ad-
water may be supplied or withheld at
entirely under his control. It is com-
that, where river
irrigation, the sedi-
ment held in sus-
posited.
Many of the
channels are beau-
deed, they are
without capricious-
wills. One misses the real river music,
the lap and gurgle over submerged
logs, the low, sweet voice of meander-
ing mountain streams; but the song
of the wind in the reeds that skirt the
channels and fill the lesser waterways
is ever a delight, and there are al-
and sky, of cattle and floating water-
birds.
THE Goulburn weir, which Is only a
few miles from Nagambie and Mur-
chison, is one of the wonders of our
State, and has become the Mecca of
many holidaymakers. It is an impres-
sive sight, even in summer, to see the
volume of water which pours, with
deafening clamor, over the great con-
crete wall to form a series of splendid
waterfalls. But in times of winter
flood, when the Goulburn is swollen
rush of waters is terrible, but mag-
nificent.
An immense sheet of water, dammed
idea of the thousands of tons of pre-
flooded the country on either bank be-
floods of the Murray. High out of the
wide expanse are the stark remains
of hundreds of trees which died when
the pent-up waters enveloped them—
to the lover of forests a mournful
These man-made rivers not only
land; they have given him other in-
terests that are some compensation
for his comparative isolation. Where
so much water is provided birds are
haunts of cormorants; black and
white ibis, herons and swans; white,
like restless spirits, swallows, in
dusky hordes, skim their surfaces. On
two occasions recently, the rare musk-
duck was seen— said to be one of Aus-
tralia's most remarkable birds. The
male has a strange, pouch-like ap-
pendage under his bill. The female
lacks this ornament.
Shakespeare's Little Western Flower LOVE-IN-IDLENESS (Article), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Saturday 23 September 1939 [Issue No.26345] page 12 2019-11-04 21:41 0VE 'N-IDLE-
II NESS was
s h akespeare's
L-Jra j.A«/nome or
'iLllittlewild pansy
CvMl » t£\| which, in his
corn or stubble, just as It
a .maiden, fell idly, or use
flower. ,
It was a potent Juice' of Love-in-
awakening, she must perforce faff in
been cultivated for nearly two cen
Its popularity. Cupid's flower Is an
other of Shakespeare's names. Herb-"
refers to its three colors. Herb-con
stancy, Herd-true-love, Call-me-tb-ydu,
Klss-me-at-lhe-garden-gate, are a few
know it best as Heart's-case, and all
token. In Shakespeare's day it' was a
of Heart's-ease would ensure that ab
The name Heart's-ease recalls Its
with a wild Vlole. (Heart's-ease is
merely a viola which has got a (Vay
from the violet shape). It was useil
Until quite recently in herbal therapy,
official In German and Swiss pharma
The Iragmnce and heart-easing
hear him ?" said the guide to Chris
tiana. "1 will dare to say that this
more of that herb called Hearts's-easc
"receipt" books, for nearly four cen
turies. "God send thee nedvcnly
It Is mutch better with poverty to have
passing of SUch innocent beliefs.
Head, of the Pansies
It Is not easy to recognise In Heart's-
circular pansles that grace our gardens
Is one of its happiest features, for it
plant life— certain visible movements .
Its well-known amatory names, Cuddle-
when' once established. The secret of
its success lies in Its colors, yellow,
the bee unerringly to tho yellow centre
ensuring fertility of Its seed.
the lowest petal; but there 'are scores
sown soon nftqr maturing:. It germin
ates best under a fluctuating tempera
into sUnsHlnc, or shade, thUs in
creasing or decreasing the tempera
ture. Self-sown plants are wonder
subjected to ninny changes of tem
It seemed no more than poetic Jus
the French namfe, Pensee, which . at
once recalled Ophelia's words; "Pdn-
sies, that's for thduglits."
And maidens call it Love-in-'
LOVE-I'N-IDLE-
NESS was
Shakespeare's
name for the
little wild pansy
which, in his
corn or stubble, just as it
a maiden, fell idly, or use-
flower.
It was a potent Juice of Love-in-
awakening, she must perforce fall in
been cultivated for nearly two cen-
its popularity. Cupid's flower is an
other of Shakespeare's names. Herb-
refers to its three colors. Herb-con-
stancy, Herd-true-love, Call-me-to-you,
Klss-me-at-the-garden-gate, are a few
know it best as Heart's-ease, and all
token. In Shakespeare's day it was a
of Heart's-ease would ensure that ab-
The name Heart's-ease recalls its
with a wild viola. (Heart's-ease is
merely a viola which has got away
from the violet shape). It was used
until quite recently in herbal therapy,
official in German and Swiss pharma-
The fragrance and heart-easing
hear him ?" said the guide to Chris-
tiana. "I will dare to say that this
more of that herb called Hearts's-ease
"receipt" books, for nearly four cen-
turies. "God send thee heavenly
it is mutch better with poverty to have
passing of such innocent beliefs.
Head of the Pansies
It is not easy to recognise in Heart's-
circular pansies that grace our gardens
is one of its happiest features, for it
plant life— certain visible movements
its well-known amatory names, Cuddle-
when once established. The secret of
its success lies in its colors, yellow,
the bee unerringly to the yellow centre
ensuring fertility of its seed.
the lowest petal; but there are scores
sown soon after maturing. It germin-
ates best under a fluctuating tempera-
into sunshine, or shade, thus in-
creasing or decreasing the tempera-
ture. Self-sown plants are wonder-
subjected to many changes of tem-
It seemed no more than poetic jus-
the French name, Pensee, which at
once recalled Ophelia's words; "Pan-
sies, that's for thoughts."
And maidens call it Love-in-
MAGIC OF A NAME BY E.C. Lad's- Love For Sentiment--and Beardless Chins (Article), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Saturday 5 August 1939 [Issue No.26,302] page 14 2019-11-04 21:23 MAGIC OF A NAME 13
"Old Man, or LaA's-Love — in tho name there's nothing '
T.he hoar-green leathery herb, almost a tree,
Growing iDith Rosemary and Lavender.
Half decorate, half perplex, the thing It is ... . I
. Yet I . would rather give up others more sweet,
EDWARD THOMAS (1S7S-1917).
- 1 — — l - s__ 'ii
UTTHPlRfflA D ' s " l 0VE
MJ B grows in yoyr
round tne- nur-
garden were planted on "his
grave in France.,
There Is nothing' very striking about
the grey-green "plant. Its flowers are
insignificant. It has not tho sweet
ness of its. peers— rosemary and laven
der — yet, like the poet, we arc strange
be coaxed by crushing tho - leaves.
Therein lies part of its magic. It Is
one of the herbs which wo Irresistibly,
pinch as we pass, Men and women,
poets and prosaic people, , differ in-
many ways, but not In ways of the
heart. A waft of flower perfume be
the faces of ' your garden visitors as
they strive to recall a vanished -name
belonging to this or that perfume 7
You were surprised at the Interest
' gave him.
over his face ps he stooped to pinch
a sprig of. Lad's-love ? Ah 1 "The
He was politely interested In all of
Yes, wo are all streaked with sen
It is mado manifest in our gardens.
It must be admitted that sontlment
plays no small part in pur choice ot
plants,, or how comes It that space
is spared for humble flowers 'of no
especial beauty,? If one seek the rea
In the magic of a name — a name born
Lad's-love I Tne name is as simple
as the plant It designates, yet In five
hoary green, feathery foliage,- and In
Growth , of Manly Beard
We smile at the name as we re
member why lads loved It, Strange as
it may seem, It was once held in high
an ointment made of Its ashes to pro
mote the growth of a manly beard,
Women, too. used It for a hair wash,
It lias -many other charming narrieC
Elizabethan and earlier. - '.'Southerns,
wood" we all know. This ls a corrup
Europe (Italy. France and Spain),
"Boys-love." too. refers to its magic,
on beardless chins. -Old Man" recalls
Its hoary foliage. -Maid s Delight" has
probably some reference to the me
diaeval maids delight in a well-
complete witnout a sprig of Lad's-
These have more language than my songs
Take them and lot them apeak for mo.
Down the green lanes of AUary.
Alas l We have grown away from
tho charming custom of "saying It
placo in the romance of .these sophis
bunch of it to church, partly as - an
antiseptic, but chiefly because Its aro-
matic odor kept people rrom drowsing
qurlpg long sermons,.,.
:. --It vas a sovereign' remedy,, for' scii-'
; sickness as well . as., for', gqut and
! hysterics 1
: century It was used by farriers to draw
; out thorns or splinters from the fcot
' of horses and catt'.c, and ls still cultl-
J well as In herbal therapy.
I Another of its many names, Bccs'-
i bane, . reminds us that a branch was
iused to urge a swarm ot bees Into a
; new hive. It ls said to be hated by,
' bees visit your Lad's-love, for it sel-
j dom flowers In Australia.
And Lad's-love has . magic powers 1
l leavcs will never miss their mark 1
Shakespeare, in Midsummer -Night's
: Dream,; .gives - pretty. -instance of- its-
magic In counteracting the effect of
- the' juice of- Cupid's -.flower on- TittfnJa.
Dlan's-bud, he .qalls. .it, for Artemisia,
the herb of Artemis, or Dlnnn. Oboron
, lifts tho . spell . by touching .Titanla's
; eyes with Lad's-love, and she is cured
Lad's-love for sentiment, for -.bald
heads and beardless chins, end for
magic powers I No wonder it holds its
place in our gardens. And, , as if this
tiecks straight up, and. is a remedy for
drnwne together; for the sciatica also. .
It killcth worms' and driveth them out,
If dnink "with wine it ls a remedy
against deadly poisons. It - helpeth
against the .Ringings of scorpion's."
We come Jjqck to the poet, and sen
timent— '
... A for myaelf,
Where first I met the hitter scent Is lost.
,1, too. .oftcb ehrlvel the crey ahrede.
Sniff them and think, ana enlff again, and
Once<mqre"'to"HhtnK'! what tt.Ms.I aitf.rB-
' ' memberlne.
Always In vaid.
—Ah, no 1 ; Not always.
Lad's-Love (Artemisia abroUnum), the poet's Kerb, The hoary, feathery
MAGIC OF A NAME BY E.C.
"Old Man, or Lad's-Love — in the name there's nothing
The hoar-green feathery herb, almost a tree,
Growing with Rosemary and Lavender.
Half decorate, half perplex, the thing It is ...
Yet I would rather give up others more sweet,
EDWARD THOMAS (1878-1917).
L A D ' S - L OVE
grows in your
garden, as it
round the hut
garden were planted on his
grave in France.
There is nothing very striking about
the grey-green plant. Its flowers are
insignificant. It has not the sweet-
ness of its peers— rosemary and laven-
der — yet, like the poet, we are strange-
be coaxed by crushing the leaves.
Therein lies part of its magic. It is
one of the herbs which we irresistibly
pinch as we pass. Men and women,
poets and prosaic people, differ in
many ways, but not in ways of the
heart. A waft of flower perfume be-
the faces of your garden visitors as
they strive to recall a vanished name
belonging to this or that perfume ?
You were surprised at the interest
gave him.
over his face as he stooped to pinch
a sprig of Lad's-love ? Ah ! "The
He was politely interested in all of
Yes, we are all streaked with sen-
It is made manifest in our gardens.
It must be admitted that sentlment
plays no small part in our choice of
plants, or how comes it that space
is spared for humble flowers of no
especial beauty ? If one seek the rea-
in the magic of a name — a name born
Lad's-love ! The name is as simple
as the plant it designates, yet in five
hoary green, feathery foliage, and in
Growth of Manly Beard
We smile at the name as we re-
member why lads loved It. Strange as
it may seem, it was once held in high
an ointment made of its ashes to pro-
mote the growth of a manly beard.
Women, too, used it for a hair wash,
It has many other charming names,
Elizabethan and earlier. "Southern-
wood" we all know. This ls a corrup-
Europe (Italy, France and Spain),
"Boys-love," too, refers to its magic
on beardless chins. "Old Man" recalls
its hoary foliage. "Maid's Delight" has
probably some reference to the me-
diaeval maid's delight in a well-
complete without a sprig of Lad's-
These have more language than my song;
Take them and let them speak for me,
Down the green lanes of Allary.
Alas ! We have grown away from
the charming custom of "saying it
place in the romance of these sophis-
bunch of it to church, partly as an
antiseptic, but chiefly because its aro-
matic odor kept people from drowsing
during long sermons.
It was a sovereign remedy, for sea-
sickness as well as for gout and
hysterics !
century it was used by farriers to draw
out thorns or splinters from the foot
of horses and cattle, and is still culti-
well as in herbal therapy.
Another of its many names, Bees'-
bane, reminds us that a branch was
used to urge a swarm ot bees into a
new hive. It is said to be hated by
bees visit your Lad's-love, for it sel-
dom flowers in Australia.
And Lad's-love has magic powers !
leaves will never miss their mark !
Shakespeare, in Midsummer Night's
Dream, gives a pretty instance of its
magic in counteracting the effect of
the juice of Cupid's flower on Titania.
Dian's-bud he calls it, for Artemisia,
the herb of Artemis, or Dlana. Oboron
lifts the spell by touching Titania's
eyes with Lad's-love, and she is cured
Lad's-love for sentiment, for bald
heads and beardless chins, and for
magic powers ! No wonder it holds its
place in our gardens. And, as if this
necks straight up, and. is a remedy for
drawne together; for the sciatica also.
It killeth worms and driveth them out,
If drunk with wine it is a remedy
against deadly poisons. It helpeth
against the stingings of scorpions."
We come back to the poet, and sen-
timent—
As for myself,
Where first I met the bitter scent is lost.
I, too, often shrivel the grey shreds.
Sniff them and think, and sniff again, and
Once more to think what it is I am re-
membering.
Always In vain.
—Ah, no ! Not always.
Lad's-Love (Artemisia abrotanum), the poet's herb, The hoary, feathery
THE PLANTS' PHYSICIAN CHAMOMILE-- For the Sick and the Sound (Article), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Saturday 27 May 1939 [Issue No.26,242] page 14 2019-11-04 20:52 BY. EDITH |
| COtEMAN. |
Though the camomile, the more it is trodden on the faster .
it- grows;
Yet youth, the. more it is wasted, the sooner it wears.
Roman Chamomile (Anthemis nobilis), valued for ita medicinal qualities.
E have -travel-
ff/mv:/IB: 1 a ?ng
waY since
iWjaf t c h a m omile
WjA WQS SO much
Ccm jjl' I lauded by
I. and botanist to Charles II.;
with remedies from Ihe field, or
of the herb garden itself; It was called
the plants' physician. There is cer
tainly something in Uic old belief that
plant the latter, almost always, re
covers 1 The explanation is probably
For thaso with a suburban passion
Is only one way to grow Chamomile,
As a border-edging to paths It is
as It has a tendency to roam. ThLs
is no pleasnnter chore, for a sunny
day. than clipping the aromatic
spreadcth." And so, for centuries,
sentiment, but chiefly for lis aromatic
country homes. This homely tea. (an
ounce of dried flowers Infused and
an aid to digestion, even when ad
ministered by the woman with no pro
is snld to he soothing and sedative,
flowers make n useful fomentation,
Bags filled wltii them are steeped in
Chamomile Is more valuable than the
abundant as once It was, and could
figure, for we had depended for sup
where the drug trade was well or
cords that in heathen times Chamo
shining Balder, nnd that people of the
his course, for thc.v would then possess
By the ancient Egyptians, Chamo
mile was consecrated to the sun be
cause of lis power to cure ague. In
Chamomile were huns in the house
states that a twig nf mLstletoe, lnld
prevent an nttack. Other writers assert
that Bclony, another delightful herb,
The Chamomile opens lis flowers In
Sow the seeds thinly. Press trans
earlier if the plants are growing vigor
If preferred, the lawn may lie al
will take care or. Itself by filling vacant
divers and sundry-
BY. EDITH
COLEMAN.
Though the camomile, the more it is trodden on the faster
it grows;
Yet youth, the more it is wasted, the sooner it wears.
Roman Chamomile (Anthemis nobilis), valued for its medicinal qualities.
WE have travel-
led a long
way since
c h a m omile
was so much
lauded by
I, and botanist to Charles II.;
with remedies from the field, or
of the herb garden itself; it was called
the plants' physician. There is cer-
tainly something in the old belief that
plant the latter, almost always, re-
covers ! The explanation is probably
For those with a suburban passion
is only one way to grow Chamomile,
As a border-edging to paths it is
as it has a tendency to roam. This
is no pleasanter chore, for a sunny
day, than clipping the aromatic
spreadeth." And so, for centuries,
sentiment, but chiefly for its aromatic
country homes. This homely tea (an
ounce of dried flowers infused and
an aid to digestion, even when ad-
ministered by the woman with no pro-
is said to be soothing and sedative,
flowers make a useful fomentation.
Bags filled with them are steeped in
Chamomile is more valuable than the
abundant as once it was, and could
figure, for we had depended for sup-
where the drug trade was well or-
cords that in heathen times Chamo-
shining Balder, and that people of the
his course, for they would then possess
By the ancient Egyptians, Chamo-
mile was consecrated to the sun be-
cause of its power to cure ague. In
Chamomile were hung in the house
states that a twig of mistletoe, laid
prevent an attack. Other writers assert
that Belony, another delightful herb,
The Chamomile opens its flowers in
Sow the seeds thinly. Press trans-
earlier if the plants are growing vigor-
If preferred, the lawn may be al-
will take care of itself by filling vacant
divers and sundry
The Teachings of Nature BY E.C.­ Lessons from Plants and Insects (Article), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Saturday 26 September 1931 [Issue No.23,857] page 7 2019-11-04 15:59 . gtM.Tiiiijni.iiiii;iii,'iii'iiiiil|),iliiniiiiinniiriiTiTiiiiT)TMimiiiiiiii.iiiiiiiiliiiiwiiiTntiiiiiiiiiihiidiiiiii
5
j The Teachings
j :: of -Nature;;:.::. ;
TimHiniiiiiiiriiiiinnnminTnnnnTiTniTinTiiTnnTnTiKTr1
. . r | 1 1
Lessons . |
from i;
Plants and h
insecis i
What -v/ould thlt man 7 Now upward would hs
And, IIMIq last than angals, would bo more.
It is close on 200 years since I'opu
penned those prophetic Hues. As one
views Tlie field oi modern invention one
w-oiiucis wliat tlie poet migbt add wero
he living to-day.. Intoxicated with suc
cess,. man scorns the paths by which lie
won. Ins conquests, ol earth, ami .sou, and
sky, ami neglects Ins tribute to Nature,
who .provided the piittcnis for bis many
inventions. AVho. coir doubt That she has
all- the" slander years of his habitation of
the earth ? His vaunted Bupvemncy over
every other form .ofTife he owes to the
applied to bis own needs, The countless
devices', which 'Nature- had -perfected be-
foro'-'bls-: birth:' AVhen- most ho Thinks -he
is original ho .as - copylngj. consciously, or
ilneonselouely, principles n,for which
Nature'-: neglected-, to- : take - out. patent
rights,-. His hest: mechanical contrivances
are based on ideas borrowed from ; her.
olio Tins- ever' led -tlie- .way.. Tie miniuiy
follows. AVIio first -.conquered- the -air ?
Not/man, but the humble -insect. Far
back into -the mists of; nntiquity - giant
dnigon-flics had perfected the art of aerial
linviyiiticm, darling; dipping -mid soaring
with consuinniuto- case. Their descen
dants lo-da.v, though' greatly smiillcr, are
swifter and moro skillul to . meet, the
greater needs of liCc tinder existing con
ditions. . '-
When man essayed tocouquer the nlr
tlicre were birds, and fish and many
other creatures To provide linn- with
models for Ins first feeble. 'machines; lie
loohod, and. lo ! ir bull' ot down; lighter
than a\r. lu the humble dandelion's
friiils be bad round one of Nuluro's
many biilloons, and in each till ted seed
her peiTcot pnrnoliutc, 'Tfrom the plant-
world lie drew ninny of- bis Tlispirn turns.
In Ins architecture man's chief 'successes
have closojy followed Tlio natural pro
cesses of plants. -.-From - studying the
power of tall trees 10 resist strong winds
he learned to buttress 'islcnder ' buildings
ol great height. Jn -constructing u light
house, broad at the base, slender towerdu
tlto top for wind resistance, bow .faith
fully bo copied Nature's inclliods. 'Not
only did lie rim foundations into- the
cniTIi, like those- ot n Ti'ce; hut ho so-
cured - greater rigidity and strength by-
dove tailing his blocks of; atone us Nature
bud I ii tight lum. : '
For tho'dorc-tailmg of tissues, to secure
strength, bad been known to plants long
befol'o man iind felt tlie; need' of slieller-
lAforo tbnu tills lie learned from plants-
Then stipcilbilly over. lien in inanv forms
bf mechanical construction ib unchallenged
He saw that they had -solved The problems
of aerial navigation -und engineering with
an economy of iniitoi'ial That must ever be
Ins cnVy; a ml stimulus to frcs'i "endeavor,
T he. rigid tendril of . the Tloddor-lnurel
(L'asythu), which bridges great go ps be
tween itH victhiis by- coding back upon
itself, -is only one of ninny familiar in-
stances. -The uso of hollow Columns -in
Ins .architecture \ftis perhaps suggested
by the slrength of hollow, bamboo stems,
ami man loarutd JeTsous, cveu from leaves
An cluboruto ry»tem -of vciuiiipricnalilcs
(he-most delicate IcuMo. witbsinml strong
windsi Uuc m ulmoat swed by its inc-
vlmnlcal perfcollon. . . . -.
The housewife hems her sheets tor
strength, ss well as neatness. Did she bor
row ..the Idea Irom Nature, who hemmed
the. edges of. her Iciivus perhaps beluro the
crui|lc of the huniau -raco . bud . begun to
ryvk-rknig, before iinun bad. .muuutacturcd
beds. ...Iu.,c.putlm» Tier - leaves, tp.. prevent
io56.:of, ipoiaturc, vNqjure . kueiv ..llie vahm
ot varnished surfaces belorc man. bio did
tlio little caterpillar wlilob wnterproofs
the inside of its eoeoon with varniBb front
its own body.- As the housemother crosses
ami reerosses her- threads', lo strengthen
the darn in the -kiieo ot her boy's slock
ing, her (left- fingers are unconsciously
copying Nature. -.This she.' may -see in a
strip of bark torn , irom tho - cocoanut
pulm, where fibrous strands make u woof
and weft neuter, und- stronger than her
own. Tho little green ant ot tho tropics
Surely, excels as a seamstress; for she not
u 1 1 ij tJHinco iiui itvoti uj nwivui|j|' yu(.uiiui
the edges- of leaves,; but -she ubcs- foV
thread the silk which .issues from the body
ul her larva.
1 linvo drawn froni-the-plnnt world most
ot my examples of the teachings of Na-
lure, but the humble insect and other
many of his inventions. Tho honey bee
provided him with a six-Wnlled cell, n
the maximum space with the least expen
this. Tho trap-door spider was shoring
up the sides of its shaft lo keop them
from crumbling long hoforc man .tun
nelled into tlio earth for coal to heat his
home or drivo his machinery. In: those
bridges of cabled silk, wliicli, support a
die spider taught hint the value .'of
stranded" ropes. The modern brtgd saw
is a clover invention,, but the ancient SOW'
lly line a pah- of such; .pe'rrect.l'.l'oo.ls.'. -:Ty
gauge their efficiency one ' nc6d dully eCel;
those gops in -tljo . .nearest, gum . leaves
where her descendants have been . busy.
J he jaws ol tlic.leuf-cuUor.boe are. a. paw
of toothed scissors, . perfect .-in > action,
which in shown by the: sections' she lias
cut Irom my rose leaves, The 'locking
rlcvico of the little -shell Trigonin -would
halTIo a .burglar; and -liow remarkably- the
sections ovorlap m the shell of tbnt dainty
little niollusa 'Fainted Lady. On the- same
principle, man manufaetures water-pipes
In lhc beaks of bil'ds and animals, their
feet, or their wlngd, mnn fiuds his models,
and he hesitates not to copy them. Ho
of scattering seodi to Been re nil even- dis
tribution, and m the poppy he- found U.
lid, lie 6bw. the openings arranged in. a
ring, like little windows under, tlie eaves
of a roof. AS It swayed in (bo wind he
saw bow beautifully tho seeds .answered
iu ijiq .(vunuviiui uciagii- . xc. wna. only ?
thought from, this To the idea, ofra pepper
caster.; ..... ,
Tic lound a -perfect gimlet In the fruits
of the wild - geranium (Crane's -bill);
where the- spiral is- so - weighted by . the
seed Ihut it- alights on the -ground in the
best position : for thei t'gimlpt '. to- work.
"Wben the dentist clasps the -.root: of a
tooth with hitf Sluny "'forceps vut is'Titl.lo
satisfaction to conilect then" 'origin- wi(h
the bnll-dog gnp-.of-a' beetle's pjncersj or
the defensive --weapons - of many 'Other
Insects. ' v--;!:-
The bUuII of an aqimal provides a wonder-
un example ot natures tenoning."- Tor the
belter prelection'' of the .most vital organ
of : the body, the Tirnliv- the- bones are
dovetailed into - one dome-shaped bone
«,- -- ! " = "".-.I
of great strength. One could, multiply
such instances cndlesslj'-. . Nothing in
Nature is loo lowly to inspire -man; with
now ideas. All Iiih contrivances for div-
,ng nml lloatiug and (lying, for; pulling
and -stretching uml rolling, for . boring. and
digging and ploughing, bis weapons of; de
fence or the tools of this trade, havq been
bused on the teachings of Nature. . .:
Did we rrahs' (lur.pg tho .Great AVar,
when we puinlci! uur ships To -morge- into
comparative in 'nubility; that the- art- of
canioiifiage had been practised-, by . am-
innls ami even plants before niau lind
learned his firsi lessons m - will-fare. -J n
ninny inulam es man s pare .for his oil-
spring goes no deeper than that, of oilhor
plants or animals. In providing .food
and education for lus chihjvon: belins ail
cxuinplo par excellence ..in.. tiiQ. vegetable
world, where every (lowering plant .leaves
a legacy to its offspring m-.the food. store
airrunding lis seeds. .Exstu inc.. closely. 4n
bean or a pen, and nolo the .stock of
iiourisbmcnt that lips boon .boarded, .to
give lbs embryo plant a good sturl- in
life. . j .. ..-
For lessons in ethics and, wisdom, one
inuy well' watch some of the humblest of
Nuture's little lives. Insects Tiuvo: ever
led the way lo prosperity, .They are
older than man. 'Ihey will probably'. be
lioro when lie has left the- earth. Can
one doubt Hint tlie chief reason' for their
success is a blind obedicncp to tlip ' laws
that govern tlioin ! In these days' 'of
industrial unrest, of tin filing- financial -pro
blems, mini may well go to- tlio bc.cs, pud
tlio ants lo learn wisdom. , ,Tl\cy, teach
us lessons in Bclllcssttcss pud cpnuminallsm
—even the blind Termites', (while- mils),
who work in diirkticss. Here, one lmlts, in
hiinralo mliuiriitiun ol a civillsntiou . in
many respects superior lo mauls own,
where thu sucrilicu uf tho individual To
mi ideal is perhaps unparalleled. 'Flic ter
mites sol n standard in team: work .niuu
may wisely copy. - When .accident .-.devas
tates a portion of their:. city -Tliey, Avasto
no lime in idle recniiiinaljoj!. , lii .su . -in
credibly short tuna not, only it. order.! re
stored out oi cliaos. but'tbu new city , is
stronger limn the old. It inuy" u'cll
strengthen one's "ailli m the' ultimate
good ol ill. .
Ill the present clans of- ninn's- own af
fairs it were well solvctuiicji. To seek the
peace that Iltrn along iho qu.ct paths of
Nature, to' incdltnto upoli tiio wis(|(im of
her ways '.and ram upwlint - wo owe to
her as tcnchcr, "Guidc-ahd fncUij.
! Vf
SKELETON OF A LEAF".
uitp:' - ,.v - . -v .- yv' " ' "
POPI'Y SEED CASES.


The Teachings
of Nature


Lessons
from
Insects
What would this man ? Now upward would he
And, little less than angels, would be more.
It is close on 200 years since Pope
penned those prophetic lines. As one
views the field of modern invention one
wonders what the poet might add were
he living to-day. Intoxicated with suc-
cess, man scorns the paths by which he
won his conquests of earth, and sea, and
sky, and neglects his tribute to Nature,
who provided the patterns for his many
inventions. Who can doubt that she has
all the slender years of his habitation of
the earth ? His vaunted supremacy over
every other form of life he owes to the
applied to his own needs, the countless
devices which Nature had perfected be-
fore his birth. When most he thinks he
is original he is copying, consciously, or
unconciously, principles for which
Nature neglected to take out patent
rights. His best mechanical contrivances
are based on ideas borrowed from her.
She has ever led the way. He humbly
follows. Who first conquered the air ?
Not man, but the humble insect. Far
back into the mists of antiquity giant
dragon-flies had perfected the art of aerial
navigation, darting; dipping and soaring
with consummate ease. Their descen-
dants to-day, though greatly smaller, are
swifter and more skilful to meet, the
greater needs of life under existing con-
ditions.
When man essayed to conquer the air
there were birds, and fish and many
other creatures to provide him with
models for his first feeble machines. He
looked, and lo ! a ball of down; lighter
than air. In the humble dandelion's
fruits he had found one of Nature's
many balloons, and in each tufted seed
her perfect parachute, From the plant
world he drew many of his inspirations.
In his architecture man's chief successes
have closely followed the natural pro-
cesses of plants. From studying the
power of tall trees to resist strong winds
he learned to buttress slender buildings
of great height. In constructing a light
house, broad at the base, slender towards
the top for wind resistance, how faith-
fully he copied Nature's methods. Not
only did he run foundations into the
earth, like those of a tree, but he se-
cured greater rigidity and strength by-
dove tailing his blocks of stone as Nature
had taught him.
For the dove-tailing of tissues, to secure
strength, had been known to plants long
before man had felt the need of shelter.
More than this he learned from plants.
Their superiority over him in many forms
of mechanical construction is unchallenged.
He saw that they had solved the problems
of aerial navigation and engineering with
an economy of material that must ever be
his envy, and stimulus to fresh endeavor.
The rigid tendril of the dodder-laurel
(Casytha), which bridges great gaps be-
tween its victims by coiling back upon
itself, is only one of many familiar in-
stances. The use of hollow columns in
its architecture was perhaps suggested
by the strength of hollow bamboo stems,
and man learned lessons, even from leaves.
An elaborate system of veining enables
the most delicate Ieaf to withstand strong
winds. One is almost awed by its me-
chanical perfection.
The housewife hems her sheets for
strength, as well as neatness. Did she bor-
row the idea from Nature, who hemmed
the edges of her Ieaves perhaps before the
cradle of the human race had begun to
rock—long before man had manufactured
beds. In coating her leaves, to prevent
loss of moisture, Nature know the value
of varnished surfaces before man. So did
the little caterpillar which waterproofs
the inside of its cocoon with varnish from
its own body. As the housemother crosses
ami recrosses her threads, to strengthen
the darn in the knee of her boy's stock-
ing, her deft fingers are unconsciously
copying Nature. This she may see in a
strip of bark torn from the cocoanut
palm, where fibrous strands make a woof
and weft neater and stronger than her
own. The little green ant of the tropics
surely excels as a seamstress, for she not
only makes her nest by sewing together
the edges of leaves, but she uses for
thread the silk which issues from the body
of her larva.
I have drawn from the plant world most
of my examples of the teachings of Na-
ture, but the humble insect and other
many of his inventions. The honey bee
provided him with a six-walled cell, a
the maximum space with the least expen-
this. The trap-door spider was shoring
up the sides of its shaft to keep them
from crumbling long before man tun-
nelled into the earth for coal to heat his
home or drive his machinery. In those
bridges of cabled silk, which support a
the spider taught him the value of
"stranded" ropes. The modern bread saw
is a clever invention, but the ancient saw-
fly had a pair of such perfect tools. To
gauge their efficiency one need only to seek
those gaps in the nearest gum leaves
where her descendants have been busy.
The jaws of the leaf-cutter bee are a pair
of toothed scissors, perfect in action,
which is shown by the sections she has
cut from my rose leaves. The locking
device of the little shell Trigonia would
baffle a burglar; and how remarkably the
sections overlap in the shell of that dainty
little mollusc Painted Lady. On the same
principle, man manufactures water-pipes
In the beaks of birds and animals, their
feet, or their wlngs, man finds his models,
and he hesitates not to copy them. He
of scattering seeds to secure an even dis-
tribution, and in the poppy he found it.
lid, he saw the openings arranged in a
ring, like little windows under the eaves
of a roof. As it swayed in the wind he
saw how beautifully the seeds answered
to the wonderful design. It was only a
thought from this to the idea of a pepper
He found a perfect gimlet in the fruits
of the wild geranium (Crane's -bill),
where the spiral is so weighted by the
seed that it-alights on the ground in the
best position for the "gimlet" to work.
When the dentist clasps the root of a
tooth with his shiny forceps it is little
satisfaction to connect their origin with
the bull-dog grip of a beetle's pincers, or
the defensive weapons of many other
insects.
The skuII of an animal provides a wonder-
fun example of nature's teaching. For the
better protection of the most vital organ
of the body, the brain, the bones are
dovetailed into one dome-shaped bone

of great strength. One could multiply
such instances endlessly . Nothing in
Nature is too lowly to inspire man with
new ideas. All his contrivances for div-
ing and floating and flying, for pulling
and stretching and rolling, for boring and
digging and ploughing, his weapons of de-
fence or the tools of this trade, have been
based on the teachings of Nature.
Did we ???? during the Great War,
when we painted our ships to merge into
comparative invisibility, that the art of
camouflage had been practised, by ani-
mals and even plants before man had
learned his first lessons in warfare. -In
many instances man's care for his off-
spring goes no deeper than that, of either
plants or animals. In providing food
and education for his children he has an
exuample par excellence in the vegetable
world, where every flowering plant leaves
a legacy to its offspring in the food store
surrounding its seeds. Examine closely a
bean or a pea, and note the stock of
nourishment that has been hoarded to
give the embryo plant a good start in
life.
For lessons in ethics and wisdom one
may well watch some of the humblest of
Nature's little lives. Insects have even
led the way to prosperity. They are
older than man. They will probably be
here when he has left the earth. Can
one doubt that the chief reason for their
success is a blind obedience to the laws
that govern them ! In these days of
industrial unrest, of battling financial pro-
blems, man may well go to the bees, and
the ants to learn wisdom.They teach
us lessons in selflessness and cpmmunallsm
—even the blind termites, (white ants),
who work in darkness. Here one halts in
humble admiration of a civilisation in
many respects superior to man's own,
where th sacrifice of the individual to
an ideal is perhaps unparalleled. The ter-
mites set a standard in team work man
may wisely copy. When accident devas-
tates a portion of their city they waste
no time in idle recrimation. In an in-
credibly short time not only is order re-
stored out of chaos, but the new city is
stronger than the old. It may well
strengthen one's ???? in the ultimate
good of all.
In the present chaos of man's own af-
fairs it were well sometimes to seek the
peace that Iies along the quiet paths of
Nature, to meditate upon the wisdom of
her ways and sum up what we owe to
her as teacher, guide and friend.

SKELETON OF A LEAF.

POPPY SEED CASES.
POET OF THE BIRDS Bush Harmony THE SINGING GARDEN (Article), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Saturday 28 June 1941 [Issue No.26,894] page 19 2019-11-03 23:28 By B.C.
me IhnisH I fi In tlie watllo treo, an' "Oh, J on
hF'U.1 1,ls 1,1110 ,f0' or 1,11 1,10
Des wuilln' all the bush to know about his
HesiiiRS U 'over fifty llmcvi nn' then begins
nJS5" Moriiln' I Moiiiln 1 Tho xv or Id la wet
a hUnkle whore the sun comes
,iiinin thro
tm —(O J. Dennis)
TST T IS to early
I line that C
K WMb J. Dennis has
\ etched on the
loo soon to recall his passiop-
ofe love of Nature's green
Few will claim "Den,"- as he was
of his friends, as a great poet .or a
profound naturalist, but rather as -a
nature lover who sang, sweetly, often
most to him. Certainly the poet m
Alter nil, it is not the scientist
tho wakens our first interest -in
birds, but tho poet-naturalists who;
mates knowledge living." But what
arc combined !
Fortunately, wc have m Australia
ornithologists who are able to un
bend, to tell us in very human lan
guage about these jewels of . busli
who never open a book on orni
thology. he been less poet than
of us.enjoyment of the "Sentimen
to-day. One docs not read Dennis for
finds scattered throughout his work. .
tush.
furing wisdom by the peace it brings
lo simple nunds that value simple
thimrc." Tn his on rli or hnnlrc urn
find many a suggestion of his pas
sion lor feather folk, - as, lor m-
ttance, the thrush that stirred him
There arc many delightful nature
Bym, Dennis has given us something
Even in school hours toe youthful
Dennis, like ins own Sym, . must
white gate." for it is here that lie
willy niily out of doors. :
wiute; out men, as Lowell reminds
Bus, "Mr. White seems never to have
| had any harder work to do than to
study the habits of liis fellow towns
of song along a fence.'-' :
If we feel that Dennis lias hardly
\cllow Robins. Father forages, but
mother feeds the - nestlings with food
cap . comes less trippingly to the
to ten us over and over again that
ills body is a chime." two phrases
that crown Shaw Nellson "Poet of
the Blue Wicn." But Dennis has
sharpened the car of many a bird-
conscious novice to the "broad sun
our gamin of the gutter, pertlv vul
— useful, too, when apnides smother
"Where toe blossom glows I ful-
low" may be sung of other lionev
birds, but the wattle bird -seems to be
first in carrying the glnd news of
flowering pluirt or oanksin.
Dennis' starling is a lovable vaga
. although in Australia most of "his
- The courageous and inquisitive
Willie Wagtail, "
We have all seen him and his fel
lows feeding on sunlit fields, tnen at
some swift, > unseen comma/id, "rise,
Tawny Frogmouth .,
The Tawny Frogmouth. holding
his pose "with patience grim," is un
Dennis sings, he spreads terror :
among the meek/but wncn daytime-
ccmes feathered harridans make the
short-sighted follow pay for his. mis
liulc hun, ! One may see them
screaming at the vacant' post on .
before. For what- cause . is energy.
. expended m these vituperative on
"bushland's master melodist." Mag
had watched him closclv. These
traps, and many "Long John Sil
Most of us who have offered blan
dishments to biras regard the Yellow
Robin as the friendliest of all. but.
as the ooct hints, he is a cupboard
he does not toll us that yellow Bob
led tlie dawn chorus in his Singing
Garden. I wonder why. Ho appar
note, almost at dark, which an
nounced the last visitor to the gar
whole or his bird lore we remember
that exigencies of rhyme may some
times have forced mm to lake full
By E.C.
The thrush is in the watlle tree, an' "Oh, you
pretty dear !"
He's callin' to his little wife, for all the bush
to hear,
He's wantin' all the bush to know about his
charmin' hen;
He sings it over fifty times an' then begins
again.
For it's Mornin' ! Mornin' ! The worId is wet
with dew.
With tiny drops a'twinkle where the sun comes
shinin' thro'.
—(C. J. Dennis)
IT is too early
line that C.
J. Dennis has
etched on the
too soon to recall his passion-
ate love of Nature's green
Few will claim "Den," as he was
of his friends, as a great poet or a
profound naturalist, but rather as a
nature lover who sang sweetly, often
most to him. Certainly the poet in
After all, it is not the scientist
who wakens our first interest in
birds, but the poet-naturalists who
makes knowledge living." But what
are combined !
Fortunately, we have in Australia
ornithologists who are able to un-
bend, to tell us in very human lan-
guage about these jewels of bush
who never open a book on orni-
thology. Had he been less poet than
of us enjoyment of the "Sentimen-
to-day. One does not read Dennis for
finds scattered throughout his work.
bush.
suring wisdom by the peace it brings
to simple minds that value simple
things." In his earlier books we
find many a suggestion of his pas-
sion for feather folk, as, for in-
stance, the thrush that stirred him
There are many delightful nature
Sym, Dennis has given us something
Even in school hours the youthful
Dennis, like his own Sym, must
white gate." for it is here that he
willy nilly out of doors.
White; but then, as Lowell reminds
us, "Mr. White seems never to have
had any harder work to do than to
study the habits of his fellow towns-
of song along a fence. "
If we feel that Dennis has hardly
Yellow Robins. Father forages, but
mother feeds the nestlings with food
cap comes less trippingly to the
to tell us over and over again that
"his body is a chime." two phrases
that crown Shaw Neilson "Poet of
the Blue Wren." But Dennis has
sharpened the ear of many a bird-
conscious novice to the "broad sun-
our gamin of the gutter, pertly vul-
— useful, too, when aphides smother
"Where the blossom glows I fol-
low" may be sung of other honey
birds, but the wattle bird seems to be
first in carrying the glad news of
flowering plum or banksia.
Dennis' starling is a lovable vaga-
although in Australia most of "his
The courageous and inquisitive
Willie Wagtail.
We have all seen him and his fel-
lows feeding on sunlit fields, then at
some swift, unseen command, "rise,
Tawny Frogmouth
The Tawny Frogmouth, holding
his pose "with patience grim," is an
Dennis sings, he spreads terror
among the meek but when daytime
comes feathered harridans make the
short-sighted fellow pay for his mis-
hate him ! One may see them
screaming at the vacant post on
before. For what cause is energy
expended in these vituperative on-
"bushland's master melodist." Mag-
had watched him closely. These
traps, and many "Long John Sil-
Most of us who have offered blan-
dishments to birds regard the Yellow
Robin as the friendliest of all, but
as the poet hints, he is a cupboard
he does not tell us that yellow Bob
led the dawn chorus in his Singing
Garden. I wonder why. Ho appar-
note, almost at dark, which an-
nounced the last visitor to the gar-
whole of his bird lore we remember
that exigencies of rhyme may some-
times have forced him to take full
Fairies at the Bottom of the Garden Bell Birds, Bunnies and Bandicoots (Article), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Saturday 25 March 1939 [Issue No.26,189] page 14 2019-11-03 22:56 W /' IU HfuTf many years I had known them, but to meet
I Sf them on intimate terms it was necessary to
SfiafHrB Tnfl visi Belgrave, or, more recently, a li'ttle
36M/B J\t,l nearby creek at Blackburn.
'' j Now they are here, in my own garden,
! I more graceful and more musical than ever I
""—————J had thought; and so friendly that I wonder
At Bclgravc, and at our own little
crceksldes, they havo always been
glance of many windows, nnd with
their every, movement, they flit con
fidently from tree to tree, nnd shrub
to shrub, as though they were origi
But then this is not a garden In
the best suburban sense, but a wilder
ness, In which arc a few great hoary
there arc many, many blackbirds in
it; and a warm welcome lor anything
in leathers.
There is certainly something falry-
likc about the bell birds. They flit, in
stead of flying. One moment they arc
just above my head; the next a chal
lenging "tlnk" comes from another
. trefc. I sit near the pool and watch
Yes, fairies certainly I In a second
they flash through the water, and aro
on an overhead bough, preenlug them
selves In a series of movements as un
believably difficult as they are grace
color, ltko their movements, belongs
to tho pixy world. Beneath green
shady trees. Here they foregather, sit
loath to leave, lest it should disap
eyes — the eyes of a rlma, or the syrens
in a babel of tongues, the thincs thai
Elizabeth knows-?,"
when the west ivind blows,
And. fairy secrets centuries old
and clear, as If struck on metal, end
> Showing off as they flit from tree
chasing, and evading, in a ganio of
tiggy-ttggy-touchwood. Three green
T know they are showing off under
branches, like little clowns. 'Then oil
they go In search of fresh fields to
fairies In tho garden, as witness twelve
dusky gang-gangs bearing down tho
already heavily-laden Branches of a
(Top) Bellbirdi
by one leg, a ,
tall hawthorn tree, the while they dis
species of honcyeaters are swift to"
-accept them.
Especially does the splncblU love the
turn Into Utile dusty millers.
Llko tho bell birds, they loo "flash"
" It's not so very, very far away.
straight ahead. . . ,
/ do so- hope they've really come to stay. .,«
. And a little stream that quietly runs through ;
You wouldn't think they'd dare to come merry-mak
Well, they do 1
— (Rose Fjjlema" )
than arc dreamed of by those who only
The 'yellow-winged and the Regent '
lioneyeaters are royal fairies. Like
they pass, like Milne's Twlnklctoes,
"from one leaf to Its brother," until I
which is honeybird — fairies all 1
Greenle, my fourth honcyeater, Is a
summer nights;.
of the Buddlela bush. Day long they
dance about the lilac blooms, intoxi
while all among the golden rod mur
with fairies of another Ilk. There are
kers" I He Is only a youngster yet, but
mark on the Mclilot, and the seedling
fairies must <Jat.
morning the garden Is full of little
tunnelled In search of beetles.
Only once in a blue moon do i catch
sight of him for he Is under the spell
Of Invisibility. MISERABLE AS A
BANDICOOT ? Not a bit of It. That
is merely a mannerism. He is just us
"oom-ooni-oom" comes from a branch
muffled wings. Eerie V A little, but I
like It, wouldn't you ?
fairies, sitting face to face on a slen
plunder; They moke a picture that
should bring, a tender smile to tho face
right of every Australian pchlld to know
Intimately these furry fairies, either in
the bush, In parks and gardens,- or as
a frieze on nursery walls and play
What a privilego it was to see one of
bunch of It in the curl of his tall to
and seek among the tree tops, vanish
only a memory of fleeting shadow-pic
middle of the air ? '
Well, they can ! ,
FOR many years I had known them, but to meet
them on intimate terms it was necessary to
visit Belgrave, or, more recently, a little
nearby creek at Blackburn.
Now they are here, in my own garden,
more graceful and more musical than ever I
had thought; and so friendly that I wonder
At Belgrave, and at our own little
creeksldes, they have always been
glance of many windows, and with
their every, movement, they flit con-
fidently from tree to tree, and shrub
to shrub, as though they were origi-
But then this is not a garden in
the best suburban sense, but a wilder-
ness, in which are a few great hoary
there are many, many blackbirds in
it, and a warm welcome for anything
in feathers.
There is certainly something fairy-
like about the bell birds. They flit, in-
stead of flying. One moment they are
just above my head; the next a chal-
lenging "tink" comes from another
tree. I sit near the pool and watch
Yes, fairies certainly ! In a second
they flash through the water, and are
on an overhead bough, preening them-
selves in a series of movements as un-
believably difficult as they are grace-
color, like their movements, belongs
to the pixy world. Beneath green
shady trees. Here they foregather, sit-
loath to leave, lest it should disap-
eyes — the eyes of a rima, or the syrens
in a babel of tongues, the things that
Elizabeth knows—
when the west wind blows,
And fairy secrets centuries old
and clear, as if struck on metal, end-
Showing off as they flit from tree
chasing, and evading, in a game of
tiggy-tiggy-touchwood. Three green
I know they are showing off under
branches, like little clowns. Then off
they go in search of fresh fields to
fairies in the garden, as witness twelve
dusky gang-gangs bearing down the
already heavily-laden branches of a
(Top) Bellbirds
by one leg, a
tall hawthorn tree, the while they dis-
species of honeyeaters are swift to
accept them.
Especially does the splnebill love the
turn into little dusty millers.
Like the bell birds, they too "flash"
It's not so very, very far away.
I do so hope they've really come to stay.
And a little stream that quietly runs through ;
You wouldn't think they'd dare to come merry-mak-
Well, they do !
— (Rose Fylema )
than are dreamed of by those who only
honeyeaters are royal fairies. Like
they pass, like Milne's Twinkletoes,
"from one leaf to its brother," until I
which is honeybird — fairies all !
Greenie, my fourth honeyeater, is a
summer nights;
of the Buddleia bush. Day long they
dance about the lilac blooms, intoxi-
while all among the golden rod mur-
with fairies of another ilk. There are
kers"! He Is only a youngster yet, but
mark on the Melilot, and the seedling
fairies must eat.
morning the garden is full of little
tunnelled in search of beetles.
Only once in a blue moon do I catch
sight of him for he is under the spell
Of invisibility. MISERABLE AS A
BANDICOOT ? Not a bit of it. That
is merely a mannerism. He is just as
"oom-oom-oom" comes from a branch
muffled wings. Eerie ? A little, but I
like it, wouldn't you ?
fairies, sitting face to face on a slen-
plunder; They make a picture that
should bring, a tender smile to the face
right of every Australian child to know
intimately these furry fairies, either in
the bush, in parks and gardens, or as
a frieze on nursery walls and play-
What a privilege it was to see one of
bunch of It in the curl of his tail to
and seek among the tree tops, vanish-
only a memory of fleeting shadow-pic-
middle of the air ?
Well, they can !

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.