Information about Trove user: t3batman

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,858,316
2 noelwoodhouse 3,927,969
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,384,031
5 Rhonda.M 3,206,250
...
7175 rerayner10 2,141
7176 sharonc 2,141
7177 ccol2621 2,140
7178 t3batman 2,140
7179 WF000 2,140
7180 AmandaK 2,139

2,140 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2019 189
September 2019 111
July 2019 5
June 2019 23
March 2019 28
September 2018 126
April 2018 91
August 2017 27
April 2017 91
March 2017 55
September 2016 197
August 2016 46
July 2016 162
May 2016 18
April 2016 40
March 2016 267
January 2016 33
November 2015 3
October 2015 53
September 2015 382
August 2015 193

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,858,114
2 noelwoodhouse 3,927,969
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,384,010
5 Rhonda.M 3,206,237
...
7237 GarryChater 2,100
7238 JarvyEW 2,100
7239 p.strauss 2,100
7240 t3batman 2,100
7241 YASNE 2,100
7242 sleepyjean3218 2,099

2,100 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2019 189
September 2019 111
July 2019 5
June 2019 23
March 2019 28
September 2018 126
April 2018 91
August 2017 27
April 2017 91
March 2017 55
September 2016 197
August 2016 10
July 2016 162
May 2016 18
April 2016 40
March 2016 263
January 2016 33
November 2015 3
October 2015 53
September 2015 382
August 2015 193

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 314,433
2 PhilThomas 137,255
3 mickbrook 113,197
4 GeoffMMutton 74,104
5 murds5 61,555
...
779 pkenny 40
780 robynechessell 40
781 stuck 40
782 t3batman 40
783 ToastRack 40
784 trubluau 40

40 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

August 2016 36
March 2016 4


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
WHAT COUNTRY AREAS NEED Better Roads, Bridges And Culverts AND HYDRO ELECTRIC GENERATING UNITS LET THE GOVERNMENT TAKE STOCK (Article), The Wingham Chronicle and Manning River Observer (NSW : 1898 - 1954), Friday 5 August 1949 page 6 2019-10-04 19:48 down good airstrips and make avail- j
LITTLE SIAN'NIXCi FALLS 1
arc two apprcneiKs. Ono by road lio:n
Gloucester, 4,~; miles. At the liespit
abie Carter ho icslcad, 'Eoonora,' at
horses 'and rode up. ,
The other rcu*c is via Scone, Moo
ncn Brook and Tomalla (on the pla
far from tho falls.
Prior to tho road link with Glou
tain by pack hor-? or slide. There
matter. The plioto was taken by Mr.
wise. Currtnt cculd also be taken
where there ir, plenty of settlement.
end the .Little Manning Falls could
be linked up wi'h the grid system' to
help nee; a portion of the require- !
It is my carnc: t wish that the Gov
ter. s's of decL-ntral'sation, and to pro
vide a guarantee of security and free
dom from disruption of industry,' it is ]
vitally nc-cess:ry that power from j
pick prodded priva'e enterprise and
. Printed and Published by Frederick
Office. Bent' Street, Wingham, Mew
down good airstrips and make avail-
LITTLE MANNING FALLS
are two approaches. One by road from
Gloucester, 45 miles. At the hospit-
abie Carter homestead, "Boonera" at
horses and rode up.
The other route is via Scone, Moo
nan Brook and Tomalla (on the pla
far from the falls.
Prior to the road link with Glou
tain by pack horse or slide. There
matter. The photo was taken by Mr.
wise. Current could also be taken
where there is plenty of settlement.
end the Little Manning Falls could
be linked up with the grid system to
help meet a portion of the require-
It is my earnest wish that the Gov
terests's of decentralisation, and to pro
vide a guarantee of security and free-
dom from disruption of industry, it is ]
vitally necessary that power from j
pick prodded private enterprise and
Printed and Published by Frederick
Office. Bent Street, Wingham, New
WHAT COUNTRY AREAS NEED Better Roads, Bridges And Culverts AND HYDRO ELECTRIC GENERATING UNITS LET THE GOVERNMENT TAKE STOCK (Article), The Wingham Chronicle and Manning River Observer (NSW : 1898 - 1954), Friday 5 August 1949 page 6 2019-10-03 20:53 HAT CftUKRY AREAS W
Better Roads, Bridges Ami Colmis
AND HYDRO ELECTRIC GENERATING UNITS
gation of our hydro-electric possibilities by pas|£ov
crnracnts of New South Wales. Has it been the aesir?
to centralise industry in Sydney and I'icwcr.sfJo to tlie
exclusion of the rest of the State, or has is hc&n be
cause of disinterestedness in our rural areas and their
(By C. E. BENNETT, B.A., -x-JU.X^?
Tlie introduction of Local Govern- i
mcnt in l'J06 was a s'.cp in Uie right
operation, much good v;ork was done.
Gradually Ihe subsidies dwindled, and
shires beca i e financially impoverish
It was the increase in tlie number
ro:d surfaces that ran councils into a
financial dead-er.d. Ra!c revenue was
absorbed in maintaining: main roads.
It was at '.liis time that I put a pro
position to the Government to yivt
oui right grants for feeder roads;' At
Uic same time I submitted tiie prop'es
?'=i for the subsidising of rural elec
Both proposals were adopted. Ir.
the first year the sum of £-100,000 was
given outright by tile Government to
ymr 50-50 anj the mxt year 40-G0.
fcr five years. The Act was an cx
p irimentai one and wan only in force
enacted and rural lines are aga.n
sprta'J far and wide.
The p:viod during which the above
nmenilies for those living outside the
Some ol Ihe benefits provided under
ward in m = king life in the eeuntn
Mr. Spocner was a llinistir whe
thought mere about the just require
favourable political rcpcrcussicns thai
m'eht follow his actions. In Broker
Hill he committed the Government tc
the expenditure of a quarter of a rail
lion to improve the ccndi ions of the
people well knowing that no politico*
benefits to -his pzrty would follow.
PRESENT ROAD FOSITION
To-day the rcaci position is the same
as it was in the 1031-40 period. Shire?
cannot me;t the cost of read up
ed such heavy loads wculd trav:l our
ro'ds, ar.d at such high speed.
The Gov; r.nmcnt will aga n have t-'
transport arter'es. Disin'eres'iidncsr
in rural aflairs and sellis'ar.ess must
The strike b;s brought home to the i
Powers that Ee tlie real value of good
roads. V.'ith restricted rail traffic, ;
rcllance has 'o be placed on mo' or j
transport to enable the community ;
to ex1 st. Wheat b'ef, tirr.ber and,
other primary products have to tc '
conveyed to the big centres.' Mer
chandise and the rcquirerren's cf
- nYBKO-ELECTRICIIY
There is the import -jit problem of
making rural industries indeperdeni
coal. It is fcr that reason that wc
claim ike right for a thorough exash|
:natian of hydro-electric pcssil.il'
Electricity in tlie country 13 a ne
cessity just as it is in the ci'y. In
the rural homes current for light' rg,
frigerators, -wirekss, and many other
tilings would make life happier and
fits as her e'ty eister.
The farmer requires cleetric'ty for
his m'Iking machines, irrigation, hot
water unite, etc.
forsst arias if transmission lines are
Freezers can bt built in the bush if
power Is available. Rabbits and - vcn '-
beef could be' treated ana made ready
There are many uses tint c?» te :
made of clcctricity if it is provided
coast I'ne. .j
in develop'ng- hydro-electricity. The
t- pp'.e Isle know tiiat cool mireir in
industry in other S'ates, In 1916
with its water storage of 6G sq. miles,
55 feet deep. Bifj-industrJps transfer
red to that Stn'e and new industries
feet above ssa level. The rainfall is
from 100 to 120 inches per STear.
Other States have donq little to
dat'. Tlie Korth Coast, as n .result of
locjl enterprise and agitation, estab- 1
Jislied bydro-tlcctrlclty generation
units at Xyn-.toida'-iciicJ JaekSfSgory,
in the Clarence Hivcr water 3%0; . A:
the present mommt Ihe Snoli'y Kiver
Ecfcc.Te is in the public eye.
Cl-K LOCAL PROSPECTS
the Barrirgton Topa plateau ' com
mences Md runs nor;:iwsrd some 17
to 20 miles. Ihe average lit ight above
sea-level is -1C20 feci. It is a poten
tial hydro-el-. ctr.'c supply are?.
Running' cas'.erly the main rivers
are the G!o;;c':cter and the Barriiii;
lon. They tumble down from the pla
teau level to the footh lis. At the
northern end is tile Litile Mannir.g.
cester F al'j and the limning Fail.
Both appear to n;e, a layni.'n, as suit
able fur tbc al!-irr.por'ant purpose of
Wlic-n Precidcnt cf the Durgog and
Barringtcn To;' Tourist Lt ague, we
^c!:ed t'.ic late Mr. Henry Harris to
explore ihe country from the top o!
the Gloucester Kr.lls ri^'iit to ihe head
of that river. Ho travelled 20 miles
with a friend an:; r. rortecMh;t a car
could travel all b;it the last six miles,
ter River heaiicd at Caret's Peak on
the pla'.e-au side.
From this report it can tc deduced
that tlie liver could be danced and
a large expanse of w-tcr impounded
to provide a regular How cf water to
Falls. It ivas taken by rue and was
just an ama' cur's fluke. I; is probably
tlie only one ever taken because it is
d'flicult country to descend. These
track from Harris' farm and there j
was once a slide track up to the pla- j
Chichester and properties on the Glou- !
cester s'de 't the head of the rivers, j
Kohlwha, Dilgery, Cobark Creek ,e(c.'
The Barring! o'n River runs off the
pi 2 teau north of the Gloucester River.
head at Mt. Harrington down to
Sandy Flat, tut have not viewed it
Many years ago a party from licit
land and Newc.'.slle, which included a
exprtEsed that a bi:j bike could be
created by -.he construction of a srr.a'.l
embenk rent. The bigger the e:r. bnnk-
men ', the Uij,n;ei the lal;e. This would
necessary for hyJro-cleitrie purposes.
It oust not be forgotten that a
site for an aercd'.ome was selected by
Government purveyors at the time
when roads of access were be'ng sur
veyed. Tliese rc?.ds led from Dun
was Mr. Spooncr's in'ention to open
up tlie Tops as a tourist and health
tho fact that the unemployed on the
ot the proposal. The floored tents,'
kitchcns, etc., had to' be demolished,
urcnt, It should rot be difficult to put
down good airstrips rnd wake avail- j
able by plane journey this Blue Moun- 1
WHAT COUNTRY AREAS NEED
Better Roads, Bridges And Culverts
AND HYDRO ELECTRIC GENERATING UNITSS
gation of our hydro-electric possibilities by past Gov-
ernments of New South Wales. Has it been the desire?
to centralise industry in Sydney and Newcastle to the
exclusion of the rest of the State, or has is been be-
cause of disinterestedness in our rural areas and theirr
(By C. E. BENNETT, B.A., (M.L.A )
Tlie introduction of Local Govern-
ment in l906 was a step in the right
operation, much good work was done.
Gradually the subsidies dwindled, and
shires became financially impoverish
It was the increase in the number
road surfaces that ran councils into a
financial dead-end. Rate revenue was
absorbed in maintaining main roads.
It was at this time that I put a pro-
position to the Government to give
out right grants for feeder roads. At
the same time I submitted the propos-
al for the subsidising of rural elec-
Both proposals were adopted. In
the first year the sum of £100,000 was
given outright by the Government to
year 50-50 and the next year 40-G0.
fcr five years. The Act was an ex
experimentai one and was only in force
enacted and rural lines are again
spreading far and wide.
The period during which the above
amenitiies for those living outside the
Some of the benefits provided under
ward in making life in the country
Mr. Spocner was a Minister who
thought more about the just require
favourable political repercussicns that
might follow his actions. In Broken
Hill he committed the Government to
the expenditure of a quarter of a mil
lion to improve the conditions of the
people well knowing that no politics
benefits to his party would follow.
PRESENT ROAD POSITION
To-day the real position is the same
as it was in the 1939-40 per. Shires
cannot meet the cost of road up-
ed such heavy loads wculd travel our
roads, and at such high speed.
The Government will again have to
transport arteries. Disinteredness
in rural affairs and selfishness must
The strike has brought home to the
Powers that Be the real value of good
roads. With restricted rail traffic,
reliance hast'o be placed on motor
transport to enable the community
to exist. Wheat beef, butter and,
other primary products have to be
conveyed to the big centres. Mer
chandise and the requirerrents of
HYDRO-ELECTRICITY
There is the important problem of
making rural industries indeperdent
coal. It is for that reason that we
claim the right for a thorough exami-
natian of hydro-electric possibil-
Electricity in the country is a ne-
cessity just as it is in the city. In
the rural homes current for lighting,
frigerators, wirelss, and many other
things would make life happier and
fits as her city sister.
The farmer requires electricity for
his miIking machines, irrigation, hot
water units, etc.
forest areas if transmission lines are
Freezers can be built in the bush if
power Is available. Rabbits and even
beef could be treated and made ready
There are many uses that can be
made of electricity if it is provided
coast Iine.
in developing- hydro-electricity. The
Apple Isle know that coal miners in
industry in other States, In 1916
with its water storage of 66 sq. miles,
55 feet deep. Big industries transfer-
red to that State and new industries
feet above sea level. The rainfall is
from 100 to 120 inches per year.
Other States have done little to
date. The North Coast, as a result of
local enterprise and agitation, estab-
lished bydro-electrlclty generation
units at Nymboidia and Jackadgery,
in the Clarence River watershed . At
the present moment Ihe Snowy River
Scheme is in the public eye.
OUR LOCAL PROSPECTS
the Barrirgton Topa plateau com-
mences and runs northwestward some 17
to 20 miles. The average heiight above
sea-level is 4000 feet. It is a poten-
tial hydro-electric supply area.
Running easterly the main rivers
are the G!oucester and the Barring-
ton. They tumble down from the pla
teau level to the foot hills. At the
northern end is the Litile Manning.
cester Falls and the Manning Fail.
Both appear to me, a layman, as suit
able for the al! important purpose of
When President cf the Dungog and
Barringtcn Tops Tourist League, we
asked the late Mr. Henry Harris to
explore the country from the top of
the Gloucester Falls right to ihe head
of that river. He travelled 20 miles
with a friend and reported that a car
could travel all but the last six miles,
ter River headed at Carey'ss Peak on
the plateau side.
From this report it can be deduced
that the liver could be dammed and
a large expanse of water impounded
to provide a regular flow of water to
Falls. It was taken by me and was
just an amateur's fluke. It is probably
the only one ever taken because it is
diflicult country to descend. These
track from Harris' farm and there
was once a slide track up to the pla-
Chichester and properties on the Glou-
cester side at the head of the rivers,
Kohlwha, Dilgery, Cobark Creek ,etc.'
The Barrington River runs off the
plateau north of the Gloucester River.
head at Mt. Barrington down to
Sandy Flat, but have not viewed it
Many years ago a party from Mait-
land and Newcastle, which included a
expresssed that a big lake could be
created by the construction of a small
embankment. The bigger the embank-
ment, the bigger the lake. This would
necessary for hydro- electric purposes.
It must not be forgotten that a
site for an aerodrome was selected by
Government surveyors at the time
when roads of access were being sur
veyed. These roads led from Dun
gog side and from Gloucester side. It
was Mr. Spooner's intention to open
up tlhe Tops as a tourist and health
the fact that the unemployed on the
ot the proposal. The floored tents,
kitchens, etc., had to be demolished,
ment, It should not be difficult to put
down good airstrips and make avail- j
able by plane journey this Blue Moun-
Old Time Memories BUSH SHIPBUILDERS OF THE RICHMOND AND MANNING. BOB PYERS ACHIEVEMENTS. (Article), Dungog Chronicle : Durham and Gloucester Advertiser (NSW : 1894 - 1954), Friday 17 September 1926 page 5 2019-09-22 16:55 HOB PYEIIS' ACHIEVEMENTS.
Pyors, at Irvington, tho head of tha
13. S. Sorenson, in 'The Austra
lasia.' It was an unusual place for
stood alongside tho skids, and there
At the finish half tho local popu
cause it took a long time to got the
large hull to move down tho skids,
nnd the crowd walling for tho belat
ed banquet sat on tho stumps and
shipyard, and whon the steamer was
of us them had a tug-of-war to re
proved too large for the rlvei
whose energies wore a forceful fac
lock tracks. Whon I first mot him
Ironbark Bob. Tho giders were
watched tho squaring of girders at
weekly mail. That industry laid tho
was while shipping the girders thai
Bog got Interested In ships, and
The many sidedness of IronbarK
was hardly a bush-worker on 111 3
Emma Pyers, for shipbuilding w;u
tho bottle of champagne at this
Bob wastln' good stuff like that,' bo
plunge; and years afterwardK,
through a gun accident, Ironbniii
Bob was launched as suddenly lut'j
eternity. That trim little coastc.'l
was a largo Industry on the Man
on the Murray by destroying tl.'.
whore It was ousted by the competi
tion of largo centres.
But ships wore also built on other
parts of the river, handy to the blj,
pltsaws and axes, for when. the rich
many of tho settlers had to fashion
and manned by tho timber-getters,
but tho crews were as much timber
getters as sailors. Thoy went with
ages, and sometimes, whon they re
tho settlers flocked to the riverside
of flour andi rushed off with them
and hut when the ship came homo,
taking on the axe or hoe again, wan
arc great as Columbus. There was
Some of the old-time coasters thai
ning, Morning Packet, and tins
volumes for tho grIL of the men who
staked their fortune!) in thai
tlors being wrecked on the bar.
they haidl to put their hoes.
carrying cattle, foundered on tho
bar, with the -loss of all hands, and
tho live stock. Eleven bodies from
tho wreck wore buried uncofllnod
on tho beach. But the men who
built ships for themselves were loo
forest thoy cut and built again, and
hewed timber and grow produce
once more to load their ships. Tho
holp a nidi independence; and among
a thousand grand old men who arc
listed on tho proud role of track
blazers was Davio Irvine, of tho
ho hud a rough timo, and lived al
most entirely on tho resources of
tho plantation and the surrounding
wandering parson called on Davio
whon ho had run out of maize. A
girl was sent In haste to anothor
about two miles, and when 'sho re
turned the cob had to bo roasted
refreshed with afternoon tea. Those '.
to take their produce to markot — :
like tho tlmbor-gottors who pioneer- ;
their own timber In tho scrubs and
tually developed tho important ship
building yard at Pelican. ? -
Tho little vessel In which Davio's
hopes wore centred was the Man
ning Packet. Siio was owned by a '
company of farmers nnd sottlors, of
which Davio was ono. Thoy loaded
her with the produce of tho year,
mostly maize, and made Davio cap
tho farm limber camps, including
Bloovod flannels and patch-work
pants, stood on tho river bank and
cheered happily as sho moved on
her first eventful voyage. But thoii
happiness was short-lived. Tho vos- :
sol stuck on tho Manning bar. All
ed to shift her, and Bho was left
Davle roturned to his farm on Dingo
Crook, to drink the beverage of ;
roast corn again, and' grub hard lo t
retrieve the llttlo winnings thai '
year or more tho Manning Packet
remained on tho bar, buffoted by
vicious storms. Thoy howled at
least a compliment to tho fine work
manship of the hard-tolling build
ers. But the strandodi ship, a gaunt
the great surprise of tho company,
she floated up tho rivor, silently and
unmanned*, to her homo port. Tier
jubilant owners subsequently ro
palrod her, and for years afterwards
tho Concord1. And from the tlmy :
the IobI ship roturned Davle's for- ?
HOB PYERS' ACHIEVEMENTS.
Pyors, at Irvington, the head of tha
E. S. Sorenson, in "The Austra
lasia." It was an unusual place for
stood alongside the skids, and there
At the finish half the local popu
cause it took a long time to get the
large hull to move down the skids,
and the crowd walling for the belat
ed banquet sat on the stumps and
shipyard, and when the steamer was
of us then had a tug-of-war to re
proved too large for the rlver
whose energies were a forceful fac
lock tracks. When I first met him
Ironbark Bob. The girders were
watched the squaring of girders at
weekly mail. That industry laid the
was while shipping the girders that
Bob got Interested In ships, and
The many sidedness' of Ironbark
was hardly a bush-worker on the
Emma Pyers, for shipbuilding was
the bottle of champagne at this
Bob wastln' good stuff like that,' he
plunge; and years afterwards,
through a gun accident, Ironbark
Bob was launched as suddenly launched into
eternity. That trim little coaster
was a large Industry on the Man
on the Murray by destroying the
where It was ousted by the competi
tion of large centres.
But ships were also built on other
parts of the river, handy to the big
pltsaws and axes, for when the rich
many of the settlers had to fashion
and manned by the timber-getters,
but the crews were as much timber
getters as sailors. They went with
ages, and sometimes, when they re
the settlers flocked to the riverside
of flour and rushed off with them
and hut when the ship came home
taking on the axe or hoe again, was
as great as Columbus. There was
Some of the old-time coasters that
ning, Morning Packet, and the
volumes for the grit of the men who
staked their fortunes in that
tlers being wrecked on the bar.
they had to put their hoes.
carrying cattle, foundered on the
bar, with the loss of all hands, and
the live stock. Eleven bodies from
the wreck were buried uncofflned
on the beach. But the men who
built ships for themselves were too
forest they cut and built again, and
hewed timber and grew produce
once more to load their ships. The
help and independence; and among
a thousand grand old men who are
listed on the proud role of track
blazers was Davie Irvine, of the
he had a rough time, and lived al
most entirely on the resources of
the plantation and the surrounding
wandering parson called on Davie
when he had run out of maize. A
girl was sent In haste to another
about two miles, and when she re
turned the cob had to be roasted
refreshed with afternoon tea. Those
to take their produce to market —
like the tlmber-getters who pioneer-
their own timber In the scrubs and
tually developed the important ship
building yard at Pelican.
The little vessel In which Davie's
hopes were centred was the Man
ning Packet. She was owned by a
company of farmers and settlers, of
which Davio was one. They loaded
her with the produce of the year,
mostly maize, and made Davie cap
the farm timber camps, including
sleeved flannels and patch-work
pants, stood on the river bank and
cheered happily as she moved on
her first eventful voyage. But their
happiness was short-lived. The ves-
sel stuck on the Manning bar. All
ed to shift her, and she was left
Davle returned to his farm on Dingo
Creek, to drink the beverage of ;
roast corn again, and' grub hard to
retrieve the llttle winnings that
year or more the Manning Packet
remained on tho bar, buffeted by
vicious storms. They howled at
least a compliment to the fine work
manship of the hard-toiling build
ers. But the stranded ship, a gaunt
the great surprise of the company,
she floated up the rivor, silently and
unmanned to her home port. Her
jubilant owners subsequently re
paired her, and for years afterwards
tho Concord. And from the tlme
the Iost ship returned Davle's for

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. Bohnock and Manning River entrance
    List
    Public

    3 items
    created by: public:t3batman 2018-04-07
    User data
  2. Coastal Shipping
    List
    Public

    SS Electra

    1 items
    created by: public:t3batman 2018-09-19
    User data
  3. George Barlin Family
    List
    Public

    2 items
    created by: public:t3batman 2018-09-18
    User data
  4. History of Ryde
    List
    Public

    5 items
    created by: public:t3batman 2018-07-07
    User data
  5. James Graham
    List
    Public

    Ticket of leave

    7 items
    created by: public:t3batman 2016-07-25
    User data
  6. James Graham Boatbuilder
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:t3batman 2019-10-31
    User data
  7. Killabakh MU Oddfellowship
    List
    Public

    Eade/Walpole

    1 items
    created by: public:t3batman 2018-09-19
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.