Information about Trove user: tbfrank

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,857,486
2 noelwoodhouse 3,927,941
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,383,069
5 Rhonda.M 3,206,199
...
56 suedebyga 699,463
57 RonnieLand 697,830
58 Jeff.Noble 682,406
59 tbfrank 680,770
60 wattlesong 661,745
61 rodneyvc 661,651

680,770 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

December 2019 996
November 2019 1,271
October 2019 1,524
September 2019 1,132
August 2019 71
July 2019 226
April 2019 97
March 2019 247
February 2019 1,105
January 2019 2,625
December 2018 3,657
November 2018 4,774
October 2018 446
September 2018 1,543
August 2018 1,002
June 2018 226
May 2018 190
April 2018 460
March 2018 918
February 2018 1,122
January 2018 1,437
December 2017 2,114
November 2017 3,208
October 2017 3,461
September 2017 1,163
August 2017 1,630
June 2017 4,244
May 2017 2,073
April 2017 6,967
March 2017 5,495
February 2017 1,340
January 2017 3,770
December 2016 7,073
November 2016 7,819
October 2016 7,197
September 2016 826
August 2016 2,205
July 2016 2,272
June 2016 3,329
May 2016 5,456
April 2016 9,233
March 2016 6,353
February 2016 5,133
January 2016 4,472
December 2015 5,142
November 2015 8,702
October 2015 7,710
September 2015 2,220
August 2015 3,419
July 2015 1,699
June 2015 1,023
May 2015 2,682
April 2015 3,148
March 2015 8,648
February 2015 5,762
January 2015 7,363
December 2014 8,050
November 2014 11,573
October 2014 8,194
July 2014 41
June 2014 789
May 2014 751
April 2014 3,834
March 2014 5,614
February 2014 7,552
January 2014 6,336
December 2013 5,290
November 2013 8,391
October 2013 7,809
September 2013 9,061
August 2013 9,968
July 2013 8,287
June 2013 7,486
May 2013 10,200
April 2013 9,792
March 2013 12,032
February 2013 9,444
January 2013 9,334
December 2012 9,207
November 2012 11,132
October 2012 10,380
September 2012 7,933
August 2012 10,329
July 2012 7,714
June 2012 9,452
May 2012 8,416
April 2012 11,065
March 2012 9,452
February 2012 9,294
January 2012 10,209
December 2011 10,203
November 2011 12,509
October 2011 7,394
September 2011 9,319
August 2011 10,206
July 2011 5,528
June 2011 8,251
May 2011 7,225
April 2011 8,729
March 2011 9,492
February 2011 8,709
January 2011 9,790
December 2010 6,804
November 2010 8,881
October 2010 7,423
September 2010 8,722
August 2010 7,730
July 2010 6,634
June 2010 9,826
May 2010 8,039
April 2010 8,362
March 2010 5,040
February 2010 6,039
January 2010 6,486
December 2009 4,648
November 2009 5,665
October 2009 1,056
September 2009 4,219
August 2009 6,952
January 2009 3,431
December 2008 2,194
November 2008 451
October 2008 82
September 2008 900

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,857,284
2 noelwoodhouse 3,927,941
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,383,048
5 Rhonda.M 3,206,186
...
56 suedebyga 699,199
57 RonnieLand 697,827
58 Jeff.Noble 682,406
59 tbfrank 680,770
60 rodneyvc 661,630
61 wattlesong 661,320

680,770 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

December 2019 996
November 2019 1,271
October 2019 1,524
September 2019 1,132
August 2019 71
July 2019 226
April 2019 97
March 2019 247
February 2019 1,105
January 2019 2,625
December 2018 3,657
November 2018 4,774
October 2018 446
September 2018 1,543
August 2018 1,002
June 2018 226
May 2018 190
April 2018 460
March 2018 918
February 2018 1,122
January 2018 1,437
December 2017 2,114
November 2017 3,208
October 2017 3,461
September 2017 1,163
August 2017 1,630
June 2017 4,244
May 2017 2,073
April 2017 6,967
March 2017 5,495
February 2017 1,340
January 2017 3,770
December 2016 7,073
November 2016 7,819
October 2016 7,197
September 2016 826
August 2016 2,205
July 2016 2,272
June 2016 3,329
May 2016 5,456
April 2016 9,233
March 2016 6,353
February 2016 5,133
January 2016 4,472
December 2015 5,142
November 2015 8,702
October 2015 7,710
September 2015 2,220
August 2015 3,419
July 2015 1,699
June 2015 1,023
May 2015 2,682
April 2015 3,148
March 2015 8,648
February 2015 5,762
January 2015 7,363
December 2014 8,050
November 2014 11,573
October 2014 8,194
July 2014 41
June 2014 789
May 2014 751
April 2014 3,834
March 2014 5,614
February 2014 7,552
January 2014 6,336
December 2013 5,290
November 2013 8,391
October 2013 7,809
September 2013 9,061
August 2013 9,968
July 2013 8,287
June 2013 7,486
May 2013 10,200
April 2013 9,792
March 2013 12,032
February 2013 9,444
January 2013 9,334
December 2012 9,207
November 2012 11,132
October 2012 10,380
September 2012 7,933
August 2012 10,329
July 2012 7,714
June 2012 9,452
May 2012 8,416
April 2012 11,065
March 2012 9,452
February 2012 9,294
January 2012 10,209
December 2011 10,203
November 2011 12,509
October 2011 7,394
September 2011 9,319
August 2011 10,206
July 2011 5,528
June 2011 8,251
May 2011 7,225
April 2011 8,729
March 2011 9,492
February 2011 8,709
January 2011 9,790
December 2010 6,804
November 2010 8,881
October 2010 7,423
September 2010 8,722
August 2010 7,730
July 2010 6,634
June 2010 9,826
May 2010 8,039
April 2010 8,362
March 2010 5,040
February 2010 6,039
January 2010 6,486
December 2009 4,648
November 2009 5,665
October 2009 1,056
September 2009 4,219
August 2009 6,952
January 2009 3,431
December 2008 2,194
November 2008 451
October 2008 82
September 2008 900

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
GLIDER PIONEER'S FATAL CRASH Was Inventor of New Featherweight Pylon Racing Aeroplanes LONDON, May 14. (Article), The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950), Monday 15 May 1933 [Issue No.18,148] page 5 2019-12-10 13:16 (Special to 'The Dally News')
The weU-knoWn English glider pio
from 400 feet and Was killed at Maid
atone.
He was flying tho feather plane of his
. On December 27 last air-speeding was
inuuglirated at Han worth with baby
pianos, with six horse-power motor
Wylde, providing A fascinating spec
60 miles art houi\ they never rose above
ten feet, with tho pilots neck and nock
jockeying for position When rounding
the pylons. Four plahes in the air
simultaneously suggested ' a battery of
methods With which he was successful
2300 horse-poWer plane, failed to beat
'*ss scientific methods, but was beaten
in tho final of thb Australian flight re
and manoeuvring. power of these en
horse which lost an eye iu the recent
By special arrangement Reuter's
uswl irt the compilation of the over
soae intelligence published in this -
issue, and all riL'hta therein in Aus
tralia and New Zealand are reserved.
disturbances, hajf a lap start, won on
the .post.
The planes weigh only 4001b, and are
known as the B.A.O. No. 7 type. Mr.
Wylde, Who was a native of Maidstone,
Kent, Was one of Britain's most famous
conjunction with the Master of Serapill
and Mi1, Gordon England at the work
shops of tie National Flying Services.
(Special to "The Dally News")
The well-known English glider pio-
from 400 feet and was killed at Maid-
stone.
He was flying the feather plane of his
On December 27 last air-speeding was
inaugurated at Hanworth with baby
planes, with six horse-power motor-
Wylde, providing a fascinating spec-
60 miles an hour they never rose above
ten feet, with the pilots neck and neck
jockeying for position when rounding
the pylons. Four planes in the air
simultaneously suggested a battery of
methods with which he was successful
2300 horse-power plane, failed to beat
less scientific methods, but was beaten
in the final of the Australian flight re-
and manoeuvring power of these en-
horse which lost an eye in the recent
[By special arrangement Reuter's
used in the compilation of the over-
seas intelligence published in this
issue, and all rights therein in Aus-
tralia and New Zealand are reserved.]
disturbances, half a lap start, won on
the post.
The planes weigh only 400lb, and are
known as the B.A.C. No. 7 type. Mr.
Wylde, who was a native of Maidstone,
Kent, was one of Britain's most famous
conjunction with the Master of Sempill
and Mr. Gordon England at the work
shops of the National Flying Services.
While I Remember Problems (Article), The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Tuesday 27 November 1934 [Issue No.17,952] page 15 2019-12-10 13:05 TN England, Lord Sempill — that
x slight, composed flyer who arrived
here yesterday in such sensational cir
For in 1919, as the Master of Sempill.
ne married tnc
apart from her dis
tinguished hus
And today, she is recognised as the ori
IN England, Lord Sempill — that
slight, composed flyer who arrived
here yesterday in such sensational cir-
For in 1919, as the Master of Sempill,
he married the
apart from her dis-
tinguished hus-
And today, she is recognised as the ori-
GRAF ZEPPELIN IN ENGLAND Passengers Enjoy 1,000-mile Flight (British Official Wireless) LONDON, August 19. (Article), News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954), Thursday 20 August 1931 [Issue No.2,524] page 9 2019-12-10 12:58 GRAY ZEPPELIN
- "LONDON, August 19.
. 24-houfr tour 'f Britain when it
evening "and diseniblirked its passengers..
PrevioutI- it circled'over London for an
conditions, but the operation, was com
pleted Withoiut hitch. "'
- The Graf Zeppelin-r ?emaii-ed at Han
worlh for about half an ,hour, and,,Dr.
EHigo ?Eckener, its- commander, -,eceived
Sir ,John Simonior oiioard 4 and -showed
him the eqhipineiit of the controli abin.
Shortl?-"before -8 o'clock the great airship
,to -Friedrictshaven...," -- . .
: The -trip round -Britaini of 1.000 miles
was confined to England and ,Ireland.
as he bad intended.
2 In passin-g over Hull at nioon, Dr.
Eekener dipped thei. Graf Zeppelini in
memor- of the men- of the British airsliip
Huniber. .
After landing. the Master of Sempill
"and other passengers stated that they
had a :good time despite the bid weather.
and that it had beenx a great flight.
GRAF ZEPPELIN
LONDON, August 19.
24-hour tour of Britain when it
evening and disembarked its passengers.
PreviousIy it circled over London for an
conditions, but the operation was com-
pleted without hitch.
The Graf Zeppelin remained at Han-
worth for about half an hour, and Dr.
Hugo Eckener, its commander, received
Sir John Simon on board and showed
him the equipment of the control cabin.
Shortly before 8 o'clock the great airship
rose and started its homeward journey
to Friedricshaven.
The trip round Britain of 1,000 miles
was confined to England and Ireland.
as he had intended.
In passing over Hull at noon, Dr.
Eckener dipped the Graf Zeppelin in
memory of the men of the British airship
Humber.
After landing, the Master of Sempill
and other passengers stated that they
had a good time despite the bad weather,
and that it had been a great flight.
Von Hindenburg's Resolve. CLEAN SWEEP IN BALKANS. LONDON, December 11. (Article), The Week (Brisbane, Qld. : 1876 - 1934), Friday 15 December 1916 [Issue No.2,138] page 12 2019-12-10 12:46 Von Hifidenburg's Resolve.
The Milan correspoaaenn 01 me i>
publicly stated that Marshal von Hinden
burg had resolved to make a clean sweep;
•German, Bulgarian, and Turkish forces
six weeks. *
Karl von Wiegand, ' correspondent of
the "New York World," reports an inter
that Germany' is in a strong position.
the .West Front in the spring. Jle admits
that the Germans on the Sootyie were
contends that the- position is changing,
numerically is not. sufficient to protect
.the smaller States.. Von Wiegand says
Kaiser, and staff are in a secluded posi
tion on a large estate. Von W.iega'nd
asked regarding the prospects of peace, 1
and Marshal von Hindenburg replied, j
"Ask the other* side." Von Wiegand !
arc read^ . for peace ?" to which von
Hindenburg replied: "When we have im- 1
pressed our will on the Entente; when J
will agree to- Germany's integrity being
Von Hindenburg's Resolve.
The Milan correspondent of the Lon-
publicly stated that Marshal von Hinden-
burg had resolved to make a clean sweep
German, Bulgarian, and Turkish forces
six weeks.
Karl von Wiegand, correspondent of
the "New York World," reports an inter-
that Germany is in a strong position.
the West Front in the spring. He admits
that the Germans on the Somme were
contends that the position is changing,
numerically is not sufficient to protect
the smaller States. Von Wiegand says
Kaiser, and staff are in a secluded posi-
tion on a large estate. Von Wiegand
asked regarding the prospects of peace,
and Marshal von Hindenburg replied,
"Ask the other side." Von Wiegand
are ready for peace?" to which von
Hindenburg replied: "When we have im-
pressed our will on the Entente; when
will agree to Germany's integrity being
Pope and Peace. THAT APPEAL TO AMERICA. ROME, April 15. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Friday 16 April 1915 [Issue No.13229] page 4 2019-12-10 12:41 ROME. Anril 15.
The "Corricrc della Sera," a Milan
paper, 'reports that "tlie Vatican has been
'overwhelmed with (olographic .3 inquiries
ciergv, and laity in ' the United States,
Great Britain, and France, with regard,
reported hy the New York "World," and
nrohablv his Holiness formally will dis-
issue of "VOsscrvatore Romano." The
Karl von Wiegand, a Gcrmari-Amcriuari.
York "World" with reports of intct-
viOws. The "Corricrc della Sera" ex
presses doubts as to whether .tho alleged
interview took place. The Vatican or
President Wilson to do nothing to pro
long the war," which has -been inter
preted to mean that America should stop;
;A cable message under date (2th
April, xvas as follows : The newspapers in
Great Britain and America arc giving
prominence fo a report oi aii interview
with Hie Pope, published in the New
York "World, ' in which his Holiness asks
America 10 work miceasingly' for peace,
avoiding anything Hint would' prolong tlie
.struggle. Tlie Pope is reported to have
to America 10 lake thr initiative In
moment came the I loir. See would sup
port its efforts, Tlie Vienna newspapers
approve of (he i'ope's desire for pe.uv.
though they admit thai Hie lime is not
ROME, April 15.
The "Corriere della Sera," a Milan
paper, reports that the Vatican has been
overwhelmed with telegraphic inquiries
clergy, and laity in the United States,
Great Britain, and France, with regard
reported by the New York "World," and
probably his Holiness formally will dis-
issue of "l'Osservatore Romano." The
Karl von Wiegand, a German-American,
York "World" with reports of inter-
views. The "Corriere della Sera" ex-
presses doubts as to whether the alleged
interview took place. The Vatican or-
President Wilson to do nothing to pro-
long the war," which has been inter-
preted to mean that America should stop
A cable message under date 12th
April, was as follows: The newspapers in
Great Britain and America are giving
prominence to a report of an interview
with the Pope, published in the New
York "World," in which his Holiness asks
America to work unceasingly for peace,
avoiding anything that would prolong the
struggle. The Pope is reported to have
to America to take the initiative to-
moment came the Holy See would sup-
port its efforts, The Vienna newspapers
approve of the Pope's desire for peace,
though they admit that the time is not
THE WAR ROUMANIAN SITUATION AGAIN DISQUIETING. RUSSO ROUMANIAN RETREAT IN DOBRUDJA. ENEMY CAPTURE CONSTANZA. FEARED HUGE STORES CAPTURED. CONTINUED ROUMANIAN SUCCESSES ON NORTHERN FRONT. CREEK NATIONAL GOVERNMENT ISSUES ULTIMATUM TO BULGARIA. EVACUATION OF EASTERN MACEDONIA DEMANDED. ROUMANIA. SERIOUS SITUATION IN DOBRUDJA. ENEMY CAPTURE CONSTANZA. CHIEF ROUMANIAN BLACK SEA PORT. CAPTURE OF ENORMOUS PETROLEUM AND OTHER. STORES FEARED. ROUMANIAN SUCCESSES Op NORTHERN FRONT. NEW YORK, October 23. (Article), Maryborough Chronicle, Wide Bay and Burnett Advertiser (Qld. : 1860 - 1947), Wednesday 25 October 1916 [Issue No.13,555] page 4 2019-12-10 12:31 ? In a despatch to the ''New York
World,' Karl yqn Wiegaud, the -«?ell- I
known . Germah-Americah correspon
dent, who is: with the Germans oi-. the
Roumanian if rontier, say s : ' GencraM
von Falkeuh^yn's army, on' a frohtof
290 miles, -in Transylvania, is striving.
to tighten the grn- fin the Mountain
passes inc. 3toum:uii:i.' The ir.ny js
advancing iri, 'three columns through
Passes, which lead towards. Bucharest,
SO miles distant, and. also through the
Arischan Pass. The : Germaii 'left v*m'fo.
bS miles north of Kroristadt, Is endea
vohring to cut off- the. Russian . support
from . the: Roumanians .in- the ;Pa1anl:a
Fass. A German column is now in the
vicinity of 'Campolunum, 20 miles
south-west of Sitiia, which is an impor
tant railway- terminal. General von
F.alkeiihayn is forcing his troops, and
trying- to reach' 'the eastern and Sbuth
erTi slope? of the mountains before
heavy snows make mountain opera-'
tions impossible'. The contrast between ;
the war methods' here and on the W°st
Front is striking.. Whereas all artillery
is screened on the West Front,' scores
of batteries sn the Predeal Valley !are
11) 7U11 Slgllt OI U»C IVUUUIdlllill^ l^liiii.
the Roumanian lines are :uso plain!)
visible to the Germans. Once thi: tiur
mans ceased -fiw, hp,pii?£. lhat the S'.i..
iiianians, TArbnii rejr«at, but the Rou
manians istuck to their positions. The
Papen, late j German military attache
,, PETROGRAD, October 23.
. A cemmunique states: The Rou
mgn»ni fnrffti fllf* ptlpmv tn Tptire in
t'iie:Trotus, Outuz;- and ^Sianic'valleys..
The Roumanian successes continue osi
the west frontier --t Moldavia.- The
P.usso-Roumanians retired, stubbornly
; ,, LONDON, October 23. .
An official. German statement claims
the capture 6f Constanza.
We retired immediately -south of the
Ccrnavorda-Constanza railway. There
and Bicaz, the enemy retiring in Tratus
ivallcy. We' prevented ah .enemy at-,
Ciituz and Slanic valleys. We repulsed
attacks 'at , Predeal, and re-captured
i)fawoslavele. !We took many prison
ers.' We repulsed the enemy advancing
froni'Scara tiirough the Topolog valley,
prisonering J22. We also repulsed an
at+arL-.»rt- fh#» r#»Dfjon nf'Orsnva
BUCJHAREST, October 24. ?
General- Pplivanoff, formerly Russian
Minister for, War, is joining the.Rou-:
luanian heatiquarters staff. ? . - . ';
,..,-. . LOKDON, October 24.
- ; Th c jsuctjefss. of ? Gen eral Mackeh sen;e
unexpected fiitack-^and the capture of
CpnstanTa jhave renewed -public .flnxiclv
as to Rqumariia 5 abilitj' -to counter.
tWe fierce' Austro-German assaults:- It
is understood that Mackensen wow
commands a ihird of the' Bulgarian
jaerniaiis, while many: Turks have been
added since jMackensen's reverse on the
20th Septepber. After, breaking -ithe
*lMS6O-Routtianian left wing suai cap
turing the -fortified ^centre, to Prisar^
General Matkeh'sen .pushed on instantly.
15 miles, [ displaying a remarkable
jacalry.of -improying his victory, which
is, nis cmei military vinue. tie was
then' able to throw an army within 24
hours across -the railway, catting^ of?
Gonstanza. ? It is 'feared that large
quan'ities -01 perqleum and stores 'are
'.50 acres, and are able to store 70,000
tons of gratn. It is also the headquar
ters of 7S7 Roumanian merchant -ships.
The capture k-i :.the -lown means . the
ltiss-of the; -shortest- line, of tommuni
cation titweenA Bucharest and Odessa,
via- the Black Sea, and increases the
difficulty'* 'of' preventing the ?enemy-
from crossing the Dannoe and cutting'
the Bussjan lines of communication
with Bucharest .'A further RussoRoa
manian difficaity anscs from the fact
that they icaiinptr Tetreat '? SriBrthward.
because it is TKitario%^ep contiet'-m*.
the -Cernavpda. bridge,;which is the sole
means ,of ] Mjmmunicarion acrosiy-the
Danube. ,1If'.: MacBensen~i: hems' 'flie
Russo-Rouinanians into ja -small sejn:
^ijcle of :teVritory before terhavoda the
Roumanians '-would find the tridge-5
head very' costly to defend agamst
condifions of modem artillery fire.' -'! 'If
retreat' js eventually necessary the cpas
sajgeW Hie bridge -wbiiW be an' opera-
ticin frought -with the utmost inauger.
TJbe.fatt that Mackensen clafins^io'pri
scmcri indicates1 that theifionrnahtan
'threat beyond tie -?rsilway'wMiin^aci
f^rifSsWce' mtlv piflni ?'-I-ter«;i!^|!tuMK(rif
iphtiniT on thb' other RotiraBnwnvfrbtiW:
1»trt.ohly~6jrth« north wn sector fe.tbe**
a 'tendency -.to . drive Tdje. enemy oaek.1
Geajeral FftOcenhayn'e . troo(ps have a'
: {doting bh 'the ' Rduinahian side, of .at
: least five passes.-. It is estimated that
Falkenh'ayn; has 14 divisions In Tisahr
Syjvania:' -T|t. is note-wotthy 'tha^v Aus
tro-Hungarian 'warcorresB'qndeiits.'. -in
Tfansylvania continually insist ^ira' the -
diffitulties' ' ? confronting ' ' Falkenh&yn.
Thfcy sky that snow has fatten, which'
bray delay the advance, and .that . itp
:Eoumariiaris wiir be ' gbie -to draw:
lipon Russian reinforcements.' . the
Central' Powers must be-sStisfied SfthiS'
cnemy'is kept oiut of Hui^ary.'- : ' ;. '*
^'(Constanza, or Kuetmaji, is the chief '
and only Roumanian : seaport on the
Bla'ct Sea, with railway- communication
with the capital; Bucharest' It TiaB.a
population of 13,000 (sbotit the s|»S of '
Jri.:-ryborough), .and? « a fav^Urite
wn'tel-ing place). ''(?] ' '..'-f^, '??:,..'
In a despatch to the ''New York
World," Karl von Wiegand, the well-
known German-American correspon-
dent, who is with the Germans on the
Roumanian frontier, says: General
von Falkenhayn's army, on a front of
290 miles, in Transylvania, is striving
to tighten the grip on the Mountain
passes into Roumania. The army is
advancing in three columns through
Passes, which lead towards Bucharest,
80 miles distant, and also through the
Artschan Pass. The German left wing,
65 miles north of Kronstadt, is endea-
vouring to cut off the Russian support
from the Roumanians in the Palanka
Pass. A German column is now in the
vicinity of Campolunum, 20 miles
south-west of Sinia, which is an impor-
tant railway terminal. General von
Falkenhayn is forcing his troops, and
trying to reach the eastern and south-
ern slopes of the mountains before
heavy snows make mountain opera-
tions impossible. The contrast between
the war methods here and on the West
Front is striking. Whereas all artillery
is screened on the West Front, scores
of batteries in the Predeal Valley are
in full sight of the Roumanians, while
the Roumanian lines are also plainly
visible to the Germans. Once the Ger-
mans ceased fire, hoping that the Rou-
manians would retreat, but the Rou-
manians stuck to their positions. The
Papen, late German military attache
PETROGRAD, October 23.
A communique states: The Rou-
manians forced the enemy to retire in
the Trotus, Outuz, and Slanic valleys.
The Roumanian successes continue on
the west frontier of Moldavia. The
Russo-Roumanians retired, stubbornly
LONDON, October 23.
An official German statement claims
the capture of Constanza.
We retired immediately south of the
Cernavorda-Constanza railway. There
and Bicaz, the enemy retiring in Trotus
valley. We prevented an enemy at-
Cutuz and Slanic valleys. We repulsed
attacks at Predeal, and re-captured
Drawoslavele. We took many prison-
ers. We repulsed the enemy advancing
from Scara through the Topolog valley,
prisonering 122. We also repulsed an
attack in the region of Orsova.
BUCHAREST, October 24.
General Polivanoff, formerly Russian
Minister for War, is joining the Rou-
manian headquarters staff.
LONDON, October 24.
The success of General Mackensen's
unexpected attack and the capture of
Constanza have renewed public anxiety
as to Roumania's ability to counter
the fierce Austro-German assaults. It
is understood that Mackensen now
commands a third of the Bulgarian
Germans, while many Turks have been
added since Mackensen's reverse on the
20th September. After, breaking the
Russo-Roumanian left wing and cap-
turing the fortified centre to Prisan,
General Makensen pushed on instantly
15 miles, displaying a remarkable
faculty of improving his victory, which
is his chief military virtue. He was
then able to throw an army within 24
hours across the railway, cutting off
Constanza. It is feared that large
quantities of petroleum and stores are
150 acres, and are able to store 70,000
tons of grain. It is also the headquar-
ters of 757 Roumanian merchant ships.
The capture of the town means the
loss of the shortest line of communi-
cation between Bucharest and Odessa,
via the Black Sea, and increases the
difficulty of preventing the enemy
from crossing the Danube and cutting
the Russian lines of communication
with Bucharest. A further Russo-Rou
manian difficulty arises from the fact
that they cannot retreat norrthward,
because it is vital to keep contact with
the Cernavoda bridge, which is the sole
means of communication across the
Danube. If Mackensen hems the
Russo-Roumanians into a small semi-
circle of territory before Cernavoda the
Roumanians would find the bridge-
head very costly to defend against
conditions of modem artillery fire. If
retreat is eventually necessary the pas-
sage of the bridge would be an opera-
tion fraught with the utmost danger.
The fact that Mackensen claims no pri-
soners indicates that the Roumanian
retreat beyond the railway was in ac-
cordance with plan. there is stubborn
fighting on the other Roumanian fronts,
but only on the northern sector is there
a tendency to drive the enemy back.
General Falkenhayn's troops have a
footing on the Roumanian side of at
least five passes. It is estimated that
Falkenhayn has 14 divisions in Tran-
sylvania. It is notw-worthy that Aus-
tro-Hungarian war correspondents in
Transylvania continually insist on the
diffitulties confronting Falkenhayn.
They say that snow has fatten, which
may delay the advance, and that the
Roumanians will be able to draw
upon Russian reinforcements. The
Central Powers must be satisfied if the
enemy is kept out of Hungary.
(Constanza, or Kustmdji, is the chief
and only Roumanian seaport on the
Black Sea, with railway communication
with the capital, Bucharest. It has a
population of 13,000 (aoubt the size of
Maryborough), and is a favourite
watering place).
THE WAR ROUMANIAN SITUATION AGAIN DISQUIETING. RUSSO ROUMANIAN RETREAT IN DOBRUDJA. ENEMY CAPTURE CONSTANZA. FEARED HUGE STORES CAPTURED. CONTINUED ROUMANIAN SUCCESSES ON NORTHERN FRONT. CREEK NATIONAL GOVERNMENT ISSUES ULTIMATUM TO BULGARIA. EVACUATION OF EASTERN MACEDONIA DEMANDED. ROUMANIA. SERIOUS SITUATION IN DOBRUDJA. ENEMY CAPTURE CONSTANZA. CHIEF ROUMANIAN BLACK SEA PORT. CAPTURE OF ENORMOUS PETROLEUM AND OTHER. STORES FEARED. ROUMANIAN SUCCESSES Op NORTHERN FRONT. NEW YORK, October 23. (Article), Maryborough Chronicle, Wide Bay and Burnett Advertiser (Qld. : 1860 - 1947), Wednesday 25 October 1916 [Issue No.13,555] page 4 2019-12-10 11:59 [?]
RUSSO^OUi«A*H AN JRETREAT IN
[?]
EVACUATION mOF : *§*&£&*& 'HiiACJEOPWP|li
'-:!?-' .!???? :-: .' (O^SPBMAt.MEBSAGBh'n?;'. / ' ??? ~-'^^'\
;:?', inouMANJA. ;: .: :...:;;
tklEP ROtliMANIAN7 BLACK
SEAPORT. :
-CAPTURE OF ENORMOUS
' PETROLEUM Agp;.QTHEB
STORES FEARED. '?'-??
ROUMANIAN SUCCESSES ^ (
NORTHERN FRONT. '
MEW YORK. Octbher 23. ' 1
THE WAR
RUSSO-ROUMANIAN RETREAT IN
DOBRUDJA.
ENEMY CAPTURE CONSTANZA.
FEARED HUGE STORES CAPTURED.
CONTINUED ROUMANIAN SUCCESSES ON
NORTHERN FRONT.
GREEK NATIONAL GOVERNMENT ISSUES
ULTIMATUM TO BULGARIA.
EVACUATION OF EASTERN MACEDONIA
DEMANDED.
(OUR SPECIAL MESSAGE).
ROUMANIA.
CHIEF ROUMANIAN BLACK
SEA PORT.
CAPTURE OF ENORMOUS
PETROLEUM AND OTHER
STORES FEARED.
ROUMANIAN SUCCESSES
NORTHERN FRONT.
NEW YORK, October 23.
IS THERE HOPE FOR HINCH- CLIFFE ? AN EXPERT’S THEORY. (Article), Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs Gazette (Qld. : 1922 - 1933), Monday 16 April 1928 [Issue No.88] page 5 2019-12-09 15:55 the Atlantic ily.-s and admiring
savs: "We must no1 lie led astray to
believe the day of the frvqiienl crossing
of the Atlantic- in either direction
1 am inclined to the view that, nil At-
Ian tic air service will only bo made
practicable by the airship. TIkhitii
flying boats must be Us'ed t<> ensure
! safety and n-pularii y.
Mrs. Hinchcliffe wid th'-st O:'-,-r.n
Hincheliffe told her before starting on
hhn. I will not resign hope until mid-
will enable him to communicatc with
CLIFFE?
the Atlantic flyers and admiring
says: "We must not be led astray to
believe the day of the frequent crossing
of the Atlantic in either direction
I am inclined to the view that an At-
Iantic air service will only be made
practicable by the airship. Though
flying boats must be used to ensure
safety and regularity.
Mrs. Hinchcliffe said that Captain
Hinchcliffe told her before starting on
him. I will not resign hope until mid-
will enable him to communicate with
THE SUN STOP PRESS OVER BRITAIN'S GREATEST LENGTH LONDON, Wednesday Night. (Article), The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), Thursday 30 September 1926 [Issue No.4961] page 1 2019-12-09 15:48 THE SDN STOP PRESS
' . LENGTH
LONDON, Wednesday Night,
The Master of Scmpill, ' flying a '
Moth, covered tho 690 miles. ' from
8 hours 14 minutes, with ono halt.at
Chester, i,
THE SUN STOP PRESS
LENGTH
LONDON, Wednesday Night.
The Master of Sempill, flying a
Moth, covered the 690 miles from
8 hours 14 minutes, with one halt at
Chester.
THE FARMER OF THE FUTURE WILL GO TO TOWN BY AEROPLANE. LONDON. 7th January. (Article), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Saturday 9 January 1926 [Issue No.22,080] page 15 2019-12-09 15:46 THE FARMER OP THE FUTURE
LONDON. 7th Jumnirv.
Ill a tiny 'moth' aeroplane, Wing Com
completed a remarkable bad weather (light
to Dublin and back, lie says there is
a great future for light aeroplanes. Tho
placed numerous orders ior these ma
chines. The Australian farmer, would soon
lind that tho light piano was the best
certainly would prove tho quickest and
most reliable way of getting to town, be
small held and could be stored in a very
small shed with tho wings folded back.
THE FARMER OF THE FUTURE
LONDON, 7th January.
In a tiny "moth" aeroplane, Wing Com-
completed a remarkable bad weather flight
to Dublin and back. He says there is
a great future for light aeroplanes. Th3
placed numerous orders for these ma-
chines. The Australian farmer would soon
find that the light plane was the best
certainly would prove the quickest and
most reliable way of getting to town, be-
small field and could be stored in a very
small shed with the wings folded back.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.