Information about Trove user: tobyrnes

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,827,679
2 noelwoodhouse 3,924,399
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,329,475
5 Rhonda.M 3,140,785
...
448 lwetherall 108,650
449 jeansieguy 108,540
450 pbetteridge 108,352
451 tobyrnes 108,293
452 JennyPoss 108,253
453 judithl 108,250

108,293 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

November 2019 890
October 2019 1,619
September 2019 753
August 2019 259
July 2019 929
June 2019 817
May 2019 943
April 2019 1,737
March 2019 3,180
February 2019 1,505
January 2019 1,112
December 2018 1,566
November 2018 1,171
October 2018 960
September 2018 448
August 2018 1,989
July 2018 2,793
June 2018 1,972
May 2018 2,222
April 2018 910
March 2018 3,621
February 2018 2,907
January 2018 4,641
December 2017 4,022
November 2017 4,751
October 2017 2,179
September 2017 2,934
August 2017 3,884
July 2017 4,014
June 2017 2,534
May 2017 4,430
April 2017 2,291
March 2017 2,849
February 2017 2,634
January 2017 1,320
December 2016 2,584
November 2016 1,732
October 2016 1,655
September 2016 3,234
August 2016 2,170
July 2016 1,860
June 2016 1,034
May 2016 806
April 2016 231
March 2016 437
February 2016 878
January 2016 1,108
December 2015 1,605
November 2015 410
October 2015 517
September 2015 350
August 2015 756
July 2015 1,332
June 2015 507
May 2015 243
April 2015 651
March 2015 1,367
February 2015 519
January 2015 357
December 2014 491
November 2014 413
October 2014 849
September 2014 1,090
August 2014 2,321

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,827,477
2 noelwoodhouse 3,924,399
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,329,454
5 Rhonda.M 3,140,772
...
444 lwetherall 108,574
445 jeansieguy 108,494
446 pbetteridge 108,352
447 tobyrnes 108,289
448 JennyPoss 108,253
449 judithl 108,250

108,289 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

November 2019 890
October 2019 1,619
September 2019 753
August 2019 259
July 2019 929
June 2019 817
May 2019 943
April 2019 1,737
March 2019 3,180
February 2019 1,505
January 2019 1,112
December 2018 1,566
November 2018 1,171
October 2018 960
September 2018 448
August 2018 1,989
July 2018 2,793
June 2018 1,972
May 2018 2,222
April 2018 910
March 2018 3,621
February 2018 2,907
January 2018 4,641
December 2017 4,022
November 2017 4,747
October 2017 2,179
September 2017 2,934
August 2017 3,884
July 2017 4,014
June 2017 2,534
May 2017 4,430
April 2017 2,291
March 2017 2,849
February 2017 2,634
January 2017 1,320
December 2016 2,584
November 2016 1,732
October 2016 1,655
September 2016 3,234
August 2016 2,170
July 2016 1,860
June 2016 1,034
May 2016 806
April 2016 231
March 2016 437
February 2016 878
January 2016 1,108
December 2015 1,605
November 2015 410
October 2015 517
September 2015 350
August 2015 756
July 2015 1,332
June 2015 507
May 2015 243
April 2015 651
March 2015 1,367
February 2015 519
January 2015 357
December 2014 491
November 2014 413
October 2014 849
September 2014 1,090
August 2014 2,321

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 314,433
2 PhilThomas 135,231
3 mickbrook 111,230
4 murds5 61,555
5 GeoffMMutton 53,528
...
2706 Terry.Davis 4
2707 tiger031060 4
2708 Tina 4
2709 tobyrnes 4
2710 tonguert 4
2711 torbreck 4

4 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

November 2017 4


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
NEWS OF THE MONTH. LAURA, January 12. (Article), Harp and Southern Cross (Adelaide, SA : 1873 - 1875), Friday 30 January 1874 [Issue No.241] page 4 2019-11-17 19:32 death occurred under the following cir
the 4th instaut, when the animal fell,
The deceased leaves a wife and six chil
death occurred under the following cir-
the 4th instant, when the animal fell,
The deceased leaves a wife and six chil-
Family Notices (Family Notices), The Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA : 1867 - 1922), Thursday 30 May 1895 [Issue No.9,465] page 2 2019-11-17 19:27 the wife of S; 0. King^ jiost and telegraph master, of
a daughter. '
STUTLEY.—On the 2Sth May, at Myrtle Holme,
Darling, N.S.W., of a son. '
BRAIN—JONES.—On the lath May, at Glenelg, by
the Rev. G. Rayneiy Thomas Henry Brain to Sara
WARE—BURTON.—On the 20th May, at the Aus
the residence of the bride's father, by Rev. 0. Lake,
, DEATHS.
WARNER.—On the 80th May, at her late.residence,
Dawkins, of Gawler River, aged 80 years.
TRUST.—On the 27tli May, at her residence,
MOORE.—On the 4tli May, at Cross Roads, Moonta.
Cecil Dee Goss, the beloved son of J. H. and E. Moore,
aged 1 year and 9 months. " For of such is the king
BENNIER.—On the lathMay; at Wallaroo Hospital,
knew linn. '
ROGERS.—On the 29th May, at Brown-street, Ade
laide, Harriet, the youngest dearly-beloved. daughter
17 years and G months. Gone, but not forgotten.
N MEMORIAM.
WITHY.—In loving remembrance of Walter Frede
who died May 30,18S9, aged S years.
To cherish undetiled.
■ But just as it was opening
loving brother and. sister, Walter and Maggie,
Alfred, who died at the Squatters'Arms, Thebarton,
May 30,1893, aged 26 years. -
- On Canaan's bright shore,
the wife of S. C. King, post and telegraph master, of
a daughter.
STUTLEY.—On the 28th May, at Myrtle Holme,
Darling, N.S.W., of a son.
BRAIN—JONES.—On the 15th May, at Glenelg, by
the Rev. G. Rayner, Thomas Henry Brain to Sara
WARE—BURTON.—On the 20th May, at the Aus-
the residence of the bride's father, by Rev. O. Lake,
DEATHS.
WARNER.—On the 30th May, at her late residence,
Dawkins, of Gawler River, aged 86 years.
TRUST.—On the 27th May, at her residence,
MOORE.—On the 4th May, at Cross Roads, Moonta,
Cecil Lee Goss, the beloved son of J. H. and E. Moore,
aged 1 year and 9 months. " For of such is the king-
BENNIER.—On the 15th May, at Wallaroo Hospital,
knew him.
ROGERS.—On the 29th May, at Brown-street, Ade-
laide, Harriet, the youngest dearly-beloved daughter
17 years and 6 months. Gone, but not forgotten.
IN MEMORIAM.
WITHY.—In loving remembrance of Walter Frede-
who died May 30,1889, aged 8 years.
To cherish undefiled.
But just as it was opening
loving brother and sister, Walter and Maggie,
Alfred, who died at the Squatters' Arms, Thebarton,
May 30,1893, aged 26 years.
On Canaan's bright shore,
POLICE COURTS. THIS DAY. ADELAIDE: SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 12. [Before Mr. S. Beddome. P.M.] (Article), Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912), Saturday 12 February 1870 [Issue No.339] page 3 2019-11-17 19:16 [Before Mr. S. Beddome. P.M.!
of John Bainford, with threatening to
the defendant went to his publionouse and
for a policeman to take charge of him. Policeconstable
Lynch stated that he took defendant
wandering. Mr. Bee said he knew the defenr
brother was woimded in the jaw. He did not
fall at the moment. - Was standing about a yard
cannot say whether the prisoner was or riot.
said, "I'll take good care you don't; Britt
prisoner in any way: I had taken some drink,
Albert William Walls, legally-qualified'
said^Ori Saturday evening, between half-past"
10 and 111 was called to see Cornelius Britt.
j deluged in blood, with a wound at the back of
I and the upper and lower lips severely cut.
j Think a pistol ball would cause the injuries I
minutes ago. He is nut in any immediate
f
ive evidence for a month. This closed the evience
at present forthcoming. The.- prisoner
Worship—James "Owen, you are remanded for
take bail? His Worship—Certainly nbt.
KAPUNDA BAZAAR.—Four days'sales of useful
[Before Mr. S. Beddome. P.M.]
of John Bamford, with threatening to
the defendant went to his public-house and
for a policeman to take charge of him. Police-
constable Lynch stated that he took defendant
wandering. Mr. Bee said he knew the defen-
brother was wounded in the jaw. He did not
fall at the moment. Was standing about a yard
cannot say whether the prisoner was or not.
said, "I'll take good care you don't." Britt
prisoner in any way. I had taken some drink,
Albert William Walls, legally-qualified
said—On Saturday evening, between half-past
10 and 11 was called to see Cornelius Britt.
deluged in blood, with a wound at the back of
and the upper and lower lips severely cut.
Think a pistol ball would cause the injuries I
minutes ago. He is not in any immediate
give evidence for a month. This closed the evidence
at present forthcoming. The prisoner
Worship—James Owen, you are remanded for
take bail? His Worship—Certainly not.
KAPUNDA BAZAAR.—Four days' sales of useful
Family Notices (Family Notices), The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), Tuesday 16 May 1882 [Issue No.7355] page 4 2019-11-17 03:37 BIBTBS.
MCCLORY.—On the 11th May, at Hanson-street.
THOMAS—BAOUB.—On the 13th May, at the
ROse Bank Farm, Mitcham, to Emma Hemmingway,
sington Park, late of C---eracha.
BIRTHS.
MCCLORY.—On the 11th May, at Hanson-street,
THOMAS—HAGUE.—On the 13th May, at the
Rose Bank Farm, Mitcham, to Emma Hemmingway,
sington Park, late of Gumeracha.
THE LATE CAPTAIN G. B. JOHNSTON. (Article), South Australian Weekly Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1881 - 1889), Saturday 1 July 1882 [Issue No.1,245] page 7 2019-11-14 17:44 took place .at Goolwa on Sunday, June 18.
As the deceased had endeared himself throughgb,
As the day drew near many persons from the .
of this colony found their wav to this quiet
was a large representation. At 2 o'clock ,
intendent). assembled in front of his late resi
dence. The Rev. G. W. Patchell having.con-
children to sing one of the captain's favourite .
reacbipg the Creek station, in addition to.the
the Oddfellows and Foresters of Port Elliot and .
Victor Harbor. , On approaching
the cemetery the already, vast crowd was
augmented by hundreds of country people. .
.The Rev. G. W. Patchell conducted the
service according to the form of the Wesieyan :
Church, of which Mr.. Johnston had.been a
member for many years. The Oddfellows also -?
had a service read, after which the minister gave,
sung before his death, and the greater porion
took for his text Rev.xiv.13— 'And I heard , -'
'blessed are the dead which die in the Lord
from henceforth; yea, saith .the Spirit,
their works do follow them;' . He said:— '
Christianity affords man the noblest views ,
future. It satisfactorily solves the great pro
the darkness which rested on these subjects ,
,for ages, and gives us clearly, to understand. .
them.' We do not bend over the graves of our
departed friends, and with palpitating hearts ,
a building of God— an house not made withy '
,hands, eternal. in the heavens, The Apostle
and glorious revelations. The light of God's '
him to submit to and bear the afflictive scenes .
of his life. The Roman Emperor who trans
revelations of God. . By these revelations he
saw the conflicting scenes of the moral world;' .
the triumphs, of truth, holiness, and righteous
ness over error, superstition, and sin, and the ,
also permitted to look into the invisibles state, ,
and. become acquainted with the condition of .
those. who had served God on earth, and who -
a verse in proof of this. . In directing your,
attention to .the- subject ,of- this passage we
propose, in the first instance, to make a. few,
next place notice, the character arid blessedness.
security given not only to console us in the. '.
death of pious friends,- but to guide and sup- ,
God help us to meditate aright on these ,
1. Man was made in the image of his Maker, .
a feature of which was- immortality, but
body became mortal. . It was then announced .
to him by God, 'Dust thou art, and
unto dust shalt thou return.' By sin
death entered the world with all its woe. .
Respecting death there have been strange,
a demon. The nights of poetry have clothed -
it in various aspects ; but 'Death and his
image rising in the brain bearf aint.resem-.
blance-never are alike.' Philosophically
St. Paul, who studied the subject in its mys. .
teriousness, applies to it the word 'un-
clothed.' To die is to be 'unclothed.' This
is the most beautiful and appropriate descrip- -
tion that ever was uttered by mortal , lips. .
The soul is distinct from the body, and .when
it departs it. is stripped of its earthly covet- ?
Looking at the dead body as it is a. strong
do not wonder that from particular appear
ances a high decree of , alarm was- excited ii
the death of the.beast and that of man. There :
seems with many a -general decline .in soul
and body. Death seems to closethe scene,- ?
?and the grave to put a period to tiie prospects
of man. Thewords.of Job, xiy., 14, clearly sets ?
.forth -this anxiety, of mind — 'If a man. die ?
shall he live again VI There is hope of aStree
that the tender branch- thereof wiUjnofc cease ?
t— ' Though the root thereof wax old in, the
. earthy and the stock thereof die in the 'round :
and bring forth boughs like a plant, but ,
man ? dieth - and wasteth away.; yea, man
giveth up the ghost, and where is he V
Annihilation is a thought we cannot bear*
To bean outcast from existence, to mingle
. with the dust and be . scattered . over the -
animated . our frame, . is a thought-, so ?
dark and jso intolerable- that we dare.
not entertain it. Is that which was more,
valuable than the whole material universe : ?
-crushed into nonentity like- a worm? Is
-extinguished as a transitory spark? ? Having .,
one moment opened Ms eyes on the evidences.,
of the boundless wisdom, goodness,, and glora
of the Almighty,. is man to close them the
next moment in .eternal darkness? : It is not
hath Ehpne on the shades of death.- Life and
immortality are brought to light by, the
gospeL Death changes the mode of ' oub
. being, but the existence remains. . All .souls .
are living. . The soul by death, is simply 'iin- -
clothed.!' The perceptions : '; and sensations
and feelings are freed . from / everything ; .
earthly land material, and- are in possession .. -
of ' a degree of perfection infinitely, above- *,-
?everything which they had while living. in :
this world. The unclothing .pf .the body. may. '_
be only the perfection of consciousness , in
relation to thlags eternaL .-When the body,
is put off and left her* — when the spirit is. ;
' unclothed1'— it becomes awfully conscious of' . ?*.
the presence of God, of the presence ef other
spirits, and of , the full nature of the state ,'. .
into which it has entered, whether of happiness. '
.or misery. Thestate ofthe dead is not a state T
of oblivion, but one of perfection in knowledge .
in reference to eternal and spiritual things. -,
- But -we are directed by this passage . to. -
some of the dead whose character -and.
blessedness claim our notice .and attention. r
They are those who die in- .the Lord. , This-'
refers no doubt to those who died in and for . '
the cause of their Saviour, many of whom ..
'were stoned,' 'were sawn asunder,?
. were, beheaded, were rolled .down hills, in
spiked barrels, ,were burned to ashes, at the. ? .
stake, and whosedust lies mouldering: in. the
. catacombs of ? Rome, around the-mountains. .-
of Switzerland, and in. the dust of Smith^eld ?
—in .a,, word, the -noble army of the martyrs , - .
of every 'land and, of every tongue— -these . .
'died iin and for the Lord.. But the words ?
also apply to all- the pious dead. They have. .
'fallen asleep in Christ;' they are 'the .
dead in -Christ;' they 'died in the. Lord.? ...
. From this it may be inferred they lived at '?'.-
-least a -portion of; their time in the Lord..
With some their, service in this life is longer ;
than with others. But with all who thus as*
?parted a vital union existed between,. them, -
and their Saviour. At some time ?previously - ,
they humbly and believingly , -consecrated- .
themselves to Christ. TheyexperieHcedGod'S '. -
? pardoning favor, His adopting love, and-Hia ,
?renewing grace. Thus, having takenref^ge in
Chribt,andbeingaccepted,tiegreatunion;was
? established. .This union was not. merelj -
illustrated in Scripture by 'a marriage tie'
by the head of the body , and. its
members, .by a 'vine and its branches.' ,
?? This union is the source -of life and activity*. ,
It seals the .Christian's; title to eternal life.
All the Christian graces,! ,all the fruits of
righteousness which ploom. in the vineyard of
the Lord and adorn the lives of Christians, .
owe their productive -origin to this union. ?
Our Saviour said, 'Abide in Me and I in you.
I am the vine, ye are the branches. .As the
branch cannot bear .fruit of itself except it
abide in the vine, no moje can you except, y.e ?
abide in me. . Without me ye can do noit^ng,''-
Now he who '.dies in the Lord' has this .
union when death comes. It is not that ,he ,
once had it, but he has it at that final and- ?
?solemn moment. Christ is his accepted..
? Sayiour, and he is saved in the-Beloved. .Thus :
has on the wedding garment, and .he is, pre- .
pared for the coining of hia Lord, whether
it be at evening, midnight, cockcrowing, op
in the morning. . What fsay, however, is pot .
intended to exclude a late re^tuiining prpdigal ,
from tie hope of salvatiqn. Though mpst- . -
men die as they live, there ..may be. excep- ,
tional cases. Some. mayfind mercy* Ekp $he _
penitent thief, at the eleventh hour,. This' ia ,.
or the encouragement and jhope of all'flfho 7 .
have neglected t9 prepare to meet. G-?d till \, ?
^UfeisabouttocloEC.. Butletithot]belopkeft ;.
upon ae a' licence to squander .life's, ahor^jaay, .
in sin with the hope that inercy can ,]Je had .
at the, last moment. Such is a perad venture -, ,
full' of uncertainty. The penitent thief, is
took place at Goolwa on Sunday, June 18.
As the deceased had endeared himself through
As the day drew near many persons from the
of this colony found their way to this quiet
was a large representation. At 2 o'clock
intendent). assembled in front of his late resi-
dence. The Rev. G. W. Patchell having con-
children to sing one of the captain's favourite
reaching the Creek station, in addition to the
the Oddfellows and Foresters of Port Elliot and
Victor Harbor. On approaching
the cemetery the already vast crowd was
augmented by hundreds of country people.
The Rev. G. W. Patchell conducted the
service according to the form of the Wesieyan
Church, of which Mr. Johnston had been a
member for many years. The Oddfellows also
had a service read, after which the minister gave
sung before his death, and the greater portion
took for his text Rev. xiv.13— "And I heard
blessed are the dead which die in the Lord
from henceforth; yea, saith the Spirit,
their works do follow them." He said:—
Christianity affords man the noblest views
future. It satisfactorily solves the great pro-
the darkness which rested on these subjects
for ages, and gives us clearly to understand
them. We do not bend over the graves of our
departed friends, and with palpitating hearts
a building of God— an house not made with
hands, eternal in the heavens. The Apostle
and glorious revelations. The light of God's
him to submit to and bear the afflictive scenes
of his life. The Roman Emperor who trans-
revelations of God. By these revelations he
saw the conflicting scenes of the moral world;
the triumphs, of truth, holiness, and righteous-
ness over error, superstition, and sin, and the
also permitted to look into the invisibles state,
and become acquainted with the condition of
those who had served God on earth, and who
a verse in proof of this. In directing your
attention to the subject of this passage we
propose, in the first instance, to make a few
next place notice, the character and blessedness.
security given not only to console us in the
death of pious friends, but to guide and sup-
God help us to meditate aright on these
1. Man was made in the image of his Maker,
a feature of which was immortality, but
body became mortal. It was then announced
to him by God, "Dust thou art, and
unto dust shalt thou return." By sin
death entered the world with all its woe.
Respecting death there have been strange
a demon. The nights of poetry have clothed
it in various aspects ; but "Death and his
image rising in the brain bear faint resem-
blance—never are alike." Philosophically
St. Paul, who studied the subject in its mys-
teriousness, applies to it the word "un-
clothed." To die is to be "unclothed." This
is the most beautiful and appropriate descrip-
tion that ever was uttered by mortal lips.
The soul is distinct from the body, and when
it departs it is stripped of its earthly cover-
Looking at the dead body as it is a strong
do not wonder that from particular appear-
ances a high decree of alarm was excited in
the death of the beast and that of man. There
seems with many a general decline in soul
and body. Death seems to close the scene,
and the grave to put a period to the prospects
of man. The words of Job, xiv., 14, clearly sets
forth this anxiety, of mind — "If a man die
shall he live again ?" There is hope of a tree
that the tender branch thereof will not cease
— "Though the root thereof wax old in the
earth, and the stock thereof die in the ground ;
and bring forth boughs like a plant, but
man dieth and wasteth away; yea, man
giveth up the ghost, and where is he ?"
Annihilation is a thought we cannot bear.
To be an outcast from existence, to mingle
with the dust and be scattered over the
animated our frame, is a thought so
dark and so intolerable that we dare
not entertain it. Is that which was more
valuable than the whole material universe
crushed into nonentity like a worm? Is
extinguished as a transitory spark ? Having
one moment opened his eyes on the evidences
of the boundless wisdom, goodness, and glory
of the Almighty, is man to close them the
next moment in eternal darkness ? It is not
hath shone on the shades of death. Life and
immortality are brought to light by the
gospel. Death changes the mode of our
being, but the existence remains. All souls
are living. The soul by death is simply "un-
clothed." The perceptions and sensations
and feelings are freed from everything
earthly and material, and are in possession
of a degree of perfection infinitely above
everything which they had while living in
this world. The unclothing of the body may
be only the perfection of consciousness in
relation to things eternal. When the body
is put off and left here— when the spirit is
"unclothed"— it becomes awfully conscious of
the presence of God, of the presence of other
spirits, and of the full nature of the state
into which it has entered, whether of happiness
or misery. The state of the dead is not a state
of oblivion, but one of perfection in knowledge
in reference to eternal and spiritual things.
But we are directed by this passage to
some of the dead whose character and.
blessedness claim our notice and attention.
They are those who die in the Lord. This
refers no doubt to those who died in and for
"were stoned," "were sawn asunder,"
were beheaded, were rolled down hills in
spiked barrels, were burned to ashes, at the
stake, and whose dust lies mouldering in the
catacombs of Rome, around the mountains
of Switzerland, and in the dust of Smithfield
—in a word, the noble army of the martyrs
of every land and of every tongue—these
died in and for the Lord. But the words
"fallen asleep in Christ;" they are the
dead in Christ;" they "died in the Lord."
From this it may be inferred they lived at
least a portion of their time in the Lord.
With some their service in this life is longer
than with others. But with all who thus de-
parted a vital union existed between them
and their Saviour. At some time previously
they humbly and believingly consecrated
themselves to Christ. They experienced God's
pardoning favor, His adopting love, and His
renewing grace. Thus, having taken refuge in
Christ, and being accepted, the great union was
established. This union was not merely
illustrated in Scripture by "a marriage tie'
by the head of the body and its
members, by a "vine and its branches."
This union is the source of life and activity.
It seals the Christian's title to eternal life.
All the Christian graces, all the fruits of
righteousness which bloom in the vineyard of
the Lord and adorn the lives of Christians,
owe their productive origin to this union.
Our Saviour said, "Abide in Me and I in you.
I am the vine, ye are the branches. As the
branch cannot bear fruit of itself except it
abide in the vine, no more can you except ye
abide in me. Without me ye can do nothing.''
Now he who "dies in the Lord" has this
union when death comes. It is not that he
once had it, but he has it at that final and
solemn moment. Christ is his accepted
Saviour, and he is saved in the Beloved. Thus
has on the wedding garment, and he is pre-
pared for the coming of his Lord, whether
it be at evening, midnight, cockcrowing, or
in the morning. What I say, however, is not
intended to exclude a late returning prodigal
from the hope of salvation. Though most
men die as they live, there may be excep-
tional cases. Some may find mercy, like the
penitent thief, at the eleventh hour. This is
for the encouragement and hope of all who
have neglected to prepare to meet. God till
life is about to close. But let it not be looked
upon as a licence to squander life's short day
in sin with the hope that mercy can be had
full of uncertainty. The penitent thief is
GOOLWA REGATTA. (Article), South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), Monday 28 August 1854 [Issue No.2476] page 2 2019-11-14 16:19 provided for the Murray traffic, A number
First race — Open for all saiiing-bnata, steer
ing with a rudder. Entrance fee, £1 Is.
by amateurs. Entranc^ £1 Is,
Third race—Open for all sailing-boats, ex
cept vthe winner and second of tlie first race.
Entrance^ 10s.
Fourth race— Sculling match, one man pull
ing to eaib. boa1. Entrance, 5s. - -
Sailing matches — Boats to sail from the ?
starting buoys, to Port Price and back. Esti
mated distance, seven miles. ? ~
Rowing and Bculling matches — Boats to
lewe the starting buoys, and t- round the
buoys opposite Laifin'a bush fence ,arid back.
FRIZES.
F.irst match, for sailing-boats. First prize,
£17 | second prize, £6.
Second match, rowing. .First prize, £17;
second prizs, £6.
EXTKIE3.
with bluo border; M. Cook, Endeavour,
union jack ; K. Crcmore, Childe Harold, red
flag ; Mr. iSumner, Wave, St. George's Cross.
Second match— J. Varcce, Rover, blue with
gold star; J. V7ebb\ Augusta, red; Captain
Fourth match— T. South and John Webb. .
1. All boats to draw lots for thoir stations. '
2.! All boats to rido at tho buoys ready for
3. -Each boat to declare its distinguishing
flag at the time of entry. '. '' .
4. Boats ia tho first and third race may
5.' In drawing to windward, should thero be
any doubt as to which vossel will weather,
tha one on the port tack to gtve:way to that
6. No two boats to continuo head reaching
on one tack, so as to cause tho lee boat to go
7. Bach boat to go fairly round the marks;
shall forfeit a,l claim to tho prize.
8. -Any race not concluded by 5 o'clock to
be sailed over again at any timo the Commit
9. When rounding tho mark, the boat
buoy, such boat shall forfeit her claim to tho
. 10. Any boat pulling away or altering her
forfeit all claim to tho prizo. In running be
fore the -wind, whichever side tho leading
? 2. Any boat pulling away, or altering her
out of her course, to forfeit nil claim to this
4. All boats to occupy the posts. marked
out for the Lady Augusta on the' starboard
si-'o going up, and the starboard side coming
5. Tbat.no ballast bo thrown over after
At a meeting of the Committee, held Au
over Boa and land during tho afternoon, was
to the gloom of the morning. A 'special
train' left Port Elliot at 10 o'clock in the
tramway by a single horsc.; Other passengers
wero taken up on the lino, making a total of
was performed in 1 hour and 10 mintuos.
Bach, like tho former, c mtaining a. largo
number of passengers, including a fair pro
portion of tho gentler sex. In addition to a^
largo number of the surrounding settlers, we.
observed several gentlemen* from Adelaide,
who, having engagements iii the far south
connected with their mercantile pursuits, -lo-
termined upon killing two birds wich one stone,
by uniting business with pleasure. ;
Many visitors were disappointed ou finding
so few entries made for tho several matches,
but wero nevertheless disposed to tike in good,
part .a defect which may be regarded as almost
necessarily iucidentil to a first attempt.
The start for, tho first match took placo at 1
o'clock, between -Endeavour, Cbilde H-rold
and_ Wave. ] Prima Donna was up the stream
to join her compeors in. the race. On the
firing of tho gun, tho three first-named boats,
shot away at full speed towards the wcathor
shore, close hauled to tho wind, Childo Harold
TJiis position was maintained for about three
- In the meantime, the whale-boats took thoir
stations, manned with their several crows,
whosa naval uniform of red, blue, and white,
' astonish the natives,' and to please every
spectator. As might have bocn expected, the
Rover soon shot a- head, being manned by srx
rowers; tho Augusta having but five, and
Venture only four. Tho contest throughout
the issua appeared to hang in a doubtful scale ;
but ou reaching the starti. g-buoys Kover
was fully a cable's length a-head. Her tri-.
uraph was accompanied by hearty cheers from
At the conclusion of this match, tho interest
of the visitors appeared to be flagging, in con
occurred which, for a brief space of timo,
with more courage than prudence, hail ven
tured into tho water with his holiday habili
ments on, to secure a floating oar which tho
the Southern Ocean. For a while ho was
'seen 'buffeting with tbo merciless element
whoso power he had d- fied, and would in all
inV temerity, had not a boat been put off to his
assistance. Ho was rescued from his perilous
-condition as ho was sinking beneath the wave,
About half past 2 o'clock, tho whito sail* of
the boats, were again viniWe, as they rounded
the point of the island. TI12 wind, though
1 he wind was adverse, tho tide had began to
side, 'and keeping close hauled, succeeded in
Time, 4 hours 5 miuutes.
This closed the day's sport3. Tho Commit
half-yearly regattas. Daring the day many
with tho Lady Augusta, and tha lighters
Eureka and Wakool, wero lying off tho jetty.
The chu-f cabin of the Melbourne is situate
about 30 feet m length, and occupies tho
and ventilated, and its furniture and decora
tions are such as to make the visit'* reluctant
to depart. The ladies' cabin, which lYasfrn
'f the former, is much smaller in dimensions,
bat eqtiiilly provided with accommodations for
th'i convenience and comfort of passengers.
Both aro carpeted and cushioned from end to
end with so its of purple velvet. The engirt
bears thv following inscription— Scott, Sinclair,
morning, during the attempt to extricate, the
provided for the Murray traffic. A number
First race — Open for all sailing-boats, steer-
ing with a rudder. Entrance fee, £1 1s.
by amateurs. Entrance, £1 1s,
Third race—Open for all sailing-boats, ex-
cept the winner and second of the first race.
Entrancee 10s.
Fourth race— Sculling match, one man pull-
ing to each boat. Entrance, 5s.
Sailing matches — Boats to sail from the
starting buoys, to Port Price and back. Esti-
mated distance, seven miles.
Rowing and sculling matches — Boats to
leave the starting buoys, and to round the
buoys opposite Laffin's bush fence and back.
PRIZES.
First match, for sailing-boats. First prize,
£17 ; second prize, £6.
Second match, rowing. First prize, £17;
second prize, £6.
EXTRIES.
with blue border; M. Cook, Endeavour,
union jack ; K. Cremore, Childe Harold, red
flag ; Mr. Sumner, Wave, St. George's Cross.
Second match— J. Varcoe, Rover, blue with
gold star; J. Webb, Augusta, red; Captain
Fourth match— T. South and John Webb.
1. All boats to draw lots for their stations.
2. All boats to ride at the buoys ready for
3. Each boat to declare its distinguishing
flag at the time of entry.
4. Boats in the first and third race may
5. In drawing to windward, should there be
any doubt as to which vessel will weather,
the one on the port tack to give way to that
6. No two boats to continue head reaching
on one tack, so as to cause the lee boat to go
7. Each boat to go fairly round the marks;
shall forfeit all claim to the prize.
8. Any race not concluded by 5 o'clock to
be sailed over again at any time the Commit-
9. When rounding the mark, the boat
buoy, such boat shall forfeit her claim to the
10. Any boat pulling away or altering her
forfeit all claim to the prize. In running be-
fore the wind, whichever side the leading
2. Any boat pulling away, or altering her
out of her course, to forfeit all claim to this
4. All boats to occupy the posts marked
out for the Lady Augusta on the starboard
side going up, and the starboard side coming
5. That no ballast be thrown over after
At a meeting of the Committee, held Au-
over sea and land during the afternoon, was
to the gloom of the morning. A "special
train" left Port Elliot at 10 o'clock in the
tramway by a single horse. Other passengers
were taken up on the line, making a total of
was performed in 1 hour and 10 minutes.
each, like the former, containing a large
number of passengers, including a fair pro-
portion of the gentler sex. In addition to a
large number of the surrounding settlers, we
observed several gentlemen from Adelaide,
who, having engagements in the far south
connected with their mercantile pursuits, de-
termined upon killing two birds with one stone,
by uniting business with pleasure.
Many visitors were disappointed on finding
so few entries made for the several matches,
but were nevertheless disposed to take in good
part a defect which may be regarded as almost
necessarily incidental to a first attempt.
The start for the first match took place at 1
o'clock, between Endeavour, Childe Harold
and Wave. Prima Donna was up the stream
to join her compeers in the race. On the
firing of the gun, the three first-named boats,
shot away at full speed towards the weather
shore, close hauled to the wind, Childe Harold
This position was maintained for about three
In the meantime, the whale-boats took their
stations, manned with their several crews,
whose naval uniform of red, blue, and white,
"astonish the natives," and to please every
spectator. As might have been expected, the
Rover soon shot a head, being manned by six
rowers; the Augusta having but five, and
Venture only four. The contest throughout
the issue appeared to hang in a doubtful scale ;
but on reaching the starting-buoys Rover
was fully a cable's length a-head. Her tri-
umph was accompanied by hearty cheers from
At the conclusion of this match, the interest
of the visitors appeared to be flagging, in con-
occurred which, for a brief space of time,
with more courage than prudence, had ven-
tured into the water with his holiday habili-
ments on, to secure a floating oar which the
the Southern Ocean. For a while he was
seen buffeting with tho merciless element
whose power he had defied, and would in all
his temerity, had not a boat been put off to his
assistance. He was rescued from his perilous
condition as he was sinking beneath the wave,
About half past 2 o'clock, the white sails of
the boats, were again visible, as they rounded
the point of the island. The wind, though
the wind was adverse, the tide had began to
side, and keeping close hauled, succeeded in
Time, 4 hours 5 minutes.
This closed the day's sports. Tho Commit-
half-yearly regattas. During the day many
with the Lady Augusta, and the lighters
Eureka and Wakool, were lying off the jetty.
The chief cabin of the Melbourne is situate
about 30 feet in length, and occupies the
and ventilated, and its furniture and decora-
tions are such as to make the visitor reluctant
to depart. The ladies' cabin, which is astern
of the former, is much smaller in dimensions,
but equally provided with accommodations for
the convenience and comfort of passengers.
Both are carpeted and cushioned from end to
end with seats of purple velvet. The engine
bears the following inscription— Scott, Sinclair,
morning, during the attempt to extricate the
GOOLWA REGATTA—SECOND DAY. August 25, 1854. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 9 September 1854 [Issue No.585] page 9 2019-11-14 15:49 rProm our Correspondent.!
The establishing of the Goolwa itegatta lias proven ny
no means an insignificant fact. In the first place it ,
marts another step in the march of rapid improvements
which have commenced and are progressing so satisfac
in the nest, it is full of promise of Hie happiest results, as
surrounding districts to join in one of the most invigor
ating of our national sports. - - - ,
that of the second it is now my pleasing duty to com
respective owners, and a fine breeze
The Endeavour, A Cook, Esq.,, of and from Weir
lington. ■ •' 1
: The Prinja Donna, T. South, Esq., of and from Cur
rency Creek. . ■/■■■.:
The Gazelle,;3Ir. Sonde, of the Goolwa.
These hitats, after -nearly three hoiirs' beautiful sailing,
i-a mile, at least, below tlie Goolwa Jetty, thus affording
boats ofthegreater draught a tnore equal chance, and
conferring also on the spectators additional pleasure. .
partook of a sumptuous dinner, with good wine, ; at
local, and complimentary 'sentiment was received with
live long in the recollecfi his of all present.
[From our Correspondent.]
The establishing of the Goolwa Regatta has proven by
no means an insignificant fact. In the first place it
marks another step in the march of rapid improvements
which have commenced and are progressing so satisfac-
in the next, it is full of promise of the happiest results, as
surrounding districts to join in one of the most invigor-
ating of our national sports.
that of the second it is now my pleasing duty to com-
respective owners, and a fine breeze:—
The Endeavour, A Cook, Esq., of and from Wel-
lington.
The Prima Donna, T. South, Esq., of and from Cur-
rency Creek.
The Gazelle, Mr. Goode, of the Goolwa.
These boats, after nearly three hours' beautiful sailing,
a mile, at least, below the Goolwa Jetty, thus affording
boats of the greater draught a more equal chance, and
conferring also on the spectators additional pleasure.
partook of a sumptuous dinner, with good wine, at
local, and complimentary sentiment was received with
live long in the recollections of all present.
Family Notices (Family Notices), Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912), Saturday 5 May 1894 [Issue No.7347] page 4 2019-11-11 23:02 STAPLETON— WIGHT.—On the 5th April, it
late Barnes Lawrence Staplelon, to Mary, eldest
daughter of A. J. Wight, M Magill.
WilsoiL Fred Scriven, eldest son of A. J. Wight, of
Magill. to Adelaide, second daughter of O. Ziegler,
Burt, William Thomas, eldest- son of Richard
Richards, to Hani>sb, fifth danghter of the late
Henry Idithlesn, Moonta Mines. -
BOTTKW—SPINKS.—On the 12th March, at St.
John's Cburch Adelaide, by the Rev. C. S. Hornabrook
J. Botten, Heningie, to Margaret, danghter of the
late William Watson Spinks. Adelaide.
KENNEDY.—On the 1st Msy, at the Wheelwright's
Pataick Kennedy, of the West-End Hotel, Wilcannia,
N.S.W., aged 63 years
' IN MBMOBIAM.
who departed this life on 4th May, 1S90.
STAPLETON—WIGHT.—On the 5th April, at
late James Lawrence Stapleton, to Mary, eldest
daughter of A. J. Wight, of Magill.
WIGHT—ZIEGLER.—On the 8th April, at the
Wilson, Fred Scriven, eldest son of A. J. Wight, of
Magill, to Adelaide, second daughter of O. Ziegler,
Burt, William Thomas, eldest son of Richard
Richards, to Hannah, fifth daughter of the late
Henry Lathlean, Moonta Mines.
BOTTEN—SPINKS.—On the 12th March, at St.
John's Church Adelaide, by the Rev. C. S. Hornabrook
J. Botten, Meningie, to Margaret, daughter of the
late William Watson Spinks, Adelaide.
KENNEDY.—On the 1st May, at the Wheelwright's
Patrick Kennedy, of the West-End Hotel, Wilcannia,
N.S.W., aged 53 years
IN MEMORIAM.
who departed this life on 4th May, 1890.
Family Notices (Family Notices), South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), Monday 27 May 1878 [Issue No.9838] page 4 2019-11-11 22:27 BROWN-JOHNSON.— On the 23rd May, at St.
THADDOCK.— On the 25th May, at her own resi
BROWN—JOHNSON.— On the 23rd May, at St.
THADDOCK.— On the 25th May, at her own resi-
News from Victor Harbor. HAPPY TIMES FOR BOWLING CARNIVAL AT VICTOR THIS MONTH. (Article), Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), Thursday 1 March 1945 [Issue No.4,326] page 4 2019-11-10 18:05 I By Lucy Webb.]
'Clare, as a thank-offering for the
1(1851). He caused her name and
[date to be engraved on the rim of
I the bell. Hughes Senr., also built
I St. Margaret's, Woodville, and named
Jit after his wife. Margaret Good
jhart (now Mrs. Colin Humphries)
I who has recently come to live
I amongst us, was named after the
I church in which she was baptised.
I 1 remember the beginnings of the
I Clare Parish Leaflet, now 40 years
I old. Its initial numbers were the
I work of the Sunday School teachers
I of that era, including myself, Miss
I Fanny Young, Consie Davey (now
I Dr. Constance Davev). Rita Barnard
[By Lucy Webb.]
Clare, as a thank-offering for the
(1851). He caused her name and
date to be engraved on the rim of
the bell. Hughes Senr., also built
St. Margaret's, Woodville, and named
it after his wife. Margaret Good-
hart (now Mrs. Colin Humphries)
who has recently come to live
amongst us, was named after the
church in which she was baptised.
I remember the beginnings of the
Clare Parish Leaflet, now 40 years
old. Its initial numbers were the
work of the Sunday School teachers
of that era, including myself, Miss
Fanny Young, Consie Davey (now
Dr. Constance Davey), Rita Barnard

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.