Information about Trove user: rhondab

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,822,344
2 noelwoodhouse 3,921,237
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,323,031
5 Rhonda.M 3,138,508
...
932 Fdmg 45,988
933 mezzie 45,893
934 agillanders 45,833
935 rhondab 45,790
936 pilatesking 45,756
937 RoyHenderson 45,755

45,790 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

September 2019 166
August 2019 339
July 2019 435
June 2019 47
December 2018 17
November 2018 197
October 2018 681
August 2018 161
June 2018 558
May 2018 368
April 2018 438
March 2018 2,678
January 2018 150
December 2017 335
November 2017 1,799
October 2017 1,962
September 2017 3,062
August 2017 16,240
July 2017 2,123
January 2017 432
April 2016 251
March 2016 148
February 2016 2
January 2016 26
December 2015 1,131
November 2015 5,553
October 2015 16
June 2015 1,142
May 2015 9
April 2015 1,447
September 2014 292
August 2014 30
February 2014 724
December 2013 1,366
December 2012 875
February 2012 472
January 2012 118

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,822,142
2 noelwoodhouse 3,921,237
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,323,010
5 Rhonda.M 3,138,495
...
931 ChrisHampton 45,972
932 mezzie 45,893
933 agillanders 45,804
934 rhondab 45,790
935 pilatesking 45,756
936 mimmy 45,745

45,790 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

September 2019 166
August 2019 339
July 2019 435
June 2019 47
December 2018 17
November 2018 197
October 2018 681
August 2018 161
June 2018 558
May 2018 368
April 2018 438
March 2018 2,678
January 2018 150
December 2017 335
November 2017 1,799
October 2017 1,962
September 2017 3,062
August 2017 16,240
July 2017 2,123
January 2017 432
April 2016 251
March 2016 148
February 2016 2
January 2016 26
December 2015 1,131
November 2015 5,553
October 2015 16
June 2015 1,142
May 2015 9
April 2015 1,447
September 2014 292
August 2014 30
February 2014 724
December 2013 1,366
December 2012 875
February 2012 472
January 2012 118

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
SYDNEY FAIRBAIRN ROWELL THE ROWELL HAS WON HIS SPURS (Article), Smith's Weekly (Sydney, NSW : 1919 - 1950), Saturday 15 January 1944 [Issue No.46] page 11 2019-09-03 18:53 SYDHEY FAIRBAIRN ROWELL
THE BOWES &
ass w@w ms
SPUH8
7a enough for a man to
a win his spurs. Not so to-
y. day, as the case of Rowell
x will indicate.
H) Spurs without rowels may
(w be all right, but a Rowell with
in out spurs seems incongruous.
7a Maybe it is the extra ell which
A makes the difference. 0
7 This Rowell was born at /<?,.
IA r 'Jass&A
\r jjuunaicys, . ouuui Aua-
7a 1894, and christened j
A Sydney Fairbairn. There J
x was military tradition |
(jf in his blood: His father '
W was Colonel James
fA Rowell.
a Young 'Sydney, who
y. had studied at
( r Adelaide High
V) School, went lllllllli
4 from there to 1|||||
a Military College,
7, Duntroon, and gradu-
jc ated on . August 14,
y 1914, ten days after
4 "Outbreak of World War
AT'
(a He had judged it .very i j-
a nicely, and as a subal-
V tern went with the 3rd ll|||ji||
Light Horse Regiment, g|pl|jj|gj
w) AIF, to Egypt.
/A It might seem that he
A had attained his spurs. JjpP
y Not so. The Third LightlfLy
(r Horse, leaving its mounts, ii|
W) and spurs, in Egypt,
4 landed on Gallipoli, where
a the only spurs about were
7 trenern nhio.nl nnaa
g). Fairbairn Rowell returned to \
(A Egypt and was in- M
A valided back to
y. Australia at com- M
\r mencement of 1016.
y He occupied various ad-
(p ministrative posts in Vic- t
W) toria and SA till 1924, and on
4 August 20, 1919, married
A "Rlnnnho Mnv Murison. of
7 Exeter, SA.
A For some ,, years he followed
y a more or less routine military
4 . career, became captain in 1920,
U went to Camberley Staff College
4 during 1925-6, where, he is still
A remembered as one of the most
7 brilliant students to have
(p attended that school. In
y January, 1926, he became major,
(A returned home in 1927, was for
A four years GSO in Western Aus-
y tralia, and GSO Army HQ from
nt 1932 to 1934.
V Following year he was
(p seconded to the British Army
y for a couple of years, rose to
4 Lieut-Colonel in 193G, took a
A course at Imperial Defence Col-
7 lege in 1937, and returned once
(r more to Australia, where in 1938
W) he became Director Military
7) Operations and Intelligence,
A AHQ, and from August, 1938, to
y . October, 1939, was Staff Officer
Y to the Inspector-General AMF,
7 with rank of Colonel.
when traffic was. threatened
charge under A
bomb fire from \
enemy planes, and 7
by his cool hand- W
ling of the prob- #0
lem prevented a 4
dangerous bottle- \
neck which might 7
have meant vj
heavy loss of W
life. 4
In August, 1941, 4)
. a vdnev Fairbairn IL
||x. Rowell returned V
to Australia as Deputy-Chief of 7
PEfflPlW the General Staff, and when the W
tragic days of 1942 arrived jw
he was given command of 4
the Australian -forces jv
based on Fort Moresby. 7
The Japanese had vj
landed at Buna and «
driven south as far as 4
Kokoda. j\
It was . Sydney Fairbairn 7
#Rowell who, confident that Mores- v
by could be held, organised the W
Wlw counter - offensive which finally 4
||fj|T turned back the enemy at Iora- J\
n baiwa. Recapture of that village 7
Wm hy the Australians on the Sun- v
Jim? day marked the turning point of W
the campaign. At that historic native 4
r village high among Papuan spurs the J)
threat to Australia was rolled back. 7
It might be thought that there Sydney \
Fairbairn Rowell really won his spurs. 7
Not so. For the next known of him was y
that he was back in his garden at East f)
Malvern, where the only, spurs likely to 4
be seen would be larkspurs. A
Notwithstanding his impressive military 7
record, Sydney Fairbairn Rowell Is V
not ari aggressive personality. He is fy
|||i a man of high principle, does not seek 4
||||Uhe limelight, is nothing of the poli- p)
|||||w tician. He has a quiet voice, A
Quiet manner, an appearance S?
ratiier of the scholar than r)
the soldier. He is slim 4
and wiry, but tough, with i\
a sallow complexion, dark 4
hair, thoughtful eyes. V
Behind these qualities is a 7
keen analytical ability, a fine y
instinct ror essentials, an ability p)
to think clearly and say what 4
he thinks. \
One American war correspon-. A
dent, after a Press conference, V
summed up Sydney Fairbairn )
Rowell: "There is a guy who y
knows his owii mind and speaks p)
it." n
Subsequently he was posted J)
as . Australian Liaison Officer 7
- in Middle East, where his chief y
duty was to arrange repatria- r)
tion of returping Australian 4
prisoners of war, a job which a)
certainly held no promise of A
spurs for a Rowell. y
Now comes cable news that 7
Sydney Fairbairn Rowell, at y
request of the British authori- A
ties, has gone on loan to the 4
War Office in London to fill a A
highly important position in the a
tactical field, with the rank of y
Major-General. r)
At last It .may be said that y
the Rowell has won his spurs, f)
SYDNEY FAIRBAIRN ROWELL
THE ROWELL
HAS WON HIS
SPURS
enough for a man to
win his spurs. Not so to-
day, as the case of Rowell
will indicate.
Spurs without rowels may
be all right, but a Rowell with
out spurs seems incongruous.
Maybe it is the extra ell which
makes the difference.
Locksleys, South Australia
1894, and christened
Sydney Fairbairn. There
was military tradition
in his blood: His father
was Colonel James
Rowell.
Young Sydney, who
had studied at
Adelaide High
School, went
from there to
Military College,
Duntroon, and gradu-
ated on August 14,
1914, ten days after
outbreak of World War
I.
He had judged it .very
nicely, and as a subal-
tern went with the 3rd
Light Horse Regiment,
AIF, to Egypt.
It might seem that he
had attained his spurs.
Not so. The Third Light
Horse, leaving its mounts,
and spurs, in Egypt,
landed on Gallipoli, where
the only spurs about were
geographical ones.
Fairbairn Rowell returned to
Egypt and was in-
valided back to
Australia at com-
mencement of 1916.
He occupied various ad-
ministrative posts in Vic-
toria and SA till 1924, and on
August 20, 1919, married
Blanch May Murison, of
Exeter, SA.
For some years he followed
a more or less routine military
career, became captain in 1920,
went to Camberley Staff College
during 1925-6, where, he is still
remembered as one of the most
brilliant students to have
attended that school. In
January, 1926, he became major,
returned home in 1927, was for
four years GSO in Western Aus-
tralia, and GSO Army HQ from
1932 to 1934.
Following year he was
seconded to the British Army
for a couple of years, rose to
Lieut-Colonel in 1936, took a
course at Imperial Defence Col-
lege in 1937, and returned once
more to Australia, where in 1938
he became Director Military
Operations and Intelligence,
AHQ, and from August, 1938, to
October, 1939, was Staff Officer
to the Inspector-General AMF,
with rank of Colonel.
when traffic was threatened
charge under
bomb fire from
enemy planes, and
by his cool hand-
ling of the prob-
lem prevented a
dangerous bottle-
neck which might
have meant
heavy loss of
life.
Sydnev Fairbairn
Rowell returned
to Australia as Deputy-Chief of
the General Staff, and when the
tragic days of 1942 arrived
he was given command of
the Australian forces
based on Port Moresby.
The Japanese had
landed at Buna and
driven south as far as
Kokoda.
It was Sydney Fairbairn
Rowell who, confident that Mores-
by could be held, organised the
counter - offensive which finally
turned back the enemy at Iora-
by the Australians on the Sun-
day marked the turning point of
the campaign. At that historic native
village high among Papuan spurs the
threat to Australia was rolled back.
t might be thought that there Sydney
Fairbairn Rowell really won his spurs.
Not so. For the next known of him was
that he was back in his garden at East
Malvern, where the only, spurs likely to
be seen would be larkspurs.
Notwithstanding his impressive military
record, Sydney Fairbairn Rowell is
not an aggressive personality. He is
the limelight, is nothing of the poli-
quiet manner, an appearance
rather of the scholar than
the soldier. He is slim
and wiry, but tough, with
a sallow complexion, dark
hair, thoughtful eyes.
Behind these qualities is a
keen analytical ability, a fine
instinct for essentials, an ability
to think clearly and say what
he thinks.
One American war correspon-
dent, after a Press conference,
summed up Sydney Fairbairn
Rowell: "There is a guy who
knows his own mind and speaks
it."
Subsequently he was posted
as Australian Liaison Officer
in Middle East, where his chief
duty was to arrange repatria-
tion of returning Australian
prisoners of war, a job which
certainly held no promise of
spurs for a Rowell.
Now comes cable news that
Sydney Fairbairn Rowell, at
request of the British authori-
ties, has gone on loan to the
War Office in London to fill a
highly important position in the
tactical field, with the rank of
Major-General.
At last it may be said that
the Rowell has won his spurs.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.