Information about Trove user: rogerbayley

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 6,025,184
2 noelwoodhouse 4,005,442
3 NeilHamilton 3,494,044
4 DonnaTelfer 3,477,445
5 Rhonda.M 3,442,979
...
993 Zsuzsu 44,732
994 KTPA 44,627
995 Brian.Blaylock 44,614
996 RogerBayley 44,581
997 culled 44,384
998 SugarMuseum 44,264

44,581 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2020 88
March 2020 978
January 2020 3,699
December 2019 56
November 2019 177
September 2019 127
July 2019 21
June 2019 526
May 2019 104
April 2019 444
March 2019 563
January 2019 795
December 2018 3,244
November 2018 134
October 2018 51
September 2018 91
May 2018 48
April 2018 334
February 2018 90
January 2018 75
December 2017 397
November 2017 108
September 2017 261
August 2017 255
March 2017 1,002
December 2016 181
November 2016 1,269
October 2016 1,240
September 2016 345
August 2016 788
July 2016 1,509
June 2016 263
May 2016 2,686
April 2016 631
February 2016 177
January 2016 1,461
December 2015 347
November 2015 606
October 2015 73
September 2015 186
June 2015 33
May 2015 264
April 2015 174
March 2015 662
February 2015 32
January 2015 296
December 2014 3
November 2014 703
October 2014 25
September 2014 363
August 2014 174
July 2014 78
June 2014 52
March 2014 451
February 2014 697
January 2014 795
November 2013 54
August 2013 325
July 2013 890
June 2013 1,079
May 2013 711
April 2013 44
February 2013 3
November 2012 624
September 2012 623
August 2012 461
July 2012 2,835
June 2012 707
May 2012 1,480
April 2012 132
March 2012 1,784
February 2012 162
January 2012 52
September 2011 718
July 2011 104
June 2011 367
March 2011 819
February 2011 328
October 2010 47

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 6,024,982
2 noelwoodhouse 4,005,442
3 NeilHamilton 3,493,915
4 DonnaTelfer 3,477,419
5 Rhonda.M 3,442,966
...
992 Zsuzsu 44,710
993 KTPA 44,627
994 Brian.Blaylock 44,614
995 RogerBayley 44,504
996 SugarMuseum 44,264
997 alkae 44,247

44,504 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2020 88
March 2020 978
January 2020 3,699
December 2019 56
November 2019 177
September 2019 127
July 2019 21
June 2019 526
May 2019 104
April 2019 444
March 2019 563
January 2019 795
December 2018 3,244
November 2018 134
October 2018 51
September 2018 91
May 2018 48
April 2018 334
February 2018 90
January 2018 75
December 2017 397
November 2017 108
September 2017 261
August 2017 255
March 2017 1,002
December 2016 181
November 2016 1,269
October 2016 1,240
September 2016 345
August 2016 788
July 2016 1,432
June 2016 263
May 2016 2,686
April 2016 631
February 2016 177
January 2016 1,461
December 2015 347
November 2015 606
October 2015 73
September 2015 186
June 2015 33
May 2015 264
April 2015 174
March 2015 662
February 2015 32
January 2015 296
December 2014 3
November 2014 703
October 2014 25
September 2014 363
August 2014 174
July 2014 78
June 2014 52
March 2014 451
February 2014 697
January 2014 795
November 2013 54
August 2013 325
July 2013 890
June 2013 1,079
May 2013 711
April 2013 44
February 2013 3
November 2012 624
September 2012 623
August 2012 461
July 2012 2,835
June 2012 707
May 2012 1,480
April 2012 132
March 2012 1,784
February 2012 162
January 2012 52
September 2011 718
July 2011 104
June 2011 367
March 2011 819
February 2011 328
October 2010 47

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 376,612
2 GeoffMMutton 184,763
3 PhilThomas 145,116
4 mickbrook 115,334
5 DavoChiss 77,963
...
511 Denise.Smeathers 77
512 jpalmer 77
513 JulPar60 77
514 rogerbayley 77
515 alancsalt 76
516 anon 76

77 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2016 77


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
LOOKING BACKWARD. The Black side of Bathurst. The Capital Criminals of the City of the Plains—A Rum Orgie—Fatal Fight in a Shepherd's Hut—The Hanging of Timothy S—and a Chinaman—Horrible Scenes at the Gallows. Strange Request and Burial—Bathurst Cemetery—The Convict Corner—Deniehy's Bones—Dug Up by Dan O'Connor—A List of Convict Graves. (Article), Truth (Sydney, NSW : 1894 - 1954), Sunday 2 August 1896 [Issue No.314] page 2 2020-04-04 18:39 a Chinaman- Hor
Bones— Dug Up by Dan
into groups, each group eigerly discussing
part in the 'demonatration'
man named Newina, condemned to die for
A LARGE SUM FOR WAGES,
well enough the consequsness of murder under
all over, the instrument used beine a stable
presided, aud the Solicitor-General (Mr Wm.
FROM THE BODY,
amusement was created when, the grave
satisfied was that of Denieby. They had
grave-diggsrs to a spot where he believed
little orator' in life pronounced to be that
Newina, a Chinaman, murder, same time.
murder, Nov. 21, 1865 ; Bam Poo, murder,
a Chinaman - Hor
Bones — Dug Up by Dan
(By X )
into groups, each group eagerly discussing
part in the 'demonstration'
man named Newins, condemned to die for
less did not matter. S — was convicted of
A LARGE SUM FOR WAGES
well enough the consequences of murder under
trial, were clear upon this point. S----'s
all over, the instrument used being a stable
presided, and the Solicitor-General (Mr Wm.
'Water-Jug), appeared for him. These
to speak 'the truth, the whole truth, and
demned man exclaimed, 'And the sooner the
Bob of that day gave him a cosy drop; and
FROM THE BODY
'the Jaynial Dan' — to transfer the bones of
amusement was created when the grave
satisfied was that of Deniehy. They had
bones may rest in the beautiful 'Casket'
grave-diggers to a spot where he believed
little orator in life pronounced to be that
some of whose skeletons were disturbed by
Newins, a Chinaman, murder, same time.
On April 11, 1863, two 'Paddies' were exe
murder, Nov. 21, 1865 ; Sam Poo, murder,
---------------------------
MAIL ROBBERY. (Article), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Monday 3 October 1859 [Issue No.1,543] page 6 2020-04-03 22:15 William Day was indicted, at Bathurit, for that
he did on the 21th June, 1859, feloniously, unlaw
of New South Wales, boing armed with a gun, steal
from tbe person of William Audell, eleven bags, one
Guilty. Mr Wild prosccuted, the Attorney- General
bsin? a witness.
William Audell : I am a wail driver on the Syd
ney road. I remember tbe morning of the 21 S June
and about two hundred yards from the top of tbe hill
a raau came out of tho bush and presented a double
barrr-lled ym at me. I was walking bebide tbo horses
at iliu ii:ue. The man had w''at appeared to Im a
?p'eoeof brown blanket covering bio face, in v.bich was
a pi ire cut to lo.k through. Hi was about the eauie
hi igbt ?.r:d build ' as ths prisaner, but I did not s^o
hiB f iw. I beard tha prisoner speak at Hartley on
What journal !— Un, A.
stopped ma he said, ' Hold hard, Bland ; give mo
out tbem mail bags.' I said 'I must not
do that.' He s»id 'You give tne ont
not, if you want tham coma and take them.' He again
you.' I said, ' If you want tbe bags come and take
I don't waat to shoot or murder you, but by God if
you don't give me tbe bags I will.' I then tot upon
this time he had his gua pointed at my head. When
He was also armed with a long pistol in hiB belt.
yards in advancs walking up the hill. They were
They timed round to look at what was going on,
told tbem I had been robbed, and they said, 'Yes,
we saw it.' The mam then called ont to us, 'If
the morning. It was a very cold fr03ty morning, and
while Mr Shepherd, the toll-bar keeper, weat away ia
the mat's who robbed m«.
By prifoner : The man who robbed me was about
some Chinamen between the place where I was'robbed
The Hon- L- H. Bayley deposed : I remember the
walked up Mount Victoria in compiny with a man
np, but as it was aome time coming I turned round
and saw it standing still, about 100 or It I yards dis*
tant, with some person in loud conversation with tha
last witness, and I walked towards it to aea v-hat was
fase pointing a gun at the mailman, and several times
demanded the mail bagB. The mailman said something
which I did not hear. At last I heard the man Eay
shoot him, or words to that eff-ct. Tha coachman
threw out tha bags, aud drove towards me. The
look, I saw him take up the bags and go into tho
height, but I think he w.i3 about your stature. I do
thought he should know ihu voice again.
handwriting. I rsmctnb&r giving this letter, with
two other official letters on the 22ad June, to post.
police. I recollect Mr. Gore giving nie three letters
markeThcmpson ; I am po3tmaster at Bathurst.
. j dulncs tbo mail bigs, with assistance. The letter
box, P^icoVhich bears the date 22nd June, would
ThX Natior11'3' on 'he 23rd, and would get to Hartley
ikoc furanrrening. It would leave Hartley on the
at;£5 the 24th- . !
2-5 ' 4(1 per^5^ Thompson '. I am eon to the last wit
William Day was indicted, at Bathurst, for that
he did on the 24th June, 1859, feloniously, unlaw
of New South Wales, being armed with a gun, steal
from the person of William Audell, eleven bags, one
Guilty. Mr Wild prosecuted, the Attorney- General
being a witness.
William Audell : I am a mail driver on the Syd
ney road. I remember the morning of the 24th June
and about two hundred yards from the top of the hill
a man came out of the bush and presented a double
barrelled gun at me. I was walking beside the horses
at the time. The man had what appeared to be a
piece of brown blanket covering his face, in which was
a place cut to look through. He was about the same
height and build as the prisoner, but I did not see
his face. I heard the prisoner speak at Hartley on
What journal !— Ed. A.
stopped me he said, ' Hold hard, stand ; give me
out them mail bags.' I said 'I must not
do that.' He said 'You give me out
not, if you want them come and take them.' He again
you.' I said, ' If you want the bags come and take
I don't want to shoot or murder you, but by God if
you don't give me the bags I will.' I then got upon
this time he had his gun pointed at my head. When
He was also armed with a long pistol in his belt.
yards in advance walking up the hill. They were
They turned round to look at what was going on,
told them I had been robbed, and they said, 'Yes,
we saw it.' The man then called out to us, 'If
the morning. It was a very cold frosty morning, and
while Mr Shepherd, the toll-bar keeper, went away in
the man's who robbed me.
By prisoner : The man who robbed me was about
some Chinamen between the place where I was robbed
The Hon. L. H. Bayley deposed : I remember the
walked up Mount Victoria in company with a man
up, but as it was some time coming I turned round
and saw it standing still, about 100 or 150 yards dis
tant, with some person in loud conversation with the
last witness, and I walked towards it to see what was
face pointing a gun at the mailman, and several times
demanded the mail bags. The mailman said something
which I did not hear. At last I heard the man say
shoot him, or words to that effect. The coachman
threw out the bags, and drove towards me. The
look, I saw him take up the bags and go into the
height, but I think he was about your stature. I do
thought he should know the voice again.
handwriting. I remember giving this letter, with
two other official letters on the 22nd June, to post.
police. I recollect Mr. Gore giving me three letters
???? Thompson ; I am postmaster at Bathurst.
???? the mail bags, with assistance. The letter
???? which bears the date 22nd June, would
???? urst on the 23rd, and would get to Hartley
????? ening. It would leave Hartley on the
???? the 24th.
????Thompson: I am son to the last wit
THE TIRRANNA DIGGINGS. (Article), The Goulburn Herald and Chronicle (NSW : 1864 - 1881), Saturday 24 August 1878 page 4 2020-03-30 14:33 Tai Tirnauxxxv. Drersaes.-The whole frontage to
the creek has now been pegged out; hot the paddock
being small (only about forty acres) frootage for
about a dozen claims is all that is aifforded. Many
have yet been met with. Tire want of surlicient
A handhellrchief.fiull of wash-stailff givenr by Mr.
Blacashaw to a friend was brought into town,
and on being washted showed about twenty specks of
gold. The German, who has been at work fIcr some
five miles ; aind they go home at nights. It will be
seen by reference to our advertising columnsrr that
The Tirranna Diggings. -The whole frontage to
the creek has now been pegged out; but the paddock
being small (only about forty acres) frontage for
about a dozen claims is all that is afforded. Many
have yet been met with. The want of sufficient
A handkerchief full of wash-stuff given by Mr.
Blackshaw to a friend was brought into town,
and on being washed showed about twenty specks of
gold. The German, who has been at work for some
five miles; and they go home at nights. It will be
seen by reference to our advertising columns that
THE LATE MAIL ROBBERY. (To the Editor of the Goulburn Herald.) (Article), The Goulburn Herald and County of Argyle Advertiser (NSW : 1848 - 1859), Wednesday 4 August 1858 [Issue No.569] page 4 2020-03-30 14:06 Mil. EDITon,-In your edition of Wednesday
July 28th,'I saw the account of the late mail rob
bery. Four of tlh passengers out of five, and all of
Now, Sir, what I want to lnow is, who is this
stranger? where did he tale his passage from? and
where is he gone to? because it seems to me a caso
protected persons to themercy of bushrangers,because
ing, altd subsequently apprehending, one or perhaps
to find out wiht and what this stranger is, and then,
perhaps lie will give an explanation as to the cause
of Iis Icaving the other passengers ill Such i toys
deeply laid plot. I sincerely hope that tle police
think that the police ought, under tlhe circumstances,
allowed to leave Goulbarn.
prevention is better than euro
Wollogorang, WILLIAMI PLANK.
MR. EDITOR, - In your edition of Wednesday
July 28th, I saw the account of the late mail rob-
bery. Four of the passengers out of five, and all of
Now, Sir, what I want to know is, who is this
stranger? where did he take his passage from? and
where is he gone to? because it seems to me a case
protected persons to the mercy of bushrangers, because
ing, and subsequently apprehending, one or perhaps
to find out who and what this stranger is, and then,
perhaps he will give an explanation as to the cause
of his Ieaving the other passengers in such a mys
deeply laid plot. I sincerely hope that the police
think that the police ought, under the circumstances,
allowed to leave Goulburn.
prevention is better than cure
Wollogorang, WILLIAM PLANK.
Supreme Criminal Court. (BEFORE THE CHIEF JUSTICE.) THURSDAY, JUNE 25th. (Article), The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), Saturday 27 June 1829 [Issue No.1676] page 2 2020-03-24 18:45 Richard Peacock, William Pitts, and
who was diiving a team with a quantity of
THURSDAY, JUNE 25th.
Richard Peacock, William Pitts, and
Bargo Brush, when the three persons rushed
after possessing themselves of a pistol which
who was driving a team with a quantity of
ped and plundered of a quantity of bread,
which was identified by the prosecutor,
Crew, as that taken from him, and also a
common assault on the person ofMary, the
OUR PRISON SYSTEM. VISITS TO DARLINGHURST. RED-TAPEISM. REFORMS URGENTLY NEEDED. (Article), Illustrated Sydney News (NSW : 1881 - 1894), Thursday 28 June 1888 [Issue No.6] page 18 2020-03-22 06:41 in general are blocking these attempts and clog-
ging, the feet of the officials.
the prisons of the .colony not a failure, but an
known by the suggestive title of "Observation";

in general are blocking these attempts and clog-
ging the feet of the officials.
managed. On the other hand, the men who have
and the administrative officers—can bring their
the prisons of the colony not a failure, but an
Gaol, taken from within the gates ; the ward
known by the suggestive title of "Observation";
OUR PRISON SYSTEM. VISITS TO DARLINGHURST. RED-TAPEISM. REFORMS URGENTLY NEEDED. (Article), Illustrated Sydney News (NSW : 1881 - 1894), Thursday 28 June 1888 [Issue No.6] page 18 2020-03-22 06:38 fceen convicted, and are shown not to belong to
arid though limited in its scope, promises well.
THE "STAR CLASS."
A great reduction in the number of re-convic-
establishment of the "Star Class," in which are
been convicted, and are shown not to belong to
and though limited in its scope, promises well.
in the sense of supervision and want of absolute
man is once "known" to the police, the smallest
were rewarded for the absence of crime in his
PRISONERS AT EXERCISE, GOULBURN GAOL.
known as the "Ticket of Leave," inasmuch as it
to allow them passes to go and see their families,
"Vernon" has proved a success, but no reform
lead to crime.
No young fellow with an ounce of spirit will
within close walls, even with "as low a diet as is
consistent with health ;" but place him in an agri-
frame, giving wholesome instead of morbid and
tences on youthful offenders, so much the better,
have some pleasure ? Probably moderate liberty
any amount of dark cells and lashes.
article, having gone through the whole of the
thought and earnest hope, which were brought to
mated at £42,016 13s. 9d., but the amount of
OUR PRISON SYSTEM. VISITS TO DARLINGHURST. RED-TAPEISM. REFORMS URGENTLY NEEDED. (Article), Illustrated Sydney News (NSW : 1881 - 1894), Thursday 28 June 1888 [Issue No.6] page 18 2020-03-22 06:14 mosphere of thc place is debasing to every fine
they cnn do little.
case, one ppsses to the cells of the condemned,
must now be a-buildiug !"
of a gaol, can know thc awfulness of that "stern
the right of ju.stice in a land which professes to
lie3 between the two extremes. Although a com-
silent until the desire to hear tho sound of his
lent spirits are -wrought up to indulge in even
.walking for a certain time in a circle in absolute
Draconic code, humane judges were in the -.habit
such löng-convict periods permitted, and even
home-and come forth weakened and coved for
appropriating money "for a day or two," intend-
mosphere of the place is debasing to every fine
that his lowest self, devoid of one elevating in-
The officers do their best; there is no great
try to isolate young offenders ; but the system of
they can do little.
practice of locking up prisoners in the cells at five
gaolers and chaplains not being clairvoyant,
dencies.
case, one passes to the cells of the condemned,
in his vision of night, "Gay mansions, with
tremulous and faint, and bloodshot eyes look out
must now be a-building !"
THE PLACE OE EXECUTION.
Not they who dwell in "gay mansions," but
of a gaol, can know the awfulness of that "stern
the right of justice in a land which professes to
of "pals" getting themselves committed for
for the purpose of carrying out the separate
"As he went through Cold Bath Fields he saw a
lies between the two extremes. Although a com-
soften the solitary soul ? Still "the separation
vantage as a training and discipline preparatory
servitude." In plain words, isolation breaks a
man's spirit, and he is then easier to work
silent until the desire to hear the sound of his
lent spirits are wrought up to indulge in even
when in peril of the "gag."
walking for a certain time in a circle in absolute
is cut off. The father cannot hear whether his
Draconic code, humane judges were in the habit
such long-convict periods permitted, and even
to a disadvantage in comparison with the other
colonies.
tion ; it is equally the dream of the "condemned
home-and come forth weakened and cowed for
OUR PRISON SYSTEM. VISITS TO DARLINGHURST. RED-TAPEISM. REFORMS URGENTLY NEEDED. (Article), Illustrated Sydney News (NSW : 1881 - 1894), Thursday 28 June 1888 [Issue No.6] page 18 2020-03-22 06:07 a frotting grief against which the whole spirit
of incarceration every ¡íossible means were taken
as may be supposed, to keep theBe four ends in
THK WOMEN'S QUARTERS,
lady against wearing buch an adornment. Here
short peviod on the sick list is considered a great
dry bread forfbreakfast, meat and potatoes for
dinner, and hominy for tea were nutritious
OUR PRISON SYSTEM.
a fretting grief against which the whole spirit
of incarceration every possible means were taken
as may be supposed, to keep these four ends in
view."
There is evidently an earnest desire on the part
THE WOMEN'S QUARTERS,
lady against wearing such an adornment. Here
a noble work, and by the church visitors, who have
but the proportion of those who find their way
short period on the sick list is considered a great
dry bread for breakfast, meat and potatoes for
dinner, and hominy for tea were nutritious -
The women are, as a rule, well-behaved. One
kindness. During the reading of "Alone in
"hard labour" of oakum picking. Added to
these are a school for the boys, with library, and
typical burglars, the type of countenance is de-
them realised their position more fully. It is sad
CONTENTS OF THE GOVERNMENT GAZETTE. (Article), The Sydney Monitor and Commercial Advertiser (NSW : 1838 - 1841), Monday 25 May 1840 [Issue No.1501] page 6 2020-03-12 19:36 stake his trial on suspicion of murder, and Patrick
take his trial on suspicion of murder, and Patrick

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.