Information about Trove user: petur59

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,856,376
2 noelwoodhouse 3,927,775
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,379,356
5 Rhonda.M 3,202,651
...
662 C.Weber 70,897
663 ray-coffey 70,888
664 Trove15ART 70,782
665 petur59 69,976
666 Divergence 69,963
667 RichBarr 69,963

69,976 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2019 321
August 2019 283
April 2019 4
March 2019 270
December 2018 125
April 2018 58
November 2017 2,649
September 2017 208
August 2017 10
April 2017 1,251
August 2016 35
June 2016 93
May 2016 54
October 2015 271
September 2015 145
August 2015 163
July 2015 58
June 2015 1,355
May 2015 150
April 2015 799
March 2015 238
February 2015 595
January 2015 26
December 2014 14
November 2014 873
October 2014 775
September 2014 252
August 2014 491
July 2014 24
June 2014 2,447
May 2014 973
April 2014 980
March 2014 233
January 2014 170
December 2013 40
November 2013 1,402
October 2013 1,163
September 2013 1,893
August 2013 1,768
July 2013 2,649
June 2013 1,090
May 2013 686
April 2013 464
March 2013 1,683
February 2013 2,240
January 2013 1,216
November 2012 240
October 2012 1,324
September 2012 2,337
August 2012 868
July 2012 523
June 2012 112
May 2012 1,835
April 2012 5,502
March 2012 2,643
February 2012 1,288
January 2012 456
November 2011 962
October 2011 438
September 2011 935
August 2011 23
July 2011 278
June 2011 3,398
May 2011 961
April 2011 12
March 2011 119
February 2011 62
January 2011 133
December 2010 453
October 2010 1,209
September 2010 892
August 2010 2,015
July 2010 4,433
June 2010 477
May 2010 1,907
April 2010 155
March 2010 99
February 2010 1,200

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,856,174
2 noelwoodhouse 3,927,775
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,379,335
5 Rhonda.M 3,202,638
...
660 ray-coffey 70,888
661 Trove15ART 70,782
662 lynell.charlton 70,396
663 petur59 69,976
664 Divergence 69,963
665 RichBarr 69,963

69,976 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2019 321
August 2019 283
April 2019 4
March 2019 270
December 2018 125
April 2018 58
November 2017 2,649
September 2017 208
August 2017 10
April 2017 1,251
August 2016 35
June 2016 93
May 2016 54
October 2015 271
September 2015 145
August 2015 163
July 2015 58
June 2015 1,355
May 2015 150
April 2015 799
March 2015 238
February 2015 595
January 2015 26
December 2014 14
November 2014 873
October 2014 775
September 2014 252
August 2014 491
July 2014 24
June 2014 2,447
May 2014 973
April 2014 980
March 2014 233
January 2014 170
December 2013 40
November 2013 1,402
October 2013 1,163
September 2013 1,893
August 2013 1,768
July 2013 2,649
June 2013 1,090
May 2013 686
April 2013 464
March 2013 1,683
February 2013 2,240
January 2013 1,216
November 2012 240
October 2012 1,324
September 2012 2,337
August 2012 868
July 2012 523
June 2012 112
May 2012 1,835
April 2012 5,502
March 2012 2,643
February 2012 1,288
January 2012 456
November 2011 962
October 2011 438
September 2011 935
August 2011 23
July 2011 278
June 2011 3,398
May 2011 961
April 2011 12
March 2011 119
February 2011 62
January 2011 133
December 2010 453
October 2010 1,209
September 2010 892
August 2010 2,015
July 2010 4,433
June 2010 477
May 2010 1,907
April 2010 155
March 2010 99
February 2010 1,200

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
RECRUITS. (Detailed lists, results, guides), Traralgon Record (Traralgon, Vic. : 1886 - 1932), Tuesday 15 February 1916 [Issue No.2,703] page 3 2019-10-08 19:06 RECRUITS. - ,
who pansed the preliminary euamina"
beginning of campaign:
Edward Llewellyn, Traralgon..
Christopher Klein, Nambrck.
S,. B, Moysey, Traralgon.
John C. Guatta. Walhalls,.
Alan King, Voongabbie
James Fryatt, Flynn.
Ernest Marfield, Flynn.
Percy B. king, Gormandale.
Herbert N. Mortimer, Callignue.
have failed to pass the final medic4
RECRUITS.
who passed the preliminary examina"-
beginning of campaign:—
Edward Llewellyn, Traralgon.
Christopher Klein, Nambrok.
S. B, Moysey, Traralgon.
John C. Guasta, Walhalla.
Alan King, Toongabbie
James Frystt, Flynn.
Ernest Maxfield, Flynn.
Percy B. King, Gormandale.
Herbert N. Mortimer, Callignee.
have failed to pass the final medical
INQUEST. (Article), Traralgon Record (Traralgon, Vic. : 1886 - 1932), Friday 20 May 1892 [Issue No.735] page 2 2019-10-08 18:28 INQUIEST.
13. Serjeant, solicitor, of Sale, an account
issue:
as a gardener. Deceased has been offand
I asked him the same question, and hbe
dark. I saw him a few minutes after
wards in his bedroom, walking upand
from the bedroom to thekitchen. About
a gun in the direction -that I had seen
I told him I had not seen it. " That was
lying nown, and she thought he was
dead. I went to the place, saw the de
Macdonald, and when he came we re
Dr. Browne deposed: I knew the de
ceased, Harry Bruce Serjeant, who Was
great change in him. He had been en
gaged in a case that wascomingoff at the
next Bairnsdalo assizes. He seemed to
engaged or pro-occupied by the case I re
mind to his business, and I am dis
the 14th May, at his office,' and I advised
"1 think Mr. Sergeant is a little off,"
from diarrhwa.
Lotty Pricedeposed: I have been in the
employ of deceased as servant. Iwent to
o'clock to get the newspaper. I- was
ground. I wcnt further, and I saw agun
lying across the arm of the deceased. 1
but thought nothing of it, an reports
about a quarter of an hour after I heard:
the report that I saw the body of de
Elizabeth Price deposed : I hard been
said lhe was underneath the tree in the
that ho was dead. I ran back to the
returned and saw the deceased. The doc-.
noticed the deceased lately, and lihe ap
residing with my son for the last fort
vacant stare, He did not answer me. I
pardon," as if lodesiied me to repeat the
" 1 don't know." He then left the room,
Harry Bruce Serjeant alive on Satur
day, 14th 'inst. He was complaining
of a severe attack of diarrhma, which
low-spirited. oe said he had not slept
Onl Saturday he appeared indisposed to
him, who was known to me from his boy
I next.saw. him this morning about 9.30
of the gun to the too of his boot. The
of the boot on the trigger, and the con
deceased discharged the gun while tem
The Jury comprised-Messrs. R. Pike.
Thos. L. Hughes, W.. Wilson, G. Gibbs,
Alex Allan.-" Times."
INQUEST.
B. Serjeant, solicitor, of Sale, an account
issue:—
as a gardener. Deceased has been off and
I asked him the same question, and he
dark. I saw him a few minutes after-
wards in his bedroom, walking up and
from the bedroom to the kitchen. About
a gun in the direction that I had seen
I told him I had not seen it. That was
lying down, and she thought he was
dead. I went to the place, saw the de-
Macdonald, and when he came we re-
Dr. Browne deposed: I knew the de-
ceased, Harry Bruce Serjeant, who was
great change in him. He had been en-
gaged in a case that was coming off at the
next Bairnsdale assizes. He seemed to
engaged or pre-occupied by the case I re-
mind to his business, and I am dis-
the 14th May, at his office, and I advised
"I think Mr. Sergeant is a little off,"
from diarrhoea.
Lotty Price deposed: I have been in the
employ of deceased as servant. I went to
o'clock to get the newspaper. I was
ground. I went further, and I saw a gun
lying across the arm of the deceased. I
but thought nothing of it, as reports
about a quarter of an hour after I heard
the report that I saw the body of de-
Elizabeth Price deposed: I have been
said he was underneath the tree in the
that he was dead. I ran back to the
returned and saw the deceased. The doc-
noticed the deceased lately, and he ap-
residing with my son for the last fort-
vacant stare. He did not answer me. I
pardon," as if he desired me to repeat the
"I don't know." He then left the room,
Harry Bruce Serjeant alive on Satur-
day, 14th inst. He was complaining
of a severe attack of diarrhoea, which
low-spirited. He said he had not slept
On Saturday he appeared indisposed to
him, who was known to me from his boy-
I next saw him this morning about 9.30
of the gun to the toe of his boot. The
of the boot on the trigger, and the con-
deceased discharged the gun while tem-
The Jury comprised—Messrs. R. Pike.
Thos. L. Hughes, W. Wilson, G. Gibbs,
Alex Allan.—" Times."
SHOOTING FATALITY. (Article), Traralgon Record (Traralgon, Vic. : 1886 - 1932), Tuesday 14 May 1889 [Issue No.434] page 3 2019-10-08 18:19 ,SHOOTING FATALITY.
iMrNicolson, P.M., the actingcoroner,
death of a young man named Williata
institution on Thursday evening suffer
the rightshoulder, caused by theacciden
tal discharge of a weapon carried byhis
hospital. From the evidence it ap
partners, engaged inshooting kangaroos
walking in front. Howell was carry
result that Howells fingers were severe
farmer, namnld Bertrue, a short dis
Aloir from Morwell, who, after probing
night and when admitted was inna state
of collapse. Dr. Macdonald, who at
that the wound was a large one, ap
was extensive internal hfemorrhage,and
occurrence took place, and from en
SHOOTING FATALITY.
Mr Nicolson, P.M., the acting coroner,
death of a young man named William
institution on Thursday evening suffer-
the right shoulder, caused by the acciden-
tal discharge of a weapon carried by his
hospital. From the evidence it ap-
partners, engaged in shooting kangaroos
walking in front. Howell was carry-
result that Howell's fingers were severe-
farmer, named Bertrue, a short dis-
Moir from Morwell, who, after probing
night and when admitted was in a state
of collapse. Dr. Macdonald, who at-
that the wound was a large one, ap-
was extensive internal haemorrhage, and
occurrence took place, and from en-
BON VOYAGE TO MR. AND MRS. J. MILLS. VALUABLE GIFTS TO THE HOSPITAL. (Article), Gippsland Mercury (Sale, Vic. : 1914 - 1918), Friday 6 February 1914 [Issue No.5,524] page 3 2019-10-08 18:12 \'VA1. ABLE GIIFTS TU TIll"I
1IUSIITAL.
i iihe lrge anld represenlltative gather
illg \\iliich assemllbled lIast \Vednllesdlay
alterlluoon at tlhe GilppSland lospital,
to lid bon voyage to Mr. and Mlrs.
Mills, prior ti their departure for a
tin'p to N\ew Zealand, \\as a strilking
i'e?rt llnoy of the esteemi and popu
larity of thie dleparting guests.
i'ine Pire'ident, .ir. J. Hii. Cartledge,
ill tltOlcd ii is 11,l5 lrsLL'.15 by s?ttlllg that
|tle galheriing there that atteriiUOi
il' for the lilitill'ure of hollnoring Air.
and Mrs. \lIlls. prlior to their leanvig
h10r New Z?aland. Both Mrll. anlld Airs.
Mills haId b·etn life goverllnors of tilhe
hospital since 1i Iii amid silica theni
their charity had knolltWi no bounds.
'they tvere the lirst to collie forward
with a lalndsomiie donlatioli for thie Ine\w
children's \y ard. (This new ward, ow
convterL'ted mIo a women S sUl'rgicalI
ward; \whilst the ward which had lone
duty for womenI s surgical cases is
utilized for tile children). F'ollowing
this donation camie a asubstanItial
cheque for tile nurses qua(llrl'rtel'rs, anlld
several othler large tlllolllltS for iat
rious purposes. In consequellice of the
largo and increasinllg nuibier of sur
gical cases, the ilietical olticers made
an urgent tppeal to tihe COlmlmittee
to. provide a sterilizilng plant to as
sist themn in successfuily carryilng
out their worlk. 'T'he Presiden t It the
tiule, Mr. Jas. t Ctonllor, wnellt to Mel
bourne, and spellt a considerable time
ir getting informallltlonll alnd in viewing
ftle various steriziln g llants at work,
and his report w'as both exhaustive and
Instructive; but thle probable cost
(l3O.l) was beyondl tile lillnaclal power
of tilhe commnlittee to cople with. 31rs.
circumstances of tihe cast., with that
large-hearted genllerosity with wh2ich
shie is gifted, promnlItly forwarded tlhe
handsoulme sum of 11~00. This acted as
all incentive to others, and several
generots dollatiolls \were tlhen recelv
ed, with the resullt that tlhe cmulnamntte,.
medical oilicers lor tile past few yealrs,
and, inll fact, the lllatron alnd sisters,
have drawn the attention of thle coat
mittee to the urgent lnecessity whlich
existed in havting the operating thea
tre floor tiled or covered with a ma
wooden lioor being a mentace to
health. Mrs.1 Mills tagain canme to the
rescue, and donated £5u for lroplerly
-tiling the theatre. Some months back
.thle committee decided to ask Mrs.
Mills if she would allow tilemn to place
a framed photo enlargement of her
self in thile children s ward. Mrs.
Mills :graciously consented. but only
on the .one condition that she x\ould
proTide the photo. That afternoon,
theretore, hlie had great pleasure in
asking the tatron to unvell the paint
ing? which Mrs. Mills had donatedl
A;fter the matron .t1iss Nason) had
tunveiled the painting, the Presidelnt
continued his remarks. by stating
that the hanging of thle picture in the
MIills s request. The comimittee hav
Ing heard tf tile departure, temlpor
arily, of Mlr. and Mrs. Mills for New
Zealanid,. considered that prior to
hhung, and also it would give thleni
the opportunity of wishing the de
partinllg guests a safe voyage, anid ait
accustomed good health. HIe would
be remiss' in his duty if he did not
lake '.this opportunity of referring to
the invaluable- services rendered by
having an medical staff which stood in
the very highest ranks of tile pro
fession, and in season and out of sea
to thle wants of: the sick and suffer
ing poor of not: only Gippsland, but
oftentimes other -parts of the State.
The matroi-- commanded the esteem
and resplect: of- the committee, and
her adininistrative work' was of the
assisted in her dutties by capable sis
the Gippsland Hospital) and all etlici
eait staff. Nothinig gave him greater
Man of the Gilppsltiand Itospital pre
days his natme and iability were a
household word, aild Illany a mlan and
It was altways a gratifying feature to
see tile young following in the ifa
ther's footsteps-ttind tile hosplital now
:had oni its staff two yolung inedical
men both of \\'whose fathers had doine
.the early days-Drs. Maecdonald and
Reid. The hospital hlad recognised in
. .small way thile splendid anid itunsel
lish work done by the late .*Lr. Reid.
bV placing a framed photo of him in
tile vestibule of the hospital.
Dr, Macdonald, who was visibly af
about the hospital. In 1S65 he came
to Sale; and it Inust be remembered
that Sale was different them. Pio
especially so ill the medical profes
sion. There were no upl-to-date ster
ilising plants, nor all the convenienees
for successful surgery; but thie \work
which was donte \\was of atll extremely
The urgent need for till hospital was
recognised by thie medical gentlemiten
thenii established in Saile, viz.. Drs.
iledley. Arbuckle, and himself. Tihe
tirst hospital was established in Mrs.
Dyer 's private house of fiv, rooms, ini
York-street. This, however, was iiin
adClquatie for thile detiiands required on
it. Steps \were talken to buildt a niew
hios)ital, alnd in 1866Siti a portioni of tilhe
tresent hospital was built, lie hIad a
iphioto tlaken b" MIlr. \ize (\hliom older
resitdelts wxill renlemtber), and from it
it xwould be scctn that many additions
Ithae l.)een tltade since it teas Iirst
started. Since thle laying of the foun
datioll-stone to thile )IrCsenlit lmnoment
hte had been connected with it; and
ihe regretted to say that all his old
colleagues had gone to their well
earned rest. and he was tile only oue
renlaining. During the 4S years thle
hospital hadi been it existeilnc io mte
dical olticer ihadti received fee or reward
-a record uniequalled in any part of
freely and voluntarily, and the popu
itatients not only canme frotn all parts
of Gippaland, but from other parts of
the State. )During the above long pe
riod lie never kinew a medical man to
fail ini his appointmnlent, and if circunl
stances prevented his atteniding he in
variably provided a substitute. -ie
remembered vividly tthe large gather
ing at tile laying of the foundation
stone in 1866. Thie Gippsland Hospital
was hIeavily indebted to Mrs. Ml!lls for
hitr generouts suIpport; and there were
olthers also, in the earlier days, and, in
fact. recenttly, who had donated large
MIr. .las. O'Connor (ex-President).
it sulpltlemnenting the remarks o tihe
President. wtas gratified to be atble to
testify to thie splendidl itancial sup
port given by Mrs. Mills. During lils
periold of ollice, Mrs. Mills invariably
gave tani ilmpetus to all mnovements
required for the bettering of the con
ditions of the hIlospital, by generously
ldonating largely, and, as at rule, her
examltple was followed. Ilers was the
:irst donation to the childrein's ward,
the nurses quarters, iiand the sterlllz
Intg plant, and againi, to tie tiling of
lhie operating theatre. T'he generous
gifts of Mr. and Mrs. Mills to the ihos
pital only formed a very small por
tion of the good they did, antd were
Id)ing: and the allny kind and char
.tablh acts tihey perfornted throughout
-ippslatld were ulnkltotin 1t ttaity.
The, active interest taken in thie Dar
ngo HoIme Ntrsilng schteie n xottld ever
:iet lulltd to her credit. Thie placiig of
M1rs. Mill's s photo ill the children 's
\tlrd was n thoughtful act, and woutlld
u.t pleasure to all, and bring to
:mntory the tlanty kindnesses perform
Ad by the lady ill aid of the sick and
stuff.,ring inl the Gippsland Hospital.
'IThe tphoto, however, ewould not be
eonlllplete until stich time as it was
suple?lnented with one of Mr. Mills.
Mrs. Mills (who was re?ceived with
of the halptiest nm1toments Of her life.
Sh it aPtprociated thie tction of the cont
mittee in allow!ng her photo to be
hung in the childrent s ward. After she
hadtl passed aw'vay it would be gratify
lig tlo know that she would be rentl
clbtreld by tihe little ones, and by'
othlers sick anldl suffering in the hos
pital. :is onie whlo felt for them In
their iaitl aindt sickness. and who ilad
tried to atssist in alleviating their
trubles. Hter idea was that it was in
living, as it enabled the donor to par
pleasure thiey were recei?ing. She and
Mr. Mills applreciated cthe kindly re
wisht for their safle joturney and happy
retturn flrom Nex' Zealand.
The life-size plainting of Mrs. Mills
is ill profile. and is an excellent work
of art, Ilthe. tnle effects being particu
larly good, andl thie likelless a very
outll in t highly artistic mnanner by
Mrs. Sparks, of Maffr,'a; anld the artist
is to he congratulated for the manner
it wthich she has executed her comn
T?le afterlloon l plroceedings were
enlivened by a shlort, but pleasurable,
musical interlude,. as follows-Two in
the Misses Reece, and MIessrs. Puttick
and Recoe; solos by Mrs. Morrison,.
Misses Paul and IMay I' Carthy. The
aCCOtmpa l i minents w'ere elltrusted to
Mrsadalnes Napper and SSpencer andi
Afternoon-teqa was ,prov'ided on the
lawn, andl tlhe Imatlronl and staff are
to be tongratlllated upolln tihe exce!
I?nt mannerl in \which titi whole
Innction was cnaried out.
'The ouvllir ol'g lramme of th of h c
'asinll w:as a very tasteful one, and
contained aI photo of the hosriltal
buildingg, takel hy Mr. Ticlkey.
VALUABLE GIFTS TO THE
HOSPITAL.
The large and representative gather-
ing which assembled last Wednesday
afternoon at the Gippsland Hospital
to bid bon voyage to Mr. and Mrs.
Mills, prior to their departure for a
trip to New Zealand, was a striking
testimony of the esteem and popu-
larity of the departing guests.
The President, Mr. J. J. Cartledge,
introduced his remarks by stating that
the gathering there that afternoon
was for the purpose of honoring Mr.
and Mrs. Mills prior to their leaving
for New Zealand. Both Mr. and Mrs.
Mills had been life governors of the
hospital since 1903, and since then
their charity had known no bounds.
They were the first to come forward
with a handsome donation for the new
children's ward. (This new ward, ow-
converted into a women's surgical
ward; \whilst the ward which had done
duty for women's surgical cases is
utilized for the children). Following
this donation came a substantial
cheque for the nurses' quarters, and
several other large amounts for va-
rious purposes. In consequence of the
large and increasing number of sur-
gical cases, the medical officers made
an urgent appeal to the committee
to provide a sterilizing plant to as-
sist them in successfully carrying
out their work. The President at the
time, Mr. Jas. O,Connor went to Mel-
bourne, and spent a considerable time
in getting information and in viewing
the various sterilizing plants at work,
and his report was both exhaustive and
instructive; but the probable cost
(£300) was beyond the financial power
of the committee to cope with. Mrs.
circumstances of the case, with that
large-hearted generosity with which
she is gifted, promptly forwarded the
handsome sum of £100. This acted as
an incentive to others, and several
generous donations were then receiv-
ed, with the result that the committee
medical officers for the past few years,
and, in fact, the matron and sisters,
have drawn the attention of the com-
mittee to the urgent necessity which
existed in having the operating thea-
tre floor tiled or covered with a ma-
wooden floor being a menace to
health. Mrs. Mills again came to the
rescue, and donated £50 for properly
tiling the theatre. Some months back
the committee decided to ask Mrs.
Mills if she would allow them to place
a framed photo enlargement of her-
self in the children's ward. Mrs.
Mills graciously consented, but only
on the one condition that she would
provide the photo. That afternoon,
therefore, he had great pleasure in
asking the matron to unveil the paint-
ing which Mrs. Mills had donated
After the matron (Miss Nason) had
unveiled the painting, the President
continued his remarks, by stating
that the hanging of the picture in the
MIills's request. The committee hav-
Ing heard of the departure, tempor-
arily, of Mr. and Mrs. Mills for New
Zealand, considered that prior to
hung, and also it would give them
the opportunity of wishing the de-
parting guests a safe voyage, and a
accustomed good health. He would
be remiss in his duty if he did not
take this opportunity of referring to
the invaluable services rendered by
having a medical staff which stood in
the very highest ranks of the pro-
fession, and in season and out of sea-
to the wants of the sick and suffer-
ing poor of not only Gippsland, but
oftentimes other parts of the State.
The matron commanded the esteem
and respect of the committee, and
her administrative work was of the
assisted in her duties by capable sis-
the Gippsland Hospital) and an effici-
ent staff. Nothing gave him greater
Man of the Gippsland Hospital pre-
days his name and ability were a
household word, and many a man and
It was always a gratifying feature to
see the young following in the fa-
ther's footsteps— and the hospital now
had on its staff two young medical
men both of whose fathers had done
the early days—Drs. Macdonald and
Reid. The hospital had recognised in
a small way the splendid and unsel-
fish work done by the late Dr. Reid,
by placing a framed photo of him in
the vestibule of the hospital.
Dr. Macdonald, who was visibly af-
about the hospital. In 1865 he came
to Sale; and it must be remembered
that Sale was different them. Pio-
especially so in the medical profes-
sion. There were no up-to-date ster-
ilising plants, nor all the conveniences
for successful surgery; but the work
which was done was of an extremely
The urgent need for an hospital was
recognised by the medical gentlemen
then established in Sale, viz., Drs.
Hedley, Arbuckle, and himself. The
first hospital was established in Mrs.
Dyer's private house of five rooms, in
York-street. This, however, was in-
adequate for the demands required on
it. Steps were taken to build a new
hospital, and in 1866 a portion of the
present hospital was built. He had a
photo taken by Mr. Vize (whom older
residents will remember), and from it
it would be seen that many additions
have been made since it was first
started. Since the laying of the foun-
dation-stone to the present moment
he had been connected with it; and
he regretted to say that all his old
colleagues had gone to their well-
earned rest, and he was the only one
remaining. During the 48 years the
hospital had been in existence no me-
dical officer had received fee or reward
—a record unequalled in any part of
freely and voluntarily, and the popu-
patients not only came from all parts
of Gippsland, but from other parts of
the State. During the above long pe-
riod he never knew a medical man to
fail in his appointment, and if circum-
stances prevented his attending he in-
variably provided a substitute. He
remembered vividly the large gather-
ing at the laying of the foundation
stone in 1866. The Gippsland Hospital
was heavily indebted to Mrs. Mills for
her generous support; and there were
others also, in the earlier days, and, in
fact. recently, who had donated large
Mr. Jas. O'Connor (ex-President).
in supplementing the remarks of the
President, was gratified to be able to
testify to the splendid financial sup-
port given by Mrs. Mills. During his
period of office, Mrs. Mills invariably
gave an impetus to all movements
required for the bettering of the con-
ditions of the hospital, by generously
donating largely, and, as a rule, her
example was followed. Hers was the
first donation to the children's ward,
the nurses' quarters, and the steriliz-
ing plant, and again, to the tiling of
the operating theatre. The generous
gifts of Mr. and Mrs. Mills to the hos-
pital only formed a very small por-
tion of the good they did, and were
doing; and the many kind and char-
itable acts they performed throughout
Gippsland were unknown to many.
The active interest taken in the Dar-
go Home Nursing Scheme would ever
redound to her credit. The placing of
Mrs. Mills's photo in the children's
ward was a thoughtful act, and would
be a pleasure to all, and bring to
memory the many kindnesses perform-
ed by the lady in aid of the sick and
suffering in the Gippsland Hospital.
The photo, however, would not be
complete until such time as it was
supplemented with one of Mr. Mills.
Mrs. Mills (who was received with
of the happiest moments of her life.
She appreciated the action of the com-
mittee in allowing her photo to be
hung in the children's ward. After she
had passed away it would be gratify-
ing to know that she would be rem-
embered by the little ones, and by
others sick and suffering in the hos-
pital, as one who felt for them in
their pain and sickness, and who had
tried to assist in alleviating their
troubles. Her idea was that it was in-
living, as it enabled the donor to par-
pleasure they were receiving. She and
Mr. Mills appreciated the kindly re-
wish for their safe journey and happy
return from New Zealand.
The life-size painting of Mrs. Mills
is in profile, and is an excellent work
of art, the tone effects being particu-
larly good, and the likeness a very
out in a highly artistic manner by
Mrs. Sparks, of Maffra; and the artist
is to be congratulated for the manner
in which she has executed her com-
The afternoon's proceedings were
enlivened by a short, but pleasurable,
musical interlude, as follows—Two in-
the Misses Reece, and Messrs. Puttick
and Reece; solos by Mrs. Morrison,
Misses Paul and May M'Carthy. The
accompaniments were entrusted to
Mesdames Napper and Spencer and
Afternoon-tea was provided on the
lawn, and the matron and staff are
to be congratulated upon the excel-
Ient manner in which the whole
function was carried out.
The souvenir programme of the oc-
casion was a very tasteful one, and
contained a photo of the hospital
building, taken by Mr. Tuckey.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.